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1

Technical and Economic Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Technologies for Commercial Customer Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, the overall efficiency of energy utilization by conventional power systems averages around 33 percent. Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies installed at commercial and industrial sites, however, can increase the overall efficiency beyond 85 percent by recovering waste heat and putting it to beneficial use. Thus, CHP reduces the energy consumption and improves environmental quality. Currently, CHP accounts for approximately only 7 percent of total generation capacity and 40 percent of th...

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY (Megawatts)","SUMMER_CAPACITY (Megawatts)" 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Coal",3,65.5,61.1 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Petroleum",1,20.4,18.99 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","All Sources",23,229.4,204.21 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Natural Gas",28,159.32,136.67 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Petroleum",8,68.28,65.86

5

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35% of CA commercial electricity demand. Simulating thesereflect the benefit of electricity demand displacement byApr. ) Electricity electricity demand electricity demand

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this report was funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt

8

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes athe purchase price (pure net-metering) and without the Selfin tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also consider solar thermal and PV, but they are mostlywas performed in which solar thermal and PV are included. Inthis competition between FCs and PV/solar thermal change if

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

11

WORKING PARK-FUEL CELL COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the aims and objectives of the project which was to design, install and operate a fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system in Woking Park, the first fuel cell CHP system in the United Kingdom. The report also covers the benefits that were expected to accrue from the work in an understanding of the full technology procurement process (including planning, design, installation, operation and maintenance), the economic and environmental performance in comparison with both conventional UK fuel supply and conventional CHP and the commercial viability of fuel cell CHP energy supply in the new deregulated energy markets.

Allan Jones

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Title Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6267E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Stadler, Michael, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Abstract Governor Brown's research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners' perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In 2030 it will be only 2.5 GW due to the anticipated grid de-carbonization. The 2030 result requires a 60% electric efficiency and 20 year life time for fuel cells, a payback period of 10 years, and a CO2 minimization strategy of building owners. Finally, the possible CHP potential in 2030 shows a significant variance between 0.2 GW and 2.5 GW, demonstrating the complex interactions between technologies, policies, and customer objectives.

13

Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search All power plants release a certain amount of heat during electricity generation. This heat can be used to serve thermal loads, such as building heating and hot water requirements. The simultaneous production of electrical (or mechanical) and useful thermal power from a single source is referred to as a combined heat and power (CHP) process, or cogeneration. Contents 1 Combined Heat and Power Basics 2 Fuel Types 2.1 Rural Resources 2.2 Urban Resources 3 CHP Technologies 3.1 Steam Turbine 3.2 Gas Turbine 3.3 Microturbine 3.4 Reciprocating Engine 4 Example CHP Systems[7] 4.1 University of Missouri (MU) 4.2 Princeton University 4.3 University of Iowa 4.4 Cornell University 5 Glossary 6 References Combined Heat and Power Basics

14

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management...

15

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

16

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

17

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Energy » Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems The CHP systems program aimed to facilitate acceptance of distributed energy in end-use sectors by forming partnerships with industry consortia in the commercial building, merchant stores, light industrial, supermarkets, restaurants, hospitality, health care and high-tech industries. In high-tech industries such as telecommunications, commercial data processing and internet services, the use of electronic data and signal processing have become a cornerstone in the U.S. economy. These industries represent high potential for CHP and distributed energy due to their ultra-high reliability and power quality requirements and related large

18

Combined Heat and Power Pilot Loan Program (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program (Connecticut) Loan Program (Connecticut) Combined Heat and Power Pilot Loan Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $450 per kilowatt Program Info Funding Source Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Start Date 06/18/2012 State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies based on the specific technology, efficiency, and economics of the installation Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Note: The application deadline was September 28, 2012. This solicitation is now closed. Check the program web site for information regarding the next solicitation. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) is administering

19

Combined Heat and Power Pilot Grant Program (Connecticut ) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Program (Connecticut ) Grant Program (Connecticut ) Combined Heat and Power Pilot Grant Program (Connecticut ) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $450 per kilowatt Program Info Funding Source Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority State Connecticut Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies based on the specific technology, efficiency, and economics of the installation Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Note: The initial application deadline was September 28, 2012. This solicitation is now closed. Check the program web site for information regarding the next solicitation. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) is administering

20

Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

22

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined heat and power (CHP), also called cogeneration, is an efficient approach to generating electric power and useful thermal energy for heating ...

23

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

24

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most ... Combined heat and power technology fills an important ... CHP capacity additions followed the pattern of the electric power industry ...

25

Equilibrium Modeling of Combined Heat and Power deployment in Philadelphia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combined heat and power (CHP) generates electricity and heat from the same fuel source and can provide these services at higher equivalent conversion efficiency relative… (more)

Govindarajan, Anand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

27

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

28

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

29

Combined Heat and Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is: A process flow diagram showing efficiency benefits of CHP CHP Process Flow Diagram The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. A type of distributed generation, which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption. A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling. CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few

30

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southeast www.southeastCHPTAP.org Isaac Panzarella North Carolina State University 919-515-0354 ipanzarella@ncsu.edu Alabama View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Alabama. Arkansas Fourche Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, Little Rock View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Arkansas. Florida Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant, Tampa Shands Hospital, Gainesville View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Florida.

31

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

32

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Northwest www.northwestCHPTAP.org David Sjoding Washington State University 360-956-2004 sjodingd@energy.wsu.edu Alaska Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Anvik Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Grayling Exit Glacier - Kenai Fjords National Park, Seward Golovin City, Golovin Inside Passage Electric Cooperative, Angoon Kokhanok City, Kokhanok St. Paul Island, St. Paul Island Village Council, Kongiganak City Village Council, Kwigillingok City Village Council, Stevens Village

33

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southwest www.southwestCHPTAP.org Christine Brinker Southwest Energy Efficiency Project 720-939-8333 cbrinker@swenergy.org Arizona Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility, Tucson University of Arizona, Tucson View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Arizona. Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver MillerCoors, Golden New Belgium Brewery, Fort Collins Trailblazer Pipeline, Fort Collins View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Colorado.

34

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

35

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Midwest www.midwestCHPTAP.org John Cuttica University of Illinois at Chicago 312-996-4382 cuttica@uic.edu Cliff Haefke University of Illinois at Chicago 312-355-3476 chaefk1@uic.edu Illinois Adkins Energy, Lena Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest Antioch Community High School, Antioch Elgin Community College, Elgin Evanston Township High School, Evanston Hunter Haven Farms, Inc., Pearl City Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest

36

Customer Sited Combined Heat and Power on Maui: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the experience of Maui Electric Company (MECO) in developing and operating a 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) project at a resort on Maui. Tests conducted during the project evaluated the heat rate and performance of the packaged CHP system, which had been originally designed for natural gas fueling but was fueled by commercial propane in this application.

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nationâ??s best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission â?? providing top quality medical care and instruction â?? without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power outages. TECOâ??s operation is the largest Chilled Water District Energy System in the United States. The company used DOEâ??s funding to help install a new high efficiency CHP system consisting of a Combustion Turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This CHP installation was just part of a larger project undertaken by TECO to ensure that it can continue to meet TMCâ??s growing needs. The complete efficiency overhaul that TECO undertook supported more than 1,000 direct and indirect jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and construction, with approximately 400 of those being jobs directly associated with construction of the combined heat and power plant. This showcase industrial scale CHP project, serving a critical component of the nationâ??s healthcare infrastructure, directly and immediately supported the energy efficiency and job creation goals established by ARRA and DOE. It also provided an unsurpassed model of a district energy CHP application that can be replicated within other energy intensive applications in the industrial, institutional and commercial sectors.

E. Bruce Turner; Tim Brown; Ed Mardiat

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of CHP project profiles. Search the project profiles database. Project profiles can be searched by state, CHP TAP, market sector, North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code, system size, technology/prime mover, fuel, thermal energy use, and year installed. View a list of project profiles by market sector. To view project profiles by state, click on a state on the map or choose a state from the drop-down list below. "An image of the United States representing a select number of CHP project profiles on a state-by-state basis View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known

39

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems on research campuses can reduce climate impact by 15% to 30% and yield a positive financial return, because they recover heat that is typically wasted in the generation of electric power and deliver that energy in a useful form. The following links go to sections that describe how CHP may fit into your climate action plans. Considerations Sample Project Related Links CHP systems can take advantage of large central heating plants and steam distribution systems that are available on many campuses. CHP systems may be new at a particular facility, but the process and equipment involve well-established industrial technologies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CHP Partnership offers technical information and resources that

40

Understanding Emissions from Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is more energy efficient than separate generation of electricity and thermal energy. In CHP, heat that is normally wasted in conventional power generation is recovered as useful energy for satisfying an existing thermal demand thus avoiding the losses that would otherwise be incurred from separate generation of power. Modeling analyses has demonstrated significant air emissions, transmission and price benefits of clean CHP technologies. Despite these benefits, CHP remains an underutilized technology hindered by a number of disincentives, including treatment under current air quality permitting practice, which does not recognize the efficiency benefits of CHP. Output-based standards begin to address these permitting shortcomings. This paper will discuss how to view emissions from CHP systems from an output-basis and compares emission from different technologies. Treatment of distributed generation is compared with central generation, and emissions from an integrated system that produces more than one usable output are discussed. Regulatory and policy strategies that encourage clear and efficient CHP are also discussed.

Shipley, A. M.; Greene, N.; Carter, S.; Elliott, R. N.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Using and Measuring the Combined Heat and Power Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, refers to the integration of thermal energy with power generation. CHP is a powerful energy conservation measure that has been identified as an important greenhouse gas reduction measure with net economic benefits. It complements other energy conservation measures. CHP can be used any place that heat is needed so it is used with a variety of applications, fuels, and equipment. There are ancillary benefits of CHP to the host site and the public including air quality, reliability, reduced water consumption, and economic development. There is no universal practice for reporting the efficiency of CHP systems which can result in both overstatement and understatement of the benefits of CHP compared to other power generation systems. Fuel Charged to Power (FCP) is the fuel, net of credit for thermal output, required to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity. This provides a metric that is used for comparison to the heat rate of other types of generation and insight into the development of CHP projects that maximize economic and environmental benefits. Biomass generation is generally less efficient than fossil fuel generation due to size and combustion characteristics, which means that there is more benefit from CHP because there is more waste heat available for recovery. An example is presented demonstrating that CHP significantly improves the economics and environmental benefits for biomass to power.

John, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description 1 CHP System Name 2 CEC Plant ID 3 EIA Plant ID 4 Qualifying Facility ID (if applicable) 5 Thermal, and emissions related to combined heat and power (CHP) system power plant operations. This information is used the power plant is first reported on Form CEC-2843. The respondent should use the Commission assigned code

43

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

45

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

267E 267E Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Michael Stadler, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Environmental Energy Technologies Division http://microgrid.lbl.gov This project was funded by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program under WFO Contract No. 500-10-052 and by the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. We are appreciative of the Commission's timely support for this project. We particularly thank Golam Kibrya and Chris Scruton for their guidance and assistance through all phases of the project. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California

46

Combined Heat and Power in Biofuels Production and Use of Biofuels for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of the biofuels industry presents electric utilities with two types of opportunities: combined heat and power (CHP) applications in biofuel production facilities using topping and bottoming power generation cycles and the use of the biofuels as a fuel in electric power generation. This report reviews production processes for ethanol and biodiesel, including the prospects for CHP applications, and describes power generation opportunities for the use of biofuels in power production, especially in ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown...

