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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary for the Combustion Program The Combustion Technologies Product promotes the advancement of coal combustion power generation for use in industrial, commercial, and utility...

2

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

3

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technology (June 15-16, 1999) Animal Waste Remediation Roundtable PDF-78KB Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems '98 Conference (July 21-23, 1998)...

4

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Public Power District's Sheldon Station with APFBC Technology Nebraska Public Power District's Sheldon Station with APFBC Technology FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: APFBC Repowering Project Summary Key Features Site Layout Performance Environmental Characteristics Cost Other Combustion Systems Repowering Study Links: A related study is underway that would repower Sheldon Unit 1 and Unit 2 with gasification fluidized-bed combined cycle technology (GFBCC). CLICK HERE to find out more about repowering the Sheldon station with GFBCC instead. APFBC Repowering Project Summary Click on picture to enlarge Advanced circulating pressurized fluidized-bed combustion combined cycle systems (APFBC) are systems with jetting-bed pressurized fluidized-bed (PFB) carbonizer/gasifier and circulating PFBC combustor. The PFB carbonizer and PFBC both operate at elevated pressures (10 to 30 times atmospheric pressure) to provide syngas for operating a gas turbine topping combustor giving high cycle energy efficiency. The remaining char from the PFB carbonizer is burned in the pressurized PFBC. The combustion gas from the PFB also feeds thermal energy to the gas turbine topping combustor. This provides combined cycle plant efficiency on coal by providing the opportunity to generate electricity using both high efficiency gas turbines and steam.

5

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abbreviations & Acronyms Abbreviations & Acronyms Reference Shelf Solicitations & Awards Abbreviations & Acronyms The Combustion Technologies Product uses a number of abbreviations and acronyms. This web page gives you a definition of frequently used terms, as follows: 1½-Generation PFBC -- A PFBC plant where the hot (about 1400ºF) PFBC exhaust gases are used as a vitiated air supply for a natural gas combustor supplying high-temperature gas (above 2000ºF) to a combustion turbine expander (synonym for "PFB-NGT"). 1st-Generation PFBC -- Commercial PFBC technology where an unfired low-temperature (below 1650ºF) ruggedized turbine expander expands PFBC exhaust gases (synonym for "PFB-EGT"). 2nd-Generation PFBC (see synonyms: "APFBC," "PFB-CGT") -- Advanced PFBC where a carbonizer (mild gasifier) provides hot (about 1400ºF) coal-derived synthetic fuel gas to a special topping combustor. The carbonizer char is burned in the PFBC, and the PFBC exhaust is used as a hot (about 1400ºF) vitiated air supply for the topping combustor. The syngas and vitiated air are burned in a topping combustor to provide high-temperature gas (above 1700ºF) to a combustion turbine expander.

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

7

Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Engine Combustion Engine Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Combustion Engine Research

8

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Combustion A number of companies are participating in DOE's evaluation of Combustion Systems products. The list below gives you access to each participant company's home page....

9

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbines for APFBC Gas Turbines for APFBC FBC Repower Simple Description Detailed Description APFBC Specs GTs for APFBC Suited for Repowering Existing Power Plants with Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combined Cycles APFBC combined cycles have high energy efficiency levels because they use modern, high-temperature, high-efficiency gas turbines as the core of a combined power cycle. This web page discusses a current U.S. Department of Energy project that is evaluating combustion turbines suited for repowering existing steam plants. The natural-gas-fueled version of the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation W501F. Modified versions of this gas turbine core are suited for operating in APFBC power plants. Contents: Introduction APFBC Repowering Considerations

10

Review of Combustion Modification Emerging Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion modification emerging technologies for coal-fired boilers represent new developments in NOx control through changes in the fuel/air mixing of the combustion process. Technologies examined in this report fall into the categories of low-NOX burners (LNB), overfire air (OFA), enriched combustion, and combustion diagnostics. The technology reviews are comprised of the following sections where sufficient information was available: background, NOX reduction principle, performance and experience base...

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Description of APFBC Repowering Detailed Description of APFBC Repowering FBC Repower Simple Description Detailed Description APFBC Specs GTs for APFBC Click on picture to enlarge Repowering Existing Power Plants with Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combined Cycles Contents: Please send me to the NON-TECHNICAL DISCUSSION about APFBC instead! Click on the technical discussion areas below, or simply browse down in this page: APFBC Repowering Considerations Process Sketch APFBC Components High Energy Efficiency Excellent Environmental Performance Cost Comparable to a Pulverized Coal Plant APFBC Repowering Considerations Click on picture to enlarge Process Sketch While all elements of the APFBC plant have been tested, APFBC technology is still under development. Test programs are in place that will soon show commercial operations for all parts. The most important of these are the DOE Power Systems Development Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama, and two DOE Clean Coal Technology projects: Piñon Pines, testing ceramic filters, and the APFBC CCT project. DOE views the following as the development status of the various elements for application in a year 2002 repowering plant installation:

12

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solicitations/Awards Solicitations/Awards Reference Shelf Solicitations & Awards Abbreviations & Acronyms Recent Solicitations(Accessible from the NETL Business page) December 7, 2000 Program Solicitation (PS) DE-PS26-01NT41104, entitled A Power Plant Improvement Initiative. This is a DRAFT Solicitation placed here for public comments/questions. Please submit all comments/questions by c.o.b. on January 5, 2000. Comments should be forwarded to Ms. Jo Ann C. Zysk via the Internet at zysk@netl.doe.gov or faxed to her at 412-386-6137. December 1, 2000 Program Solicitation Notice No. DE-PS26-01NT41048, entitled A Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Developing Coal, Oil and Gas Energy Resources. Questions regarding this solicitation should be directed to the point of contact, Lisa Kuzniar, via the Internet at lkuzni@netl.doe.gov or by phone at 304-285-4242.

13

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AES Greenidge Units 3 and 4 with APFBC AES Greenidge Units 3 and 4 with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: Summary Key Features of Greenidge APFBC Repowering Project Operating Conditions APFBC Repowered AES Greenidge Unit 4 Process Decisions Gas Turbine Environmental and Licensing Click on picture to enlarge Summary Units 3 and 4 are the last steam turbines installed at AES Greenidge steam power plant. These units are the focus of this DOE APFBC repowering evaluation. Information relating to the station and studies includes the following: Space is available to the west, and in the power house. Greenidge Unit 4, on left, is the main focus. It is a 106.3 MW unit built in 1953.

14

Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Reactivity and Capacity of Oxygen Carriers for the Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov February 2013 This...

15

Advanced clean combustion technology in Shanxi province  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass energy resources in China are first described, along with biomass gasification R & D now underway. In Shanxi province biomass and other regenerative energy is relatively little used but coal resources are large. Hence Shanxi is mainly developing clean coal technology to meet its economic and environmental protection requirements. Clean combustion research at Taiyuan University of Technology includes cofiring of coal and RDF in FBC, gas purification and adsorption, fundamentals of plasma-aided coal pyrolysis and gasification and coal derived liquid fuels from synthesis gas. 5 refs.

Xie, K.-C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced Combustion Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Clean Coal » Advanced Combustion Science & Innovation » Clean Coal » Advanced Combustion Technologies Advanced Combustion Technologies Joe Yip, a researcher at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, uses laser-based Rayleigh light scattering to measure flame density and speed over a flat flame burner. Oxyfuel combustion, using oxygen in place of air with diluents such as steam or carbon dioxide, can reduce pollutant emissions in advanced power cycles using gas turbines. Photo courtesy of NETL Multimedia. Joe Yip, a researcher at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, uses laser-based Rayleigh light scattering to measure flame density and speed over a flat flame burner. Oxyfuel combustion, using oxygen in place of air with diluents such as steam or carbon dioxide, can reduce pollutant

17

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High Efficiency Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High Efficiency Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle...

18

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows...

19

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the development trends in post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) scouted carbon capture technologies worldwide and applied filtering criteria to identify those best suited for EPRI support. Those criteria included a technology developer's interest in working with EPRI, the potential for EPRI investment to provide significant advancement, the technology's suitability for broad application, and its potential ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is one of the most promising and cost-effective near- to mid-term approaches to increasing highway vehicles' fuel economy. The Vehicle Technologies Office's research and development activities address critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles. This technology has great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum consumption, resulting in greater economic, environmental, and energy security. Already offering outstanding drivability and reliability to over 230 million passenger vehicles, internal combustion engines have the potential to become substantially more efficient. Initial results from laboratory engine tests indicate that passenger vehicle fuel economy can be improved by more than up to 50 percent, and some vehicle simulation models estimate potential improvements of up to 75 percent. Advanced combustion engines can utilize renewable fuels, and when combined with hybrid electric powertrains could have even further reductions in fuel consumption. As the EIA reference case forecasts that by 2035, more than 99 percent of light- and heavy-duty vehicles sold will still have internal combustion engines, the potential fuel savings is tremendous.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Technology FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP

22

Application of Regenerative Combustion Technology on Reheating Furnace in PISCO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key features of the regenerative combustion technology were introduced and its application in the reheating furnace of Rail & Beam plant of PISCOPanzhihua Iron & Steel Co.was discussedComparedwith the traditional combustion technologythe ... Keywords: Regenerative Style, Combustion Technology, Reheating Furnace, Energy Conservation

Chen Yong; Pan Hong; Xue Nianfu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application and Practice of Regenerative Combustion Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regenerative Combustion burning alternative to traditional flow control system is ... that regenerative combustion have many advantage in energy conservation...

24

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows technicians observing operation at the monitoring station and making subsequent fine adjustments on combustion system controls Technical staff are making boiler adjustments with the control and monitoring system. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. Technology Description A novel combustion control system, along with gas sensors, sets the opening of fuel and air inlets based on flue-gas concentrations. Continuous feedback from measurements of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide concentrations enable the control system

25

Measurement Technology for Benchmark Spray Combustion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benchmark Spray Combustion Database. ... A1, uncertainty budget for the fuel flow rate. A2, uncertainty budget for the combustion air flow rate. ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name State Grid...

27

State of Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combustion technology has been developed in the last decade that permits the burning of low quality coal, lignite and other fuels, while maintaining stack emissions within State and Federal EPA limits. Low quality fuels can be burned directly in fluidized beds while taking advantage of low furnace temperatures and chemical activity within the bed to limit SO2 and NOx emissions, thereby eliminating the need for stack gas scrubbing equipment. The excellent heat transfer characteristics of the fluidized beds also result in a reduction of total heat transfer surface requirements, thus reducing the size and cost of steam generators. Tests on beds operating at pressures of one to ten atmospheres, at temperatures as high as 1600oF, and with gas velocities in the vicinity of four to twelve feet per second, have proven the concept. Early history of this technology is traced, and the progress that has been made in the development of fluidized bed combustion boilers, as well as work currently underway, in the United States and overseas, is reviewed. Details on the fluidized bed boiler installations at Alexandria, Virginia (5,000 lbs/hr), Georgetown University (100,000 lbs/hr), and Rivesville, West Virginia (300,000 Ibs/hr) are presented, and test results are discussed. Potential application of fluidized bed boilers in industrial plants using lignite and lignite refuse is examined. The impact of proposed new DOE and EPA regulations on solid fuels burning is also examined.

Pope, M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FY 2008 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMBUSTION COMBUSTION ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES annual progress report 2008 V e h i c l e T e c h n o l o g i e s P r o g r a m U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2008 Progress rePort For AdvAnced combustion engine technologies Energy Efficiency

29

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology exchange workshop  

SciTech Connect

The pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology exchange workshop was held June 5 and 6, 1979, at The Meadowlands Hilton Hotel, Secaucus, New Jersey. Eleven papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. The papers include reviews of the US DOE and EPRI programs in this area and papers by Swedish, West German, British and American organizations. The British papers concern the joint program of the USA, UK and FRG at Leatherhead. The key factor in several papers is the use of fluidized bed combustors, gas turbines, and steam turbines in combined-cycle power plants. One paper examines several combined-cycle alternatives. (LTN)

,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion and Emission Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and fuel formulation to arrive at the most cost-effective approach to optimizing advanced combustion engine efficiency and performance while reducing emissions to near-zero levels....

31

Program on Technology Innovation: Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive overview of current post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies and potential directions for future development.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Numerical Simulation Of Utility Boilers With Advanced Combustion Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of a pulverized coal flame and a coal-fired utility boiler with advanced combustion technologies. A combustion model based on an extended Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) combined with finite rate chemistry is described and some applications are shown. This model can be regarded as an extension of the previously used Eddy Breakup model (EBU) where infinite fast chemistry is assumed. It is part of a 3D-prediction code for quasi-stationary turbulent reacting flows which is based on a conservative finite-volume solution procedure. Equations are solved for the conservation of mass, momentum and scalar quantities. A domain decomposition method is used to introduce locally refined grids. Validation and comparison of both combustion models are made by comparison with measurement data of a swirled flame with air staging in a semi-industrial pulverized coal combustion facility. The application to three-dimensional combustion systems is demonstrated by the simulati...

H. C. Magel; R. Schneider; B. Risio; U. Schnell; K. R. G. Hein

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document presents an overview of combustion as a waste management strategy in relation to the development of material-specific emission factors for EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM). Included are estimates of the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from combustion of most of the materials considered in WARM and several categories of mixed waste. 1. A SUMMARY OF THE GHG IMPLICATIONS OF COMBUSTION Combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) results in emissions of CO 2 and N2O. Note that CO2 from combustion of biomass (such as paper products and yard trimmings) is not counted because it is biogenic (as explained in the Introduction & Overview chapter). WARM estimates emissions from combustion of MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. WARM does not consider any recovery of materials from the MSW stream that may occur before MSW is delivered to the combustor. WTE facilities can be divided into three categories: (1) mass burn, (2) modular and (3) refusederived fuel (RDF). A mass burn facility generates electricity and/or steam from the combustion of

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Assessment of Gas Turbine Combustion Dynamics Monitoring Technologies: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines commercially available combustion dynamics monitoring systems (CDMS) and monitoring centers for use on gas turbine engines, specifically 7FA, 501F/5000F/8000H engines. The report provides a current review of combustion monitoring issues and methods, details of operation and available features for various CDMS, including, interviews with equipment suppliers and monitoring center providers, and end-user interviews.BackgroundGas turbines are ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

36

Assessment of Alternative Post-Combustion NOx Controls Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As emission control requirements continually become stricter, power producers need new, efficient, cost-effective approaches to reduce NOx and other atmospheric pollutants. This report focuses on alternative emerging and commercial post-combustion NOx controls applications other than the industry standard selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Assessment of Emerging Combustion Turbine Capacity Enhancement Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the potential for exploiting emerging capacity enhancement technologies to deal with the new challenges to combustion turbine (CT) operators in the upcoming decade. It also looked at ways of optimizing maintenance intervals to minimize the increased cost of repair and replacement of parts that goes along with high-efficiency CTs.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS PRE-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES POST-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS POST-COMBUSTION SORBENTS POST-COMBUSTION MEMBRANES OXY-COMBUSTION OXYGEN PRODUCTION CHEMICAL LOOPING ADVANCED COMPRESSION R&D COLLABORATIONS B-1 APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS APPENDIX B: CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNOLOGY SHEETS NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY PRE-COMBUSTION SOLVENTS B-6 SRI International - CO 2 Capture Using AC-ABC Processt B-7 PRE-COMBUSTION SORBENTS B-14 TDA Research - CO 2 Capture for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems B-15 URS Group - Sorbent Development for WGS B-18 Air Products and Chemicals - Advanced Acid Gas Separation B-24 Ohio State University-Department of Chemical Engineering - Calcium Looping for Hydrogen Production B-33

39

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Technology Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Herbert E. andrus, Jr. Principal Investigator ALSTOM Power 2000 Day Hill Rd. Windsor, CT 06095 860-285-4770 herbert.e.andrus@power.alstom.com Hybrid Combustion-GasifiCation CHemiCal loopinG Coal power teCHnoloGy development Description Gasification technologies can provide a stable, affordable energy supply for the nation, while also providing high efficiencies and near zero pollutants. With coal

40

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0009484 Alstom is advancing the development of Limestone Chemical Looping Combustion (LCL-C(tm)) technology. Chemical looping has no direct contact between air and fuel. The looping process usually utilizes oxygen from a metal carrier, but in this case, limestone is used. Economic evaluations will be made of four LCL-C plant configurations. The base configuration plant has already been completed and will be updated from previous reports. A second case will compare the effects of designing the reducer reactor using CFB sizing standards. A third case will investigate the effects of using a pressurized reducer reactor. Pressurizing the reducer reduces the reactor size and reduces the amount of compression required for the CO2 outlet gas stream. A fourth case will investigate the use of an advanced ultra-supercritical (USC) steam cycle. The advanced USC steam cycle should increase overall plant efficiency and lower the cost of electricity. Mass and energy balances will be done for each case. The four LCL-CTM cases will be compared against a supercritical pulverized coal-fired plant without CO2 capture.

42

Application of polymer membrane technology in coal combustion processes  

SciTech Connect

The energy efficiency and the environmental consequences of typical coal upgrading processes, such as combustion, depend to a large extent on the degree of gas separation, recovery, and recycle. Among the available methods used in chemical industry for a variety of gas separation tasks, the technology of polymer membranes offers several advantages such as low size, simplicity of operation and maintenance, compatibility, and use with a diversity of fuel sources. To examine the impact of membrane separation on coal upgrading processes, the Aspen Plus simulation software was used, in combination with developed membrane mathematical models. Energy analysis in coal combustion processes, where the main scope is CO{sub 2} removal, showed that very promising results can be attained. It is estimated that 95% of the emitted CO{sub 2} can be captured with a moderately low energy penalty (10%). This penalty can be further decreased if higher selectivity and/or permeability polymers can be developed.

Kaldis, S.P.; Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new particulate filtration technologies. Major tasks during this period of the funded project's timeframe included: (1) Conducting pretests on a laboratory-scale simulated FBC system; (2) Completing detailed design of the bench-scale CFBC system; (3) Contracting potential bidders to fabricate of the component parts of CFBC system; (4) Assembling CFBC parts and integrating system; (5) Resolving problems identified during pretests; (6) Testing with available Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and co-firing of PRB coal with first wood pallet and then chicken wastes; and (7) Tuning of CFBC load. Following construction system and start-up of this 0.6 MW CFBC system, a variety of combustion tests using a wide range of fuels (high-sulfur coals, low-rank coals, MSW, agricultural waste, and RDF) under varying conditions were performed to analyze and monitor air pollutant emissions. Data for atmospheric pollutants and the methodologies required to reduce pollutant emissions were provided. Integration with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) slipstream unit did mimic the effect of flue gas composition, including trace metals, on the performance of the SCR catalyst to be investigated. In addition, the following activities were also conducted: (1) Developed advanced mercury oxidant and adsorption additives; (2) Performed laboratory-scale tests on oxygen-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion; and (3) Conducted statistical analysis of mercury emissions in a full-scale CFBC system.

Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

NETL: Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tool Conducting CFD-aided design of a novel staged combustion vessel and radiative heat exchanger Performing lab-scale experiments of staged combustion without flue gas...

45

Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J Abstract Combustion system development in power generation is discussed ranging from the pre-environmental era in which the objectives were complete combustion with a minimum of excess air and the capability

Kammen, Daniel M.

