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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Increase of unit efficiency by improved waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

For coal-fired power plants with flue gas desulfurization by wet scrubbing and desulfurized exhaust gas discharge via cooling tower, a further improvement of new power plant efficiency is possible by exhaust gas heat recovery. The waste heat of exhaust gas is extracted in a flue gas cooler before the wet scrubber and recovered for combustion air and/or feedwater heating by either direct or indirect coupling of heat transfer. Different process configurations for heat recovery system are described and evaluated with regard to net unit improvement. For unite firing bituminous coal an increase of net unit efficiency of 0.25 to 0.7 percentage points and for lignite 0.7 to 1.6 percentage points can be realized depending on the process configurations of the heat recovery systems.

Bauer, G.; Lankes, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

5

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation covers typical sources of waste heat from process heating equipment, characteristics of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power.

6

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

7

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

9

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

10

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

13

Sundstrand waste heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The two programs discussed in this report deal with the use of organic Rankine cycle systems as a means of producing electrical or mechanical power from energy in industrial processes' exhaust. Both programs deal with the design, development, demonstration, and economic evaluation of a 600kWe organic Rankine cycle system designed to recover energy from the exhaust of industrial processes with exhaust gas temperatures of 600/sup 0/F or above. The work done has, through the successful operation of the units installed, demonstrated the technical feasibility of utilizing an organic Rankine cycle bottoming system as a means of conserving energy through waste heat utilization. Continued operation at several sites has also demonstrated the soundness of the design, overall system reliability, and low operating cost. In addition, the basis under which this technology is economically viable in industrial applications was established. As a result of market studies and experience gained from the application of the units addressed in this report, it is concluded that there is a significant market for the equipment at the installed cost level of $1200/kWe to $1500/kWe and that this goal is achievable in the proper manufacturing environment. 54 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Waste Heat as Energy Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

References on waste heat utilization were compiled, covering citations from the NTIS data base for the period 1964 to March 1978. The bibliography contains 253 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the pre...

Prof. Dr. Anthony Delyannis; Dr. Euridike-Emmy Delyannis

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for integration into selected waste heat recovery applications.

16

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using RelaxorWaste heat Pyroelectric energy

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. ”Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. ” Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes. ”

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

19

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

20

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference (presentation) - "Status of a Cylindrical Waste Heat Power Generator for Vehicles Development Program", J. LaGrandeur, L. Bell, D. Crane *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or otherwise restricted information Project ID ace47lagrandeur Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- 2009 Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

22

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Start Date: Oct '04 Program End date: Oct '10 Percent Complete: 80% 2 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review- June...

23

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

24

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

25

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Development of a 100-Watt High...

26

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Presents successful...

27

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development...

28

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-- Washington D.C. ace47lagrandeur.pdf More Documents & Publications Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery...

29

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

30

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

31

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

32

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

33

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

36

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

37

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions.

38

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

39

Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

Meisner, Gregory P

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermoelectric recovery of waste heat -- Case studies  

SciTech Connect

The use of waste heat as an energy source for thermoelectric generation largely removes the constraint for the wide scale application of this technology imposed by its relatively low conversion efficiency (typically about 5%). Paradoxically, in some parasitic applications, a low conversion efficiency can be viewed as a distinct advantage. However, commercially available thermoelectric modules are designed primarily for refrigerating applications and are less reliable when operated at elevated temperatures. Consequently, a major factor which determines the economic competitiveness of thermoelectric recovery of waste heat is the cost per watt divided by the mean-time between module failures. In this paper is reported the development of a waste, warm water powered thermoelectric generator, one target in a NEDO sponsored project to economically recover waste heat. As an application of this technology case studies are considered in which thermoelectric generators are operated in both active and parasitic modes to generate electrical power for a central heating system. It is concluded that, in applications when the supply of heat essentially is free as with waste heat, thermoelectrics can compete economically with conventional methods of electrical power generation. Also, in this situation, and when the generating system is operated in a parasitic mode, conversion efficiency is not an important consideration.