48

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. ... other biomass. For all years, also includes non-renewable waste ...

49

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of obtaining heat from a boiler and power from the electric grid. Additionally, since CHP system energyTracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1 Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems, also referred to as cogeneration, generate on-site electricity

50

Definition: Combined heat and power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat and power heat and power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Combined heat and power The production of electricity and heat from a single process. Almost synonymous with the term cogeneration, but slightly more broad. Under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), the definition of cogeneration is the production of electric energy and "another form of useful thermal energy through the sequential use of energy." Since some facilities produce both heat and power but not in a sequential fashion, the term CHP is used.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Cogeneration power plants produce electricity but do not waste the heat this process creates. The heat is used for district heating or other purposes, and thus the overall efficiency is improved. For example could

51

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

HEATMAP©CHP - The International Standard for Modeling Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATMAP©CHP is a software tool that can provide a comprehensive simulation of proposed and existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant and system applications, The software model provides a fully integrated analysis of central power production plants that are linked to district energy applications using hot water or steam for heating and/or chilled water-cooling and/or refrigeration connected to a network of buildings or other residential commercial, institutional, or industrial facilities. The program will provide designers, planners. engineers, investors, utilities, and operators with extensive technical, economical, and air emission information about a specific CHP application. The software can also be a valuable tool for community, military, regional, or national planners in defining all aspects of developing, evaluating, and justifying a new CHP project or upgrading an existing thermal system for CHP. Program output may be used to evaluate existing system performance or model the effects of various potential alternative system strategies including upgrades, expansions or conversion of thermal fluids (e.g., steam to hot water). A major feature of the program is its capability to comprehensively analyze a central CHP plant interface application involving thermal storage for both heating and cooling systems in conjunction with various technical distribution parameters covering both the supply and return elements of an extensive piping distribution system. Important features of the software include: the capability to utilize a myriad of fuel and equipment options; determination of air emission impacts that can result from CHP or central energy plant implementation; and the evaluation of extensive economic scenarios including the influence of environmental taxes on a variety of fuel alternatives.

Bloomquist, R. G.; O'Brien, R. G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power (CSP) troughs in the central valley of California (Pricesolar combined heat and power with desalination Figure 2.7: Comparison of desalination plants; price

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power Systemfor Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Powerin parabolic trough solar power technology. Journal of Solar

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integration of Combined Heat and Power Generators into Small Buildings - A Transient Analysis Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Small combined heat and power generators have the potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of residential buildings. Recently, much attention has been… (more)

DeBruyn, Adrian Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Ranking of State Combined Heat and Power Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has been identified as a significant opportunity for greater energy efficiency and decreased environmental impacts of energy consumption. Despite this, the regulatory and policy landscape for CHP is often quite discouraging to the deployment of these systems, despite their many benefits to customers and society at large. That the landscape changes considerably from state to state only confuses the matter. Of all the various types of distributed generation, CHP systems encompass technologies particularly hard hit by policies and regulations that do not actively support their deployment. Given the large size of some CHP systems, interconnection standards that clearly delineate interconnection processes for multi-megawatt systems are necessary. In addition, since many CHP technologies emit incremental criteria pollutants as part of their operation, the manner in which emissions are regulated by a state can significantly impact the financial realities of running a CHP system. In the absence of strong federal guidance, interconnection standards, tax incentives, tariff designs, environmental regulations and other policy measures that dramatically impact the attractiveness of CHP projects can only be significantly addressed by state lawmakers and regulators. State activity is essential to creating a policy framework that encourages CHP. Within the past several years, a number of states have made significant strides in implementing more “CHP-friendly” policies. Some states have worked to develop these policies at an accelerated rate while others have done little. In many cases the difference between states that are proactively encouraging CHP and states that are ignoring it all together is stark. This paper will identify which states are leading the way, which states are following, and what the policies of all states look like at this current point in time. It will define what “CHP-friendly” policies are, what makes a good policy better, and discuss the manners in which a variety of states have chosen to approach CHP. CHP system developers will come away with a clearer picture of each state’s unique CHP barriers, potential CHP customers will understand how their current CHP climate compares to that of other locations, and state lawmakers and CHP advocates will be able to learn about best practices in policy creation that already exist in the field.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System Callaway Spring 2011 #12;Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar of analysis of Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power (DCS-CHP) systems is a design

California at Berkeley, University of

58

Combined heat and power economic dispatch by mesh adaptive direct search algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal utilization of multiple combined heat and power (CHP) systems is a complex problem. Therefore, efficient methods are required to solve it. In this paper, a recent optimization technique, namely mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) is implemented ... Keywords: Combined heat and power, Economic dispatch, Mesh adaptive direct search algorithm, Optimization

Seyyed Soheil Sadat Hosseini; Ali Jafarnejad; Amir Hossein Behrooz; Amir Hossein Gandomi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A modified unit decommitment algorithm in combined heat and power production planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the unit commitment in multi-period combined heat and power (CHP) production planning, considering the possibility to trade power on the spot market. We present a modified unit decommitment algorithm (MUD) that starts with a good ... Keywords: combined heat and power production, deregulated power market, energy optimization, modelling, modified unit decommitment, unit commitment

Aiying Rong; Risto Lahdelma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power October 21, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More Top Things: Top 9 Things You Didn't Know About America's Power Grid Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post 741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide an American Recovery Act and Reinvestment Act of 2009 financial assistance grant to Seattle Steam Company to facilitate the installation of a combined heat and power plant in downtown Seattle, Washington. NOTE: This project has been cancelled. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 16, 2010 EA-1741: Draft Environmental Assessment Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington (June 2010)

62

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power October 21, 2013 - 11:25am Addthis Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn how combined heat and power could strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce harmful emissions. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More Top Things: Top 9 Things You Didn't Know About America's Power Grid Top 9 Things You Didn't Know about Carbon Fiber

63

Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

Oland, CB

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

64

Berkeley Lab Study Evaluates Potential Combined Heat and Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stadler evaluated an integrated approach that optimizes the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). This study focused on commercial-sector CHP, especially those...

65

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Mid-Atlantic www.midatlanticCHPTAP.org Jim Freihaut Pennsylvania State University 814-863-0083 jdf11@psu.edu Delaware View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Delaware. District of Columbia View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in the District of Columbia. Maryland Baltimore Refuse Energy Co., Baltimore View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Maryland. New Jersey View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in New Jersey.

66

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

67

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

68

Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New York) This is the approved revision of...

69

Section 5.8.8 Combined Heat and Power: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Combined Heat and Power Technical Information Thermal-energy losses from power plants in the U.S. currently total approximately 23 quads (one quad is 10 15 Btu)-more than...

70

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

71

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Didn't Know About..." Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10. Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and heat from...

72

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources: The CERTS MicroGrid Concept. ” Berkeley Lab1. Energy Characteristics of Microgrid’s Individual MembersEffects of a Carbon Tax on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power in Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

Data centers represent a rapidly growing and very energy intensive activity in commercial, educational, and government facilities. In the last five years the growth of this sector was the electric power equivalent to seven new coal-fired power plants. Data centers consume 1.5% of the total power in the U.S. Growth over the next five to ten years is expected to require a similar increase in power generation. This energy consumption is concentrated in buildings that are 10-40 times more energy intensive than a typical office building. The sheer size of the market, the concentrated energy consumption per facility, and the tendency of facilities to cluster in 'high-tech' centers all contribute to a potential power infrastructure crisis for the industry. Meeting the energy needs of data centers is a moving target. Computing power is advancing rapidly, which reduces the energy requirements for data centers. A lot of work is going into improving the computing power of servers and other processing equipment. However, this increase in computing power is increasing the power densities of this equipment. While fewer pieces of equipment may be needed to meet a given data processing load, the energy density of a facility designed to house this higher efficiency equipment will be as high as or higher than it is today. In other words, while the data center of the future may have the IT power of ten data centers of today, it is also going to have higher power requirements and higher power densities. This report analyzes the opportunities for CHP technologies to assist primary power in making the data center more cost-effective and energy efficient. Broader application of CHP will lower the demand for electricity from central stations and reduce the pressure on electric transmission and distribution infrastructure. This report is organized into the following sections: (1) Data Center Market Segmentation--the description of the overall size of the market, the size and types of facilities involved, and the geographic distribution. (2) Data Center Energy Use Trends--a discussion of energy use and expected energy growth and the typical energy consumption and uses in data centers. (3) CHP Applicability--Potential configurations, CHP case studies, applicable equipment, heat recovery opportunities (cooling), cost and performance benchmarks, and power reliability benefits (4) CHP Drivers and Hurdles--evaluation of user benefits, social benefits, market structural issues and attitudes toward CHP, and regulatory hurdles. (5) CHP Paths to Market--Discussion of technical needs, education, strategic partnerships needed to promote CHP in the IT community.

Darrow, Ken [ICF International; Hedman, Bruce [ICF International

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

76

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

77

A Preliminary Study on Designing Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System for the University Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems are an evolving technology that is at the front of the energy conservation movement. With the reduction in energy consumption and green house gas emissions, CHP systems are improving the efficiency of power generation. Our goal for this research is to develop a specification for a CHP System that will improve the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s operating efficiency. This system will reduce the operating cost of the university and provide reliable, clean energy to the College of Engineering and surrounding buildings. If this system is implemented correctly, it has the ability to meet the economic and reliability needs of the university. CHP systems are the combination of various forms of equipment to meet the electrical and thermal needs from one single fuel source. Major steps involved in the development of a CHP system including data collection and analysis, system calculations and system specifications will be discussed. This research also examines the barriers that CHP systems encounter with environmental regulations and grid interconnection.

Kozman, T. A.; Reynolds, C. M.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to addre

Brown, E.; Elliott, N.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Assessment of Residential Combined Heat and Power Systems: Application Benefits and Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the benefits of installing a residential combined heat and power (RCHP) plant in several U.S. geographies and under a number of dispatch scenarios. The report also provides an assessment of 14 companies developing or selling RCHP systems in North American, Europe, and Japan.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Combined Heat and Power System Implementation — A Management Decision Guide: Industrial Center of Excellence Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide discusses how a well-balanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) project is the most efficient power generation resource available and suggests the open exploration of collaboration and sharing of benefits between utilities and their key customers who have coincident electric and thermal loads for solid CHP project development. The overriding objective of the guide is to present a balanced and effective approach for potential CHP project developers, owners, and participants to make well-informed ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies in a µGrid Application heat, usually in thethe µGrid. In this µGrid the heat loads are not that great,Combined Heat and Power Technologies in a µGrid Application

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the Californiaand/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems with and without heatmicro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP)

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Is It Right For Your Facility?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership with the US DOE Partnership with the US DOE Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Is It Right For Your Facility U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Webcast Series May 14 th , 2009 John J. Cuttica Cliff Haefke 312/996-4382 312/355-3476 cuttica@uic.edu chaefk1@uic.edu In Partnership with the US DOE Mid Atlantic www.chpcenterma.org Midwest www.chpcentermw.org Pacific www.chpcenterpr.org Northwest Region www.chpcenternw.org Northeast www.northeastchp.org Intermountain www.IntermountainCHP.org Gulf Coast www.GulfCoastCHP.org Southeastern www.chpcenterse.org In Partnership with the US DOE CHP Decision Making Process Presented by Ted Bronson & Joe Orlando Webcast Series January 8, 2009 CHP Regional Application Centers Walkthrough STOP Average Costs Typical Performance Yes No Energy Rates Profiles

86

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing of the CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to address barriers to CHP, and some states have begun to provide incentives to encourage the development of systems in their states. This report outlines current state-level activities regarding CHP in the areas of interconnection, emissions standards, and financial incentives offered for CHP. Moreover, because this report intends to educate the public about the difficulties of installing CHP, specifically not covered in this report are utility-owned CHP facilities and large investor-owned utilities (IOUs).