46

Ultra-Clean Low Swirl Combustion : Technologies : From the Lab to the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-Clean Low Swirl Combustion Ultra-Clean Low Swirl Combustion From the Lab to the Marketplace Ten Years Later, Energy Efficient Technologies from Research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Lab logo (left) with six rows of gray dots transitioning to a line art drawing of a cityscape and residential houses. Ultra-Clean Low Swirl Combustion Combustion provides 83% of the energy consumed in the U.S. For the past three decades the reduction of harmful pollutants from combustion systems has been the major driver of combustion technology development. In 1991, Robert Cheng, a Berkeley Lab scientist, conceived a combustion method that emits a very low level of pollutants. His low swirl combustion method operates on a new basic principle that can be broadly applied to heat and

47

DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants June 11, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The projects, totaling nearly $14.4 million, will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Pre-combustion processes convert fossil fuels into a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and CO2 prior to combustion. The CO2 is then separated and the

48

Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a market assessment of gasification and direct combustion technologies that use wood and agricultural resources to generate heat, power, or combined heat and power (CHP) for small- to medium-scale applications. It contains a brief overview of wood and agricultural resources in the U.S.; a description and discussion of gasification and combustion conversion technologies that utilize solid biomass to generate heat, power, and CHP; an assessment of the commercial status of gasification and combustion technologies; a summary of gasification and combustion system economics; a discussion of the market potential for small- to medium-scale gasification and combustion systems; and an inventory of direct combustion system suppliers and gasification technology companies. The report indicates that while direct combustion and close-coupled gasification boiler systems used to generate heat, power, or CHP are commercially available from a number of manufacturers, two-stage gasification systems are largely in development, with a number of technologies currently in demonstration. The report also cites the need for a searchable, comprehensive database of operating combustion and gasification systems that generate heat, power, or CHP built in the U.S., as well as a national assessment of the market potential for the systems.

Peterson, D.; Haase, S.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background Development of innovative environmental control technologies is key to maintaining coal as an affordable and environmentally sound energy source. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies, specifically post-combustion CO 2 capture, for coal- fired power plants is a major focus area in addressing climate change concerns. Post-

50

Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal  

SciTech Connect

The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of <$30,000/lb of Hg removed. WRI has teamed with Etaa Energy, Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (FWNA), and Washington Division of URS (WD-URS), and with project co-sponsors including Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC), Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU), North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), Detroit Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods. As such, further testing, demonstration and economic analysis as described in the Phase II effort is warranted and should be pursued.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the quarter April 1--June 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, the final specifications for the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the CFB Combustor Building have been delivered to the architect, and invitations for construction bids for the two tasks have been released. Second, the component parts of the CFBC system have been designed after the design work for assembly parts of the CFBC system was completed. Third, the literature pertaining to Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDD) and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDF) released during the incineration of solid waste, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) have been reviewed, and an experimental plan for fundamental research of MSW incineration on a simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) facility has been prepared. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

Wei-Ping Pan, Kunlei Liu; John T. Riley

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Project No.: DE-FE0009702 Washington University in St. Louis is developing a unique pressurized system to capture carbon from coal-fired power plants that incorporates a fuel-staged combustion approach. By staging the combustion, the temperature and heat transfer can be controlled. The potential benefits of the process are: higher efficiency, reduced process gas volume, increased radiative heat transfer, reduced oxygen demands, reduced capital equipment costs, increased CO2 purity entering the carbon compression and purification unit, and reduced auxiliary power demands. These benefits are expected to yield a lower cost of electricity than alternative approaches to pressurized oxy-combustion.

53

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EstablishmEnt EstablishmEnt of an EnvironmEntal Control tEChnology laboratory with a CirCulating fluidizEd-bEd Combustion systEm Description In response to President Bush's Clear Skies Initiative in 2002-a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and mercury (Hg) from power plants-the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified four high- priority research needs for controlling emissions from fossil-fueled power plants: multipollutant control, improved sorbents and catalysts, mercury monitoring and capture, and an improved understanding of the underlying combustion chemistry.

54

LBNL's Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts LBNL's Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation Speaker(s): Robert Cheng Date: February 2, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg....

55

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - NOx Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Options and Integration Control Options and Integration Reaction Engineering International (REI) is optimizing the performance of, and reduce the technical risks associated with the combined application of low-NOx firing systems (LNFS) and post combustion controls through modeling, bench-scale testing, and field verification. Teaming with REI are the University of Utah and Brown University. During this two-year effort, REI will assess real-time monitoring equipment to evaluate waterwall wastage, soot formation, and burner stoichiometry, demonstrate analysis techniques to improve LNFS in combination with reburning/SNCR, assess selective catalytic reduction catalyst life, and develop UBC/fly ash separation processes. The REI program will be applicable to coal-fired boilers currently in use in the United States, including corner-, wall-, turbo-, and cyclone-fired units. However, the primary target of the research will be cyclone boilers, which are high NOx producing units and represent about 20% of the U.S. generating capacity. The results will also be applicable to all U.S. coals. The research will be divided into four key components:

56

Engine Combustion & Efficiency - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Combustion & Efficiency Engine Combustion & Efficiency ORNL currently and historically supports the U.S. DOE on multi-cylinder and vehicle applications of diesel combustion, lean burn gasoline combustion, and low temperature combustion processes, and performs principal research on efficiency enabling technologies including emission controls, thermal energy recovery, and bio-renewable fuels. Research areas span from fundamental concepts to engine/vehicle integration and demonstration with a particular emphasis on the following areas: Thermodynamics for identifying and characterizing efficiency opportunities for engine-systems as well as the development of non-conventional combustion concepts for reducing fundamental combustion losses. Nonlinear sciences for improving the physical understanding and

57

Assessment of Emerging Low-Emissions Technologies for Combustion-Based Distributed Resource Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the performance and cost of conventional and emerging emission control technologies for combustion-based distributed resource generators (combustion turbines, microturbines, and reciprocating engines). The performance is measured against the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) small generator certification standards for 2007. The costs are provided as capital cost and cost of electricity for emission control. The report also provides information on alternative fuel conside...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

60

Health Effects from Advanced Combustion and Fuel Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This document requires a separate file for the figures. It is for DOE's Office of Vehicle Technologies Annual Report

Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prediction of Combustion Stability and Flashback in Turbines with High-Hydrogen Fuel - Georgia Institute of Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prediction of Combustion Stability Prediction of Combustion Stability and Flashback in Turbines with High- Hydrogen Fuel-Georgia Institute of Technology Background Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), in collaboration with Pennsylvania State University and gas turbine manufacturers, is conducting research to improve the state-of-the-art in understanding and modeling combustion instabilities, one of the most critical problems associated with burning high-hydrogen content (HHC) fuels in

62

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Technology for Retrofitting Coal-Fired Boilers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost effeCtive Cost effeCtive oxy-Combustion teChnology for retrofitting Coal-fireD boilers Background Electric power generation from fossil fuels represents one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Various technologies and concepts are being investigated as means to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. The concept of pulverized coal (PC) oxy-combustion is one potential economical solution, whereby coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled flue gas. In this manner, the flue gas is composed primarily of CO 2 and H 2 O, so that a concentrated stream of CO 2 is produced by simply condensing the water in the exhaust stream. An advantage of

64

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS ABSTRACf CRAIG A series, injection of up to 15% (HHV basis) natural gas reduced NOx by 50-70% while maintain ing, Illinois DAVID G. LINZ Gas Research Institute Chicago, Illinois ducing NOx emISSIons from municipal solid

Columbia University

65

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS Discussion by CRAIG's increased turbulent mixing is on the CO profile and what the incremental NOx reduction experienced was from that this alone would contribute to a significant reduction in the NO", generated. The authors are careful

Columbia University

66

Development and evaluation of coal/water mixture combustion technology. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective was to advance the technology for the preparation, storage, handling and combustion of highly-loaded coal/water mixtures. A systematic program to prepare and experimentally evaluate coal/water mixtures was conducted to develop mixtures which (1) burn efficiently using combustion chambers and burners designed for oil, (2) can be provided at a cost less than that of No. 6 oil, and (3) can be easily transported and stored. The program consisted of three principal tasks. The first was a literature survey relevant to coal/water mixture technology. The second involved slurry preparation and evaluation of rheological and stability properties, and processing techniques. The third consisted of combustion tests to characterize equipment and slurry parameters. The first task comprised a complete search of the literature, results of which are tabulated in Appendix A. Task 2 was involved with the evaluation of composition and process variables on slurry rheology and stability. Three bituminous coals, representing a range of values of volatile content, ash content, and hardness were used in the slurries. Task 3 was concerned with the combustion behavior of coal/water slurry. The studies involved first upgrading of an experimental furnace facility, which was used to burn slurry fuels, with emphasis on studying the effect on combustion of slurry properties such as viscosity and particle size, and the effect of equipment parameters such as secondary air preheat and atomization.

Scheffee, R.S.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; Skolnik, E.G.; McHale, E.T.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal's sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E's technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project, Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE entered into a cooperative agreement with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) under which DOE proposes to provide cost-shared funding to design, construct, and operate an Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project to repower an existing steam turbine generator set at the Springfield (Illinois) City Water, Light and Power (CWL&P) Lakeside Generating Station, while capturing 90% of the coal`s sulfur and producing elemental sulfur as a salable by-product. The proposed demonstration would help determine the technical and economic feasibility of the proposed IGCC technology on a scale that would allow the utility industry to assess its applicability for repowering other coal-burning power plants. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE in compliance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The sources of information for this EA include the following: C-E`s technical proposal for the project submitted to DOE in response to the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Program Opportunity Notice (PON); discussions with C-E and CWL&P staff; the volume of environmental information for the project and its supplements provided by C-E; and a site visit to the proposed project site.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessment of Post-Combustion Capture Technology Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of technologies and processes that can be used to capture carbon dioxide from the flue gas of conventional coal and natural-gas-fired power plants. It summarizes the findings from a continuing EPRI investigation into emerging concepts, tests, demonstrations, and field trials of technologies in the areas of absorption, adsorption, membrane separation, cold separation, and biofixation. Each of these capture pathways are described in the report, and examples are provided for...

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods. As such, further testing, demonstration and economic analysis as described in the Phase II effort is warranted and should be pursued.

Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Multi-objective design and optimization of district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present context of finding ways to decrease CO2 emissions linked with human activity, district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies are likely (more)

Weber, Cline Isabelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity produced from hydrogen in fuel cells can be highly efficient relative to competing technologies and has the potential to be virtually pollution free. Thus, fuel cells may become an ideal solution to this nation's energy needs if one has a satisfactory process for producing hydrogen from available energy resources such as coal, and low-cost alternative feedstocks such as biomass. GE EER is developing an innovative fuel-flexible advanced gasification-combustion (AGC) technology for production of hydrogen for fuel cells or combustion turbines, and a separate stream of sequestration-ready CO2. The AGC module can be integrated into a number of Vision- 21 power systems. It offers increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems and near-zero pollution. The R&D on the AGC technology is being conducted under a Vision-21 award from the U.S. DOE NETL with co-funding from GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The AGC technology converts coal and air into three separate streams of pure hydrogen, sequestration-ready CO2, and high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The three-year program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. Process and kinetic modeling studies as well as an economic assessment will also be performed. This paper provides an overview of the program and its objectives, and discusses first-year R&D activities, including design of experimental facilities and results from initial tests and modeling studies. In particular, the paper describes the design of the bench-scale facility and initial process modeling data. In addition, a process flow diagram is shown for a complete plant incorporating the AGC module with other Vision-21 plant components to maximize hydrogen production and process efficiency.

Rizeq, George; West, Janice; Frydman, Arnaldo; Subia, Raul; Kumar, Ravi; Zamansky, Vladimir (GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation); Das, Kamalendu (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

Markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the potential of using US-developed advanced coal technologies (ACTs) for small combustors in foreign markets; in particular, the market potentials of the member countries of the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) were determined. First, the United States and those OECD countries with very low energy demands were eliminated. The remaining 15 countries were characterized on the basis of eight factors that would influence their decision to use US ACTs: energy plan and situation, dependence on oil and gas imports, experience with coal, residential/commercial energy demand, industrial energy demand, trade relationship with the United States, level of domestic competition with US ACT manufacturers, and environmental pressure to use advanced technology. Each country was rated high, medium-high, low-medium, or low on each factor, based on statistical and other data. The ratings were then used to group the countries in terms of their relative market potential (good, good but with impediments, or limited). The best potential markets appear to be Spain, Italy, turkey, Greece, and Canada. 25 refs., 1 fig., 37 tabs.

Placet, M.; Kenkeremath, L.D.; Streets, D.G.; Dials, G.E.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NETL: Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0000465 Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. URS and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are investigating a dry sorbent process configured to combine the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for coal gasification systems. A combination of process simulation modeling and sorbent molecular and thermodynamic analyses will be performed to predict optimal sorbent properties and identify optimal operating temperature and pressure ranges

76

Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

190 190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-46190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase Prepared under Task No. IGST.9034 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

77

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility were completed. The riser, primary cyclone and secondary cyclone of Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Combustor have been erected. Second, the Mercury Control Workshop and the Grand Opening of Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET) were successfully held on February 22 and 23, 2006, respectively. Third, effects of hydrogen chlorine (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) on mercury oxidation were studied in a drop tube reactor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; Songgeng Li

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Program on Technology Innovation: Combustion Exhaust Gas Monitoring with Laser Absorption Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In current plant practice, the operator of a coal-fired boiler must typically rely on a limited number of point measurements of exhaust-gas oxygen and nitric oxides (NOX) to support combustion and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) control efforts with the goal of meeting emissions reduction mandates. As a possible alternative, tunable diode laser technology offers the potential for enabling a much richer set of measurements to be obtained using in situ, species-specific laser absorption sensors. This t...

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Oxy-Combustion Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., (AP) has reviewed oxy-combustion, a methodology to burn coal using oxygen rather than air to aid in removing carbon by producing a more concentrated stream of carbon dioxide (CO2) for remediation, which reduces the cost and energy required to do so. This report discusses the ion transport membrane (ITM), a technology developed by AP under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

Oxy-fuel Combustion and Integrated Pollutant Removal as Retrofit Technologies for Removing CO2 from Coal Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One third of the US installed capacity is coal-fired, producing 49.7% of net electric generation in 20051. Any approach to curbing CO2 production must consider the installed capacity and provide a mechanism for preserving this resource while meeting CO2 reduction goals. One promising approach to both new generation and retrofit is oxy-fuel combustion. Using oxygen instead of air as the oxidizer in a boiler provides a concentrated CO2 combustion product for processing into a sequestration-ready fluid.... Post-combustion carbon capture and oxy-fuel combustion paired with a compression capture technology such as IPR are both candidates for retrofitting pc combustion plants to meet carbon emission limits. This paper will focus on oxy-fuel combustion as applied to existing coal power plants.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.B.; Summers, C.A.; Gerdemann, S.J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. The effort in this quarter has concentrated on installing the CFBC Facility and for conducting cold fluidization operations tests in the CFBC facility. The assembly of the ash recirculation pipe duct from the cyclones back to the bed area of the combustor, including the upper and lower loop seals was completed. The electric bed pre-heater was installed to heat the fluidizing air as it enters the wind box. The induced draft fan along with its machine base and power supply was received and installed. The flue gas duct from secondary cyclone outlet to induced draft fan inlet was received and installed, as well as the induced fan flue gas discharge duct. Pressure testing from the forced draft fan to the outlet of the induced fan was completed. In related research a pilot-scale halogen addition test was conducted in the empty slipstream reactor (without (Selective Catalytic Reduction) SCR catalyst loading) and the SCR slipstream reactor with two commercial SCR catalysts. The greatest benefits of conducting slipstream tests can be flexible control and isolation of specific factors. This facility is currently used in full-scale utility and will be combined into 0.6MW CFBC in the future. This work attempts to first investigate performance of the SCR catalyst in the flue gas atmosphere when burning Powder River Basin (PRB), including the impact of PRB coal flue gas composition on the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) under SCR conditions. Secondly, the impacts of hydrogen halogens (Hydrogen fluoride (HF), Hydrogen chloride (HCl), Hydrogen Bromide (HBr) and Hydrogen Iodine (HI)) on Hg(0) oxidation and their mechanisms can be explored.

Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Code Thrust 1400 Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering (including Aerodynamics, Aerospace Engineering, and Space Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (including Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technologies, Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, Gerontology, Health and Medical Administrative Services, Other Health Professions and Related Services, Environmental health, Geotechnical, Hydraulic, Hydrologic, Sanitary, Structural, and Transportation) 1404

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

84

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Reports: 2004 Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Markets Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine plant owners, operators, and project developers. EPRI's comprehensive Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle (CT/CC) program provides a range of tools, methodologies, and approaches to help owner/operators and project developers face these challenges and prosper in this evolving marketplace. Access to this resource base in a timely, concise manner is key to delivering benefits in the new e...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2003: Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Markets Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deregulation of power generation markets worldwide presents both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine plant owners, operators, and project developers. EPRI's comprehensive Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle (CT/CC) program provides a range of tools, methodologies, and approaches to help owner/operators and project developers face these challenges and prosper in this evolving marketplace. Access to this resource base in a timely, concise manner is key to delivering benefits in t...

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Amine-Based, Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns over global warming, technologies need to be developed that capture and store the CO2 released by fossil- fueled power plants. A study carried out in 2000 by Parsons and co-funded by the US-DOE and EPRI investigated the thermal and economic performance of supercritical pulverized coal (PC) combustion, E-Gas integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and natural gas combined cycle power plants with and without CO2 removal. The general conclusion was that for power plants with C...

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

CYCLE-BY-CYCLE COMBUSTION VARIATIONS IN SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES Engineering Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-8088 USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CYCLE-BY-CYCLE COMBUSTION VARIATIONS IN SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES C.S. DAW Engineering Technology-2053 USA ABSTRACT Under constant nominal operating conditions, internal combustion engines can exhibit sub- stantial variation in combustion efficiency from one cycle to the next. Previous researchers have attempted

Tennessee, University of

89

Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

Atreya, Arvind

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Near-Zero NOx Combustion Technology for ATS Mercury 50 Gas Turbine  

SciTech Connect

A project to demonstrate a near-zero NOx, catalytic combustion technology for natural gas-fired, industrial gas turbines is described. In a cooperative effort between Solar Turbines Incorporated and Precision Combustion Incorporated (PCI), proof-of-concept rig testing of PCI's fuel-rich catalytic combustion technology has been completed successfully. The primary technical goal of the project was to demonstrate NOx and CO emissions below 5ppm and 10 ppm, respectively, (corrected to 15% O{sub 2}) at realistic gas turbine operating conditions. The program consisted of two tasks. In the first task, a single prototype RCL{trademark} (Rich Catalytic Lean Burn) module was demonstrated at Taurus 70 (7.5 Mw) operating conditions (1.6 MPa, 16 atm) in a test rig. For a Taurus 70 engine, eight to twelve RCL modules will be required, depending on the final system design. In the second task, four modules of a similar design were adapted to a Saturn engine (1 Mw) test rig (600 kPa, 6 atm) to demonstrate gas turbine light-off and operation with an RCL combustion system. This project was initially focused on combustion technology for the Mercury 50 engine. However, early in the program, the Taurus 70 replaced the Mercury. This substitution was motivated by the larger commercial market for an ultra-low NOx Taurus 70 in the near-term. Rig tests using a single prototype RCL module at Taurus 70 conditions achieved NOx emissions as low as 0.75 ppm. A combustor turndown of approximately 110C (200F) was achieved with NOx and CO emissions below 3 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Catalyst light-off occurred at an inlet temperature of 310C (590F). Once lit the module remained active at inlet air temperatures as low as 204C (400F). Combustor pressure oscillations were acceptably low during module testing. Single module rig tests were also conducted with the Taurus 70 module reconfigured with a central pilot fuel injector. Such a pilot will be required in a commercial RCL system for turbine light-off and transient operation. At and near simulated full load engine conditions, the pilot operated at low pilot fueling rates without degrading overall system emissions. In the second project task, a set of four Taurus 70 modules was tested in an existing Saturn engine rig. The combustion system allowed smooth engine startup and load variation. At steady state conditions (between 82% and 89.7% engine speed; 32% and 61% load), NOx and CO emissions were below 3ppm and 10ppm, respectively. Rig limitations unrelated to the RCL technology prevented low emissions operation outside of this speed range. Combustor pressure oscillations were low, below 0.25 % (peak-to-peak) of the mean combustor pressure.