Rowe, M.D.; Min, G.; Williams, S.G.K.; Aoune, A. [Cardiff School of Engineering (United Kingdom). Div. of Electronic Engineering; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kuznetsov, V.L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fu, L.W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Microelectronics Inst.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3...

43

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

itself * Waste heat recovery or auxiliary or adjoining systems within a plant * Waste heat to power conversion Recycle Copyrighted - E3M Inc. August 20, 2009 Arvind Thekdi, E3M...

44

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generator (Waste Heat 1) - TEG 1 (preliminary assembly and testing) - TEG 2 (Bi-Te modules) - TEG 3 (Skutterudite and Bi-Te modules) * Develop Cost-Effective TEG (Waste Heat...

45

Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle 2005...

46

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Waste-heat recovery in batch processes using heat storage  

SciTech Connect

The waste-heat recovery in batch processes has been studied using the pinch-point method. The aim of the work has been to investigate theoretical and practical approaches to the design of heat-exchanger networks, including heat storage, for waste-heat recovery in batch processes. The study is limited to the incorporation of energy-storage systems based on fixed-temperature variable-mass stores. The background for preferring this to the alternatives (variable-temperature fixed-mass and constant-mass constant-temperature (latent-heat) stores) is given. It is shown that the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method (time average model, TAM) can be achieved by locating energy stores at either end of each process stream. This theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. A simple procedure for determining a number of heat-storage tanks sufficient to achieve the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method is described. This procedure relies on combinatorial considerations, and could therefore be labeled the combinatorial method for incorporation of heat storage in heat-exchanger networks. Qualitative arguments justifying the procedure are presented. For simple systems, waste-heat recovery systems with only three heat-storage temperatures (a hot storage, a cold storage, and a heat store at the pinch temperature) often can achieve the maximum energy-saving targets. Through case studies, six of which are presented, it is found that a theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. The description of these six cases is intended to be sufficiently detailed to serve as benchmark cases for development of alternative methods.

Stoltze, S.; Mikkelsen, J.; Lorentzen, B.; Petersen, P.M.; Qvale, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Energetics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L. [SRRI, Springfield, MA (United States); Davis, J.J. [Deltak, Minon, MN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet recommends installing waste heat recovery systems for fuel-fired furnaces to increase the energy efficiency of process heating systems.

54

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

55

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorand Simulation of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System forControl of Organic Rankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Industrial waste heat recovery and cogeneration involving organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a systematic approach for energy integration involving waste heat recovery through an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The proposed approach is based...

César Giovani Gutiérrez-Arriaga…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging,...

58

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

59

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement.

60

Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Process simulation of refinery units including chemical reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process simulation methods for design and operation of refinery units are well established as long as no chemical reactors are included. The feedstocks are divided into pseudo-components which enables calculation of phase equilibria and transport properties. When chemical reactors are present some chemical conversion takes place which obviously affects the nature of the pseudo-components and their properties. The stream leaving the reactor will not only be of a different composition than the stream entering the reactor but in addition, the pseudo-components making up the outlet stream will also have other physical properties than the ones in the inlet stream. These changes affect not only the reactor unit but also the simulation of the whole flow-sheet. The paper presents a detailed model for an adiabatic distillate hydrotreater which takes into account the elemental composition of the feed. A special simulation strategy has been developed to incorporate such reactor units into process simulators. Finally, the simulation strategy is illustrated for a hydrotreating plant.

Jens A. Hansen; Barry H. Cooper

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Waste-heat utilization. (Latest citations from the U. S. Patent data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning processes employed for the recovery of useful heat from the environment, or from equipment which generates waste heat. Heat pump systems, furnaces, industrial boilers, and systems employed in the recovery of heat from internal combustion engines are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Utilization of waste heat stream in distillation  

SciTech Connect

Cost of separation can be reduced by utilizing all available energy streams at various temperature levels. In the simplest case a waste energy heat stream can be used to partially vaporize a liquid feed stream. A more beneficial process involves an entire evaporation of a portion of the feed and introducing it into a column below the liquid portion of the feed. One can also use the waste energy stream as a heating medium in an intermediate reboiler in the column. There is, however, a limit to the amount of the waste energy that can be utilized in each case, beyond which this approach is no longer beneficial. Detailed analysis of the waste heat utilization enables one to determine this limit and compare each of these flowsheet options.