Brown, E.; Scott, K.; Elliott, R. N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at

Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heat; • refrigeration loads that can be met either by standard equipment or absorption equivalents; • hot-water and space-heating

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus aof three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentive than the current California SGIP support levels for stationary fuel cells of $2500/kW for natural gas

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.L. Edwards, (2003), “Distributed Energy Resources CustomerGas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,”on the economics of distributed energy resources (DER) in

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageCHP, often with absorption chillers that use waste heat forand • heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of1947-4326 Introduction A microgrid is defined as a clusterfor short periods (see Microgrid Symposiums 2005-2009, and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities, the electricity tariff has a fairly small fixed4 detailed electricity and natural gas tariffs, and DGexisting tariffs of three major electricity distribution

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory,sites 2 in different climate zones were picked. These samplevaries considerably by climate zone, and in general, the

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Microgrids for Commercial Building Combined Heat and Power and Power and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels), photovoltaics (PV), fuel cells, local heat and electricity storage, etc. Trends emerging at a consistent level of PQR throughout large regions. For example, PQR targets are consistent virtually all cost, point A, which in Fig. 3 occurs to the left of the current U.S. target of about 3-4 nines, point

98

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firestone 2004, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Mechanical Cost Datahttp://der.lbl.gov). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalwith absorption chillers that use waste heat for cooling (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants are widely used in industrial applications. In the aftermath of the recession, many of the associated production processes are under-utilized, which challenges the competitiveness of chemical companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which is in transition to the so-called smart grid, if the CHP plant can dynamically react to time-sensitive electricity prices. In this paper, we describe a generalized mode model on a component basis that addresses the operational optimization of industrial CHP plants. The mode formulation tracks the state of each plant component in a detailed manner and can account for different operating modes, e.g. fuel-switching for boilers and supplementary firing for gas turbines, and transitional behavior. Transitional behavior such as warm and cold start-ups, shutdowns and pre-computed start-up trajectories is modeled with modes as well. The feasible region of operation for each component is described based on input-output relationships that are thermodynamically sound, such as the Willans line for steam turbines. Furthermore, we emphasize the use of mathematically efficient logic constraints that allow solving the large-scale models fast. We provide an industrial case study and study the impact of different scenarios for under-utilization. 1

Sumit Mitra; Ignacioe. Grossmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Real-Time Combined Heat and Power Operational Strategy Using a Hierarchical Optimization Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing attempts to optimize the operation of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This paper considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm, i.e., a hierarchical controller, that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step. In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying, i.e., measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ?measured? values as initial conditions. The simulation environment presented in this paper features nonlinear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. The results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions have the potential to yield significant savings when compared to conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Use of Time-Aggregated Data in Economic Screening Analyses of Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) projects (also known as cogeneration projects) usually undergo a series of assessments and viability checks before any commitment is made. A screening analysis, with electrical and thermal loads characterized on an annual basis, may be performed initially to quickly determine the economic viability of the proposed project. Screening analyses using time-aggregated data do not reflect several critical cost influences, however. Seasonal and diurnal variations in electrical and thermal loads, as well as time-of-use utility pricing structures, can have a dramatic impact on the economics. A more accurate economic assessment requires additional detailed data on electrical and thermal demand (e.g., hourly load data), which may not be readily available for the specific facility under study. Recent developments in CHP evaluation tools, however, can generate the needed hourly data through the use of historical data libraries and building simulation. This article utilizes model-generated hourly load data for four potential CHP applications and compares the calculated cost savings of a CHP system when evaluated on a time-aggregated (i.e., annual) basis to the savings when evaluated on an hour-by-hour basis. It is observed that the simple, aggregated analysis forecasts much greater savings (i.e., greater economic viability) than the more detailed hourly analysis. The findings confirm that the simpler tool produces results with a much more optimistic outlook, which, if taken by itself, might lead to erroneous project decisions. The more rigorous approach, being more reflective of actual requirements and conditions, presents a more accurate economic comparison of the alternatives, which, in turn, leads to better decision risk management.

Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty-one percent of global executives surveyed by McKinsey & Co. (in 2008) expect the issues associated with climate change to boost profits—if managed well. What these executives recognize is that new regulations, higher energy costs, and increased scrutiny by private gate-keepers (such as Wal-Mart) offer an opportunity to identify and implement more efficient practices in commercial and industrial environments. One of the most impactful solutions for the industrial sector—from the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissions—is combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixed—largely because companies do not fully appreciate the challenges of maintaining and operating a CHP system, optimizing its performance, and taking full advantage of the many benefits it offers. Despite these challenges, the slogan for CHP should perhaps be: "CHP, now more than ever".

Davis, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities u CHP Table........................................................................................................................................................................................... 189 Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities Industrial Distributed Energy, a cross-cutting activity within the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), builds on activities conducted by DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies

107

Proposing a decision-making model using analytical hierarchy process and fuzzy expert system for prioritizing industries in installation of combined heat and power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring electric power and increasing energy cost encourage large energy consumers to utilize combined heat and power (CHP) systems. In addition to these two factors, the gradual exclusion of subsidies is the third factor intensifying the utilization ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy process, Combined heat and power, Decision making, Fuzzy expert system, Industry

Mehdi Piltan; Erfan Mehmanchi; S. F. Ghaderi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future  

SciTech Connect

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure modernization. The energy efficiency benefits of CHP offer significant, realistic solutions to near- and long-term energy issues facing the Nation. With growing demand for energy, tight supply options, and increasing environmental constraints, extracting the maximum output from primary fuel sources through efficiency is critical to sustained economic development and environmental stewardship. Investment in CHP would stimulate the creation of new 'green-collar' jobs, modernize aging energy infrastructure, and protect and enhance the competitiveness of US manufacturing industries. The complementary roles of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and responsible use of traditional energy supplies must be recognized. CHP's proven performance and potential for wider use are evidence of its near-term applicability and, with technological improvements and further elimination of market barriers, of its longer term promise to address the country's most important energy and environmental needs. A strategic approach is needed to encourage CHP where it can be applied today and address the regulatory and technical challenges preventing its long-term viability. Experience in the United States and other countries shows that a balanced set of policies, incentives, business models, and investments can stimulate sustained CHP growth and allow all stakeholders to reap its many well-documented benefits.

Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution utilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of...

110

Emissions Performance of an 85 kWe Packaged Combined Heat and Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer industrial, commercial, institutional, and residential customers a means of providing electric power close to the load while at the same time increasing their electrical reliability, energy efficiency, and power quality. In most cases, the cost to fuel a continuously operating generator with natural gas or distillate is greater than the value of the electricity generated. It is only when co-generated heat is recovered from the generator and used to reduce fuel cos...

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. Expensiveonsite (without absorption chiller offset) Effectiveonsite (includes absorption chiller offset) Heating Load

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil and biomass fuel, the continuous-combustion heaterBiomass can be used many ways, including direct combustion,

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden Central Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study: Fuel Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Com- bined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office With more than 67 million customers nationwide, Verizon Communications is one of the largest telecommunica- tions providers in the U.S. Power inter- ruptions can severely impact network operations and could result in losses in excess of $1 million/minute. 1 In 2005, Verizon Communications installed a 1.4 MW phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system, consisting of seven 200 kW units, at its Central Office in Garden City, New York. This fuel cell power plant, the largest in the United States at the time, is reaping environmental benefits and demonstrating the viabil- ity of fuel cells in a commercial, critical telecommunications setting. Background Verizon's Central Office in Garden City,

114

GUIDE TO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS FOR BOILER OWNERS AND OPERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. ORNL/TM-2004/144

C. B. Oland; Document Availability; C. B. Oland

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Effects of a Carbon Tax on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The

Ernest Orlando Lawrence; Afzal S. Siddiqui; Chris Marnay; Jennifer L. Edwards; Ryan Firestone; Srijay Ghosh; Michael Stadler; Afzal S. Siddiqui; Chris Marnay; Jennifer L. Edwards; Ryan Firestone

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

1Â…10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat 1-10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program NREL/BK-6A10-48265 November 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

117

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewables, including hydroelectric. For this analysis, itin 2010 and 33% in 2020. Hydroelectric generation follows aGas Cogeneration Hydroelectric New Renewables Existing

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondly, waste heat driven thermal cooling systems are onlyelectricity and thermal energy for cooling and heatingrecovery and cooling technologies, including the thermal-

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems (typically Stirling engines or CPV modules) forheat engines including Brayton, Ericsson, and Stirling, thefocal-mounted engine (e.g. dish-Stirling) by decoupling the

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included. Therefore, the cost per kWh should not necessarilyproduction, i.e. the cost per kWh only relates to theof the tax shield and cost per kWh of power produced for

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high electricity costs, net metering and high thermal-to-favor microCHP include net metering policies that allow homecurrently not eligible for net metering in most New England

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid ((mu)Grid) consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A (mu)Grid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The (mu)Grid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without CHP equipment, such as water- and space-heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the (mu)Grid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean generation in California.

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

REFORMING PROCESSES FOR MICRO COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM BASED ON SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy balance, different types of fuel reforming including steam reforming, autothermal reforming technologies. Steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming are the three major fuel of an activated carbon bed. Prior to enter the SOFC stack, the fuel is pre-reformed (methane is partially

Liso, Vincenzo

125

Collaborative National Program for the Development and Performance Testing of Distributed Power Technologies with Emphasis on Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A current barrier to public acceptance of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies is the lack of credible and uniform information regarding system performance. Under a cooperative agreement, the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed four performance testing protocols to provide a uniform basis for comparison of systems. The protocols are for laboratory testing, field testing, long-term monitoring and case studies. They have been reviewed by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee made up of industry, public interest, end-user, and research community representatives. The types of systems covered include small turbines, reciprocating engines (including Stirling Cycle), and microturbines. The protocols are available for public use and the resulting data is publicly available in an online national database and two linked databases with further data from New York State. The protocols are interim pending comments and other feedback from users. Final protocols will be available in 2007. The interim protocols and the national database of operating systems can be accessed at www.dgdata.org. The project has entered Phase 2 in which protocols for fuel cell applications will be developed and the national and New York databases will continue to be maintained and populated.

Soinski, Arthur; Hanson, Mark

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation at Ernesto Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the potential for coupling combined heat and power (CHP) with on-site electricity generation to provide power and heating, and cooling services to customers. This research into distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid (mGrid), a semiautonomous grouping of power-generating sources that are placed and operated by and for the benefit of its members. For this investigation, a hypothetical small shopping mall (''Microgrid Oaks'') was developed and analyzed for the cost effectiveness of installing CHP to provide the mGrid's energy needs. A mGrid consists of groups of customers pooling energy loads and installing a combination of generation resources that meets the particular mGrid's goals. This study assumes the mGrid is seeking to minimize energy costs. mGrids could operate independently of the macrogrid (the wider power network), but they are usually assumed to be connected, through power electronics, to the macrogrid. The mGrid in this study is assumed to be interconnected to the macrogrid, and can purchase some energy and ancillary services from utility providers.