Kenneth Smith

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry  

SciTech Connect

Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6 percentage points higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program has determined the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and investigated operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrated experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the fifteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2004 and ending June 30, 2004. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale testing, kinetic modeling, program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; K. Mondal; L. Stonawski; Krzysztof Piotrowski; T. Szymanski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6 percentage points higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the fourteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting January 1, 2004 and ending March 31, 2004. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale shakedown and performance testing, program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE Global Research (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE Global Research, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on ASPEN Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6% higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL under Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2003 and ending December 31, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, pilot-scale demonstration and program management and technology transfer.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Krzysztof Piotrowski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered in this presentation include: the continued importance of coal; related materials challenges; combining oxy-combustion & A-USC steam; and casting large superalloy turbine components.

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2002: Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine plant owners, operators, and project developers. EPRI's comprehensive CT/CC program provides a range of tools, methodologies, and approaches to help owner/operators and project developers face these challenges and prosper in this evolving marketplace. Access to this resource base in a timely manner is key to delivering benefits in the new electricity marketplace. The EPRI "CT Experien...

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

SciTech Connect

This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is nearly completed. The erection of the CFBC facility is expected to start in the second week of February, 2006. Second, effect of flue gas components on mercury oxidation was investigated in a drop tube reactor. As a first step, experiment for mercury oxidation by chlorine was investigated. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

Wei-Ping Pan; Songgeng Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Supplemental Comprehensive Report to Congress - Clean Coal Technology Program. Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) in February 1987 submitted a Comprehensive Report to Congress for a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project entitled {open_quotes}Tidd PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} In that document, DOE reported to Congress that the Government share of project costs would be $60,200,000 and that the participant agreed to absorb any cost overruns, even though the public law contained provisions which would allow DOE to share in project cost growths up to 25 percent of the original financial assistance. This Supplemental Report is being submitted because DOE now intends to increase its contribution to the project by approximately 11 percent to facilitate extension of the original 3-year operating period by one additional year. DOE`s overall percentage cost share resulting from this extension will not exceed DOE`s overall percentage cost share in the original agreement.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on Aspen Plus process modeling, has an estimated process efficiency of 6% higher than IGCC with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The current R&D program will determine the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through pilot-scale testing, and will investigate operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates experimental testing, modeling and economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the third annual technical progress report for the UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending September 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, bench-scale experimental testing, process modeling, pilot-scale system design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Photo of Spray Combustion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Spray Combustion Chamber. NIST, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory, ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Asia. [Including external environmental costs  

SciTech Connect

The United States is well positioned to play an expanding role in meeting the energy technology demands of the Asian Pacific Basin, including Indonesia, Thailand, and the Republic of China (ROC-Taiwan). The US Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program provides a proving ground for innovative coal-related technologies that can be applied domestically and abroad. These innovative US CCTs are expected to satisfy increasingly stringent environmental requirements while substantially improving power generation efficiencies. They should also provide distinct advantages over conventional pulverized coal-fired combustors. Finally, they are expected to be competitive with other energy options currently being considered in the region. This paper presents potential technology scenarios for Indonesia, Thailand, and the ROC-Taiwan and considers an environmental cost-benefit approach employing a newly developed method of applying environmental externalities. Results suggest that the economic benefits from increased emission control can indeed be quantified and used in cost-benefit comparisons, and that US CCTs can be very cost effective in reducing emissions.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE-EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE-EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R and D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the 1st quarterly progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2000 and ending December 31, 2000. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of initial program activities covering program management and preliminary progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and process/kinetic modeling. More over, the report presents and discusses preliminary results particularly form the bench-scale design and process modeling efforts including a process flow diagram that incorporates the AGC module with other vision-21 plant components with the objective of maximizing H{sub 2} production and process efficiency.

George Rizeq; Ravi Kumar; Janice West; Vitali Lissianski; Neil Widmer; Vladimir Zamansky

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

System Issues and Tradeoffs Associated with Syngas Production and Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

future technologies, including oxy-fuel, chemical looping, fuel cells, and hybrids. Goals to improve system efficiencies, further reduce NOx emissions, and provide options for CO2 sequestration require advancements in many aspects of IGCC plants, including the combustion system. Areas for improvements in combustion technology that could minimize these tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance are discussed.

Kent H. Casleton; Ronald W. Breault; George A. Richards

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling with best-case scenario assumptions, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2003 and ending June 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2001 and ending June 30, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and engineering studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Vladimir Zamansky; Linda Denton; Hana Loreth; Tomasz Wiltowski

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending September 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2002 and ending June 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab-/bench-scale experimental testing and pilot-scale design.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Edwin Hippo; Tomasz Wiltowski

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the fifth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending December 31, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design, and economic studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sandia Combustion Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.) [eds.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Mid-Infrared Lasers for Combustion Gas Sensing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) are important trace species in combustion exhaust, with absorption spectrum features that overlap with the absorption by water vaporan interference that increases with gas temperature. This situation is exacerbated by the need to monitor ppm levels of CO and NO in combustion product gases, which typically have in excess of 10% water. Therefore, the development of sensitive sensors for absorption detection of CO and NO in combustion gases requires evaluation of t...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Computational Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

BERLIN, G.T.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of a Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent-Based Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO 2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants Background Currently available commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from flue gas streams are costly and energy intensive. RTI International is heading a research team to continue development and scale-up of an innovative process for CO 2 capture that has significant potential to be less expensive and less energy intensive than conventional technologies. The "Dry Carbonate Process" utilizes a dry,

116

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research is developing an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on the Phase I program started in October 2000, and work on the Phase II effort started in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than IGCC with conventional CO2 separation. The Phase I R&D program established the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing and investigated operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The Phase I effort integrated experimental testing, modeling and preliminary economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. The Phase II effort will focus on three high-risk areas: economics, sorbent attrition and lifetime, and product gas quality for turbines. The economic analysis will include estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs will be benchmarked with IGCC polygen costs for plants of similar size. Sorbent attrition and lifetime will be addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor sorbent performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas from the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) will be evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. This is the eighteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the Phase II period starting July 01, 2005 and ending September 30, 2005. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including process modeling, scale-up and economic analysis.

George Rizeq; Parag Kulkarni; Wei Wei; Arnaldo Frydman; Thomas McNulty; Roger Shisler

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for DE-FC26-07NT43091 ??Ionic Liquids: Breakthrough Absorption Technology for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture?. A detailed summary is provided of the ionic liquid (IL) discovery process, synthesis and testing results, process / systems modeling, lab-scale operational testing, corrosion testing and commercialization possibilities. The work resulted in the discovery of a new class of ionic liquids (ILs) that efficiently react with CO{sub 2} in a 1:1 stoichiometry with no water present and no increase in viscosity. The enthalpy of reaction was tuned to optimize process economics. The IL was found to have excellent corrosion behavior with and without CO{sub 2} present. In lab-scale tests, the IL was able to effectively remove CO{sub 2} from a simulated flue gas stream, although mass transfer was slower than with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) due to higher viscosities. The non-volatile nature of the solvent and its high thermal stability, however, make it an intriguing option. An independent systems analysis indicates that the economics of using the best IL discovered to date (NDIL0157), are at least comparable to ?? and potentially slightly better than -?? the Fluor Econamine FG PlusTM process (DOE Case 12). Further work should be directed at improving mass transfer / lowering viscosity and developing commercial synthesis routes to make these ILs at scale in an inexpensive manner. Demonstration of the process at larger scales is also warranted, as is the exploration of other process configurations that leverage the anhydrous nature of the solvent and its extremely low volatility.

Maginn, Edward

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nondestructive Evaluation: Remote Field Technology Assessment for Piping Inspection Including Buried and Limited Access Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides results for the following projects: 1. Remote Field Technology Assessment for Piping Inspection 2. Inspection Techniques and NDE for Buried and Limited-Access Components 3. Guideline Development for Above-Ground, Below-Ground, and Limited-Access Storage Vessel Inspection These projects provided the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) the opportunity to engage its membership and several vendors in identifying remote field technology for piping inspection and advanced NDE inspec...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pulse combustion: Commercial, industrial, and residential applications. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the evolution of pulse combustion, the types of pulse combustion burners and their applications, and selected fuels utilized. Topics include fuel combustion efficiency, energy conversion and utilization technologies, modeling of chemical kinetics, and dynamics and thermal characteristics of pulse combustors. Pulse combustion systems for water heaters, gas furnaces, industrial and residential boilers, commercial cooking equipment, and space heating devices are presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

124

Proceedings: Coal Combustion Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the 2007 Coal Combustion workshop was to present a holistic view of the various combustion processes required for minimal emissions, peak performance, and maximum reliability in a coal-fired power plant. The workshop also defined needs for future RD in coal combustion technology.

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Updated Cost and Performance Estimates for Clean Coal Technologies Including CO2 Capture - 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction and commodity costs were relatively stable for the period 2000-2003. However there were also very few orders for new coal plants in that period when Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Plants were mostly the chosen technology selection. Since 2003 the value of the US dollar has been reduced versus other currencies. The rapid increases in crude oil and natural gas prices since early 2004 have also produced marked increases in several commodities and thereby the cost of construction of power pla...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Combustion aspects of the reapplication of energetic materials as fuels as a viable demil technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation addresses the combustion-related aspects of the reapplication of energetic materials as fuels in boilers as an economically viable and environmentally acceptable use of excess energetic materials. The economics of this approach indicate that the revenues from power generation and chemical recovery approximately equal the costs of boiler modification and changes in operation. The primary tradeoff is the cost of desensitizing the fuels against the cost of open burn/open detonation (OB/OD) or other disposal techniques. Two principal combustion-related obstacles to the use of energetic-material-derived fuels are NO{sub x} generation and the behavior of metals. NO{sub x} measurements obtained in this investigation indicate that the nitrated components (nitrocellulose, nitroglycerin, etc.) of energetic materials decompose with NO{sub x} as the primary product. This can lead to high uncontrolled NO{sub x} levels (as high as 2,600 ppm on a 3% O{sub 2} basis for a 5% blend of energetic material in the fuel). NO{sub x} levels are sensitive to local stoichiometry and temperature. The observed trends resemble those common during the combustion of other nitrogen-containing fuels. Implications for NO{sub x} control strategies are discussed. The behavior of inorganic components in energetic materials tested in this investigation could lead to boiler maintenance problems such as deposition, grate failure, and bed agglomeration. The root cause of the problem is the potentially extreme temperature generated during metal combustion. Implications for furnace selection and operation are discussed.

Baxter, L.; Davis, K.; Sinquefield, S.; Huey, S.; Lipkin, J.; Shah, D.; Ross, J.; Sclippa, G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend current capabilities for modeling fuel transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation coal-based, fuel-flexible combustion and gasification processes. This multi-organization, multi-investigator project has produced data, correlations, and submodels that extend present capabilities in pressure, temperature, and fuel type. The combined experimental and theoretical/computational results are documented in detail in Chapters 1-8 of this report, with Chapter 9 serving as a brief summary of the main conclusions. Chapters 1-3 deal with the effect of elevated pressure on devolatilization, char formation, and char properties. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with advanced combustion kinetic models needed to cover the extended ranges of pressure and temperature expected in next-generation furnaces. Chapter 6 deals with the extension of kinetic data to a variety of alternative solid fuels. Chapter 7 focuses on the kinetics of gasification (rather than combustion) at elevated pressure. Finally, Chapter 8 describes the integration, testing, and use of new fuel transformation submodels into a comprehensive CFD framework. Overall, the effects of elevated pressure, temperature, heating rate, and alternative fuel use are all complex and much more work could be further undertaken in this area. Nevertheless, the current project with its new data, correlations, and computer models provides a much improved basis for model-based design of next generation systems operating under these new conditions.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas H. Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion (LTC-D) "FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Solicitation for University Research and Graduate Automotice Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in the final report (December 2008), outcomes from the research included providing guidelines to the engine and energy industries for achieving optimal low temperature combustion operation through using advanced fuel injection strategies, and the potential to extend low temperature operation through manipulation of fuel characteristics. In addition, recommendations were made for improved combustion chamber geometries that are matched to injection sprays and that minimize wall fuel films. The role of fuel-air mixing, fuel characteristics, fuel spray/wall impingement and heat transfer on LTC-D engine control were revealed. Methods were proposed for transient engine operation during load and speed changes to extend LTC-D engine operating limits, power density and fuel economy. Low emissions engine design concepts were proposed and evaluated.

Rolf Reitz; P. Farrell; D. Foster; J. Ghandhi; C. Rutland; S. Sanders

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Potential Improvements in IGCC Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This overall project is aimed at experimental proof-of-concept testing and validation of high-risk, early-stage ideas for CO2 capture. If successful, such processes are likely to reduce the energy penalty of CO2 capture processes significantly, or in other cases, they will increase our understanding of the practical limits of CO2 capture. This particular report focuses on potential improvements that are under research and development for the pre-combustion capture of CO2 in integrated-gasification-combin...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Combustibles Alternativos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustibles Alternativos Dispensador de Combustible Alternativo Los combustibles alternativos estn derivados de otras fuentes adems del petrleo. Unos son producidos en el...

133

Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air - Energy ...  

Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and ...

134

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this sixth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was implemented and tested within the Linear Eddy Model (LEM). ISAT type 3 is being tested so that extrapolation can be performed and further improve the retrieval rate. Further testing of the LEM for subgrid chemistry was performed for parallel applications and for multi-step chemistry. Validation of the software on backstep and bluff-body reacting cases were performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment at Georgia Tech using their LES code were performed. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. A new and improved Artificial Neural Network (ANN), with log-transformed output, for the 1-step chemistry was implemented in CFDRC's LES code and gave reasonable results. This quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting was held at CFDRC. Next quarter, LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will continue to be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for multi-step chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, will be accomplished.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

LBNLs Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Swirl Injectors for Swirl Injectors for High Hydrogen Fuel Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Research supported by NETL - Fossil Energy, US Dept. of Energy Presentation at UTSR Workshop - Oct. 20, 2010 Participants and Collaborators  LBNL - Environmental Energy Technology Div.  Robert Cheng, David Littlejohn, Peter Therkelsen, Ken Smith & Sy Ali  United Tech. Research Center - Pratt & Whitney Power Systems  Dustin Davis, Catalin Fotache & Richard Tuthill  Florida Turbine Technologies  Russell Jones & Joe Brostmeyer  LBNL - Computational Research Div.  John Bell & Marc Day  Siemens Energy Inc.  Scott Martin & Enrique Portillo Bilbao  University of Iowa

136

Oscillating combustion from a premix fuel nozzle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stringent emissions requirements for stationary gas turbines have produced new challenges in combustor design. In the past, very low NOx pollutant emissions have been achieved through various combustion modifications, such as steam or water injection, or post-combustion cleanup methods such as selective catalytic reduction (SCR). An emerging approach to NOx abatement is lean premix combustion. Lean premix combustion avoids the cost and operational problems associated with other NOx control methods. By premixing fuel and air at very low equivalence ratios, the high temperatures which produce NOx are avoided. The challenges of premix combustion include avoiding flashback, and ensuring adequate fuel/air premixing. In addition, the combustion must be stable. The combustor should not operate so close to extinction that a momentary upset will extinguish the flame (static stability), and the flame should not oscillate (dynamic stability). Oscillations are undesirable because the associated pressure fluctuations can shorten component lifetime. Unfortunately, experience has shown that premix fuel nozzles burning natural gas are susceptible to oscillations. Eliminating these oscillations can be a costly and time consuming part of new engine development. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is investigating the issue of combustion oscillations produced by lean premix fuel nozzles. METC is evaluating various techniques to stabilize oscillating combustion in gas turbines. Tests results from a premix fuel nozzle using swirl stabilization and a pilot flame are reported here.

Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

HCCI Combustion: Analysis and Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a new combustion technology that may develop as an alternative to diesel engines with high efficiency and low NOx and particulate matter emissions. This paper describes the HCCI research activities being currently pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and at the University of California Berkeley. Current activities include analysis as well as experimental work. On analysis, we have developed two powerful tools: a single zone model and a multi-zone model. The single zone model has proven very successful in predicting start of combustion and providing reasonable estimates for peak cylinder pressure, indicated efficiency and NOX emissions. This model is being applied to develop detailed engine performance maps and control strategies, and to analyze the problem of engine startability. The multi-zone model is capable of very accurate predictions of the combustion process, including HC and CO emissions. The multi-zone model h as applicability to the optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions to achieve controlled combustion at high efficiency and low emissions. On experimental work, we have done a thorough evaluation of operating conditions in a 4-cylinder Volkswagen TDI engine. The engine has been operated over a wide range of conditions by adjusting the intake temperature and the fuel flow rate. Satisfactory operation has been obtained over a wide range of operating conditions. Cylinder-to-cylinder variations play an important role in limiting maximum power, and should be controlled to achieve satisfactory performance.

Salvador M. Aceves; Daniel L. Flowers; Joel Martinez-Frias; J. Ray Smith; Robert Dibble; Michael Au; James Girard

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control IEP - Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial-Scale Boiler Applications Project No.: DE-NT0005290 Alstom oxy-combustion test facility Alstom oxy-combustion test facility. Alstom will develop an oxyfuel firing system design specifically for retrofit to tangential-fired (T-fired) boilers and provide information to address the technical gaps for commercial boiler design. Several oxyfuel system design concepts, such as internal flue gas recirculation and various oxygen injection schemes, will be evaluated for cost-effectiveness in satisfying furnace design conditions in a T-fired boiler. The evaluation will use an array of tools, including Alstom's proprietary models and design codes, along with 3-D computational fluid dynamics modeling. A

139

Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Program on Technology Innovation: Flame Structure Sensor for PC Combustion - Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame-scanner sensor technology incorporated in the Flame Doctor system to provide critical burner state information in pulverized-coal applications is inherently limited in its ability to provide the type of information needed to make very rapid control adjustments. This project investigated the feasibility of two new types of flame-structure sensors for providing supplemental information about flame state that can be used for Flame Doctor system calibration and also for advanced high-speed burner c...

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

UWM-CBU Concrete Materials Technology Series Program No. 71 Workshop on GREEN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Center for By-Products Utilization NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION 3200 MATERIALS USING COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS Sponsored By UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, Milwaukee, WI We Energies, Milwaukee, WI Co-Sponsored By American Coal Ash Association Educational Foundation

Saldin, Dilano

143

Indicator strip and portable instrument technologies for determining nitroesters or moisture in combustible cartridge cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sometimes large round-to-round variability observed in accelerated environmental testing, plus difficulties in quantifying the environmental histories of a given round suggest the need for nondestructive rapid tests of munitions to supplement lifetime prediction models in quality assurance of munitions. Technologies are being developed for reagent strips which can be affixed to rounds and which will visually indicate the presence and extent of nitroester migration by a visible color change. A solid state adaptation of a modified Griess reagent develops a red-purple color in the presence of nitroesters. Performance of current designs tested in the laboratory suggest a short-term (ca. one month) single usage. Dielectric capacitance is a promising means for rapid, nondestructive moisture determinations using a portable battery-powered instrument. Laboratory studies with a modified, inexpensive, commercial device have demonstrated fast (a few seconds) detection of case wall moisture content.

Griest, W.H.; Ho, C.H.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Bates, B.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Vehiculos de combustible flexible: brindando opciones en combustible renovable (Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice), Programa de Technologias de Vehiculos (Vehicle Technologies Program - VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mayo 2010 Mayo 2010 la Junta de Recursos del Aire de California. El uso de conversiones no certificadas es ilegal y puede afectar la garantía de su vehículo. Para obtener más información sobre el pro- ceso de conversión de vehículos, consulte la Guía de certificación actualizada para convertidores de combustible alternativo de la EPA en su sitio web, www.epa.gov/otaq/ cert/dearmfr/cisd0602.pdf. ¿El E85 afecta el desempeño del vehículo?