Fidkowski, Z.T.; Agrawal, R. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-L. “Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heatNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

68

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling telluride TEMs. Key words: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

Xu, Xianfan

69

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-Pilon, L. “Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting usingNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

United States/Mexico electricity trade study. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

During energy discussions between the United States and Mexico, it was suggested that the two countries revisit the issue of enhanced electricity trade because 10 years had elapsed since this issue was first studied. Responsibility to organize the updated study was jointly assigned to the US and to the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The study highlights the opportunities for increased cooperation among the electric utilities in the U.S. and Mexico. Direct benefits could include increased reliability of electric power service and cost savings through diversity of peak demand patterns and locational benefits associated with the siting of new generation sources. Indirect benefits could include improved economic and employment opportunities, especially in the border areas of both countries. While the study indicates that increased electricity trade is possible, there are significant technical and economic issues to consider. Any major increase in electricity trade would require a higher level of cooperation and coordination among utilities in both countries and would need to be preceded by a detailed analysis of associated benefits and costs (including environmental impacts) on both a short-term and a long-term basis. Whether US utilities and CFE decide to pursue specific projects will depend upon the need for and economics of those projects. The study recommends that the work begun by the two utility groups be continued. The study also recommends that regulators at all levels consider policies to increase coordination and review among all relevant parties so that unnecessary delays in planning and constructing needed facilities are avoided. 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on Combustion Engines High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on...

72

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program...

73

High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation 2005 Diesel Engine...

74

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy Efficient Design of a Waste Heat Rejection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and oil preheaters. The heating requirements for these heat sinks are generally met by burning fossil fuels or even by using electric heaters while available waste heat is rejected to the surrounding environment using devices such as cooling towers...

Mehta, P.

77

Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

Prasad, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Waste-heat-driven refrigeration plants for freezer trawlers  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is made of the possibility of utilizing waste heat from a proposed gas-turbine fishing-vessel propulsion engine to power a refrigeration plant. On the basis of superior volume, maintenance and reliability, and cost and availability, the ammonia-water absorption system is chosen over the other waste-heat-driven option considered. It is found to be comparable in volume and in maintenance and reliability to the conventional vapor-compression system.

Kellen, A.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Model developed provides effective guidelines to designing thermoelectric generation systems for automotive waste heat recovery applications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

83

Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design  

SciTech Connect

The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

Jurns, John M. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bäck, Harald [Sweco Industry AB, P.O. Box 286, 201 22 Malmö (Sweden); Gierow, Martin [Lunds Energikoncernen AB, P.O. Box 25, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600 MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600 MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600 MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37 W/m2·K and the static pressure loss of 781 Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 2–4 g/(kW·h) and saving of water at 25–35 t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

88

NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Purdue ? GM Partnership on Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reviews results in developing commercially viable thermoelectric generators for efficient conversion of automotive exhaust waste heat to electricity

89

Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Developing a low and high temperature dual thermoelectric generation waste heat recovery system for light-duty vehicles.

90

Using ''waste'' heat to conserve energy  

SciTech Connect

The organic Rankine cycle diesel bottoming system (DRCDBS) is being tested at the Naval Air Station in Bermuda for viability in operational use. The system uses heat recovered from the exhaust gases of diesel/generator sets to power a turbine/generator unit. The system will be demonstrated for three years before operational use. A schematic for the system is given. Its daily KWh hours performance is calculated. Logistic support--maintainence and training--are also treated. Potential sites are being studied.