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ontario Power Generation's 250 kWe Class Atmospheric Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 250 kW solid oxide fuel cell system in a combined heat and power demonstration operating on natural gas. The project was a collaboration initiative between Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to install and test a first-of-a-kind SOFC system at OPG site in Toronto, Canada. This test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under res...

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing a traditional fuel (namely natural gas) with crude glycerol from biodiesel production. This analysis showed that the cost of replacing natural gas with crude glycerol requires a strong function of the market price per unit of energy for the traditional fuel. However, the economics can be improved through the inclusion of a federal tax credit for the use of a renewable fuel. The conclusion of this analysis also shows that the ideal customer for energy replacement via crude glycerol is biodiesel producers who are located in remote regions, where the cost of energy is higher and the cost of crude glycerol is lowest. Lastly, the commercialization strategy analyzed competing technologies, namely traditional natural gas and electric heaters, as well as competing glycerol burners, and concludes with a discussion of the requirements for a pilot demonstration.

William L. ROberts

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives including Combined Heat and Power: 250,000 Large Industrial Gas Incentives: 250,000 Energy Efficiency...

132

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Incentive for New Construction: 50% up to $250,000 Incentive for Existing Buildings: 50% up to $100,000 Custom Projects including Combined Heat and Power: 50% up to $100,000 Steam Trap Survey or Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Trap Survey and Replacement: 100 units Insulation: $10,000/account Programmable Thermostats: $125

133

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

135

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

136

Energy and cost analysis of a solar-hydrogen combined heat and power system for remote power supply using a computer simulation  

SciTech Connect

A simulation program, based on Visual Pascal, for sizing and techno-economic analysis of the performance of solar-hydrogen combined heat and power systems for remote applications is described. The accuracy of the submodels is checked by comparing the real performances of the system's components obtained from experimental measurements with model outputs. The use of the heat generated by the PEM fuel cell, and any unused excess hydrogen, is investigated for hot water production or space heating while the solar-hydrogen system is supplying electricity. A 5 kWh daily demand profile and the solar radiation profile of Melbourne have been used in a case study to investigate the typical techno-economic characteristics of the system to supply a remote household. The simulation shows that by harnessing both thermal load and excess hydrogen it is possible to increase the average yearly energy efficiency of the fuel cell in the solar-hydrogen system from just below 40% up to about 80% in both heat and power generation (based on the high heating value of hydrogen). The fuel cell in the system is conventionally sized to meet the peak of the demand profile. However, an economic optimisation analysis illustrates that installing a larger fuel cell could lead to up to a 15% reduction in the unit cost of the electricity to an average of just below 90 c/kWh over the assessment period of 30 years. Further, for an economically optimal size of the fuel cell, nearly a half the yearly energy demand for hot water of the remote household could be supplied by heat recovery from the fuel cell and utilising unused hydrogen in the exit stream. Such a system could then complement a conventional solar water heating system by providing the boosting energy (usually in the order of 40% of the total) normally obtained from gas or electricity. (author)

Shabani, Bahman; Andrews, John; Watkins, Simon [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Metro  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metro New York) Metro New York) National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Metro New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives including Combined Heat and Power: $250,000 Large Industrial Gas Incentives: $250,000 Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Traps: $2,500 All Insulation: $10,000/account Boiler Controls: 2 units ENERGY STAR Programmable Thermostats: 5 units Pipe Insulation: 500 ft Program Info State New York Program Type

138

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimizal design and control strategies for novel Combined Heat and Power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Combined Heat and Power ecopower micro CHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Grandkids) ? Full in-floor radiant heating system in the house ? Geothermal system as backup. ? In 20 months of ecopower ...

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

generators, combined heat and power in commercial buildings, ... 6/ Includes (but is not limited to) miscellaneous uses such as transformers, ...

144

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Commercial and industrial sectors include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Federal Reserve System, ... Defense District” ...

145

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating Oil Residential Prices ... Commercial and industrial sectors include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Federal Reserve ...

146

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3/ Includes miscellaneous uses, such as pumps, emergency generators, combined heat and power in commercial buildings, and manufacturing performed in ...

147

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

148

Table 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 The percentage of the sector's consumption in Table ...

149

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy niche ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel consumption at CHP plants. Useful thermal output ... data on all generators at plants greater than one megawatt on the Annual Power Plant Operations ...

150

Combined Heat and Power: A Technology Whose Time Has Come  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid, the few buildings equipped with Combined Heat andthe grid system. 29 Source: EPA Combined Heat and Powergrid system. 21 Alternatively, a CHP system collects the wasted heat

Ferraina, Steven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity; and the waste heat is used in some type of thermal process. Process flow for a typical CHP system leverages heat created during electricity generation to...

152

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating andor cooling. CHP...

153

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industry Classification System (NAICS) code, system size, technologyprime mover, fuel, thermal energy use, and year installed. View a list of project profiles by market...

154

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power: Effective...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions annually...

155

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Project Profiles Database  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

112210 Hog and Pig Farming 211112 Natural Gas Liquid Extraction 221112 Fossil Fuel Electric Power Generation 221210 Natural Gas Distribution 221310 Water Supply and...

156

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Commission (CEC) * International District Energy Association (IDEA) * National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) * New York State Energy Research and Development...

157

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combine Heat and Power: A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capacity. Finally, the economics of CHP are improving as a result of the changing outlook in the long-term supply and price of North American natural gas - a preferred fuel...

158

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... System Energy Losses h: Total g: Distillate ... includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP ...

160

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coffee brewers, and water services. 3 Includes miscellaneous uses, such as pumps, emergency generators, combined heat and power in commercial buildings, and manufacturing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Laboratory Evaluation of a 25-kW Pre-Commercial Stirling Engine-Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New electric generation technologies and combined heat and power products are being introduced to the North American market. Utilities want to know more about these systems and how they may impact their customers. Both field and laboratory testing is crucial to gaining a better understanding for the operating criteria, compatibility, and performance characteristics of these systems. Heat engines that generate power based on the Stirling thermodynamic cycle have recently reached the pre-commercial stage i...

2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

163

A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Combined Heat and Power Sector . Table 1.5. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Combined Heat and Power Sector .

165

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

166

Commercial and Industrial Thermal Loads: A Driving Force Behind Future DR Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems are installed to minimize overall energy costs at commercial and industrial facilities where heat can be effectively recovered from the power generation process to meet the site heat loads. The suitability of a given site for CHP is most critically dependent on the nature of the heat load at the site. To date, more attention has been paid to the technologies associated with power generation and recovering the heat output of the power generator and less to quantifying...

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2011 Electric Power 3 Transportation 4 Commercial 1 Residential 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 Lease and plant fuel,...

168

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have lower operational costs per kWh produced. There is alsoper kWh of energy, the energy payback time (EPBT), the cost

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. [43] WHOembody a stand-alone solar heating system. It is assumedrecent growth in solar-thermal heating (Weiss et al. [42]),

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by CHP heat output P e Electrical power output of system Qratio of thermal to electrical power output R d Desiredratio of thermal to electrical power output T a Ambient

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Carbon and Energy Savings from Combined Heat and Power: A Closer Look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze and update our estimates of CHP's potential for U.S. manufacturers. Typical efficiencies of available CHP technologies are used to estimate their energy use and carbon emissions. In calculating the baseline against which CHP is compared, we take into account efficiency improvements in both the industrial sector and in the electricity-producing sector. We find that manufacturers save energy and reduce their carbon emissions substantially if they replace all retiring boilers stocks and new additions to the stock (from 1994 to 2010), with existing cost-effective CHP technologies. Carbon equivalent (=12/44 carbon dioxide) emissions would be reduced by up to 70 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) per year in 2010, (18%-30% manufacturer's projected emissions), and energy use reduced by up to 7 Exajoule (EJ). These estimates also take into account growth in manufacturing, as forecast by AEO-98, and expected improvements in CHP, boilers, and electric generating technologies. However, without policy innovation, actual CHP installed by U.S. manufacturers will likely fall far short of our estimates.

Roop, J. M.; Kaarsberg, T.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermo economic comparison of conventional micro combined heat and power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power systems (CHP) on this scale is called micro CHP (mCHP). First, the energy consumption-family household. The SOFC-mCHP system provides electricity as well as hot water for use and space heating heating located in larger cities. Secondly, there are CHP systems used in a decentralized form

Liso, Vincenzo

173

110 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for SOFC-based mCHP system is presented. January 2013 Keywords: micro-CHP SOFC Anode gas recycle Ejector Energy System Simulation a b s t r a c Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for small-scale residential applications is presented. A novel detailed pro

174

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity distribution systems and theu Purchased electricity from the distribution company by theelectricity that it needs beyond its self-generation from the distribution

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives to install CHP, the least expensive method to power the facility would be to buy all electricity and natural gas

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives to install CHP the least expensive method to power the facility would be to buy all electricity and natural gas

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, Vol.of Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources. LBNL-JL. Marnay, C. Distributed Energy Re- sources Customer

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Edwards, J. : Distributed Energy Resources CustomerC. Siddiqui, A. : Distributed Energy Resources On-SiteStadler, M. : The Distributed Energy Resources Costumer

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Integration of Distributed Energy Resources: The CERTSof Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources. ”Marnay, C. (2003). “Distributed Energy Resources Customer

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fired natural gas absorption chiller (kW) DCPrice Turnkeydirect-fired natural gas absorption chiller (US$) AnnDCPricedirect-fired natural gas absorption chiller (US$) DCLifetime

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. So, facilitiesabsorption / published in the International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, vol 6(2),1 Apr-Jun 2010 adsorption chiller);

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling loads using absorption chillers. Utility rates andvia heat exchangers. Absorption chillers are considered inof single- effect absorption chillers is only one seventh (

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a heat exchanger or an absorption chiller) ? u The amount ofof heat exchangers, absorption chillers, and the relatedheat exchangers and/or absorption chillers, thermodynamic

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fired natural gas absorption chiller (kW) Turnkey cost offired natural gas absorption chiller ($) Set of end-usesexchanger or an absorption chiller) The amount of heat (in

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

186

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

187

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power Technologies in a Grid Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of increased overall conversion efficiency. First, carbon emissions from power plants and generators would be reduced. Second, the environmental problem of disposing of power plant waste heat into the environment of heat using conventional separate heat and power. For typical electrical and thermal efficiencies, CHP

188

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil-fuel based thermal power plants. Chapter 3 exploresthermal energy to be dissipated in concentrating solar power plants.thermal energy to electricity in a natural gas, coal or nuclear power plant

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rules out the use of vapor compression, reverse osmosis, andrecirculation pumps, nor vapor compression, etc (see figureholds over vapor cycles is the low compression work, on the

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decreased cost of heat and electricity grid (Casten andgrid. Chapter 1 begins with analysis of the relative demand for electricity and heatheat can be cost-effectively stored with available technologies. (c) DCS-CHP thus can ameliorate grid-

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and, beginning in 2001, non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from ...