145

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Donald Stanton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energys Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over todays state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

Stanton, Donald W

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend leading submodels of coal transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation energy technologies. During the first two projects years, significant progress was made on most of the tasks, as described in detail in the two previous annual reports. In the current third annual report, we report in detail on the BYU task on the properties and intrinsic reactivities of chars prepared at high-pressure. A flat-flame burner was used in a high pressure laminar flow facility to conduct high temperature, high heating rate coal pyrolysis experiments. Heating rates were approximately 10{sup 5} K/s, which is higher than in conventional drop tube experiments. Char samples from a Pitt No.8 coal and lignite were collected at 1300 C at 1, 6, 10, and 15 atm. Swelling ratios of the lignite were less than 1.0, and only about 1.3 for the Pitt No.8 coal. All coals showed slight increases in swelling behavior as pressure increased. The swelling behavior observed for the Pitt No.8 coal at each pressure was lower than reported in high pressure drop tube experiments, indicating the effect of heating rate on particle swelling. This heating rate effect was similar to that observed previously at atmospheric pressure. SEM photos revealed that bituminous coal has large physical structure transformations, with popped bubbles due to the high heating rate. TGA char oxidation reactivities were measured at the same total pressure as the char preparation pressure. The general trend was that the TGA reactivity on a gram per gram available basis decreased for both Pitt No.8 and Knife River lignite coal chars with increasing char formation pressure. The Pitt No.8 char intrinsic activation energy and oxygen reaction order remained relatively constant with increasing pressure. This new data provides some of the only information available on the morphology, structure, and reactivity of chars prepared in high pressure flames.

Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas Fletcher; Alan Sayre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NETL: Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process Project No.: DE-FE0000646 The Gas Technology Institute is developing a pre-combustion...

151

Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Technology Developments, Reliability Issues, and Related Market Conditions: EPRI Gas Turbine Exper ience and Intelligence Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulating power generation markets worldwide present both business opportunities and challenges for combustion turbine (CT) plant owners, operators, and project developers. The "EPRI Gas Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report" (GTE&IR) provides concise, well-organized, up-to-date technical, strategic, and business information for combustion turbine (CT) power producers. This technical report assembles all of the content from the most recent three years of GTE&IR (seven editions) into a single docu...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Property:Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is a property of type Page. This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Technology" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4C Offshore Limited + Offshore Wind + A Aisin Seiki G60 + Internal Combustion Engine + B Buffalo Software + Buffalo Software offers services supporting the NREL Energy Databus including installation, feature development and support plans. + C Capstone C30 + Microturbine + Capstone C60 + Microturbine + CarbonFree Technology + Solar Photovoltaic + Caterpillar DM5498 + Internal Combustion Engine + Caterpillar DM7915 + Internal Combustion Engine + Caterpillar G3508 + Internal Combustion Engine + Caterpillar G3516 + Internal Combustion Engine + Caterpillar G379 + Internal Combustion Engine + Coast Intelligen 150-IC with ECS + Internal Combustion Engine +

153

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: Summary Existing Units Considered for Repowering Dresser-Rand Turbomachinery Considered Phased-Construction Approach Plant Layout Performance Environmental Characteristics Cost Click on picture to enlarge The host site for this repowering evaluation is the Arizona Public Service Company's Four Corners steam generating station, shown in the photo to the right. The Four Corners station is a mine-mouth, low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired electric generating station located near Fruitland, New Mexico, about 15 miles southwest of Farmington, New Mexico.

154

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duke Power's Dan River Station Unit 3 with APFBC Duke Power's Dan River Station Unit 3 with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: APFBC Repowering Project Summary Key Features Site Layout Performance Environmental Characteristics Cost Click on picture to enlarge APFBC Repowering Project Summary Duke Power's Dan River station is located near Eden, North Carolina. The photo is a view of the station looking toward the northeast with the Dan River in the foreground. This river provides cooling for the plant. The proposed APFBC repowering would be placed in the clear level area to the west of the powerhouse, left in the photo, just past the transformers and switchyard at the front of this photo.

155

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Energy's L.V. Sutton Station Unit 1 and Unit 2 with APFBC Progress Energy's L.V. Sutton Station Unit 1 and Unit 2 with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton The host site for this DOE APFBC repowering evaluation is Progress Energy's L.V. Sutton steam generating station, shown in Progress Energy's L.V. Sutton steam generating station the photo. This station sits on the Cape Fear River, near Wilmington, North Carolina. Unit 1 (front right) and Unit 2 (center), share the common stack to the right. These are the focus of the APFBC repowering evaluations. The larger Unit 3, in the background, has its own stack, but was not evaluated for APFBC repowering.

156

Fifteenth combustion research conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

Haynes, Joel Meier (Niskayuna, NY); Mosbacher, David Matthew (Cohoes, NY); Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian (Troy, NY); Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan (Mason, OH)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Program Review - Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program; Including a Report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1978, The Division of Geothermal Energy of the Department of Energy established the Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program. The purpose of this program is to ''provide assistance to the Nation's industrial community by helping to remove technical and associated economic barriers which presently inhibit efforts to bring geothermal electric power production and direct heat application on line''. In the near term this involves the adaptation of exploration and assessment techniques from the mineral and petroleum industry to geothermal applications. In the near to far term it involves the development of new technology which will improve the cost effectiveness of geothermal exploration.

Nielson, Dennis L., ed.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990  

SciTech Connect

Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Sensor System Based on Semi-Conductor Metal Oxide Technology for In Situ Detection of Coal Fired Combustion Gases  

SciTech Connect

Sensor Research and Development Corporation (SRD) proposed a two-phase program to develop a robust, autonomous prototype analyzer for in situ, real-time detection, identification, and measurement of coal-fired combustion gases and perform field-testing at an approved power generation facility. SRD developed and selected sensor materials showing selective responses to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. Sensor support electronics were also developed to enable prototype to function in elevated temperatures without any issues. Field-testing at DOE approved facility showed the ability of the prototype to detect and estimate the concentration of combustion by-products accurately with relatively low false-alarm rates at very fast sampling intervals.

Brent Marquis

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An improvement to an internal combustion engine is disclosed that has a fuel system for feeding a fuel-air mixture to the combustion chambers and an electrical generation system, such as an alternator. An electrolytic cell is attached adjacent to the engine to generate hydrogen and oxygen upon the application of a voltage between the cathode and anode of the electrolytic cell. The gas feed connects the electrolytic cell to the engine fuel system for feeding the hydrogen and oxygen to the engine combustion chambers. Improvements include placing the electrolytic cell under a predetermined pressure to prevent the electrolyte from boiling off, a cooling system for the electrolytic cell and safety features.

Valdespino, J.M.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Flashback Detection Sensor for Hydrogen Augmented Natural Gas Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen augmented fuel is being investigated by various researchers as a method to extend the lean operating limit, and potentially reduce thermal NOx formation in natural gas fired lean premixed (LPM) combustion systems. The resulting increase in flame speed during hydrogen augmentation, however, increases the propensity for flashback in LPM systems. Real-time in-situ monitoring of flashback is important for the development of control strategies for use of hydrogen augmented fuel in state-of-the-art combustion systems, and for the development of advanced hydrogen combustion systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Woodward Industrial Controls are developing a combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS), which has already been demonstrated as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff. Since CCADS is a flame ionization sensor technique, the low ion concentration produced in pure hydrogen combustion raises concerns of whether CCADS can be used to monitor flashback in hydrogen augmented combustion. This paper discusses CCADS tests conducted at 0.2-0.6 MPa (2-6 atm), demonstrating flashback detection with fuel compositions up to 80% hydrogen (by volume) mixed with natural gas. NETLs Simulation Validation (SimVal) combustor offers full optical access to pressurized combustion during these tests. The CCADS data and high-speed video show the reaction zone moves upstream into the nozzle as the hydrogen fuel concentration increases, as is expected with the increased flame speed of the mixture. The CCADS data and video also demonstrate the opportunity for using CCADS to provide the necessary in-situ monitor to control flashback and lean blowoff in hydrogen augmented combustion applications.

Thornton, J.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Sidwell, T.; Strakey, P.A.; Huckaby, E.D.; Benson, K.J. (Woodward)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Other Internal Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) to conduct...

165

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber  

Insitu Oxygen Conduction Into Internal Combustion Chamber Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

166

METC Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Oxy-Combustion Activities Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews oxy-combustion development activities throughout the world. The report opens by reviewing carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies and their relative advantages and disadvantages before focusing on oxy-combustion concepts and giving details on potential designs. It then delves into each sub-system (air separation, oxy boiler, gas quality control, and CO2 purification) giving the latest updates on technologies and associated development issues, pulling from work reported at the Second...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions. (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Demonstration Development Project - Combustion Turbine Low Power Turndown Technologies: A Review of Current and Emerging Technologies for Combined Cycle Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a Demonstration Development Program that supports projects that evaluate developing technologies which will potentially decrease cost and increase performance of power generating assets. This report provides a review of recent developments in combined cycle technologies that provide improved performance in the areas of response time (start-up and ramp time), power turndown while maintaining low emissions, and fuel flexibility.A review of technologies either ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Pulse combustion: an assessment of opportunities for increased efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The results of a literature review on pulse combustion are discussed. Current, near-future, and potential opportunities for pulse combustion applications are summarized, and the barriers to developing and using pulse combustion technology are discussed, along with research and development needs. Also provided are the proceedings of a pulse combustion workshop held in May, 1984 in Seattle, Washington. (LEW)

Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Progress Report 5 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on

173

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Progress Report 6 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies on

174

Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approaches Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) develops affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels to secure a sustainable energy economy. To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of advanced control technologies, including chemical looping (CL)

175

Measurement of spray combustion processes  

SciTech Connect

A free jet configuration was chosen for measuring noncombusting spray fields and hydrocarbon-air spray flames in an effort to develop computational models of the dynamic interaction between droplets and the gas phase and to verify and refine numerical models of the entire spray combustion process. The development of a spray combustion facility is described including techniques for laser measurements in spray combustion environments and methods for data acquisition, processing, displaying, and interpretation.

Peters, C.E.; Arman, E.F.; Hornkohl, J.O.; Farmer, W.M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FLAMELESS COMBUSTION APPLICATION FOR GAS TURBINE ENGINES IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to review the potential application of flameless combustion technology in aerospace gas turbine engines. Flameless combustion is a regime (more)

OVERMAN, NICHOLAS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Combustion Safety Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 1-2, 2012 March 1-2, 2012 Building America Stakeholders Meeting Austin, Texas Combustion Safety in the Codes Larry Brand Gas Technology Institute Acknowledgement to Paul Cabot - American Gas Association 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Combustion Safety in the Codes Widely adopted fuel gas codes: * National Fuel Gas Code - ANSI Z223.1/NFPA 54, published by AGA and NFPA (NFGC) * International Fuel Gas Code - published by the International Code Council (IFGC) * Uniform Plumbing Code published by IAPMO (UPC) Safety codes become requirements when adopted by the Authority Having Jurisdiction (governments or fire safety authorities) 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Combustion Safety in the Codes Formal Relationships Between these codes: - The IFGC extracts many safety

178

Wood combustion systems: status of environmental concerns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document addresses the uncertainties about environmental aspects of Wood Combustion Systems that remain to be resolved through research and development. The resolution of these uncertainties may require adjustments in the technology program before it can be commercialized. The impacts and concerns presented in the document are treated generically without reference to specific predetermined sites unless these are known. Hence, site-specific implications are not generally included in the assessment. The report consists of two main sections which describe the energy resource base involved, characteristics of the technology, and introduce the environmental concerns of implementing the technology; and which review the concerns related to wood combustion systems which are of significance for the environment. It also examines the likelihood and consequence of findings which might impede wood commercialization such as problems and uncertainties stemming from current or anticipated environmental regulation, or costs of potential environmental controls. This document is not a formal NEPA document. Appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared after a formal wood combustion commercialization program is approved by DOE.

Dunwoody, J.E.; Takach, H.; Kelley, C.S.; Opalanko, R.; High, C.; Fege, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this concept offers substantial savings over SCR and is an economically attractive alternative to purchasing NOx credits or installing other conventional technologies. In conjunction with the development of oxygen based low NOx technology, Praxair also worked on developing the economically enhancing oxygen transport membrane (OTM) technology which is ideally suited for integration with combustion systems to achieve further significant cost reductions and efficiency improvements. This OTM oxygen production technology is based on ceramic mixed conductor membranes that operate at high temperatures and can be operated in a pressure driven mode to separate oxygen with infinite selectivity and high flux. An OTM material was selected and characterized. OTM elements were successfully fabricated. A single tube OTM reactor was designed and assembled. Testing of dense OTM elements was conducted with promising oxygen flux results of 100% of target flux. However, based on current natural gas prices and stand-alone air separation processes, ceramic membranes do not offer an economic advantage for this application. Under a different DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement, Praxair is continuing to develop oxygen transport membranes for the Advanced Boiler where the economics appear more attractive.

David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Descriptions of Past Research in Program 80: New Combustion Turbine/Combined-Cycle Plant Design and Technology Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundAt a time when the power industry needs to meet growing demand and capacity requirements, informed decisions on gas turbine selection and plant designs are especially important. Technology selection impacts efficiency, emissions, availability, maintainability, and durability. Flexible operational capabilities are needed for plant dispatch, and planners need to understand upcoming trends and potential improvements for future growth.The Electric Power ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally, the transient demonstration was performed in Phase IV. The project demonstrated the achievement of meeting US10 emissions without NOx aftertreatment. The successful execution of the project has served to highlight the effectiveness of closely matched combustion predictive tools to engine testing. It has further served to highlight the importance of key technologies and future areas of research and development. In this regard, recommendations are made towards further improvements in the areas of engine hardware, fuel injection systems, controls and fuels.

Ojeda, William de

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Value of Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in a World with Uncertain Greenhouse Gas Emissions Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing how the largest CO2 emitting electricity generating region in the United States, the East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR), responds to hypothetical constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, the authors demonstrate that there is an enduring role for post combustion CO2 capture technologies. The utilization of pulverized coal with carbon dioxide capture and storage (PC+CCS) technologies is particularly significant in a world where there is significant uncertainty about the future evolution of climate policy and in particular uncertainty about the rate at which the climate policy will become more stringent. The papers analysis shows that within this one large, heavily coal-dominated electricity generating region, as much as 20-40 GW of PC+CCS could be in operation before the middle of this century. Depending upon the state of PC+CCS technology development and the evolution of future climate policy, the analysis shows that these CCS systems could be mated to either already existing PC units or PC units that are currently under construction, announced and planned units, as well as PC units that could continue to be built for a number of decades even in the face of a climate policy. In nearly all the cases analyzed here, these PC+CCS generation units are compliments to a much larger deployment of CCS-enabled coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The analysis presented here shows that the combined deployment of PC+CCS and IGCC+CCS units within this one region of the U.S. could result in the potential capture and storage of between 3.2 and 4.9 billion tones of CO2 before the middle of this century in the regions deep geologic storage formations.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

COMBUSTION RESEARCH - FY-1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Measurement of Combustion Products by Zeeman Atomicand T. Hadeishi . . . . . Combustion Sources offrom Pulverized Coal Combustion J. Pennucci, R. Greif, F.

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Straw pellets as fuel in biomass combustion units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to estimate the suitability of straw pellets as fuel in small combustion units, the Danish Technological Institute accomplished a project including a number of combustion tests in the energy laboratory. The project was part of the effort to reduce the use of fuel oil. The aim of the project was primarily to test straw pellets in small combustion units, including the following: ash/slag conditions when burning straw pellets; emission conditions; other operational consequences; and necessary work performance when using straw pellets. Five types of straw and wood pellets made with different binders and antislag agents were tested as fuel in five different types of boilers in test firings at 50% and 100% nominal boiler output.

Andreasen, P.; Larsen, M.G. [Danish Technological Inst., Aarhus (Denmark)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA system were delivered to VPTNA and then assembly of APA engine was completed by June 2007. Functional testing of APA engine was performed and AC and AM modes testing were completed by October 2007. After completing testing, data analysis and post processing were performed. Especially, the models were instrumental in identifying some of the key issues with the experimental HVA system. Based upon the available engine test results during AC and AM modes, the projected fuel economy improvement over the NY composite cycle is 14.7%. This is close to but slightly lower than the originally estimated 18% from ADVISOR simulation. The APA project group demonstrated the concept of APA technology by using simulation and experimental testing. However, there are still exists of technical challenges to meet the original expectation of APA technology. The enabling technology of this concept, i.e. a fully flexible valve actuation system that can handle high back pressure from the exhaust manifold is identified as one of the major technical challenges for realizing the APA concept.

Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control: NOx Reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Reduction Technologies NOx reduction technologies can be grouped into two broad categories: combustion modifications and post-combustion processes. Some of the more important...

187

TransForum v9n2 - Low Temperature Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Temperature Combustion Knocks Out NOx, Saves Fuel and Money One of the hottest concepts in clean diesel technology is low-temperature combustion (LTC). Engineers from Argonne's...

188

2010 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Development Approved by Gurpreet Singh Team Leader, Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Vehicle Technologies Program FY 2010 Progress rePort For AdvAnced combustion engine...

189

Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process  

This patent-pending technology, Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process, provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen.

190

Advanced Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems Advanced Combustion Background Conventional coal-fired power plants utilize steam turbines to generate electricity, which operate at efficiencies of 35-37 percent. Operation at higher temperatures and pressures can lead to higher efficiencies, resulting in reduced fuel consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Higher efficiency also reduces CO2 production for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency hit, so it will actually increase the amount of CO2 to be captured. But without so much N2 in the flue gas, it will be easier and perhaps more efficient to capture, utilize and sequester. NETL's Advanced Combustion Project and members of the NETL-Regional University

191

Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Combustion 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report is a presentation of work carried out on Phase II of the HIPPS program under DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 from June 1995 to March 2001. The objective of this report is to emphasize the results and achievements of the program and not to archive every detail of the past six years of effort. These details are already available in the twenty-two quarterly reports previously submitted to DOE and in the final report from Phase I. The report is divided into three major foci, indicative of the three operational groupings of the program as it evolved, was restructured, or overtaken by events. In each of these areas, the results exceeded DOE goals and expectations. HIPPS Systems and Cycles (including thermodynamic cycles, power cycle alternatives, baseline plant costs and new opportunities) HITAF Components and Designs (including design of heat exchangers, materials, ash management and combustor design) Testing Program for Radiative and Convective Air Heaters (including the design and construction of the test furnace and the results of the tests) There are several topics that were part of the original program but whose importance was diminished when the contract was significantly modified. The elimination of the subsystem testing and the Phase III demonstration lessened the relevance of subtasks related to these efforts. For example, the cross flow mixing study, the CFD modeling of the convective air heater and the power island analysis are important to a commercial plant design but not to the R&D product contained in this report. These topics are of course, discussed in the quarterly reports under this contract. The DOE goal for the High Performance Power Plant System ( HIPPS ) is high thermodynamic efficiency and significantly reduced emissions. Specifically, the goal is a 300 MWe plant with > 47% (HHV) overall efficiency and {le} 0.1 NSPS emissions. This plant must fire at least 65% coal with the balance being made up by a premium fuel such as natural gas. To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization issues of fabrication and reliability, availability and maintenance. The program that has s

A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

International Journal of Engineering & Technology IJET-IJENS Vol: 11 No: 03 7 Co-combustion of Biosolids with Wood Pellets in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Co-combustion of biosolids with coal or other biomass fuel can play a significant role in combustion facilities for energy production and waste management policy context. This paper presents the results of an experimental study to investigate the use of biosolids for cocombustion with wood pellets in a wood pellet stove. Fuel property, gas emissions and stove efficiency are compared. In regard to fuel properties, proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and heating values are determined and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) are measured and compared. Pilot scale combustion tests revealed that cocombustion of 10 % biosolids with 90% wood pellets resulted in successful combustion without any significant degradation of efficiency and emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were found to be proportional with the N2 content in the fuel. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) emissions were negligible. Index Terms- Biosolids, co-combustion, wood pellet stove, performance and emissions.