Cooper, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description As GHP systems offer substantial energy efficiency by leveraging earth's intrinsic thermal capacitance, they could play a pivotal role in achieving the DoE's Building Technologies Pro-gram's "zero energy" goal in heavily cooling-dominated climates. Moreover, SHR-augmented GHP systems, in particular, could play a vital role in reducing building energy consumption and limiting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in heavily cooling dominated states, like Texas, which are experiencing large increases in population and correspondingly, peak electricity demand. If only 0.1% of Texas,' Arizona's, New Mexico's and Nevada's nearly 15 million-or 15,000-homes were to install new (or convert their existing HVAC or heat pump system to) a full or hybrid GHP system, it would result in between $400 and $800 million USD of new economic activity, most of which would be domestic. Moreover, these 15,000 homes would cut their annual energy consumption-and concomitant GHG emissions-by roughly 40-70%; on average they would save about $1,000 USD in annual operating costs, collectively saving about $15 million USD annually. A conservative GHP industry estimate is that at least 900 people would be directly employed for every 10,000 GHP units installed.

93

Waste heat boiler optimization by entropy minimization principle  

SciTech Connect

A second law analysis has been undertaken for a waste heat boiler having an economizer, evaporator and superheater. Following the principle of minimization of entropy generation, a general equation for entropy generation number is derived, which incorporates all the operating variables. By differentiating the entropy generation number equation with respect to the operating parameters, various optimization parameters can be obtained. Few illustrations have been made to see the effect of various parameters on entropy generation number.

Reddy, B.V.; Murali, J.; Satheesh, V.S. [Vellore Engineering Coll. (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Nag, P.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kharagpur (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system. A technical case study  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R&D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R&D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA`s Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA's Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Waste heat recovery steam curves with unfired HRSGs  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of waste heat recovery steam curves for a sampling of gas turbines ranging in output from around 1 MW to more than 200 MW is presented. The gas turbine output data shown with each set of curves differs from the values given in the Performance Specifications section of the Handbook. That's because the values have been calculated to reflect the effects of a 4 inch inlet and 10 inch outlet pressure drop on power output (lower), heat rate (higher), mass flow (higher), and exhaust temperature (higher).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

99

Cylinder wall waste heat recovery from liquid-cooled internal combustion engines utilizing thermoelectric generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report is a dissertation proposal that focuses on the energy balance within an internal combustion engine with a unique coolant-based waste heat recovery… (more)

Armstead, John Randall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery by Use of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project is a combined analytical and experimental programme to investigate the feasibility of the Organic Rankine Cycle principle for waste heat recovery in industry....

Dipl.-Phys. G. Huppmann

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of design, fabrication, integration, and test of working prototype TEG for engine waste heat recovery on Suburban test vehicle, and continuing investigation of skutterudite materials systems

103

Energy Management in Olefins Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit...

Wells, T. A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight 5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight May 20, 2011 - 5:53pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 50 percent of the energy generated annually from all sources is lost as waste heat. Scientists have developed a high-efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that actively cools electronic devices, photovoltaic cells, computers and other large industrial systems while generating electricity. Scientists have linked platinum nanoparticles with algae proteins, commandeering photosynthesis to produce hydrogen -- research that will help scientists harvest light with solar fuels. Thanks to scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the billions

106

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae, Calvin Ng, Joseph Pateman University of British Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae Calvin Ng Joseph Pateman March. This investigation deals with the viability of building a waste heat powered greenhouse on the roof of the new SUB

107

Renewable energy of waste heat recovery system for automobiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system to recover waste heat comprised of eight thermoelectric generators (TEGs) to convert heat from the exhaust pipe of an automobile to electrical energy has been constructed. Simulations and experiments for the thermoelectric module in this system are undertaken to assess the feasibility of these applications. In order to estimate the temperature difference between thermoelectric elements a network of thermal resistors is constructed. The results assist in predicting power output of TEG module more precisely. Three configurations of heat sinks which are comprised of 10 22 and 44 fins are applied in this simulation. The results of the simulations show the average thermal resistance of these heat sinks in each section of the system with varied velocity of external flow. As the performance of a TEG module is influenced by an applied pressure through the effect of the thermal contact resistance we clamp the TE module to our experimental apparatus; the relation between power output and pressure applied in this case is presented. Besides simulations the system is designed and assembled. Measurements followed the connection of the system to the middle of an exhaust pipe. Through these simulations and experiments the power generated with a commercial TEG is presented. The results establish the fundamental development of materials that enhance the TEG efficiency for vehicles.