193

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levelized electric and thermal energy cost ($0.25/kWhend-use of energy as thermal energy is used to serve thermal4 to 6 units of thermal energy and one unit of electrical

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Microgrid Distributed Energy Resource Potential Usingon Integration of Distributed Energy Resources: The CERTSof Customer Adoption of Distributed Energy Resources. ”

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the burning of natural gas for on-site power generation andnatural gas absorption chiller GenL i , m , t , h , u Generated power by distributed generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MWh) KA natural gas consumed by power generation (MWh LMWh) KA natural gas consumed by power generation (MWh) LMWh) KA natural gas consumed by power generation (MWh) L

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies on Microgrid Viability: An Investigation forother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. See

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study ofother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. Seecapability in a CERTS Microgrid configuration in reference [

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 2: Operationand Control Two-Inverter Microgrid. NREL Report No. SR-560-of a Laboratory- Scale Microgrid Phase 1: Single Inverter in

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW Reciprocating Engine 3 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW ReciprocatingEngine 5 MW Gas Turbine 3MW Gas Turbine 40 MW Gas Turbine 1 MW Reciprocating Engine

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

Sweetser, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Wagner, Timothy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC); Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies thatdesires to install distributed generation to minimize the

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power; distributed generation; premium powerand operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies that

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ios in which distributed generation and heat recovery486-7976 Keywords: distributed generation; combined heat andCERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for distributed generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50environmentally benign distributed generation in a varietyfor inexpensive Distributed Generation (DG) technologies in

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emiel (2000). “Distributed Generation in Competitiveenergy resources; DER; Distributed Generation; DG; Economicof CHP in distributed generation greatly increases the

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHP (PX and Tariff case) Distributed Energy Resources42 Figure 10. Energy Consumption Breakdown - 1999 (TariffFigure 10. Energy Consumption Breakdown - 1999 (Tariff Case)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s load profiles default energy tariffs (in this work fromDirect Access Tariff Strategic energy (US$/kWh) SCE TOU-8direct access” tariff. The energy and demand charges are

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load profiles default energy tariffs (in this work from theEnergy Characteristics of Microgrid’s Individual Members Table 2. SDG&E TariffTariff Type Season Load Period Non-coincident Demand Charge ($/kW) Coincident Demand Charge ($/kW) Energy

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer’s default electricity tariff, natural gas prices,NetApp electricity prices are based on utility tariffs intariffs during the weekends (as compared to the weekdays) results in the CCP system remaining always off, as purchase of electricity

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysed at NBVC Electricity Tariff Natural Gas Tariff Nopurchase any electricity under the tariff. This is simplytheir electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 2002. PG&E electricity tariffs. http://www.pge.com/May 2008. PG&E electricity tariffs. http://www.pge.com/customer’s default electricity tariff, natural gas prices,

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possibly in the form of microgrids, are not considered. 2007the aggregation of loads into microgrids that would providepossible organization in microgrids. It is often the case

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of MicroGrids. Power System Engineering Researchand consumed locally within microgrids (µGrids) that are

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of MicroGrids” Power System Engineering ResearchLasseter 2002). These microgrids will operate according toauthority. By contrast microgrids will develop in accordance

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Staff Workshop to Explore Microgrids as a Distributed Energygenerate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consor-of CHP sys- tems in microgrids. The current state of the art

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding to (1) solar-thermal efficiency, (2) solar-aperture) Parameter Solar-thermal efficiency Solar-electric80% solar-thermal conversion efficiency. (b) Electricity is

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 Desalination processes (Kalogirou [35 Energy comparison of desalinationsystem for seawater desalination. Applied Thermal

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Basic research needs for solar energy utilization. Technicalelectricity technology. Solar Energy 76(1-3), 19 – 31. Solar

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar-electric system (typical for thin-film panels currently) plus a 58% efficient solar-thermal system (flat-plate efficiency

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

device, like the steam turbine. Stirling engines producesophisticated. Like the steam turbine, Stirling engines can

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat Recoveryi.e. combustion turbine, steam turbine (if applicable), heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for spaceengine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Steam Generators Water Treatment System Electricalapplicable), heat recovery steam generators, water treatmentMW Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shaded regions represent power generation costs . . 11 Heat-against conventional power generation technologies when thephotovoltaic and wind power generation have recently seen

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (Natural Gas-Only Heating Load Annual Total Energy Demand (

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sustainable design and durability of domestic micro combined heat and power scroll expander systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research to understand the mechanisms of wear within the main components of three different micro-CHP scroll expander systems was conducted. This was performed in order… (more)

Tzanakis, Iakovos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This section describes four micro CHP prime movers. Eachtime frame, the Stirling micro-CHP packages are targeted toComparison of residential micro CHP technologies to separate

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Field Test of a Microturbine-based Combined Heat and Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility engineers are familiar with utility-grade protection relays. Most, if not all, inverter-based Distributed Energy Resource (DER) systems, such as microturbines systems, fuel cells, and photovoltaic arrays, do not have discrete generator/feeder protection relays. Inverter-based DER systems are designed with their own digitally emulated protection functions, such as overcurrent, undervoltage, and under-frequency, into the inverter controls. Electric utilities are uneasy with these systems. ...

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSMEANS SCAQMD SCE SDG&E SOFC TAG TOU California Independentthe solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), are still in developmentfuel cell PV: photovoltaics SOFC: solid oxide fuel cell If

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) are being engineered for°C as an electrolyte. The SOFC is the newest of the fiveA key advantage of the SOFC is that fuels other than pure

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case, such as total electricity bill, electricity generationHeat and Power Applications electricity bill for electricityK$ Investment Costs Annual Electricity Bill for Purchases

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the waste heat, a condenser is much preferable, inheat rejection in a condenser. Making a few approximationspressure heat rejection in a condenser across a temperature

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas engines and stirling engines are currently being testedapplications as the other technologies. 4) Stirling Engines.The Stirling Engine—so named because it is based on the

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the customer’s end-use load profiles (typically for spacemade in constructing the load profiles for a couple of thesome of the ‘typical’ load profiles input to our economic

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the customer’s end-use load profiles (typically for spacemade in constructing the load profiles for a couple of thesome of the ‘typical’ load profiles input to our economic

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.85. The test site load profiles described in this report3.1: Electric-Only Sample Load Profile A.S. Siddiqui et al.Space Heating Sample Load Profile Figure 3.3: Sample Cooling

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This case study describes how Verizon's Central Office in Garden City, NY, installed a 1.4-MW phosphoric acid fuel cell system as an alternative solution to bolster electric reliability, optimize the

240

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). Advances in parabolic trough solar power technology.use comparable to a parabolic trough with air cooling sincethe working fluid in parabolic trough collectors is in the

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Combined Heat and Power: Coal-Fired Air Turbine (CAT)-Cycle Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By combining an integrated system with a gas turbine, coal-fired air turbine cycle technology can produce energy at an efficiency rate of over 40%, with capital and operating costs below those of competing conventional systems. Read this fact sheet to discover the additional benefits of this exciting new technology.

Recca, L.

1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with other fossil and renewable energy production methods inrenewable energy technologies, and 3) by democratizing the means of electricity production;

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum tube liquid-vapor (heat-pipe) collectors. Proceedingsheat rejection in a condenser across a temperature gradient. This cycle ignores pressure losses in the pipes,

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systemsUse Met by Absorption Chiller Fraction of Cooling End-UseUse Met by Absorption Chiller Fraction of Cooling End-Use

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential value of absorption cooling, but California’sit should be noted that absorption cooling does not displace

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a transformative technology. Solar PV, wind, geothermal, andon the whole. Thus, solar CHP and PV systems can be comparedevaluate whether solar CHP and PV systems perform similarly

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be Published in the Journal of Energy Engineering in AprilPublished in the Journal of Energy Engineering April 2005,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP is GHG preferable to grid power only when supply projection, in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power to California are a mix ....................................................................................................................... 12 Table 7. 2020 forecasts of California electricity and natural gas prices

249

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental impact study: CSP vs. CdTe thin filmsolar · CHP · Rankine · CSP · concentrating · distributed ·the concentrating solar power (CSP) troughs in the central

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources: The CERTS MicroGrid Concept. Berkeley Laband Power Adoption by a Microgrid Chris Marnay, Jennifer L.and Power Adoption by a Microgrid Chris Marnay ? , Jennifer

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the depreciation permitted by the Internal Revenue Serviceunder the Internal Revenue Code have evolved from the simpleAccording to the Internal Revenue Code it is only admissible

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FOR A COLLEGE CAMPUS THE HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of installing the super-heaters, cooling towers, condensers and auxiliary equipment needed to make and cooling needs of the campus. This facility also has a small turbine that can be brought on line to produce Madison University central heating & cooling system. This facility uses a mass-burn style waste combustion

Columbia University

253

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf/E-20.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://pdf/G-NT.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://than less expensive natural gas fired reciprocating engine

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. – =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 4 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived ...

255

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power toand Imports 20% RPS 2010, 33% RPS 2020 California Electricity Generation (TWh/a) Natural Gas

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workshop_042307.pdf CEC [California Energy Commission],Energy Research California Energy Commission Principalfunding provided by the California Energy Commission, Public

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These systems are fueled using reformate from natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and even kerosene in some demonstrations being conducted in Japan. LT-PEM fuel cell...

258

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the standard efficiency natural gas power plant case, highand imports Natural gas plants providing power to Californianatural gas and petroleum products as well as the remote power plant

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figures A typical wet steam Rankine cycle on a temperature-A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating2011 Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermodynamics matches California demand . . . . . . .Average California residential daily demand compared withreport, University of California at Berkeley, CA (US). [22

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Arizona Commercial Industrial Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Southwest Gas...

262

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... water services, pumps, emergency generators, combined heat and power in commercial buildings, manufacturing performed in commercial buildings, ...

263

THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

February 2010 VCAT Meeting Agenda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Residential and Commercial Integration of Solar Energy and Combined Heat and Power Technologies Brian Dougherty, Heat Transfer and ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989 ...

268

Table A19. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

vehicles, laboratory fume hoods, laundry equipment, coffee brewers, water services, pumps, emergency generators, combined heat and power in commercial ...

269

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public. Includes 0.1 quadrillion Btu of electricity net

270

Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Industrial Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Kriston P. Brooks (Primary Contact), Siva P. Pilli, Dale A. King Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 372-4343 Email: kriston.brooks@pnnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-AC05-76RL01830 Subcontractor: ClearEdge Power, Portland, OR Project Start Date: May 2010 Project End Date: September 2012

271

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology i Operating cost per kWh electric produced ($/1996). Maintenance costs are typically $0.01-0.015 per kWh

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heatingsolar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Manufacturing Process Modeling of 100-400 kWe Combined Heat and Power Stationary Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Both technical reviewers are external and Phyllis Daley is serving as proxy. A non-disclosure form is not needed for this report.

Warren, Joshua A [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas loads are readily available because due to the historic stability of gas prices there has been no incentive

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,Energy Reliability, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S.costs, a microgrid’s distributed energy resources (DER)

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and noon solar thermal and absorption chiller adoption in 2020,used to supply an absorption chiller. In the CO 2 price run,

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Zhou, (2007), “Distributed Generation with Heat Recoveryoutputs the optimal Distributed Generation (DG) and storageand sizing of distributed generation and electric storage

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Op%mal Scheduling of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plants1 under Time-sensi%ve Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Co-genera8on of electricity and heat Storage Microgrids2 1. "Systema%c u. A microgrid refers to a "local grid" that can work autonomously from the central

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

279

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of OngoingSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat andSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Solar Air-Conditioning September 30 – OctoberConference on Solar Air-Conditioning September 30 – OctoberConference on Solar Air-Conditioning September 30 – October

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Review of Potential Federal and State Green House Gas Policy Drivers for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb the reduction of green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. The more efficient utilization of natural gas fuel via use of distributed combined cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems in the end-use sector may be one option to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project was undertaken to assess the extent...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Making Combined Heat and Power District Heating(CHP-DH) networks in the United Kingdom economically viable: a comparative approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

 incentive regime. In Sweden for example Local Authorities  brought together the owners of high energy consuming buildings such  as  apartment  blocks  and  company  owned  office  buildings  in  a  bid  to  collaboratively  invest  in  DH.  In  Sweden  during  the  early  1970’s  DH  networks were heavily dependent on fossil...   accelerated  depletion  of  fossil  fuel  reserves  and  greater pollution to surrounding environments.  Figure  1:  Aggregate  energy  efficiency  comparisons  of  CHP  and  thermal  generation  (1991?2006) Source...