Wood Pellet Stove; Murari Mohon Roy; Animesh Dutta; Kenny Corscadden; Peter Havard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

Baker, Quentin A. (P.O. Box 6477, San Antonio, TX 78209); Mecredy, Henry E. (1630-C W. 6th, Austin, TX 78703); O' Neal, Glenn B. (6503 Wagner Way, San Antonio, TX 78256)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

196

Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues.

Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.; Jeppson, D.W.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gas Turbine/Combined-Cycle Emissions Control Technology and Regulatory Issues Handbook-2010 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information pertaining to emissions from combustion turbines. Topics covered include low-NOx burner design and information on add-on control systems, including equipment used in practice as well as emerging technologies. Select air quality regulations that apply to new and existing combustion turbines are discussed, including requirements regarding best available control technology (BACT) (which also may represent the lowest-achievable emission rate or LAER) requirement. United State...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coal slurry combustion optimization on single cylinder engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, GE Transportation System has been conducting a proof of concept program to use coal water slurry (CWS) fuel to power a diesel engine locomotive since 1988. As reported earlier [1], a high pressure electronically controlled accumulator injector using a diamond compact insert nozzle was developed for this project. The improved reliability and durability of this new FIE allowed for an improved and more thorough study of combustion of CWS fuel in a diesel engine. It was decided to include a diesel pilot fuel injector in the combustion system mainly due to engine start and low load operation needs. BKM, Inc. of San Diego, CA was contracted to develop the electronic diesel fuel pilot/starting FIE for the research engine. As a result, the experimental combustion study was very much facilitated due to the ability of changing pilot/CWS injection timings and quantities without having to stop the engine. Other parameters studied included combustion chamber configuration (by changing CWS fuel injector nozzle hole number/shape/angle), as well as injection pressure. The initial phase of this combustion study is now complete. The results have been adopted into the design of a 12 cylinder engine FIE, to be tested in 1992. This paper summarizes the main findings of this study.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

2009 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMBUSTION COMBUSTION ENGINE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT annual progress report 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 Approved by Gurpreet Singh Team Leader, Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Office of Vehicle Technologies FY 2009 Progress rePort For AdvAnced combustion engine reseArcH And deveLoPment Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies December 2009 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 ii Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies FY 2009 Annual Progress Report

200

Program on Technology Innovation: Monitoring Carbon Monoxide and Nitric Oxide in Combustion Gases with Laser Absorption Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two important considerations for monitoring CO/O2 and NO/NH3 in the flue gas of coal-fired boilers include (1) optimization of the air/fuel distribution to individual burners, thereby enabling lower excess oxygen operation, reduced NOx emissions, and improved unit heat rate, and (2) optimization of NH3/NOx distribution at the inlet of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactor, thereby enabling increased NOx reduction performance while maintaining ammonia slip targets. Lower NOx emissions can be achie...

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coal slurry combustion optimization on single cylinder engine. Task 1.1.2.2.2, Combustion R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, GE Transportation System has been conducting a proof of concept program to use coal water slurry (CWS) fuel to power a diesel engine locomotive since 1988. As reported earlier [1], a high pressure electronically controlled accumulator injector using a diamond compact insert nozzle was developed for this project. The improved reliability and durability of this new FIE allowed for an improved and more thorough study of combustion of CWS fuel in a diesel engine. It was decided to include a diesel pilot fuel injector in the combustion system mainly due to engine start and low load operation needs. BKM, Inc. of San Diego, CA was contracted to develop the electronic diesel fuel pilot/starting FIE for the research engine. As a result, the experimental combustion study was very much facilitated due to the ability of changing pilot/CWS injection timings and quantities without having to stop the engine. Other parameters studied included combustion chamber configuration (by changing CWS fuel injector nozzle hole number/shape/angle), as well as injection pressure. The initial phase of this combustion study is now complete. The results have been adopted into the design of a 12 cylinder engine FIE, to be tested in 1992. This paper summarizes the main findings of this study.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Plum Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plum Combustion Plum Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Name Plum Combustion Place Atlanta, Georgia Product Combustion technology, which reduces NOx-emissions. Coordinates 33.748315°, -84.391109° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.748315,"lon":-84.391109,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

204

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 12, January--March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed editing of the fifth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office; and prepared two technical papers for conferences.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 14, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Siemens Heavy-Duty Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy frame combustion turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies incorporated into their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Siemens A.G. industrial combustion turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of technical risks involved in their operation. Turbine models include the SGT5/6-2000E, SGT5/6-4000F, SGT5/6-1000F, SGT5-3000E, SGT6-3000E, SGT6-5000F, SGT6-6000G and the new Siemens SGT5/6...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect including estimates for reduced CO/sub 2/ emissions technologies  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. The option concerns a ''hydrogen economy'' based on coal. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. This process produces a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and either mainly or only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Should the greenhouse effect be found to be a myth in the future, the carbon would be taken out of storage and utilized as a clean fuel, the impurities having been previously removed. This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. Total capital cost estimates have been made to replace all conventional coal burning power plants in the US with technologies that eliminate emissions of CO/sub 2/. These include removal, recovery and disposal of CO/sub 2/, nuclear, solar, photovoltaics, biomass, and HYDROCARB. 12 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Process modeling and analysis of CO? purification for oxy-coal combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxy-coal combustion technology has great potential as one of the major CO2 capture technologies for power generation from coal. The distinguishing feature of oxy-coal combustion is that the oxygen source is a high concentration ...

Iloeje, Chukwunwike Ogbonnia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Particulate waste product combustion system  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for incinerating combustion material within a fluidized bed, including the steps of: feeding the material into a fluidizing zone within which the bed is formed; introducing combustion supporting gas to the fluidizing zone in a plurality of inflow streams of different velocities insufficient to fluidize the material; continuously agitating the material to mechanically fluidize the same within the fluidizing zone during combustion and cause displacement of residual ash from the zone; and withdrawing the residual ash from a discharge location in the apparatus outside of the fluidizing zone.

Chastain, C.E.; King, D.R.

1986-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

System issues and tradeoffs associated with syngas production and combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the basic technology of coal gasification for the production of syngas and the utilization of that syngas in power generation. The common gasifier types, fixed/moving bed, fluidized bed, entrained flow, and transport, are described, and accompanying typical product syngas compositions are shown for different coal ranks. Substantial variation in product gas composition is observed with changes in gasifier and coal feed type. Fuel contaminants such as sulfur, nitrogen, ash, as well as heavy metals such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium, can be removed to protect the environment and downstream processes. A variety of methods for syngas utilization for power production are discussed, including both present (gas turbine and internal combustion engines) and future technologies, including oxy-fuel, chemical looping, fuel cells, and hybrids. Goals to improve system efficiencies, further reduce NOx emissions, and provide options for CO2 sequestration require advancements in many aspects of IGCC plants, including the combustion system. Areas for improvements in combustion technology that could minimize these tradeoffs between cost, complexity, and performance are discussed.

Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.; Breault, R.W.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Retrofitting for Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to further develop the oxy-combustion technology for commercial retrofit in existing wall-fired and Cyclone boilers by 2012. To meet this goal, a research project was conducted that included pilot-scale testing and a full-scale engineering and economic analysis.

Hamid Farzan

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Combustion Behavior of Pulverized Coal Injection in Corex Melter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to increase the utilization of fine coal, reduce coke consumption and enhance the competitiveness of the technology, the combustion behavior of...

219

Combustion Stability in Complex Engineering Flows | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vortex. Virtual testing enables engineers to design next-generation, low-emission combustion systems. Lee Shunn, Cascade Technologies; Shoreh Hajiloo, GE Global Research...

220

Examining the Relationship of Near Limit Combustion Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining the Relationship of Near Limit Combustion Research, Technology Commercialization, and Energy Savings Analysis Speaker(s): Peter Therkelsen Date: January 15, 2013 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping...

222

Superadiabatic combustion in counter-flow heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Syngas, a combustible gaseous mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and other species, is a promising fuel for efficient energy conversion technologies. Syngas is produced by (more)

Schoegl, Ingmar Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objectives to: A. Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition. B. Determine emissions characteristics including NO, NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents, and C. Operate with at least two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions. As a result of this program: 1. GE Engineering is now confident that the syngas fuels produced by all currently--viable coal gasifiers can be accommodated by the GE advanced (``F`` Technology) combustion system, and 2. For proposed syngas fuels with varying amounts of steam, nitrogen or CO{sub 2} diluent, the combustion and emissions characteristics can be reasonably estimated without undertaking expensive new screening tests for each different fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Belisle, F.H.; Maxwell, G.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Accelerated Development of Promising Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has actively searched and evaluated new post-combustion technologies to understand their merits and potential application to the utility industry. This technical update report presents an update to the following five previously published EPRI reports on the subject:Assessment of Post-Combustion Capture Technology Developments (1012796)Program on Technology Innovation: Post-Combustion ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Combustion Visualization - emissions,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Visualization Combustion Visualization Exploring Combustion Using Advanced Imaging Techniques In the photo, the GM diesel test cell is shown with vehicle exhaust aftertreatment hardware (diesel particulate filtration and diesel oxidation catalyst) along with other advanced technology-such as a variable geometry turbocharger, cooled exhaust gas recirculation and a common-rail fuel injection system. Fig. 1. The GM diesel test cell is shown with vehicle exhaust aftertreatment hardware (diesel particulate filtration and diesel oxidation catalyst) along with other advanced technology-such as a variable geometry turbocharger, cooled exhaust gas recirculation and a common-rail fuel injection system. Two-dimensional image of hydrogen combustion OH chemiluminescence. Fig. 2. Two-dimensional image of hydrogen combustion OH chemiluminescence.

226

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Reports: 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine (CT) efficiency improvements coupled with heat recovery bottoming steam cycles has risen dramatically over the past 20 years. Much of this improvement is attributed to gas turbine technology transferred from military and commercial aircraft design. This technology advantage coupled with lower emissions inherent to natural gas combustion has effectively set the standard for new large generation additions in many regions. However, there are many concerns and issues related to effectively...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine (CT) efficiency improvements, coupled with heat recovery bottoming steam cycles, have risen dramatically over the past 20 years. Much improvement is attributed to gas turbine technology transferred from military and commercial aircraft design. This technology advantage in combination with the lower emissions inherent to natural gas combustion has effectively set the standard for new large generation additions in many regions. However, there are many concerns and issues related to effec...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial support through modeling, hardware, data exchange, and technical consultation. This CRADA was also successful at establishing important next steps to further expanding the use of an HCCI engine for improved fuel efficiency and emissions. These topics will be address in a follow-on CRADA. The objectives are: (1) Improve fundamental understanding of the development of combustion instabilities with HCCI operation through modeling and experiments; (2) Develop low-order model and feedback combustion metrics which are well suited to real-time predictive controls; and (3) Construct multi-cylinder engine system with advanced Delphi technologies and charac-terize HCCI behavior to better understand limitations and opportunities for expanded high-efficiency operation.

Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Proceedings: EPRI/EPA 1995 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control: Volume 1: Tuesday, May 16, 1995, Sessions 1, 2, 3; Volume 2: Wednesday, May 17, 1995, Sessions 4 and 5; Volume 3: Thursday, May 18, 1995, Sessions 6A, 6B, 7A, 7B; Volume ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1995 Joint Symposium Combustion NOx Controls was held in Kansas City, Missouri, May 16-19, 1995. Jointly sponsored by EPRI and EPA, the symposium was the eighth in a biennial series devoted to the international exchange of information on recent technological and regulatory developments for stationary combustion NOx control. Topics covered included active full-scale retrofit demonstrations of low-NOx combustion systems in the United States and abroad; performance and economics results from pilot- and ...

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A hybrid 2-zone/WAVE engine combustion model for simulating combustion instabilities during dilute operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal combustion engines are operated under conditions of high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce NO x emissions and promote enhanced combustion modes such as HCCI. However, high EGR under certain conditions also promotes nonlinear feedback between cycles, leading to the development of combustion instabilities and cyclic variability. We employ a two-zone phenomenological combustion model to simulate the onset of combustion instabilities under highly dilute conditions and to illustrate the impact of these instabilities on emissions and fuel efficiency. The two-zone in-cylinder combustion model is coupled to a WAVE engine-simulation code through a Simulink interface, allowing rapid simulation of several hundred successive engine cycles with many external engine parametric effects included. We demonstrate how this hybrid model can be used to study strategies for adaptive feedback control to reduce cyclic combustion instabilities and, thus, preserve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Green Jr, Johney Boyd [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Working Group Review of Sampling and Analytical Methods for Amines and Amine Degradation Products in Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of amine solvents in post-combustion carbon capture (PCCC) facilities has increased over the last several years, and subsequently, a clear understanding of the potential human and environmental impacts of those solvents has become increasingly more important. A critical need identified by many researchers in the PCCC and environmental chemistry communities is to standardize stack sampling and analytical methods for amines and their degradation products. This led to the Electric Power ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Low emissions compression ignited engine technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Dunlap, IL); Kilkenny, Jonathan P. (Peoria, IL); Fluga, Eric C. (Dunlap, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 18, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Continued with data and sample analysis from the pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, air-dried and mulled microagglomerate products; air-dried Pittsburgh No. 8 as-is and mulled products for upcoming Task 3 combustion testing; and prepared two abstracts for presentation for the March 1 994 Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Hargrove, M.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering database, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical database will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical database to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Vehculos de Clula de Combustible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Clula de Combustible Vehculo de Clula de Combustible Honda Clarity FCX Los vehculos de clula de combustible (FCVs)tambin llamados de pila de combustibletienen el...

242

Welding and Repair Technology for Power Plants: Fourth RRAC International Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fourth International Conference on Welding and Repair Technology for Power Plants included presentations of case histories and emerging welding technologies and demonstrations of repair techniques and approaches. These proceedings provide technical information discussed during this conference regarding the repair of steam turbine rotors, discs, blades, piping, steam generators, headers, reactor pressure vessel internals, valves, pumps, combustion turbines, and other components. Sessions included nucl...

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Available Technologies: Heat Transfer Interface for Thermo ...  

Refrigeration systems; Internal combustion engines; ... The components of the technology could be used to improve heat transfer in industrial, ...

244

EPRI Biomass Interest Group European Technology Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Members of EPRI's Biomass Interest Group and made a 14 day tour of key European Biomass-to-Power installations in the fall of 2005. The group visited a variety of technologies, including gasification, co-firing, direct combustion, and combined heat and power facilities.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Science & Technology Highlights ZEBRAlliance Campaign Under Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric power has been carried long distances by high theory and nonlinear dynamics to energy technologies, including gas-flu- idized beds, internal combustion. SpaciMS takes gaseous samples inside the confined spaces of chemical reactors, such as automotive

246

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Home - combustion, compression ignition,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Combustion Visualization * Combustion Visualization * Compression-Ignition * Emissions Control * Fuel Injection and Sprays * Idling * Multi-Dimensional Modeling * Particulate Matter * Spark Ignition Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Engines Omnivorous engine tested by Thomas Wallner Thomas Wallner tests the omnivorous engine, a type of spark-ignition engine. Argonne's engine research is contributing to advances in technology that will impact the use of conventional and alternative fuels and the design of advanced technology vehicles. Compression Ignition

247

Development of second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and its team members, Westinghouse, Gilbert/Commonwealth, and the Institute of Gas Technology are developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology capable of achieving net plant efficiency in excess of 45 percent based on the higher heating value of the coal. A three-phase program entails design and costing of a 500 MWe power plant and identification of developments needed to commercialize this technology (Phase 1), testing of individual components (Phase 2), and finally testing these components in an integrated mode (Phase 3). This paper briefly describes the results of the first two phases as well as the progress on the third phase. Since other projects which use the same technology are in construction or in negotiation stages -- namely, the Power System Development Facility and the Four Rivers Energy Modernization Projects -- brief descriptions of these are also included.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution Combustion Synthesis Impregnated Layer Combustion Synthesis is a Novel Methodology Engineering University of Notre Dame University of Notre Dame #12;Outline: Overview of combustion synthesis Reaction system Combustion front analaysis Theoretical model results Conclusions Acknowledgements #12

Mukasyan, Alexander

249

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004787 Gas Technology Institute is partnering with PoroGen Corporation and Aker Process Systems in a three-year effort to develop a hybrid technology for CO2 capture from flue gases based on a combination of solvent absorption and hollow fiber membrane technologies. The technology could also apply to removal of numerous other gas pollutants such as NOx and SOx, separation of CO2 from hydrogen in refinery streams, and separation of CO2 from natural gas (natural gas sweetening). The technology increases interfacial gas/liquid area by a factor of ten over conventional packed or tray columns, thus increasing mass transfer. The selectivity is controlled by the chemical affinity of CO2 with a hindered amine. The process results in lower steam regeneration energy, and the CO2 is generated at pressure, reducing compression costs. The project includes bench-scale testing on a 25 kWe-equivalent slipstream at Midwest Generation's Joliet Power Station.

250

Fundamental Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies in Syngas Premixed Combustion Dynamics Ahmed F. Ghoniem, Anuradha M. Annaswamy, Raymond L. Speth, H. Murat Altay Massachusetts Institute of Technology SCIES Project 05-01-SR121 Project Awarded (08/01/2005, 36 Month Duration) Needs & Objectives Gas Turbine Needs Flexibility to operate with variable syngas compositions Ensure stable operation over a wide range of conditions Reduce emissions of CO and NO x Project Objectives Study experimentally lean premixed syngas combustion

251

Oxy-combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustion: Oxygen Transport combustion: Oxygen Transport Membrane Development Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D

252

Oxy-Combustion Activities Worldwide: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a review of oxy-combustion development activities throughout the world, most of which occurred in the calendar year of 2013. The report opens by introducing oxy-combustion and discussing its relative advantages and disadvantages and associated costs. It then delves into each sub-system (air separation, oxy boiler, gas quality control system [GQCS], and carbon dioxide [CO2] purification) giving the latest updates on technologies and associated development issues in ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES GREGORY LYNG, MOHAMMADREZA ROOFI for traveling wave solutions of an abstract viscous combustion model including both Majda's model and the full-wave) approximation. Notably, our results apply to combustion waves of any type: weak or strong, detonations or defla

Texier, Benjamin - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

254

A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion B. Fiorinaa , R. Vicquelina to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation Simulation, Turbulent premixed combustion, Tabulated chemistry 1. Introduction Flame ignition and extinction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Transportable Combustion Turbine Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) installed a 7.15-MW Solar Taurus 70 (nominal 7 MW) gas combustion turbine (CT) at its State Street substation in Auburn, New York. As a demonstration project supported through EPRI's Tailored Collaboration (TC) program, it is intended to aid in better understanding the "complete picture" for siting this particular technology as a distributed resource (DR).

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effect of market fuel variation and cetane improvers on CAI combustion in a GDI engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is continued interest in improving the fuel conversion efficiency of internal combustion engines and simultaneously reducing their emissions. One promising technology is that of Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) combustion. ...

Cedrone, Kevin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dynamic stability, blowoff, and flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion is a promising technology to implement carbon capture and sequestration for energy conversion to electricity in power plants that burn fossil fuels. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to ...