Cheng-Ting Hsu; Da-Jeng Yao; Ke-Jyun Ye; Ben Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

1. MATHEMATICS and SCIENCE (36 units minimum)1 Including Math 19, 20, 21 (or 41 & 42)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fundamentals elective, 3-5 units1 Required Depth Ā­ 38 units CEE 100 Managing Sustainable Building Projects, 4 Issues in Engineering, 4 units SUSTAINABILITY CEE 176A Energy Efficient Buildings, 3-4 units CEE 115 Goals and Methods for Sustainable Design of Buildings, 3-4 units ME 222 Beyond Green Theory: Workshop

Prinz, Friedrich B.

109

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

110

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A thermodynamic study of waste heat recovery from GT-MHR using organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation on the utilization of waste heat from a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) using different arrangements of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for power production. The con...

Mortaza Yari; S. M. S. Mahmoudi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Using Waste Heat for External Processes (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of the Using Waste Heat for External Processes fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to use waste heat in industrial applications. The temperature of exhaust gases from fuel-fired industrial processes depends mainly on the process temperature and the waste heat recovery method. Figure 1 shows the heat lost in exhaust gases at various exhaust gas temperatures and percentages of excess air. Energy from gases exhausted from higher temperature processes (primary processes) can be recovered and used for lower temperature processes (secondary processes). One example is to generate steam using waste heat boilers for the fluid heaters used in petroleum crude processing. In addition, many companies install heat exchangers on the exhaust stacks of furnaces and ovens to produce hot water or to generate hot air for space heating.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Analysis of recoverable waste heat of circulating cooling water in hot-stamping power system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article studies the possibility of using heat pump instead of cooling tower to decrease temperature and recover waste heat of circulating cooling water of power system. Making use of heat transfer theory ......

Panpan Qin; Hui Chen; Lili Chen; Chong Wang…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

Demirel, Melik C.

116

Thermal energy recovery of low grade waste heat in hydrogenation process; Återvinning av lågvärdig spillvärme från en hydreringsprocess.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The waste heat recovery technologies have become very relevant since many industrial plants continuously reject large amounts of thermal energy during normal operation which… (more)

Hedström, Sofia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat November 12, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? This new system allows manufacturers to convert heated wastewater and steam to energy. $834,000 Recovery Act tax credit is helping Ener-G-Rotors startup to commercialize their product. A three year return on investment equals $42,000 savings on average each year using the GEN4 System. Wastewater and steam can be a challenging resource for manufacturers to manage. The heated wastewater and steam are either lost or must be cooled

118

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partners 3 OBJECTIVESRELEVANCE - OVERALL Project objectives: * A detailed production cost analysis for volumes of 100,000 units per year and a discussion of how costs will be...

120

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

integration 3 OBJECTIVESRELEVANCE - OVERALL Project objectives: * Detailed production cost analysis for volumes of 100,000 units per year and a discussion of how costs will be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A review of different heat exchangers designs for increasing the diesel exhaust waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, after a short review of waste heat recovery technologies from diesel engines, the heat exchangers (HEXs) used in exhaust of engines is introduced as the most common way. So, a short review of the technologies that increase the heat transfer in \\{HEXs\\} is introduced and the availability of using them in the exhaust of engines is evaluated and finally a complete review of different \\{HEXs\\} which previously were designed for increasing the exhaust waste heat recovery is presented. Also, future view points for next \\{HEXs\\} designs are proposed to increase heat recovery from the exhaust of diesel engines.