Kelly, S; Pollitt, Michael G.

283

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. The characteristics ofCarbonate (MCFC) Solid Oxide (SOFC) Stabilized Phosphoricfuel cells (MCFC and SOFC) are capable of producing high-

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dynamic simulation of a solar-driven carbon dioxide transcritical power system for small scale combined heat and power production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is an environmental benign natural working fluid and has been proposed as a working media for a solar-driven power system. In the current work, the dynamic performance of a small scale solar-driven carbon dioxide power system is analyzed by dynamic simulation tool TRNSYS 16 and Engineering Equation Solver (EES) using co-solving technique. Both daily performance and yearly performance of the proposed system have been simulated. Different system operating parameters, which will influence the system performance, have been discussed. Under the Swedish climatic condition, the maximum daily power production is about 12 kW h and the maximum monthly power production is about 215 kW h with the proposed system working conditions. Besides the power being produced, the system can also produce about 10 times much thermal energy, which can be used for space heating, domestic hot water supply or driving absorption chillers. The simulation results show that the proposed system is a promising and environmental benign alternative for conventional low-grade heat source utilization system. (author)

Chen, Y.; Lundqvist, Per [Div. of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pridasawas, Wimolsiri [King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project  

SciTech Connect

Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

Rosfjord, Thomas J [UTC Power

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The road still not taken : how combined heat and power can contribute to a sustainable energy future in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to address rising energy costs and global climate change, Massachusetts has adopted greenhouse gas reduction goals and implemented programs and policies to promote the clean and efficient use of energy. Despite ...

Montoya, Luis D. (Luis Daniel)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S. DOE, and from the “Fuel Cell Handbook,” 4 th and 5DOE (2000), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Fuel Cells: Handbook (

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Italy REFERENCES EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage forFirestone 2004, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Mechanical Cost Data

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW) solar thermal for absorption cooling (MW) adopoted heatdisplaced due to absorption building cooling (GWh/a) annualthat cooling is necessary all day long and the absorption

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC, Controls, 2008 Microgrid Symposiums. Held at Berkeley,and annual energy costs, a microgrid’s distributed energyadoption. INTRODUCTION A microgrid is defined as a cluster

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. Justification for Using GAMS Electricity utility expansion planning and operations simulation has a long history, and

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector diagram image Footnotes: 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net exports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/PV, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public.

293

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Figure 2.0 Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 37 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to

294

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Federal Reserve System, ... for Administration Defense District” in EIA’s ... include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ...

295

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

296

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... electrical system energy losses. ... includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

297

Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Commercial-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily: distributed generation; combined heat and power; decentralised optimisation; microgrid; power quality ABSTRACT

298

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

299

Highly Efficient, 5-kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1977 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Vendor: ClearEdge Power, Hillsboro, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the durability of proton exchange membrane * (PEM) fuel cell systems in residential and light commercial combined heat and power (CHP) applications in California. Optimize system performance though testing of multiple * high-temperature units through collection of field data.

300

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Connecticut - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... System Energy Losses i: Total f,h: Distillate ... commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

302

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and ...

303

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants Total Commercial and Industrial Sectors ... In the case of some wind, solar and wave energ ...

304

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, ...

305

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Wind Banc of America Combined Heat and Power Pilot Grant Program (Connecticut ) Connecticut Commercial Industrial...

306

Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) is offering grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional...

307

Commercial Deployment Drivers for Biomass Gasification Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass gasification-based power and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies have still not met their full potential despite several decades of research, development, and deployment. This report examines the technical, economic, and policy problems that have hindered the development of these technologies and describes a detailed parametric study of key economic and environmental performance variables for various biomass technologies in order to identify which factors are most important in planning new...

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building...

309

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

310

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

311

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

312

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

313

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application, the coolant is pumped to a heat recovery system. A water-to-air heat exchange system or water-to-water heat

Victoria, University of

314

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas University began operating with natural gas, instead of the coal-fired generators of the coal that had been stockpiled, the Plant is running completely on natural gas

Keinan, Alon

315

Effects of a Carbon Tax on Combined Heat and Power Adoption by a Chris Marnay, Jennifer L. Edwards, Ryan M. Firestone, Srijay Ghosh, Afzal S. Siddidqui, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the µ engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild of generation based closer to heating and/or cooling loads 4. customers' requirements for service quality

316

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

317

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... Data also include a small number of electric utility combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

320

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4/ Includes industrial-owned generators not classified as combined heat and power, such as standby generators. 5/ Includes wood and other biomass, waste heat, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3/ Includes industrial-owned generators not classified as combined heat and power, such as standby generators. 4/ Includes wood and other biomass, waste heat, ...

322

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

323

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

324

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

325

Market Analyses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Analyses Market Analyses Market Analyses November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Need information on the market potential for combined heat and power (CHP) in the U.S.? These assessments and analyses cover a wide range of markets including commercial and institutional buildings and facilities, district energy, and industrial sites. The market potential for CHP at federal sites and in selected states/regions is also examined. Commercial CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants Part I, 17 pp and Part II, 28 pp, Nov. 2007 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings: Benefits Analysis, 310 pp, April 2002 Engine Driven Combined Heat and Power: Arrow Linen Supply, 21 pp, Dec. 2008 Integrated Energy Systems for Buildings: A Market Assessment, 77 pp,

326

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

327

Vermont Village Green Program (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

obtain proposals from eligible organizations for projects that implement renewable energy district heating projects (including combined heat and power). Preference will be given to...

328

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See “Petroleum for Administration Defense District” in EIA’s ... include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Reserve System, ...

329

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... The industrial sector includes industrial combined-heat-and-power ( ...

330

Fact Sheets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(AMO) Distributed Energy (DE) portfolio includes R&D on advanced reciprocating engine systems (ARES), combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, as well as demonstrations...

331

2005 EIA-821 SURVEY: LINE-BY-LINE REFERENCE GUIDE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric power generation company (includes combined heat and power plants) that Farm Use: 36 . 37 . 38 ... Secure File Transfer option available at:

332

Advanced Manufacturing Office: About the Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency opportunities and adopt energy management best practices, including combined heat and power technology. As a result, manufacturers across vast industrial supply chain...

333

Scott Curranr - Research Staff - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also involved in sustainability analysis for mobile and stationary sources including combined heat and power applications. Scott collaborates closely with the regional DOE...

334

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

335

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power- Geisinger Medical Center Installation of natural gas cogeneration facility that can provide heat and up to 5 MW for use on site. Includes...

336

Land Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product A renewable-energy company focussed on harnessing biomass. Activities include wood-pellet production, biomass-combined heat and power and forestry and energy-crop...

337

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece ... installed earlier will be retired from service or abandoned. 8/ Includes combined heat and power ...

338

Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2012 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production1 Imports Waste Coal Supplied ... 1 Includes refuse recovery. ... "Power Plant Report," Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant ...

339

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by End Use Consumption by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Distribution Use Natural gas used as fuel in the respondent's operations. Electric Power Consumption Gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Electric Power Sector An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -i.e., North American Industry Classification System code 22 for plants. Combined heat and power plants that identify themselves as primarily in the commercial or industrial sectors are reported in those sectors.

340

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technical Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Reports Technical Reports Technical Reports November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A wide range of resources addressing the many benefits of combined heat and power (CHP) is available, including the technical reports below. For example, Assessing the Benefits of On-Site Combined Heat and Power (CHP) During the August 14, 2003, Blackout highlights facilities that were able to remain operational during the 2003 blackout due to backup generators or distributed generation (DG) resources, including CHP. Assessing the Benefits of On-Site CHP During the August 14, 2003, Blackout, 29 pp, June 2004 Characterization of the U.S. Industrial/Commercial Boiler Population, 65 pp, May 2005 CHP: Connecting the Gap Between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff Practices Part I, 34 pp, Mar. 2006 and Part II, 64 pp, Aug. 2006

342

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901 562 413 582 294 580 1,216 1,523 1996 1,963 1,919 1,606 1,251 757 446 421 443 581 648 972 1,290 1997 1,694 1,744 1,739 1,144 892 537 430 399 460 637 1,211 1,416 1998 1,817 1,642 1,518 1,141 694 506 496 195 483 628 1,019 1,338

343

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644 6,611 4,717 2,954 1,875 1,384 1,364 1,256 1,384 1,475 2,207 4,632 1995 6,358 6,001 5,160 2,968 2,354 1,794 1,558 1,524 1,903 1,836 3,020 5,164 1996 7,808 7,923 5,595 4,413 2,222 1,770 1,798 1,678 1,759 1,900 3,273 6,014

344

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636 14,979 23,071 1994 33,573 29,301 22,713 14,498 7,933 5,111 4,027 4,287 4,492 7,331 12,594 20,936 1995 28,306 29,814 21,860 14,128 8,132 4,979 4,697 4,406 4,623 7,916 18,650 27,649 1996 33,993 29,732 26,650 16,833 8,960 7,661 4,569 4,401 4,048 8,548 18,274 26,298

345

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487 361 346 392 591 997 1,300 1996 1,734 1,783 1,359 996 710 477 346 354 421 597 1,107 1,621 1997 1,810 1,778 1,341 1,037 684 397 372 354 409 584 979 1,687 1998 1,969 1,564 1,417 1,072 686 535 405 380 386 577 1,045 1,640

346

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 80.4 79.7 77.8 77.5 67.3 65.2 1987-2012 Alabama 79.8 80.2 78.8 79.3 78.9 76.2 1990-2012 Alaska 76.0 74.9 85.3 87.7 88.6 94.9 1990-2012 Arizona 93.4 93.1 88.0 88.7 87.8 86.6 1990-2012 Arkansas 70.4 64.5 59.4 55.6 51.5 40.2 1990-2012 California 60.7 56.7 54.9 54.1 54.3 50.0 1990-2012 Colorado 95.7 95.2 94.8 94.6 93.8 92.2 1990-2012 Connecticut 71.5 70.7 69.0 65.4 65.4 65.1 1990-2012 Delaware 74.8 70.6 53.5 49.8 53.4 43.7 1990-2012 District of Columbia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 16.9 17.9 1990-2012 Florida 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.5 37.0 1990-2012 Georgia 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990-2012 Hawaii 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990-2012 Idaho 84.8 86.0 83.7 82.0 80.8 77.0 1990-2012 Illinois

347

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740 785 1,082 1,658 1995 2,280 2,583 2,089 1,607 1,158 884 820 744 766 794 1,116 2,194 1996 2,147 1,942 1,551 1,925 1,233 824 878 750 774 804 1,195 2,325 1997 2,334 2,315 2,183 1,738 1,372 951 782 853 852 899 1,354 2,379