Shroll, Andrew Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO ADVANCED COMBUSTION NO X CONTROL TECHNIQUES FOR A WALL-FIRED BOILER PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM JANUARY 2001 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0429 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

259

Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the Department of Energy initiated a comprehensive effort in 1982 to develop the necessary performance and cost data and to assess the commercial viability of coal-water fuels (CWFs) as applied to representative utility and industrial units. The effort comprised six tasks beginning with coal resource evaluation and culminating in the assessment of the technical and economic consequences of switching representative commercial units from oil to state-of-the-art CWF firing. Extensive bench, pilot and commercial-scale tests were performed to develop necessary CWF combustion and fireside performance data for the subsequent boiler performance analyses and retrofit cost estimates. Discussions on transport, rheology, combustion properties, and ash characterization are included. 11 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Chow, O.K.; Patel, R.L.; Levasseur, A.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Real-time Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Control and Diagnostics Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing its patented "Real-Time Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor-Pressure Oscillation Monitor" technology. Disclosed is NETL's sensor system and process for monitoring and controlling the amplitude and/or frequencies of dynamic pressure oscillations in combustion systems during active combustion processes. The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) is designed for gas turbine combustors that are operated near the fuel-lean flame extinction limit to minimize production of the atmospheric pollutant NOx. CCADS eliminates the problems of flashback,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Update Meeting April 2013 Technical Update Meeting April 2013 www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Code Gaps and Future Research Needs for Combustion Safety 2012 Expert Meeting Larry Brand Gas Technology Institute April 29-30, 2013 Building America Technical Update Meeting Denver, Colorado installation, inspection and testing 2. Appliance Installation: clearances to combustible materials, combustion air, and testing 3. Appliance venting: allowed materials, vent type selection, sizing, installation, and testing Fundamental Combustion Safety Related Coverage: 2 | Building America Technical Update Meeting April 2013 www.buildingamerica.gov 1. Gas piping: allowed materials, sizing, Code Coverage Three Key Provisions For Combustion Safety in the Codes 1. Combustion air

262

Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant GHG reductions are possible by efficient WtE technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHP and high power-to-heat ratio provide significant GHG savings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O and coal mine type are important in LCA GHG emissions of FBC co-combustion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting coal and fuel oil by waste is beneficial in electricity and heat production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting natural gas by waste may not be reasonable in CHP generation. - Abstract: Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO{sub 2}-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved.

Vainikka, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.vainikka@vtt.fi [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilae, Kai [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FIN 20500 Turku (Finland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Engine Combustion Network Experimental Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Maintained by the Engine Combustion Department of Sandia National Laboratories, data currently available on the website includes reacting and non-reacting sprays in a constant-volume chamber at conditions typical of diesel combustion. The data are useful for model development and validation because of the well-defined boundary conditions and the wide range of conditions employed. A search utility displays data based on experimental conditions such as ambient temperature, ambient density, injection pressure, nozzle size, fuel, etc. Experiment-related visualizations are also available. The search utility for experimental data is located at http://public.ca.sandia.gov/ecn/cvdata/frameset.html (Specialized Interface)

264

HYDROGEN ASSISTED DIESEL COMBUSTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, the effect of hydrogen assisted diesel combustion on conventional and advanced combustion modes was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, (more)

Lilik, Gregory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UK), the University of Connecticut (UC), the University of Utah (UU) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI's existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). The work discussed in this report covers the Phase II program. Five coals were studied (three in Phase I and two new ones in Phase II). In this work UK has used XAFS and Moessbauer spectroscopies to characterize elements in project coals. For coals, the principal use was to supply direct information about certain hazardous and other key elements (iron) to complement the more complete indirect investigation of elemental modes of occurrence being carried out by colleagues at USGS. Iterative selective leaching using ammonium acetate, HCl, HF, and HNO3, used in conjunction with mineral identification/quantification, and microanalysis of individual mineral grains, has allowed USGS to delineate modes of occurrence for 44 elements. The Phase II coals show rank-dependent systematic differences in trace-element modes of occurrence. The work at UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for the speciation of mercury captured on low-temperature sorbents from combustion flue gases and dev

C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

High Efficiency, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B2

Donald Stanton

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Combustion oscillation control  

SciTech Connect

Premixing of fuel and air can avoid high temperatures which produce thermal NOx, but oscillating combustion must be eliminated. Combustion oscillations can also occur in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle turbines. As an alternative to design or operating modifications, METC is investigating active combustion control (ACC) to eliminate oscillations; ACC uses repeated adjustment of some combustion parameter to control the variation in heat release that drives oscillations.

Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) -- Power Generation and Storage Technology Options: 2012 Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides cost and performance data and analysis for energy company decision makers to optimize capital investments in the power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2012 TAG has been significantly enhanced to reflect current topics of interest to members, which included market trends and integration and implementation of technologies from a planning perspective. In 2012, these topics included projected demand for large combustion turbine (CT) and combustion turbine ...

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

269

Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Boiler Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project to build a PYROFLOW circulating fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boiler at the BFGoodrich Chemical Plant at Henry, Illinois, is described. This project is being partially funded by Illinois to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-sulfur Illinois coal. Design production is 125,000 pounds per hour of 400 psig saturated steam. An Illinois EPA construction permit has been received, engineering design is under way, major equipment is on order, ground breaking occurred in January 1984 and planned commissioning date is late 1985. This paper describes the planned installation and the factors and analyses used to evaluate the technology and justify the project. Design of the project is summarized, including the boiler performance requirements, the PYROFLOW boiler, the coal, limestone and residue handling systems and the pollutant emission limitations.

Farbstein, S. B.; Moreland, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

271

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

272

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

273

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

274

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

275

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies Program CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion engine Vehicle -- Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle was undertaken to define the requirements to achieve a California Air Resource Board Executive Order for a hydrogenfueled vehicle retrofit kit. A 2005 to 2006 General Motors Company Sierra/Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD pickup was assumed to be the build-from vehicle for the retrofit kit. The emissions demonstration was determined not to pose a significant hurdle due to the non-hydrocarbon-based fuel and lean-burn operation. However, significant work was determined to be necessary for Onboard Diagnostics Level II compliance. Therefore, it is recommended that an Experimental Permit be obtained from the California Air Resource Board to license and operate the vehicles for the durability of the demonstration in support of preparing a fully compliant and certifiable package that can be submitted.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hybrid combustion control system has been developed which combines the functions which have traditionally been performed by separate stand-alone measurement and control instruments into one low-cost integrated system. Complete O2 Trim Control Systems will soon be available starting at less than 6,000 dollars. By utilizing a high performance low-cost microprocessor, both measurement and control functions can now be performed simultaneously. The new systems will feature automatic calibration, self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning equipment can be optimized to insure reduced fuel consumption end improved combustion efficiency. Typical fuel savings of 3 to 5 percent have been experienced on a wide variety of different types of fuel burning sources, including packaged boilers, incinerators, and process heaters.

Molloy, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued drop tube devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; and started writing a summary topical report to include all results on the nine fuels tested.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 16, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the first quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Reported results of drop tube furnace data analyses to determine devolatilization kinetics; reported the results from the re-analyzed pilot-scale ash deposits from the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 15, October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; re-analyzed the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; updated the topical summary report; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 13, April--June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport feed coal; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

Richard S. Tuthill

2004-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Powers Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: scale up of gas to solid heat transfer high temperature finned surface design the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas-to-solids heat transfer. A stress test rig was built and tested to provide validation data for a stress model needed to support high temperature finned surface design. Additional cold flow model tests and MTF tests were conducted to address mechanical and process design issues. This information was then used to design and cost a commercial CMB design concept. Finally, the MBHE was reconfigured into a slice arrangement and tested for an extended duration at a commercial CFB plant.

Jukkola, Glen

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Oil shale combustion/retorting  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted a number of feasibility studies on the combustion and retorting of five oil shales: Celina (Tennessee), Colorado, Israeli, Moroccan, and Sunbury (Kentucky). These studies generated technical data primarily on (1) the effects of retorting conditions, (2) the combustion characteristics applicable to developing an optimum process design technology, and (3) establishing a data base applicable to oil shales worldwide. During the research program, METC applied the versatile fluidized-bed process to combustion and retorting of various low-grade oil shales. Based on METC's research findings and other published information, fluidized-bed processes were found to offer highly attractive methods to maximize the heat recovery and yield of quality oil from oil shale. The principal reasons are the fluidized-bed's capacity for (1) high in-bed heat transfer rates, (2) large solid throughput, and (3) selectivity in aromatic-hydrocarbon formation. The METC research program showed that shale-oil yields were affected by the process parameters of retorting temperature, residence time, shale particle size, fluidization gas velocity, and gas composition. (Preferred values of yields, of course, may differ among major oil shales.) 12 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Internal combustion engine and method for control  

SciTech Connect

In one exemplary embodiment of the invention an internal combustion engine includes a piston disposed in a cylinder, a valve configured to control flow of air into the cylinder and an actuator coupled to the valve to control a position of the valve. The internal combustion engine also includes a controller coupled to the actuator, wherein the controller is configured to close the valve when an uncontrolled condition for the internal engine is determined.

Brennan, Daniel G

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Combustion instability modeling and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Chemical Looping for Combustion and Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ChemiCal looping for Combustion and ChemiCal looping for Combustion and hydrogen produCtion Objective The objective of this project is to determine the benefits of chemical looping technology used with coal to reduce CO 2 emissions. Background Chemical looping is a new method to convert coal or gasified coal to energy. In chemical looping, there is no direct contact between air and fuel. The chemical looping process utilizes oxygen from metal oxide oxygen carrier for fuel combustion, or for making hydrogen by "reducing" water. In combustion applications, the products of chemical looping are CO 2 and H 2 O. Thus, once the steam is condensed, a relatively pure stream of CO 2 is produced ready for sequestration. The production of a sequestration ready CO 2 stream does not require any additional separation units

287

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

288

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the second quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: completed drop tube furnace devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; completed writing a summary topical report including all results to date on he nine fuels tested; and presented three technical papers on the project results at the 16th International Conference on Coal & Slurry Technologies.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM) presented in this report is the second of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a signifi...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microsoft Word - 41776_GE_Fuel Flexible Combustion_Factsheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. Objective: Develop a multi-fuel low emission combustor for Vision 21 plant and gas turbine system applications. Combustion system development includes the development of...

291

Combustion of High Hydrogen Fuel for Norske Hydro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results of a recent hydrogen combustion-testing program including resultant affects on gas turbine cycles. Testing program results show the feasibility of hydrogen use for...

292

Boiler using combustible fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

1974-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work.

Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Safety analysis of the 700-horsepower combustion test facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the 700 h.p. Combustion Test Facility located in Building 93 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Extensive safety related measures have been incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of the Combustion Test Facility. These include: nitrogen addition to the coal storage bin, slurry hopper, roller mill and pulverizer baghouse, use of low oxygen content combustion gas for coal conveying, an oxygen analyzer for the combustion gas, insulation on hot surfaces, proper classification of electrical equipment, process monitoring instrumentation and a planned remote television monitoring system. Analysis of the system considering these factors has resulted in the determination of overall probabilities of occurrence of hazards as shown in Table I. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce these probabilities as indicated. The identified hazards include coal dust ignition by hot ductwork and equipment, loss of inerting within the coal conveying system leading to a coal dust fire, and ignition of hydrocarbon vapors or spilled oil, or slurry. The possibility of self-heating of coal was investigated. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce the ignition probability to no more than 1 x 10/sup -6/ per event. In addition to fire and explosion hazards, there are potential exposures to materials which have been identified as hazardous to personal health, such as carbon monoxide, coal dust, hydrocarbon vapors, and oxygen deficient atmosphere, but past monitoring experience has not revealed any problem areas. The major environmental hazard is an oil spill. The facility has a comprehensive spill control plan.

Berkey, B.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 11, No. 5, October 2007, 697714  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion Theory and Modelling Vol. 11, No. 5, October 2007, 697­714 Flame propagation in a small, to the emerging micro-combustion technology, and to the understanding of the effect of small scales; Turbulent combustion 1. Introduction The propagation of premixed flames in the presence of a flow whose

Heil, Matthias

298

Combustion Characteristics of Coal and Biomass Blends and Thermal Dynamic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using TGA technology, the combustion characteristics under different conditions of hard coal and biomass blends has been discussed. The combustion curves of blends exhibited the characteristics with two peaks. Results also exhibited that there was ... Keywords: coal, biomass, thermal analysis, combustion characteristics

Haizhen Huang; Haibo Chen; Guohua Wang; Jun Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fluidized Bed Combustion of Solid Fuels: Design Practices and Field Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although pulverized coal (PC) combustion generally continues to be the technology of choice for utility-scale steam-electric plants, fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) offers a number of advantages to power producers, most notably the ability to burn fuels not suited for PC combustion. This report updates experience with current FBC designs, focusing on circulating fluidized bed (CFB) steam generators.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Precision Combustion, Inc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Reliable, Cost Effective Fuel Processors. Abstract: Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) is developing ultra-compact Fuel Processing systems for a range of Fuel Cells and...

302

Low NOx combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

Kobayashi, Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY); Bool, III, Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Low NOx combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustion of hydrocarbon liquids and solids is achieved with less formation of NOx by feeding a small amount of oxygen into the fuel stream.

Kobayashi; Hisashi (Putnam Valley, NY), Bool, III; Lawrence E. (Aurora, NY)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fuels & Lubricant Technologies- FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels and lubricants research at FEERC involves study of the impacts of fuel and lubricant properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes liquid fuels from synthetic and renewable sources as well as conventional and unconventional fossil-based sources. Combustion and emissions studies are leveraged with relevant single and multi-cylinder engine setups in the FEERC and access to a suite of unique diagnostic tools and a vehicle dynamometer laboratory. ORNL/DOE research has been cited by EPA in important decisions such as the 2006 diesel sulfur rule and the 2010/2011 E15 waiver decision. Major program categories and examples

305

Combustion chemistry and an evolving transportation fuel environment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world currently faces tremendous energy challenges stemming from the need to curb potentially catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. In addition, many nations, including the United States, recognize increasing political and economic risks associated with dependence on uncertain and limited energy sources. For these and other reasons the chemical composition of transportation fuels is changing, both through introduction of nontraditional fossil sources, such as oil sands-derived fuels in the US stream, and through broader exploration of biofuels. At the same time the need for clean and efficient combustion is leading engine research towards advanced low-temperature combustion strategies that are increasingly sensitive to this changing fuel chemistry, particularly in the areas of pollutant formation and autoignition. I will highlight the new demands that advanced engine technologies and evolving fuel composition place on investigations of fundamental reaction chemistry. I will focus on recent progress in measuring product formation in elementary reactions by tunable synchrotron photoionization, on the elucidation of pressure-dependent effects in the reactions of alkyl and substituted alkyl radicals with O{sub 2}, and on new combined efforts in fundamental combustion chemistry and engine performance studies of novel potential biofuels.

Taatjes, Craig A. (Org. 8353, Combustion Chemistry Department)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Combustion Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion Lab Fuel Combustion Lab NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on characterizing fuels at the molecular level. This information can then be used to understand and predict the fuel's effect on engine performance and emissions. By understanding the effects of fuel chemistry on ignition we can develop fuels that enable more efficient engine designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the distributed Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory, and the Biofuels activity. Photo of assembled IQT. Ignition Quality Tester The central piece of equipment in the Fuel Combustion Laboratory is the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT(tm)). The IQT(tm) is a constant volume combustion vessel that is used to study ignition properties of liquid

307

Multi-Proxy Approach on Black Carbon Characterization and Combustion Products Source Discrimination in Environmental Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental applications of pyrogenic carbon, aka black carbon (BC), have been hampered due to the poor characterization and quantification of environmental BC. This dissertation was dedicated to the better characterization of environmental char/charcoal BC (char-BC), the most heterogeneous and the less identifiable group in the BC continuum. The analytical approach developed for char-BC was further incorporated with other BC methods in environmental samples for a comprehensive assessment of combustion-derived carbon inputs in different environmental systems. The present study firstly evaluated the feasibility of using levoglucosan, a marker derived from cellulose/hemocellulose combustion, to characterize and quantify char-BC in the environment. Levoglucosan was found exclusively in BC materials derived from biomass combustion albeit in highly variable yields across different char-BC. A further examination of synthetic chars showed that temperature is the most influential factor affecting levoglucosan yield in char. Notably, levoglucosan was only detectable in low temperature char samples (150-350 degrees C), regardless of plant species. These results demonstrated that levoglucosan could serve as a good qualitative indicator for the presence of char produced under low temperature conditions in soil, sediments, and aerosols. Results of lignin analysis on the synthetic chars further reveal that combustion can greatly decrease the yield of the eight major lignin phenols with no lignin phenols detected in any synthetic char produced at greater than or equal to 400 degrees C. The values of all lignin parameters show significant shifts with increasing combustion severity (temperature and/or duration), indicating that thermal alteration is an important abiotic lignin degradation process. Hence the input of char-BC in the environments represents a terrestrial organic matter source with highly altered lignin signatures. Finally, a multi-proxy approach, including elemental (soot-BC) and molecular (levoglucosan, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and lignin oxidation products) proxies, was adopted to investigate the centennial-scale temporal distribution of combustion products in four sediment cores from Puget Sound basins, WA. The observed temporal trends of soot-BC and combustion PAHs fluxes reflect the evolution of energy consumption and the positive effects of environmental regulations. The distinct temporal patterns of soot and PAHs among cores demonstrate that urbanization is a crucial factor controlling the inputs of combustion byproducts to the environment. On the other hand, the trends of levoglucosan may be more relevant to the climate oscillation and thus show a regional distribution pattern. Our results demonstrate that environmental loading of combustion byproducts is a complex function of urbanization and land use, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate changes.

Kuo, Li-Jung

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Kinetic Modeling Study of Oxy-methane Combustion at Ordinary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oxy-fuel combustion is one promising option among different CO2 capture technologies. The object of this work is to show the effect of CO2...

309

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated the ability to improve control of an olefins furnace (via CO-trim) that resulted in significant energy savings and lower emissions such as NOx and other greenhouse gases. The cost to retrofit measurements on an existing olefins furnace was found to be very attractive, with an estimated payback achieved in 4 months or less.

Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Zolo Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zolo Technologies Inc Zolo Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Zolo Technologies, Inc. Place Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Efficiency Product US based, Zolo Technologies, Inc., is a supplier of sensors and monitoring equipment designed to improve the efficiency and reduce harmful emission, including GHG's, from large combustion sources such as coal-fired power plants and gas turbines. References Zolo Technologies, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Zolo Technologies, Inc. is a company located in Colorado . References ↑ "Zolo Technologies, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Zolo_Technologies_Inc&oldid=353564"

312

Mathematical modeling of MILD combustion of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect

MILD (flameless) combustion is a new rapidly developing technology. The IFRF trials have demonstrated high potential of this technology also for N-containing fuels. In this work the IFRF experiments are analyzed using the CFD-based mathematical model. Both the Chemical Percolation Devolatilization (CPD) model and the char combustion intrinsic reactivity model have been adapted to Guasare coal combusted. The flow-field as well as the temperature and the oxygen fields have been accurately predicted by the CFD-based model. The predicted temperature and gas composition fields have been uniform demonstrating that slow combustion occurs in the entire furnace volume. The CFD-based predictions have highlighted the NO{sub x} reduction potential of MILD combustion through the following mechanism. Before the coal devolatilization proceeds, the coal jet entrains a substantial amount of flue gas so that its oxygen content is typically not higher than 3-5%. The volatiles are given off in a highly sub-stoichiometric environment and their N-containing species are preferentially converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to NO. Furthermore, there exists a strong NO-reburning mechanism within the fuel jet and in the air jet downstream of the position where these two jets merge. In other words, less NO is formed from combustion of volatiles and stronger NO-reburning mechanisms exist in the MILD combustion if compared to conventional coal combustion technology. (author)

Schaffel, N. [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Thermal Technology, Konarskiego 22, 44-101 Gliwice (Poland); Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology, Agricolastrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Mancini, M.; Weber, R. [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Energy Process Engineering and Fuel Technology, Agricolastrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Szlek, A. [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Thermal Technology, Konarskiego 22, 44-101 Gliwice (Poland)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Is combustion of plastics desirable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing waste will always entail some tradeoffs. All of the three options--recycling, landfilling and combustion--have some disadvantages. Even landfilling, which produces no emissions, fails to take advantage of the energy value inherent in plastic. Waste combustion, on the other hand, recovers the energy in plastic materials and reduces the volume of disposed solid waste by up to 90% of its initial preburn volumes. However, this management option generates emissions and produces an ash residue that must be managed. As demonstrated by recent test burns, improvements in combustion and air-pollution-control technology have dramatically reduced the health risks from emissions and ash. Recent studies have shown that plastics--in quantities even higher than those normally found in municipal solid waste--do not adversely affect levels of emissions or the quality of ash from waste-to-energy facilities. In addition, waste-to-energy facilities may be a relatively economical source of fuel, and may be a more economic solution to waste management than the other available options. A waste-to-energy plant generally produces electricity that is sold to the electric utilities for approximately six cents per kilowatt-hour, a rate that is competitive with those offered by nuclear power plants and power plants that generate energy by burning fossil fuels.