M. Hatami; D.D. Ganji; M. Gorji-Bandpy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of adsorber bed designs in waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems for vehicle air conditioning and refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of adsorber bed designs in waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems for vehicle air conditioning Finned tube adsorber bed Specific cooling power Adsorber bed to adsorbent mass ratio a b s t r a c t Adsorber bed design strongly affects the performance of waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems (ACS

Bahrami, Majid

123

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs If you've ever driven by an industrial plant, you've probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this

124

Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

merge to form water thin film on tube condenser surface. The condensing mechanism will change from high efficiency dropwise condensation to low efficiency filmwise condensation. In this proposal, surface system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

125

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Hybrid Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Using advanced materials, thermoelectric conversion of efficiencies on the order of 20% may be possible in the near future. Thermoelectric generators offer potential to increase vehicle fuel economy by recapturing a portion of the waste heat from the engine exhaust and generating electricity to power vehicle accessory or traction loads.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery Johan Peralez steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition engine, focusing in particular results on a steam process for SI engines, [3] on generic control issues and [4] which provides a comp

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

127

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heat-Exchanger Network Synthesis Involving Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article aims to present a mathematical model for the synthesis of a heat-exchanger network (HEN) which can be integrated with an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for the recovery of low-grade waste heat from the heat surplus zone of the background ...

Cheng-Liang Chen; Feng-Yi Chang; Tzu-Hsiang Chao; Hui-Chu Chen; Jui-Yuan Lee

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump, cryogenic refrigeration, and air liquefaction applications [3]. Organic Rankine cycles use heat harvesting Olsen cycle a b s t r a c t Waste heat can be directly converted into electrical energy by performing the Olsen cycle on pyroelectric materials. The Olsen cycle consists of two isothermal and two

Pilon, Laurent

131

The relative contribution of waste heat from power plants to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence on global climate change, being caused primarily by rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, is perceived as fairly conclusive. It is generally attributed to the enhanced greenhouse effect, resulting from higher levels of trapped heat radiation by increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases such as CO2 (carbon dioxide). Much of these gases originate from power plants and fossil fuel combustion. However, the fate of vast amounts of waste heat rejected into the environment has evaded serious scholarly research. While 1 kWh electricity generation in a typical condensing coal-fired power plant emits around 1 kg of CO2, it also puts about 2 kWh energy into the environment as low grade heat. For nuclear (fission) electricity the waste heat release per kWh is somewhat higher despite much lower CO2 releases. This paper evaluates the impact of waste heat rejection combined with CO2 emissions using Finland and California as case examples. The immediate effects of waste heat release from power production and radiative forcing by CO2 are shown to be similar. However, the long-term (hundred years) global warming by CO2-caused radiative forcing is about twenty-five times stronger than the immediate effects, being responsible for around 92% of the heat-up caused by electricity production.

R. Zevenhoven; A. Beyene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a light-duty diesel engine, which require utilization of the waste energy found in the coolant, EGR, and exhaust streams, may be increased through the development of a Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

134

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conservation of energy by its recovery from low temperature waste heat is of increasing importance in today's world energy crisis. The Organic Rankine Cycle is a cost efficient and proven method of converting low temperature (200-400o F) waste...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat losses associated with process heating equipment.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermodynamic analysis of a low-pressure economizer based waste heat recovery system for a coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An LPE (low-pressure economizer) based waste heat recovery system for a CFPP (coal-fired power plant) is investigated thermodynamically. With the installation of LPE in the flue before the FGD (flue gas desulfurizer), the heat contained in the exhaust flue gas can be recovered effectively and the water consumption can be reduced in the FGD resulted from the temperature dropped flue gas. The impacts on the related apparatuses after installing LPE in a CFPP are analyzed and the internal relationships among correlated parameters are presented. The efficiencies of LPE installed in a CFPP evaluated by the first law, the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are also compared and analyzed. A detailed case study based on a 350 MW CFPP unit is presented and the variations of the thermal performance after the installation of LPE are investigated. The results show that the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are increased which can be indicators to evaluate the performance of the LPE system while the first law efficiency is decreased after installing LPE. Results also show that the saving of SCE (standard coal equivalent) is 3.85 g/(kW·h) for this CFPP unit under full load after installing LPE.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei; Shinan Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of High-efficiency Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Utililization  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this . CRADA are: 1) Investigation of atomistic structure and nucleation of nanoprecipitates in (PbTe){sub I-x}(AgSbTe2){sub x} (LAST) system; and 2) Development of non-equilibrium synthesis of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. We have made significant accomplishment in both areas. We studied the structure of LAST materials using high resolution imaging, nanoelectron diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum, arid electron energy loss spectrum, and observed a range of nanoparticles The results, published in J. of Applied Physics, provide quantitative structure information about nanoparticles, that is essential for the understanding of the origin of the high thermoelectric performance in this class of materials. We coordinated non-equilibrium synthesis and characterization of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery application. Our results, published in J. of Electronic Materials, show enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit and robust mechanical properties in bulk . filled skutterudites.