348

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909 978 1,146 1,541 2,625 1995 2,551 2,139 1,868 1,784 1,558 1,268 1,082 978 1,009 1,151 1,444 1,871 1996 2,466 2,309 2,268 1,811 1,454 1,286 1,145 1,062 1,116 1,269 1,817 2,417 1997 2,717 2,634 2,447 1,900 1,695 1,412 1,099 1,148 1,195 1,273 1,800 2,638

349

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947 1,089 1,361 1,843 1995 2,600 2,626 2,111 1,382 1,045 1,013 950 956 1,044 1,054 1,674 2,414 1996 3,136 2,782 2,190 1,884 1,154 997 940 957 1,041 1,157 1,644 2,447 1997 2,378 2,381 1,793 1,202 1,268 1,096 989 1,004 1,884 1,167 1,757 2,639

350

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994 7,247 6,269 4,727 2,761 1,844 1,605 1,487 1,647 1,831 2,115 2,817 4,592 1995 5,839 6,031 4,241 3,065 1,766 1,579 1,487 1,475 1,597 1,740 3,263 5,279 1996 6,913 6,421 4,851 3,760 1,970 1,586 1,415 1,575 1,658 1,917 3,240 5,160

351

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767 10,193 16,875 23,833 1994 33,440 31,356 24,263 16,330 10,123 6,207 5,343 5,363 5,719 8,796 14,511 21,617 1995 27,945 29,223 23,980 18,384 11,004 6,372 5,664 5,778 6,417 9,647 19,742 29,922 1996 32,468 30,447 27,914 19,664 12,272 6,343 5,673 5,383 6,146 9,472 19,486 26,123

352

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,976 3,700 4,247 2,586 1,701 1,154 968 941 978 1,220 1,801 3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382 5,073 3,807 2,391 1,784 1,553 1,586 1,615 2,491 3,895 5,565 1993 6,273 6,568 6,232 3,772 2,110 1,861 1,507 1,567 1,700 2,231 3,898 5,915 1994 8,122 6,354 5,634 2,844 2,547 1,709 1,732 1,588 2,016 2,531 3,582 5,475 1995 6,743 7,826 4,472 3,736 2,388 1,994 1,612 1,722 2,065 1,907 4,871 7,538 1996 7,648 6,515 5,476 3,766 2,672 1,816 1,608 1,866 1,922 2,427 4,693 5,433

353

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619 3,941 3,853 3,374 3,078 2,937 2,855 2,909 2,896 2,814 3,089 3,570 1995 4,274 4,361 3,900 3,433 3,055 2,930 2,970 2,751 2,818 2,840 3,171 3,883 1996 4,731 4,272 4,167 3,918 3,336 3,029 2,836 2,716 2,840 2,957 3,179 3,830

354

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101 4,707 3,388 2,306 1,360 1,107 990 887 1,253 1,275 1,897 3,136 1995 4,387 4,171 3,478 2,027 1,337 1,156 1,015 1,021 1,060 1,183 2,265 4,311 1996 5,411 5,249 3,895 2,964 1,519 1,052 1,056 1,060 1,106 1,356 2,462 3,876

355

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995 4,244 3,324 2,948 2,429 1,675 1,122 861 899 1,088 1,905 2,605 3,724 1996 4,549 4,604 3,129 2,479 1,356 892 904 874 1,279 2,073 3,185 4,220 1997 5,030 4,454 3,350 2,664 1,263 942 923 939 1,120 2,012 3,174 5,257

356

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 28,465 29,564 21,880 18,656 19,249 21,469 15,319 17,351 19,452 19,856 21,665 26,192 1990 30,798 34,767 27,425 23,423 18,540 17,392 21,030 17,705 23,233 17,384 22,637 30,759 1991 31,793 23,911 26,128 28,375 21,468 20,003 22,080 16,547 23,307 26,510 20,109 27,379 1992 38,234 23,834 24,413 18,379 27,118 22,150 21,150 21,633 19,247 19,112 20,999 28,738 1993 27,151 31,334 21,654 18,276 18,032 15,638 18,341 14,348 16,845 19,708 20,404 28,553 1994 29,342 27,032 23,156 18,463 22,621 18,091 25,752 14,123 14,604 17,844 25,032 25,929 1995 31,883 25,693 23,399 23,976 24,831 19,028 21,954 18,362 19,391 21,272 22,818 26,152

357

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477 10,502 9,972 13,970 18,205 26,928 1994 31,014 32,757 29,376 21,207 13,641 11,207 10,158 10,485 10,002 12,399 16,783 24,226 1995 28,329 29,345 28,182 20,813 14,459 11,501 11,281 10,797 10,619 13,394 22,325 30,309 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

358

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330...

359

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992...

360

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

69,641 64,821 64,903 71,709 73,625 1990's 67,223 68,383 72,720 78,047 75,819 82,726 87,456 81,753 73,117 73,643 2000's 90,378 78,479 82,427 87,225 84,883 76,217 71,081 75,562...

362

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,139 1,214 1,250 1,461 1,660 1990's 1,678 1,860 2,209 2,311 2,381 2,426 2,566 2,713 2,456 2,547 2000's 2,770 2,642 5,167 4,781 4,811 4,792 4,701 5,749 5,878 5,541 2010's 5,830...

363

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130...

364

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890...

365

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011...

366

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672...

367

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61...

368

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

930: 613: 452: 443: 665: 954: 1,681: 2,111: 2004: 2,410: 1,883: 1,454: 1,015: 737: 647: 456: 423: 543: 879: 1,227: 1,735: 2005: 2,388: 1,585: 1,385: 1,127: 850: 589 ...

369

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Prices are in ...

370

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443...

371

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477...

372

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 107,796 117,124 130,062 1970's 132,708 146,217 159,970 180,274 189,192 181,949 178,220 131,266...

373

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's...

374

Commercial Building Profiles

This dataset includes simulation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and...

375

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 1,639 1,249 996 830 680 362 272 248 269 449 873 1,233 1992 1,404 1,078 821 668 438 309 264 269 287 439 760 1,271 1993 1,631 1,376 1,262 882 639 400 362 389 378 667 874 1,407 1994 1,351 1,412 1,065 869 544 369 291 270 308 550 915 1,287 1995 1,671 1,247 1,217 987 873 594 373 258 NA NA NA NA 1996 1,176 1,203 1,030 925 712 342 197 197 250 640 1,301 1,748 1997 1,570 1,309 1,403 1,189 958 491 623 287 316 554 966 1,088 1998 1,628 1,322 1,279 936 597 442 371 253 343 493 927 1,822

376

The South Campus Precinct is comprised of those portions of Main Campus south of the Cascadilla Creek. It includes the service and administrative areas of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and adjacent Central Combined Heat and Power Plant, additional service-related areas along Maple Avenue and accommodate growth, South Campus is anticipated to evolve significantly over the coming decades. The best PLANT SCHOELLKOPF MEMORIAL HALL PINETREEROAD DRYDEN ROAD ROUTE 366 ONEIDAPLACE FAIRMOUNTAVENUE ELM W OOD

Wang, Z. Jane

377

ERC commercialization activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

Maru, H.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering developing test procedures, labels, and energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps. Pumps exist in numerous applications, including agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. There are currently no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and industrial pumps. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding commercial and industrial pumps. 78 FR 7304 (February 1, 2013).

379

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships manages and advances the commercialization of cutting-edge discoveries ...

380

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part A-1 of Title III (42 U.S.C. 6311-6317) establishes a similar program for ''Certain Industrial Equipment,'' which includes commercial refrigeration equipment. Amendments to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Net Metering Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Net Metering Provider Washington State University Washington's net-metering law applies to systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power technologies (including fuel cells). All customer classes are eligible, and all utilities -- including municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- must offer net metering.

382

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011...

383

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rebates on a range of energy efficient equipment and measures for commercial and smaller industrial customers. Eligible customers include commercial customers on General Power...

384

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

EERE: Commercialization & Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

marketplace. Commercialization Commercialization initiatives help bridge the gap between technology R&D and venture capital funding and marketing. Energy Innovation Portal...

386

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

387

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

388

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

389

Shakopee Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single Packaged Air Conditioning (including Rooftop Units): 50 - 65 Shakopee Public Utilities (SPU) offers a wide array of rebates and incentives encouraging its commercial...

390

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships | Brookhaven Lab ...  

'Agreements for Commercializing Technology' (ACT) Now Available. Lab and DOE staff who worked on the ACT project include, ... Media & Communications Office.

391

Southwest Gas Corporation - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers rebates to commercial customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes washers, storage water heaters, tankless...

392

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development ...

393

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development (R&D), and venture ...

394

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Promoting Energy Savings for Businesses S igned by President Bush on August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) lays the foundation for the new Federal tax incentives for consumers and businesses that pursue energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy. For updated information about the tax incentives, see www.energy.gov. This web- site also describes other EPACT provisions of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building owners and lessees who purchase and install energy-saving products in their businesses can qualify for a tax deduction under EPACT. Buildings must achieve a 50 percent reduction in

395

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

396

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

398

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.6 Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Validation Technology Validation Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.6 - 1 3.6 Technology Validation The Technology Validation sub-program tests, demonstrates, and validates hydrogen (production, delivery, storage) and fuel cell systems and their integrated components in real-world environments. Feedback provided to the DOE hydrogen and fuel cell research and development (RD&D) projects, industry partners, and end users helps determine the additional RD&D required to move the technologies forward or to determine whether the technologies are ready for commercialization. Evaluations conducted include the following: * Applications - transportation; primary power; combined heat and power (CHP); combined

399

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Related Links Related Links Related Links November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Need additional help or more information? DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) provide local, individualized solutions to customers on specific combined heat and power (CHP) projects. Partners of DOE's CHP Program include federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, international entities, private clean energy companies, technology developers, and commercial builders and developers. Partners American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) CHP Association International District Energy Association (IDEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

400

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Net Metering Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSC) issued an order on January 26, 1982 requiring all regulated utilities to file tariffs allowing net metering to customers that generate electricity with systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW)* in capacity. The order applies to investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities, but not to electric cooperatives. All distributed-generation (DG) systems, including renewables and combined heat and power (CHP), are eligible. There is no limit on total enrollment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

402

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships |  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

403

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Contacts. For more information about the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, or about other commercialization initiatives, please contact ...

404

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

405

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

406

Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including commercial fryers, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

407

Covered Product Category: Commercial Boiler  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

408

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

409

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

410

Word Pro - S3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlypetroleum. Sources: Tables 3.7a-3.7c....

411

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

fuels consumed to produce electricity. Data also include fuels consumed to produce useful thermal output at a small number of electric utility combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants....

412

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power technologies (including fuel cells). All...

413

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 Electricity-only and...

414

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Includes combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants and a small number of electricity-only plants. 2 For 1978...

415

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power technologies (including fuel cells). All...

416

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

418

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

419

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

422

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

423

Commercialization Info 080611  

sponsors of the research that led to the Invention; the inventors of the Licensed Patents; and their ... of funding for the development and commercialization:

424

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Grant Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Grant Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Customer Service Otter Tail Power Company Grants for Conservation Program allows its commercial and industrial customers to submit energy-saving proposals and receive grants for their custom efficiency projects. Possibilities include but are not limited to:

425

PEPCO - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PEPCO - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Incentives PEPCO - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program PEPCO - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate All Incentives: 50% of the total installed project cost Custom Incentive Program: 50% and $250,000/electric account (including all incentive applications in a program year) Program Info Start Date 3/1/2011 State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Incentives: $0.16/annual kWh saved

426

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clothes Washers Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of residential clothes washers since 1988. Residential clothes washers use a water solution of soap and/or detergent and mechanical agitation or other movement to clean clothes. These include automatic, semi-automatic, and "other" clothes washers (known collectively as "clothes washer products"). This category does not include commercial clothes washers used in commercial settings, multifamily housing, or coin laundries. Standards put in place in 1994, 2004, and 2007 will save approximately 16.4 quads of energy and result in approximately $346.2 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 1994-2036. The standards will avoid about 870.2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 170.6 million automobiles.