Piasecki, B.; Rainey, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Lally School of Management and Technology; Fletcher, K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Contrle de combustion en transitoires des moteurs combustion interne.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cette thse traite le problme du contrle de combustion des moteurs automobiles combustion interne. On propose une mthode compltant les stratgies de contrle existantes (more)

Hillion, Mathieu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Catalytic Unmixed Combustion of Coal with Zero Pollution  

SciTech Connect

GE Global Research is developing an innovative energy-based technology for coal combustion with high efficiency and near-zero pollution. This Unmixed Combustion of coal (UMC-Coal) technology simultaneously converts coal, steam and air into two separate streams of high pressure CO{sub 2}-rich gas for sequestration, and high-temperature, high-pressure vitiated air for producing electricity in gas turbine expanders. The UMC process utilizes an oxygen transfer material (OTM) and eliminates the need for an air separation unit (ASU) and a CO{sub 2} separation unit as compared to conventional gasification based processes. This is the final report for the two-year DOE-funded program (DE-FC26-03NT41842) on this technology that ended in September 30, 2005. The UMC technology development program encompassed lab- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UMC concept. The chemical feasibility of the individual UMC steps was established via lab-scale testing. A pilot plant, designed in a related DOE funded program (DE-FC26-00FT40974), was reconstructed and operated to demonstrate the chemistry of UMC process in a pilot-scale system. The risks associated with this promising technology including cost, lifetime and durability OTM and the impact of contaminants on turbine performance are currently being addressed in detail in a related ongoing DOE funded program (DE-FC26-00FT40974, Phase II). Results obtained to date suggest that this technology has the potential to economically meet future efficiency and environmental performance goals.

George Rizeq; Parag Kulkarni; Raul Subia; Wei Wei

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion performance guidelines  

SciTech Connect

Performance specifications for conventional coal-fired boilers typically call for tests to be conducted in accordance with the ASME Performance Test Code for Steam Generating Units, PTC 4.1. The Code establishes procedures for conducting performance tests primarily to determine efficiency and capacity. The current edition of the PTC 4.1 is not entirely applicable to atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion boilers, however. AFBC boilers typically are equipped with integral sulfur capture through the addition of a sorbent material along with the fuel feed to the combustor, and this new technology introduces heat losses and credits that are not described in PTC 4.1. These heat losses and credits include combustion heat loss due to the calcination of the sorbent, heat credit due to sulfation, and the effects of calcination and sulfation on the dry flue gas flow, all of which significantly affect boiler efficiency calculations. The limitations of the current issue of the PTC 4.1 is recognized and the Code is now being reviewed to include heat losses and credits common to AFBC boilers. While this work will take some time, there is an immediate need for procedures for performance testing of AFBC boilers. These Guidelines are prepared to meet that need in the interim. The Guidelines detail procedures for boiler efficiency tests. They introduce technical and economic issues that may influence the test level of detail and accuracy. Methods of identifying required measurements, selection of measurement schemes, and assessment of measured versus estimated values are presented. A case study is used to illustrate the procedures and indicate which are the major credits and losses in the efficiency of a typical AFBC boiler. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Sotelo, E. (Sotelo (Ernest), Berkeley, CA (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center June 7, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The recent successful commissioning of an Alabama-based test facility is another step forward in research that will speed deployment of innovative post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies for coal-based power plants, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technologies tested at the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (or PC4) are an important component of Carbon Capture and Storage, whose commercial deployment is considered by many experts as essential for helping to reduce human-generated CO2 emissions that contribute to potential climate change.

319

Understanding and Control of Combustion Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Combustion Understanding and Control of Combustion Control of Combustion Understanding and Control of Combustion Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors Dynamics in Gas Turbine Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Ben T. Zinn, Tim Lieuwen, Yedidia Neumeier, and Ben Bellows SCIES Project 02-01-SR095 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/2002, 36 Month Duration) $452,695 Total Contract Value CLEMSONPRES.PPT, 10/28/2003, B.T. ZINN, T. LIEUWEN, Y. NEUMEIER Gas Turbine Need Gas Turbine Need * Need: Gas turbine reliability and availability is important factor affecting power plant economics - Problem: Combustion driven oscillations severely reduce part life, requiring substantially more frequent outages

320

PFBC and IGCC power generation technologies: status and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

View graphs are presented for pressurized fluidized bed combustion and combined-cycle power plants/coal gasification technologies. Photographs, graphs and flowsheets are included covering the following topics: product line; product goals; product development strategy; this year`s success; barrier issues; key plans for next year; technical status; and market opportunities.

Brdar, R.D.; Reuther, R.B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants (reciprocation and rotating combustion engines). E-mail newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design, performance, and testing of reciprocating and rotating engines of various configurations for all types of propulsion. Includes internal and external combustion engines; engine exhaust systems; engine air systems components; engine structures; stirling and diesel engines.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Title Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Brown, Nancy J.,...

323

A Novel Combustion Synthesis Preparation of CuO/ZnO/ZrO2/Pd for Oxidative Hydrogen Production from Methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Novel Combustion Synthesis Preparation of CuO/ZnO/ZrO2/Pd for Oxidative Hydrogen Production from pre- pared via three combustion synthesis routes including volume combustion, impregnated substrate combustion, and so-called second wave impregnation combustion methods. These catalysts were characterized via

Mukasyan, Alexander

324

Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

Venkatesan, Krishna

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia reduction in fuel allowing potential reductions in the burner NOx production. These reductions of NOx emissions and expanded alternative fuel capability make the rich catalytic combustor uniquely situated to provide reductions in capital costs through elimination of requirements for SCR, operating costs through reduction in need for NOx abating dilution, SCR operating costs, and need for co-firing fuels allowing use of lower value but more available fuels, and efficiency of an engine through reduction in dilution flows.

Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and missions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects test; and full-scale combustion tests.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 11, October--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of three Freeport Pittsburgh 8 fuels; conducted pilot-scale combustion and ash deposition tests of a fresh batch of Upper Freeport parent coal in the CE fireside Performance Test Facility; and completed editing of the fourth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 28  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of progress during the quarter ending September 30, 1981 are summarized. Field projects and supporting research in the following areas are reported: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal processes/heavy oil (steam and in-situ combustion); resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. A list of BETC publications with abstracts, published during the quarter is included. (DMC)

Linville, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

Nicoud, Franck

330

Theoretical studies on hydrogen ignition and droplet combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Droplet Combustion . . . . . . . . . . . . .Combustion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lewis, B. and von Elbe, G. Combustion, Flames and Explosions

Del lamo, Gonzalo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NETL: Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process Project No.: DE-FE0000646 The Gas Technology Institute is developing a pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) separation technology based on a solvent scrubbing process using a novel gas/liquid membrane contactor concept. The primary goal of the project is to develop a practical and cost-effective technology for CO2 separation and capture from the pre-combustion syngas in coal gasification plants. The specific objective of the project is to (1) develop a membrane contactor module containing a superhydrophobic--extremely difficult to wet--hollow fiber membrane with optimal pore size and surface chemistry, and (2) design the CO2 separation process and conduct an economic evaluation.

332

Annual highlights of the energy technology programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of the programs in the energy technology area during 1977. The objective, scope, significent accomplishments in 1977, principal activities planned for 1978, and publications are presented for each program. The Energy Storage and Conversion Division programs are in two broad areas: electrolysis-based hydrogen energy storage systems and related technologies and conservation in buildings and community systems. The Engineering Division programs include work in solar energy, fossil energy, and combustion technology areas. The Conservation Program Management Group has responsibilities of national scope involving R and D projects carried out in coordination with industry and universities. (MCW)

None

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Findings of Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine (HICE) technology takes advantage of existing knowledge of combustion engines to provide a means to power passenger vehicle with hydrogen, perhaps as an interim measure while fuel cell technology continues to mature. This project seeks to provide data to determine the reliability of these engines. Data were collected from an engine operated on a dynamometer for 1000 hours of continuous use. Data were also collected from a fleet of eight (8) full-size pickup trucks powered with hydrogen-fueled engines. In this particular application, the data show that HICE technology provided reliable service during the operating period of the project. Analyses of engine components showed little sign of wear or stress except for cylinder head valves and seats. Material analysis showed signs of hydrogen embrittlement in intake valves.

Garrett Beauregard

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coal combustion products (CCPs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

combustion products (CCPs) combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the largest segment of U.S. electricity generation (45 percent in 2010), finding a sustainable solution for CCPs is an important environmental challenge. When properly managed, CCPs offer society environmental and economic benefits without harm to public health and safety. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has made an important contribution in this regard. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Coal Combustion Products Fossil Energy Research Benefits

335

Gas turbine combustion instability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion oscillations are a common problem in development of LPM (lean premix) combustors. Unlike earlier, diffusion style combustors, LPM combustors are especially susceptible to oscillations because acoustic losses are smaller and operation near lean blowoff produces a greater combustion response to disturbances in reactant supply, mixing, etc. In ongoing tests at METC, five instability mechanisms have been identified in subscale and commercial scale nozzle tests. Changes to fuel nozzle geometry showed that it is possible to stabilize combustion by altering the timing of the feedback between acoustic waves and the variation in heat release.

Richards, G.A.; Lee, G.T.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Computational Model of Forward and Opposed Smoldering Combustion with Improved Chemical Kinetics (PhD. Thesis)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while for wood shavings smolder combustion with subsequentof smolder combustion of cellulosic materials (grain, woodcombustion. Many materials can sustain a smoldering reaction, including coal, cotton, tobacco, paper, duff, peat, wood and

Rein, Guillermo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

Peters, Norbert

338

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design Evolution, Reliability and Durability of Rolls-Royce Aero-Derivative Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Competitive pressures are driving power generators to exploit aviation combustion turbine technology to create more efficient and powerful generation plants at lower cost. However, the use of aero-derivative combustion turbines (third generation or "next generation") carry a degree of technical risk because technologies incorporated into their design push them to the edge of the envelope. This report reviews the design evolution and experience base of advanced Rolls-Royce aero-derivative combustion turbi...

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Design Evolution, Durability, and Reliability of Alstom Heavy-Duty Combustion Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy-duty combustion turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies used in their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Alstom (formerly ABB) industrial combustion turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the technical risks involved in their operation. The report establishes a pedigree matrix, or qualitative analysis, for standard production and newly introduced heavy-duty combustion turbin...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Definition: Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combustion Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Combustion The process of burning; chemical oxidation accompanied by the generation of light and heat.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition "Burning" redirects here. For combustion without external ignition, see spontaneous combustion. For the vehicle engine, see internal combustion engine. For other uses, see Burning (disambiguation) and Combustion (disambiguation). Error creating thumbnail: Unable to create destination directory This article's introduction section may not adequately summarize its contents. To comply with Wikipedia's lead section guidelines, please consider modifying the lead to provide an accessible overview of the article's key points in such a way that it can stand on its own as a

342

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All...

343

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM 2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work on the project focused on the determination of the hydraulic classification characteristics of the Coleman and Mill Creek ashes. The work utilized the hydraulic classifier developed earlier in the project. Testing included total yield, recovery of ash diameter particles and LOI partitioning as functions of dispersant dosage and type, retention time and superficial velocity. Yields as high as 21% with recoveries of up to 2/3 of the ash fractions were achieved. Mean particle size (D{sub 50}) of varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. The ashes were tested for there pozzolanic activity in mortars as measured by strength activity index using ASTM criteria. Additional testing included air entrainment reagent demand and water requirements. The classified products all performed well, demonstrating excellent early strength development in the mortars. Some increased air entrainment demand was noted. The conceptual design of a process demonstration unit PDU was also completed. A flexible, trailer-mounted field unit is envisioned.

T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo; Robert Rathebone

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Internal combustion electric power hybrid power plant  

SciTech Connect

An internal combustion-electric motor hybrid power plant for an automotive vehicle is disclosed. The power plant includes an internal combustion engine and a direct current electric motor generator which are connected to a drive shaft for the vehicle. A clutch mechanism is provided to connect the internal combustion engine, the direct current electric motor generator and the drive shaft for selectively engaging and disengaging the drive shaft with the internal combustion engine and the motor generator. A storage battery is electrically connected to the motor generator to supply current to and receive current therefrom. Thermoelectric semi-conductors are arranged to be heated by the waste heat of the internal combustion engine. These thermoelectric semi-conductors are electrically connected to the battery to supply current thereto. The thermoelectric semi-conductors are mounted in contact with the outer surfaces of the exhaust pipe of the internal combustion engine and also with the outer surfaces of the cylinder walls of the engine.

Cummings, T.A.

1979-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Project No.: DE-FE0013105 TDA is developing a new sorbent-based pre-combustion carbon capture technology for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The process, which was evaluated at bench-scale under a previous effort, uses an advanced physical adsorbent that selectively removes CO2 from coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) above the dew point of the gas. The sorbent consists of a mesoporous carbon grafted with surface functional groups that remove CO2 via an acid-base interaction. The reactor design will be optimized by using computational fluid dynamics and adsorption modeling to improve the pressure swing adsorption cycle sequence. The research will include: two 0.1 MWe tests with a fully-equipped prototype unit using actual synthesis gas to prove the viability of the new technology; long-term sorbent life evaluation in a bench-scale setup of 20,000 cycles; the fabrication of a pilot-scale testing unit that will contain eight sorbent reactors; and the design of a CO2 purification sub-system. The CO2 removal technology will significantly improve (3 to 4 percent) the IGCC process efficiency needed for economically viable production of power from coal.

346

Spontaneous Human Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Human Combustion Spontaneous Human Combustion Name: S. Phillips. Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: One of our 8th grade students has tried to find information in our library about spontaneous human combustion, but to no avail. Could you tell us where we might locate a simple reference, or provide some in information about this subject for him. Replies: Sorry, but this is definitely "fringe science"...try asking in bookstores. I seem to recall one of those "believe it or not" type of TV shows did an episode on spontaneous human combustion a few years ago in which they reported on some British scientists who investigated this purported phenomenon. Remember that people (back in the Dark Ages, and before) used to believe in "spontaneous generation" of certain plants and animals because they were not aware of the reproduction methods used by those plants and animals.

347

IN SITU COMBUSTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a combustion zone that moves through the formation toward production wells, providing a steam drive and an intense gas drive for the recovery of oil. This process is sometimes...

348

Just the Basics: Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diesel fuel, transportation- based combustion accounts for the majority of our fossil fuel use in the United States, which has led the U.S. to demand a lot of imported oil....

349

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM 2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

SciTech Connect

Work on the project focused on the determination of the hydraulic classification characteristics of the Coleman and Mill Creek ashes. The work utilized the hydraulic classifier developed earlier in the project. Testing included total yield, recovery of <5 {micro}m ash diameter particles and LOI partitioning as functions of dispersant dosage and type, retention time and superficial velocity. Yields as high as 21% with recoveries of up to 2/3 of the <5 {micro}m ash fractions were achieved. Mean particle size (D{sub 50}) of varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. The ashes were tested for there pozzolanic activity in mortars as measured by strength activity index using ASTM criteria. Additional testing included air entrainment reagent demand and water requirements. The classified products all performed well, demonstrating excellent early strength development in the mortars. Some increased air entrainment demand was noted. The conceptual design of a process demonstration unit PDU was also completed. A flexible, trailer-mounted field unit is envisioned.

T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo; Robert Rathebone

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

350

Coal combustion system  

SciTech Connect

In a coal combustion system suitable for a gas turbine engine, pulverized coal is transported to a rich zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio exceeding 1 at a temperature above the slagging temperature of the coal so that combustible hot gas and molten slag issue from the rich zone combustor. A coolant screen of water stretches across a throat of a quench stage and cools the combustible gas and molten slag to below the slagging temperature of the coal so that the slag freezes and shatters into small pellets. The pelletized slag is separated from the combustible gas in a first inertia separator. Residual ash is separated from the combustible gas in a second inertia separator. The combustible gas is mixed with secondary air in a lean zone combustor and burned at an equivalence ratio of less than 1 to produce hot gas motive at temperature above the coal slagging temperature. The motive fluid is cooled in a dilution stage to an acceptable turbine inlet temperature before being transported to the turbine.

Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN); Tramm, Peter C. (Indianapolis, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center June 6, 2011 - 2:32pm Addthis Jenny Hakun What does this mean for me? Commercial deployment of the processes tested here could cut carbon pollution. Innovation is important to finding ways to make energy cleaner. And testing the ideas and processes that researchers come up with is critical to moving ideas from the lab to the marketplace. That's why the Department of Energy recently commissioned an Alabama testing facility that will help move research forward and speed up deployment of innovative post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies for coal-based power plants. The Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (or PC4) facility tests new

352

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 5, May 1990--June 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 10, July--September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport fuels; completed editing of the first three quarterly reports and sent them to the publishing office; presented the project results at the Annual Contractors` Conference.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, November 1989--January 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Hong G. Im; Arnaud Trouve; Christopher J. Rutland; Jacqueline H. Chen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microsoft Word - 41521_PCI_RCL Combustion_Factsheet_Rev01-00-00-03.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCL RCL TM System Study for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas (Precision Combustion, Inc.) 1 FACT SHEET (DRAFT 3/17/03) I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS 1. Prime Participant: Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) 2. Other Participants: General Electric Power Systems, Pratt and Whitney Power Systems, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, American Electric Power, Calpine. , II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective(s): The objective of this project is to conduct a system study evaluating the potential impact on power generation turbines of a novel catalytic combustion technology ("Rich Catalytic/Lean burn" or "RCL(tm)" combustion). The study explores the potential for this improved combustion process for elimination of SCR aftertreatment, improved efficiency,

359

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

360

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building America Expert Meeting: Combustion Safety | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting: Combustion Safety Building America Expert Meeting: Combustion Safety This is a meeting overview of "The Best Approach to Combustion Safety in a Direct Vent World, held...

362

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

363

Ignition of Combustion Modified Polyurethane Foam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of smoldering combustion propagation," Prog. Energysmoldering to flaming combustion of horizontally orientedThermal decomposition, combustion and fire-retardancy of

Putzeys, Olivier; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Urban, Dave L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decomposition fronts in wood, Combustion and Flame 139: 16dynamics modeling of wood combustion, Fire Safety Journalduring the pyrolysis of wood, Combustion and Flame 17: 79

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Enlaces de Vehculos de Combustible Fexible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustible flexible provista por el Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC) del DOE Vehculos de Combustible Flexible: Una alternativa de combustible renovable...

366

Building materials using binders and solid combustible minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local materials including low-quality solid combustible minerals and their wastes, are being used to cheapen building costs. The author reviews the use of solid combustible minerals and their carbonaceous wastes as nonbaking binders of the lime-pozzolana type in the production of building and other materials.

Gorlov, E.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Product Leachate: Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the element boron as it occurs in leachate at coal combustion product management sites. Included are discussions of boron's occurrence in soils and water, concentrations in coal combustion products (CCPs), CCP leaching characteristics, effects on human health and ecology, geochemistry, and treatment options for removal from water.