Li, Qiang

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

139

A ground-coupled storage heat pump system with waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an experimental single-family residence that was constructed to demonstrate integration of waste heat recovery and seasonal energy storage using both a ventilating and a ground-coupled heat pump. Called the Idaho energy Conservation Technology House, it combines superinsulated home construction with a ventilating hot water heater and a ground coupled water-to-water heat pump system. The ground heat exchangers are designed to economically promote seasonal and waste heat storage. Construction of the house was completed in the spring of 1989. Located in Moscow, Idaho, the house is occupied by a family of three. The 3,500 ft{sup 2} (325 m{sup 2}) two-story house combines several unique sub-systems that all interact to minimize energy consumption for space heating and cooling, and domestic hot water.

Drown, D.C.; Braven, K.R.D. (Univ. of Idaho, ID (US)); Kast, T.P. (Thermal Dynamic Towers, Boulder, CO (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Minimum variance control of organic Rankine cycle based waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, an online self-tuning generalized minimum variance (GMV) controller is proposed for a 100 KW waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC process model is formulated by the controlled autoregressive moving average (CARMA) model whose parameters are identified using the recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm with forgetting factor. The generalized minimum variance algorithm is applied to regulate ORC based waste heat recovery system. The contributions of this work are twofold: (1) the proposed control strategy is formulated under the data-driven framework, which does not need the precise mathematic model; (2) this proposed method is applied to handle tracking set-point variations and process disturbances by improved minimum objective GMV function. The performance of GMV controller is compared with the PID controller. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy can achieve satisfactory set-point tracking and disturbance rejection performance.

Guolian Hou; Shanshan Bi; Mingming Lin; Jianhua Zhang; Jinliang Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project objective is to develop the scroll expander for Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems to be used in medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits of the prototype system.

143

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARp?) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution Benjamin Brant Sabine Brueske Donald Erickson Riyaz Papar Planetec Planetec Energy Concepts Company Energy... in Denver, Colorado. The Waste Heat Ammo nia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP?) is based on a patented process and cycle design developed by Energy Concepts Co. (ECC) to cost effectively re cover 73,000 barrels a year of salable LPGs and gasoline...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

144

EXERGY ANALYSIS AND ENTROPY GENERATION MINIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FOR ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy recovery from waste heat is attracting more and more attention. All electronic systems consume electricity but only a fraction of it is used for information processing and for human interfaces, such as displays. Lots of energy is dissipated as heat. There are some discussions on waste heat recovery from the electronic systems such as laptop computers. However the efficiency of energy conversion for such utilization is not very attractive due to the maximum allowable temperature of the heat source devices. This leads to very low limits of Carnot efficiency. In contrast to thermodynamic heat engines, Brayton cycle, free piston Stirling engines, etc., authors previously reported that thermoelectric (TE) can be a cost-effective device if the TE and the heat sink are co-optimized, and if some parasitic effects could be reduced. Since the heat already exists and it is free, the additional cost and energy payback time are the key measures to evaluate the value of the energy recovery system. In this report, we will start with the optimum model of the TE power generation system. Then, theoretical maximum output, cost impact and energy payback are evaluated in the examples of electronics system. Entropy Generation Minimization (EGM) is a method already familiar in thermal management of electronics. The optimum thermoelectric waste heat recovery design is compared with the EGM approach. Exergy analysis evaluates the useful energy flow in the optimum TE system. This comprehensive analysis is used to predict the potential future impact of the TE material development, as the dimensionless figure-ofmerit (ZT) is improved.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

145

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, February 1-July 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Griffith, J.; Joshi, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 13 to 15 million BTU per hour for fired boiler efficiencies of 80% to 70% respectively. The savings represents 85 to 90% of the energy entering the waste heat boiler. Equiva lent furnace efficiency increases from 25% to over 60% on high fire... Fired Boiler Efficiency 0.70 0.75 0.80 Energy Savings Furnace Efficiency Corresponding Peak Fuel Equivalent at High (1) . Savi ngs Fire on Melt 4453 kw (15.1x10 6 BTU/hr) 69% 4156 kw (14.1x10 6 BTU/hr) 66% 3896 kw (13.3x10 6 BTU/hr) 63% (1...