427

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

428

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

429

Automated Meteorological Reports from Commercial Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial aircraft now provide over 130,000 meteorological observations per day, including temperature,winds, and in some cases, humidity, vertical wind gust, or eddy dissipation rate (turbulence). The temperature and wind data are used in most ...

William R. Moninger; Richard D. Mamrosh; Patricia M. Pauley

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Avista Utilities (Gas)- Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers Natural Gas saving incentives to commercial customers on rate schedule 420 and 424. This program provides rebates for a variety of equipment and appliances including cooking...

431

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

433

OpenEI - Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are given by a location defined by the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for which the weather data was collected. Commercial load data is sorted by the (TMY) site as a...

434

Commercial Grade Dedication RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the CGD activities for office of Environmental Management...

435

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

436

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps. HID lamps are electric discharge lamps and include high-pressure sodium, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps. HID lamps require an HID ballast to start and regulate electric current flow through the lamp. HID lamps are used in street and roadway lighting, area lighting such as for parking lots and plazas, industrial and commercial building interior lighting, security lighting for commercial, industrial, and residential spaces, and landscape lighting. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Energy Conservation Standard and Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Test Procedures.

440

Commercial Reference Building: Hospital | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09 09 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278309 Varnish cache server Commercial Reference Building: Hospital Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Hospital for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment Best Management Practice: Commercial Kitchen Equipment October 8, 2013 - 9:42am Addthis Commercial kitchen equipment represents a large set of water users in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high volume applications typically use mostly hot water. Ensuring commercial kitchen equipment uses water efficiently affords both significant water and energy savings. Water-using commercial kitchen equipment include pre-rinse spray valves, wash tanks and sinks, commercial dishwashers, food steamers, steam kettles, commercial ice makers, and combination ovens (combination oven/steamer). Operation and Maintenance To maintain water efficiency in operations and maintenance, Federal

442

Commercialization of Coal-to-Liquids Technology  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an overview of the current status of coal-to-liquids (CTL) commercialization efforts, including an analysis of efforts to develop and implement large-scale, commercial coal-to-liquids projects to create transportation fuels. Topics covered include: an overview of the history of coal usage and the current market for coal; a detailed description of what coal-to-liquids technology is; the history of coal-to-liquids development and commercial application; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in coal-to-liquids; an analysis of the issues and challenges that are hindering the commercialization of coal-to-liquids technology; a review of available coal-to-liquids technology; a discussion of the economic drivers of coal-to-liquids project success; profiles of key coal-to-liquids developers; and profiles of key coal-to-liquids projects under development.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water...

444

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air...

445

Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell, 865-574-4180, caldwelljt@ornl.gov Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager Jennifer Caldwell is a Senior Commercialization Manager for the Partnerships...

446

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap,...

447

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university… (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

450

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

451

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

452

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 6c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using. Weather-Adjusted Site Energy. 1. ... Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

453

DOE Commercial Building Partnership Program - LBNL Project Introductio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program - LBNL Project Introductions (Includes brief update on Commercial Buildings User Facility & other items) NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley...

454

Alameda Municipal Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alameda Power and Telecom offers financial incentives for its commercial customers to install a range of energy efficient equipment and measures. HVAC rebates include efficient variable frequency...

455

Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water-Using Equipment: Commercial and Industrial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water is an important aspect of many facets in energy engineering. While the previous article detailed domestic related water-using equipment such as toilets and showerheads, this article focuses on various types of water-using equipment in commercial and industrial facilities, including commercial dishwashers and laundry, single-pass cooling equipment, boilers and steam generators, cooling towers, and landscape irrigation. Opportunities for water and energy conservation are explained, including both technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes. Water management planning and leak detection are also included as they are essential to a successful water management program.

Solana, Amy E.; McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

458

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

459

Commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems  

SciTech Connect

This article addresses design requirements for commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems. The topics of the article include design considerations, toilet exhaust, dishwasher exhaust, grease hood exhaust, codes and standards, design concerns, common problems, and fire suppression. A side bar on ducts, plenums and housings is also included.

McGuire, A.B. (McGuire Engineers, Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

464

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential...

465

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local...

466

Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State...

467

Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

468

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

469

Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Heating & Cooling...

470

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Appliances &...

471

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Quick Links. Energy Innovation Portal; Site Map Commercialization Home Page. About. Success Stories; Legacy Initiatives

472

Commercial Reference Building: Warehouse | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warehouse Warehouse Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Warehouse for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for three categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

473

Commercial Reference Building: Supermarket | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supermarket Supermarket Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Supermarket for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

474

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

476

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreements for Commercializing Technology Agreements for Commercializing Technology NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a partner seeks highly-specialized or technical services to complete a project. An ACT agreement also authorizes participating contractor-operated DOE laboratories, such as NREL, to partner with businesses using more flexible terms that are aligned with industry practice. The agreement type used depends on the business, and the specific partnership selected is determined on a case-by-case basis. Benefits The benefits of Agreements for Commercializing Technology include: Intellectual Property Rights. ACT provides a more flexible framework for negotiation of intellectual property rights to facilitate moving technology from the laboratory to the marketplace as quickly as possible.

477

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

478

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

479

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

480

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes commercial combined-heat-and-power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Commercializing solar architecture  

SciTech Connect

The seminar discussions on attitudinal, technical, and institutional issues and the suggestions related to information development, acquisition, and dissemination; education and training; demonstrations and design competitions; and other actions are documented. Information on SERI's overall mission and a paper titled, The Architectural Role of SERI, and a matrix of barriers and actions from this assessment, related to the commercialization profile for passive solar heating, are attached as appendices.

Franta, G.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface NORA WANG GEOFF ELLIOTT JUSTIN ALMQUIST EDWARD ELLIS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory JUNE 14, 2013 Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Energy asset score evaluates the as- built physical characteristics of a building Energy Asset Score and its overall energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The physical characteristics include Building envelope (window, wall, roof) HVAC systems (heating, cooling, air distribution) Lighting system (luminaire and lighting control systems) Service hot water system Other major energy-using equipment (e.g. commercial refrigerator, commercial kitchen appliances, etc.) Building energy use is affected by many factors.

483

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate See Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $500 Furnace with ECM Fan: $700 - $900 Water Boiler: $800 - $1,200 Steam Boiler: $800 Boiler Reset Control: $100 Indirect Water Heater: $300 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Provider Central Hudson Gas and Electric The Business Energy SavingsCentral program is for non-residential gas customers of Central Hudson. This includes businesses, local governments,

484

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Residual Fuel Oil by End Use Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Sales for all other energy-consuming sectors not included elsewhere. Commercial An energy-consuming sector that consists of service-providing facilities and equipment of nonmanufacturing businesses; Federal, State, and local governments; and other private and public organizations, such as religious, social, or fraternal groups. The commercial sector includes institutional living quarters. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and running a wide variety of other equipment. Electric Utility An energy-consuming sector that consists of electricity only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity and heat, to the public -- i.e., NAICS 22 plants. Volumes directly imported and used by the electric power companies are included.

485

Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Global Superior Energy Performance Commercial Buildings » Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Graphic of Global Superior Energy Performance working groups, including energy management led by the United States, power led by Japan, combined heat and power led by Finland, steel led by Japan, cool roofs led by the United states, and cement led by Japan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program, which provides industrial facilities and commercial buildings a framework for achieving continual improvement in energy efficiency while maintaining market competitiveness. SEP aims to provide a transparent, globally accepted system for energy management and continuous energy performance improvement.

486

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

487

Commercializing the H-Coal Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The H-Coal Process is being demonstrated in commercial equipment at the Catlettsburg, Kentucky plant. A program is being developed for further operations including several tests for specific commercial projects and a long-term test. Over the last year, technical feasibility has been clearly demonstrated, but the economic matrix has been greatly altered. However, because of this alteration and because many countries outside the United States are more concerned about security of supply, Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) has observed a decided swing in interest in commercial coal liquefaction. Project owners can select one of two paths for commercial coal liquefaction using H-Coal technology. The quantum strategy involves the construction of a large, independent facility and requires a very high initial capital investment. The incremental approach deals with stepwise additions of coal to a hydrogenation unit, may involve association with an existing facility, and will result in a substantially smaller initial investment. HRI's unique and commercially proven Liquid Phase Hydrogenation systems permit the owner to select the strategy most suited to his needs. The ultimate goals of commercial coal liquefaction can be reached by either route. The H-Coal program supports this goal.

DeVaux, G. R.; Dutkiewicz, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

489

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Technology Commercialization Showcase - Home - Energy ...  

Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) Partnership; ... The Department Of Energy Technology Commercialization Showcase provides effective ...

491

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian ...

492

Success Stories - EERE Commercialization Office  

Success Stories. As new energy efficient and renewable energy technologies emerge, so do potential business opportunities. These commercialization success stories ...

493

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian Renewable Energy ...

494

Inventor Resources | Technology Commercialization and ...  

Search Technologies; Patents; Contacts. TCP Director Connie Cleary. Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima ...

495

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

Aerocapacitor commercialization plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

NONE

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

497

Resource assessment/commercialization planning meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy and Division of Geothermal Resource Management, sponsored a Resource Assessment/Commercialization Planning meeting in Salt Lake City on January 21-24, 1980. The meeting included presentations by state planning and resource teams from all DOE regions. An estimated 130 people representing federal, state and local agencies, industry and private developers attended.

None

1980-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

498

Texas Gas Service - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Gas Service - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Texas Gas Service - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Texas Gas Service - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Front-loading Clothes Washers: up to $100 Commercial Water Heating System: up to 20% of cost Hydronic Heater: $125 per unit Infra-red Fryers: $400 Convection Ovens: $400 Conveyor Ovens: $400 Infra-red Griddles $200 Booster Heater: $500/unit Texas Gas Service (TGS) offers a range of financial incentives to commercal customers who purchase and install energy efficient commercial equipment. Eligible equipment includes commercial clothes washers, water heaters, hydronic heating systems, ovens, fryers, griddles and booster heaters.

499

Modesto Irrigation District - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modesto Irrigation District - Commercial New Construction Rebate Modesto Irrigation District - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program Modesto Irrigation District - Commercial New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 50% of the incremental cost of the project(s) included in the application. The maximum annual payment cap is determined per account, by the applicable MID electric rate schedule: $15,000 (GS-1); $25,000 (P-3); $50,000 (GS-2); $125,000 (GS-TOU); $250,000 (GS-3); $500,000 (IC-25). Program Info Expiration Date 12/15/2013 State California Program Type

500

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illuminated Exit Signs Illuminated Exit Signs Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of illuminated exit signs since 2005. Illuminated exit signs are used to indicate exit doors in schools, hospitals, libraries, government buildings, and commercial buildings of all kinds, including offices, restaurants, stores, auditoriums, stadiums, and movie theatres. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates There are no recent updates for this equipment. Standards for Illuminated Exit Signs The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for illuminated exit signs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.