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) research and development program is designed to develop the technology and data base required for the successful commercialization of the PFBC concept. A cooperative program with the US, West Germany, and the UK has resulted in the construction of the 25 MWe IEA-Grimethorpe combined-cycle pilot plant in England which will be tested in 1981. A 13 MWe coal-fired gas turbine (air cycle) at Curtis-Wright has been designed and construction scheduled. Start-up is planned to begin in early 1983. A 75 MWe pilot plant is planned for completion in 1986. Each of these PFBC combined-cycle programs is discussed. The current status of PFB technology may be summarized as follows: turbine erosion tolerance/hot gas cleanup issues have emerged as the barrier technology issues; promising turbine corrosion-resistant materials have been identified, but long-term exposure data is lacking; first-generation PFB combustor technology development is maturing at the PDU level; however, scale-up to larger size has not been demonstrated; and in-bed heat exchanger materials have been identified, but long-term exposure data is lacking. The DOE-PFB development plan is directed at the resolution of these key technical issues. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

2011 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annual progress report 2011 annual progress report 2011 Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development DOE-ACE-2011AR Approved by Gurpreet Singh Team Leader, Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Vehicle Technologies Program FY 2011 Progress rePort For AdvAnced combustion engine reseArcH And deveLoPment Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 December 2011 DOE-ACE-2011AR ii Advanced Combustion Engine R&D FY 2011 Annual Progress Report We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all the participants for their contributions to the programs and all the

372

Nanotechnology Combustion Sensors: Prototype Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from the combustion of fossil fuels and other sources is linked to various ecosystem impacts and human health effects, including acid rain, coastal eutrophication, damage to forest ecosystems, chronic bronchitis, respiratory problems, and heart attacks. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that in 2003, total NOx and SO2 emissions from various sources in the United States were 20.8 million tons and 15.9 million tons, respec...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

374

Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

Biruduganti, Munidhar S. (Naperville, IL); Gupta, Sreenath Borra (Naperville, IL); Sekar, R. Raj (Naperville, IL); McConnell, Steven S. (Shorewood, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling and Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and low emissions in advanced internal combustion engine, advanced diesel engine, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles. Advanced technology vehicles can incorporate any of a...

376

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industries and Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Combustion Compressed Air Distributed EnergyCombined Heat and Power (CHP) Fuel and Feedstock Flexibility Information & Communications Technology Data Centers...

377

Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

378

Vehicle Technologies Office: Program Plans, Implementation, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing Annual Progress Report Advanced Combustion Engine R&D: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments Fuel Technologies: Goals, Strategies,...

379

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Conference Proceedings: EPRI-RRAC Fifth International Conference on Welding and Repair Technology for Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Fifth International Conference on Welding and Repair Technology for Power Plants included presentations of case histories, emerging welding technologies, and demonstrated repair techniques and approaches. These proceedings provide technical information discussed during this conference on the repair of steam turbine rotors, disks, blades, piping, steam generators, headers, reactor pressure vessel internals, valves, pumps, combustion turbines, and other components. Sessions include nuclear and fos...

2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion Guidebook -- 2002 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current operating experience shows that atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) boilers meet high environmental standards and are commercially viable and economically attractive. To make the best business decision, power producers need to fully evaluate the technology as a power generation option. The content of this AFBC Guidebook allows readers to become quickly informed about all aspects of the technology.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion for Power Production from Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) technologyincluding smaller bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) as well as circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor unitsprovides robust combustion with high thermal inertia. This means that AFBC units can successfully respond to variations in ash content, calorific value, and moisture content commonly encountered in burning biomass fuels. This report describes AFBC technology and its deployment for generating steam for power plants using a wide variety of biomass fu...

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides funders of the New Combustion Turbine/Combined-Cycle Plant Design and Technology Selection program (P80) with an overview of current industry trends and market conditions, new gas turbine designs and equipment, and an update on greenhouse gas control options for combined-cycle power plants.BackgroundThe relatively ample supply and low price of natural gas in North America, along with the retirement of coal-fired fossil plants, is leading ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

NO reduction in decoupling combustion of biomass and biomass-coal blend  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a form of energy that is CO{sub 2}-neutral. However, NOx emissions in biomass combustion are often more than that of coal on equal heating-value basis. In this study, a technology called decoupling combustion was investigated to demonstrate how it reduces NO emissions in biomass and biomass-coal blend combustion. The decoupling combustion refers to a two-step combustion method, in which fuel pyrolysis and the burning of char and pyrolysis gas are separated and the gas burns out during its passage through the burning-char bed. Tests in a quartz dual-bed reactor demonstrated that, in decoupling combustion, NO emissions from biomass and biomass-coal blends were both less than those in traditional combustion and that NO emission from combustion of blends of biomass and coal decreased with increasing biomass percentage in the blend. Co-firing rice husk and coal in a 10 kW stove manufactured according to the decoupling combustion technology further confirmed that the decoupling combustion technology allows for truly low NO emission as well as high efficiency for burning biomass and biomass-coal blends, even in small-scale stoves and boilers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Li Dong; Shiqiu Gao; Wenli Song; Jinghai Li; Guangwen Xu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Multi-Phase Complex Systems

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

USING POLYMERIC HYDROGEN GETTERS TO PREVENT COMBUSTIBLE ATMOSPHERES DURING INTERIM SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) of WSRC has recently installed the capability to perform both non-destructive and destructive examination of 3013 containers of Pu oxide in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. The containers will be opened and the oxide will be sampled for analysis. The remaining bulk oxide must then be safely stored in a non-3013-compliant configuration. Available processing equipment and controls cannot prevent the oxide from adsorbing moisture during this process. Subsequent radiolysis of moisture during storage may generate combustible quantities of gases while waiting final processing, and satisfying DOE Interim Safe Storage Criteria (ISSC) would require that storage containers be vented at impractical frequencies. With support from an independent National Laboratory, WSRC/NMM has demonstrated that a commercial hydrogen getter material will effectively prevent the accumulation of combustible gas concentrations. A project overview, including storage requirements and strategies, as well as getter technology, current test results, and anticipated future developments will be addressed.

Woodsmall, T

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low emission U-fired boiler combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least one main combustion chamber contains at least one pulverized coal burner. Each pulverized coal burner is operatively arranged for minimizing NO.sub.X production and for maintaining a predetermined operating temperature to liquefy ash within the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber includes a slag drain for removing slag from the combustion chamber. A slag screen is positioned in a generally U-shaped furnace flow pattern. The slag screen is positioned between the combustion chamber and a radiant furnace. The radiant furnace includes a reburning zone for in-furnace No.sub.X reduction. The reburning zone extends between a reburning fuel injection source and at least one overfire air injection port for injecting air.

Ake, Terence (North Brookfield, MA); Beittel, Roderick (Worcester, MA); Lisauskas, Robert A. (Shrewsbury, MA); Reicker, Eric (Barre, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LTC may be able to achieve ultra-low exhaust emissions, which could greatly reduce aftertreatment requirements, cost, and fuel economy penalties. VTO is supporting work to...

389

Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

A laboratory scale supersonic combustive flow system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A laboratory scale supersonic flow system [Combustive Flow System (CFS)] which utilizes the gaseous products of methane-air and/or liquid fuel-air combustion has been assembled to provide a propulsion type exhaust flow field for various applications. Such applications include providing a testbed for the study of planar two-dimensional nozzle flow fields with chemistry, three-dimensional flow field mixing near the exit of rectangular nozzles, benchmarking the predictive capability of various computational fluid dynamic codes, and the development and testing of advanced diagnostic techniques. This paper will provide a detailed description of the flow system and data related to its operation.

Sams, E.C.; Zerkle, D.K.; Fry, H.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Combustible Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different stages of combustion, Biomass and Bioenergy 23:biomass pyrolysis, to appear in Progress in Energy and Combustion

Lautenberger, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report: 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with up-to-date information on trends in gas markets in the United States and around the world, the 2011 edition of the Combustion Turbine Experience and Intelligence Report (CTEIR) addresses the impact of shales on natural gas markets and associated risks and includes an overview of boiler windbox repowering using gas turbines.

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Starting apparatus for internal combustion engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report is a patent description for a system to start an internal combustion engine. Remote starting and starting by hearing impaired persons are addressed. The system monitors the amount of current being drawn by the starter motor to determine when the engine is started. When the engine is started the system automatically deactivates the starter motor. Five figures are included.

Dyches, G.M.; Dudar, A.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemical Constituents in Coal Combustion Products: Molybdenum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides comprehensive information on the environmental occurrence and behavior of molybdenum (Mo), with specific emphasis on Mo derived from coal combustion products (CCPs). Included are discussions of Mo's occurrence in water and soil, potential human health and ecological effects, geochemistry, occurrence in CCPs, leaching characteristics from CCPs, measurement techniques, and treatment/remediation options.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

Design factors for stable lean premix combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program includes the development of low-emission combustors. Low emissions have already been achieved by premixing fuel and air to avoid the hot gas pockets produced by nozzles without premixing. While the advantages of premixed combustion have been widely recognized, turbine developers using premixed nozzles have experienced repeated problems with combustion oscillations. Left uncontrolled, these oscillations can lead to pressure fluctuations capable of damaging engine hardware. Elimination of such oscillations is often difficult and time consuming - particularly when oscillations are discovered in the last stages of engine development. To address this issue, METC is studying oscillating combustion from lean premixing fuel nozzles. These tests are providing generic information on the mechanisms that contribute to oscillating behavior in gas turbines. METC is also investigating the use of so-called {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} control of combustion oscillations. This technique periodically injects fuel pulses into the combustor to disrupt the oscillating behavior. Recent results on active combustion control are presented in Gemmen et al. (1995) and Richards et al. (1995). This paper describes the status of METC efforts to avoid oscillations through simple design changes.

Richards, G.; Yip, M.; Gemmen, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reversed flow fluidized-bed combustion apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a fluidized-bed combustion apparatus provided with a U-shaped combustion zone. A cyclone is disposed in the combustion zone for recycling solid particulate material. The combustion zone configuration and the recycling feature provide relatively long residence times and low freeboard heights to maximize combustion of combustible material, reduce nitrogen oxides, and enhance sulfur oxide reduction.

Shang, Jer-Yu (Fairfax, VA); Mei, Joseph S. (Morgantown, WV); Wilson, John S. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

¿Qué es el Centro de Datos de Combustibles Alternativos y Vehículos Avanzados? (What Is the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - AFDC?), Programa de Technologias de Vehiculos (Vehicle Technologies Program - VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

May 2010 May 2010 combustible ahorrado por otros usuarios de AFDC. Ubicado en www.afdc.energy.gov, el sitio web recibe millones de visitas por año. Usted tiene preguntas, nosotros tenemos respuestas Admitámoslo. El cambio puede ser difícil, sobre todo cuando se trata de pasar de una tecnología de transporte convencional a otra alternativa. Pero no hay que preocuparse; el AFDC le brinda toda la información que necesita para navegar esta ruta. Cuenta con información para todos. A los recién llega- dos, el AFDC les brinda una introducción a los combustibles alternativos principales y tecnologías de vehículos avanzados. ¿Qué es el biodiesel? ¿Cómo se produce y distri- buye el gas natural? ¿Cuánto combustible se puede ahorrar reduciendo la marcha en

400

Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable technological interest in developingnew fuel-flexible combustion systems that can burn fuels such ashydrogenor syngas. Lean premixed systems have the potential to burn thesetypes of fuels with high efficiency and low NOx emissions due to reducedburnt gas temperatures. Although traditional scientific approaches basedon theory and laboratory experiment have played essential roles indeveloping our current understanding of premixed combustion, they areunable to meet the challenges of designing fuel-flexible lean premixedcombustion devices. Computation, with itsability to deal with complexityand its unlimited access to data, hasthe potential for addressing thesechallenges. Realizing this potential requires the ability to perform highfidelity simulations of turbulent lean premixed flames under realisticconditions. In this paper, we examine the specialized mathematicalstructure of these combustion problems and discuss simulation approachesthat exploit this structure. Using these ideas we can dramatically reducecomputational cost, making it possible to perform high-fidelitysimulations of realistic flames. We illustrate this methodology byconsidering ultra-lean hydrogen flames and discuss how this type ofsimulation is changing the way researchers study combustion.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Almgren, Ann S.; Lijewski, MichaelJ.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Cheng, Robert K.; Shepherd, Ian G.

2006-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview William Hallett Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Université d'Ottawa - University of Ottawa #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Introduction air fuel feedproducts xbed grate Packed Bed Combustion: fairly large particles of solid fuel on a grate, air supplied

Hallett, William L.H.

402

Fragments, Combustion and Earthquakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to show the advantages of introducing a geometric viewpoint and a non extensive formulation in the description of apparently unrelated phenomena: combustion and earthquakes. Here, it is shown how the introduction of a fragmentation analysis based on that formulation leads to find a common point for description of these phenomena

Oscar Sotolongo-Costa; Antonio Posadas

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Advanced Combustion Engine R&D 2003 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research & Development Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Gurpreet Singh December 2003 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D FY 2003 Progress Report ii Advanced Combustion Engine R&D FY 2003 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY AUTHORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

404

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants to someone by Lubricants to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research Materials Technologies Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is

405

Parameter identification for chemical models in combustion problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for parameter identification in combustion problems modeled by partial differential equations. The method includes local mesh refinement controlled by a posteriori error estimation with respect to the error in the parameters. ...

R. Becker; M. Braack; B. Vexler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low emission internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

Karaba, Albert M. (Muskegon, MI)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

LASER STABILIZATION FOR NEAR ZERO NO{sub x} GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Historically, the development of new industrial gas turbines has been primarily driven by the intent to achieve higher efficiency, lower operating costs and lower emissions. Higher efficiency and lower cost is obtained through higher turbine operating temperatures, while reduction in emissions is obtained by extending the lean operating limit of the combustor. However reduction in the lean stability limit of operation is limited greatly by the chemistry of the combustion process and by the occurrence of thermo-acoustic instabilities. Solar Turbines, CFD Research Corporation, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have teamed to advance the technology associated with laser-assisted ignition and flame stabilization, to a level where it could be incorporated onto a gas turbine combustor. The system being developed is expected to enhance the lean stability limit of the swirl stabilized combustion process and assist in reducing combustion oscillations. Such a system has the potential to allow operation at the ultra-lean conditions needed to achieve NO{sub x} emissions below 5 ppm without the need of exhaust treatment or catalytic technologies. The research effort was focused on analytically modeling laser-assisted flame stabilization using advanced CFD techniques, and experimentally demonstrating the technology, using a solid-state laser and low-cost durable optics. A pulsed laser beam was used to generate a plasma pool at strategic locations within the combustor flow field such that the energy from the plasma became an ignition source and helped maintain a flame at ultra lean operating conditions. The periodic plasma generation and decay was used to nullify the fluctuations in the heat release from the flame itself, thus decoupling the heat release from the combustor acoustics and effectively reducing the combustion oscillations. The program was built on an existing technology base and includes: extending LANL's existing laser stabilization experience to a sub-scale combustor rig, performing and validating CFD predictions, and ultimately conducting a full system demonstration in a multi-injector combustion system at Solar Turbines.

Vivek Khanna

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

Soloiu, Valentin

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Proceedings: EPRI Workshop on Condition and Remaining Life Assessment of Hot Gas Path Components of Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The severity of modern combustion turbine operation is a reflection of industry competition to achieve higher thermal efficiency. This competitive stance has resulted in new turbine designs and material systems that have at times outpaced condition and remaining life assessment (CARLA) technology. These proceedings summarize a two-day workshop on CARLA technology for hot section components of large combustion turbines.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A REAXFF REACTIVE FORCE FIELDFOR HYDROGEN COMBUSTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To investigate the reaction kinetics of hydrogen combustion at high pressure and high temperature conditions, we constructed a ReaxFF training set to include reaction energies (more)

Agrawalla, Satyam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Table 7.3a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

combustion plant use of petroleum. ... and other biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and

412

Natural gas-fired combustion turbines are generally used to meet ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combustion turbines in this article do not include combined-cycle units that operate at higher ... to operate than other types of power plants but can ...

413

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be manufactured having cement replacement with Illinois coal ashes and their blends in the range of 0 to 60LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Investigators technology for high-volume applications of Illinois coal combustion by-products generated by using both

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

414

Watershed Transformation Based Identification of the Combustion Region in an Oxy-coal Flame Image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increasingly stringent standards on pollutant emissions, oxy-coal combustion technologies are being proposed for both existing and new coal-fired power plants. However, there is lack of research to characterize this new type of combustion ... Keywords: edge detection, image enhancement, wavelet transformation, oxy-coal flame, watershed transformation, image segmentation

Tian Qiu; Yong Yan; Gang Lu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Integrated self-cleaning window assembly for optical transmission in combustion environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated window design for optical transmission in combustion environments is described. The invention consists of an integrated optical window design that prevents and removes the accumulation of carbon-based particulate matter and gaseous hydrocarbons through a combination of heat and catalysis. These windows will enable established optical technologies to be applied to combustion environments and their exhaust systems.

Kass, Michael D [Oak Ridge, TN

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Combustion Research Facility | A Department of Energy Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy-Duty Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion HCCISCCI Engine Fundamentals Spray Combustion Automotive Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion DISI Combustion...

417

Assessment of a Novel Direct Coal Conversion - Fuel Cell Technology for Electric Utility Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Technology Road Map identified a key technical challenge is "maintaining and strengthening a robust generation portfolio". Using our abundant coal resources in the most efficient way and in a way that limits CO2 emissions is among the toughest challenges facing the power industry. There are few new options or new technologies in the R&D pipeline that address this issue. Coal options available and being considered include: combustion systems such as pulverized coal (PC) and super critical systems w...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

Marriott, Craig D. (Rochester Hills, MI); Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

ADVANCED DIESEL ENGINE AND AFTERTREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR TIER 2 EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced diesel engine and aftertreatment technologies have been developed for multiple engine and vehicle platforms. Tier 2 (2007 and beyond) emissions levels have been demonstrated for a light truck vehicle over a FTP-75 test cycle on a vehicle chassis dynamometer. These low emissions levels are obtained while retaining the fuel economy advantage characteristic of diesel engines. The performance and emissions results were achieved by integrating advanced combustion strategies (CLEAN Combustion{copyright}) with prototype aftertreatment systems. CLEAN Combustion{copyright} allows partial control of exhaust species for aftertreatment integration in addition to simultaneous NOx and PM reduction. Analytical tools enabled the engine and aftertreatment sub-systems development and system integration. The experimental technology development methodology utilized a range of facilities to streamline development of the eventual solution including utilization of steady state and transient dynamometer test-beds to simulate chassis dynamometer test cycles.

Aneja, R.; Bolton, B; Oladipo, A; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z; Radwan, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Combustion turbine repowering: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation into the feasibility of repowering an existing reheat fossil unit utilizing combustion turbines. It identifies a potentially attractive repowering project, through the evaluation and selective elimination of a large number of alternatives. A conceptual design is performed on the selected alternative. Capital costs are developed for this alternative including new equipment and modifications to existing equipment. The results of an economic evaluation and sensitivity analysis are presented, to serve as a basis for a decision on whether or not to proceed with final design, procurement, and construction of the system. The steps presented in the report are intended to provide for the utility industry a detailed methodology for investigating repowering at a specific utility site. 4 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "includes combustion technologies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Investigation of mineral transformation and ash deposition during staged combustion. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document a recently completed four-year study to examine the impact of low-NOx firing technologies on ash formation and deposition while firing pulverized coal. Low-NOx burners and staged combustion inhibit NOx formation by restricting the amount of oxygen available to form a fuel-rich zone in which nitrogen compounds are reduced to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) rather than oxidized. Additional oxygen is provided downstream for complete combustion. Consequently, coal and mineral particles encounter different temperatures and oxygen concentrations when they are burned under low-NOx firing conditions than they do in conventionally-fired units. Two coals with distinctly different inorganic contents and ash characteristics were fired in a pilot-scale laboratory combustor under both conventional and staged combustion conditions. Ash and deposit samples were collected at various locations in the reactor and analyzed in order to assess the influence of staged combustion. This report is organized as follows. First, a background section provides the foundation needed in order to understand the motivation for and the results of the experimental program. The next section presents a description of the experimental apparatus and procedures, including the development the analytical methods critical to the study. Results of the analyses of coal, ash and deposit samples are then presented and discussed for each of the two coals. Finally, the report ends with a short summary and statement of conclusions.

Harb, J.N.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture refers to the removal of the carbon content of a fuel before it is burned, thereby converting a fossil resource to a carbon- free energy carrier. Pre-combustion CO2 capture is considered to be less expensive

423

Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)