Kreeger, A. H.

147

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery – Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development of thermoacoustic engine operating by waste heat from cooking stove  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are about 1.5 billion people worldwide use biomass as their primary form of energy in household cooking[1]. They do not have access to electricity and are too remote to benefit from grid electrical supply. In many rural communities stoves are made without technical advancements mostly using open fires cooking stoves which have been proven to be extremely low efficiency and about 93% of the energy generated is lost during cooking. The cooking is done inside a dwelling and creates significant health hazard to the family members and pollution to environment. SCORE (www.score.uk.com) is an international collaboration research project to design and build a low-cost high efficiency woodstove that uses about half amount of the wood of an open wood fire and uses the waste heat of the stove to power a thermoacoustic engine (TAE) to produce electricity for applications such as LED lighting charging mobile phones or charging a 12V battery. This paper reviews on the development of two types of the thermoacoustic engine powered by waste heat from cooking stove which is either using Propane gas or burning of wood as a cooking energy to produce an acceptable amount of electricity for the use of rural communities.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dynamic modeling and optimal control strategy of waste heat recovery Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) are particularly suitable for recovering energy from low-grade heat sources. This paper describes the behavior of a small-scale ORC used to recover energy from a variable flow rate and temperature waste heat source. A traditional static model is unable to predict transient behavior in a cycle with a varying thermal source, whereas this capability is essential for simulating an appropriate cycle control strategy during part-load operation and start and stop procedures. A dynamic model of the ORC is therefore proposed focusing specifically on the time-varying performance of the heat exchangers, the dynamics of the other components being of minor importance. Three different control strategies are proposed and compared. The simulation results show that a model predictive control strategy based on the steady-state optimization of the cycle under various conditions is the one showing the best results.

Sylvain Quoilin; Richard Aumann; Andreas Grill; Andreas Schuster; Vincent Lemort; Hartmut Spliethoff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy storage for desalination processes powered by renewable energy and waste heat sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Desalination has become imperative as a drinking water source for many parts of the world. Due to the large quantities of thermal energy and high quality electricity requirements for water purification, the desalination industry depends on waste heat resources and renewable energy sources such as solar collectors, photovoltaic arrays, geothermal and wind and tidal energy sources. Considering the mismatch between the source supply and demand and intermittent nature of these energy resources, energy storage is a must for reliable and continuous operation of desalination facilities. Thermal energy storage (TES) requires a suitable medium for storage and circulation while the photovoltaic/wind generated electricity needs to be stored in batteries for later use. Desalination technologies that utilize thermal energy and thus require storage for uninterrupted process operation are multi-stage flash distillation (MSF), multi-effect evaporation (MED), low temperature desalination (LTD) and humidification–dehumidification (HD) and membrane distillation (MD). Energy accumulation, storage and supply are the key components of energy storage concept which improve process performance along with better resource economics, and minimum environmental impact. Similarly, the battery energy storage (BES) is essential to store electrical energy for electrodialysis (ED), reverse osmosis (RO) and mechanical vapor compression (MVC) technologies. This research-review paper provides a critical review on current energy storage options for different desalination processes powered by various renewable energy and waste heat sources with focus on thermal energy storage and battery energy storage systems. Principles of energy storage (thermal and electrical energy) are discussed with details on the design, sizing, and economics for desalination process applications.

Veera Gnaneswar Gude

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Study on the Application of High Temperature Heat Pump to Recover Waste Heat of Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Being an energy-saving equipment with great development potential, high temperature heat pump is becoming one of the research hotspots in recent years. However, there is little research about the application of high temperature heat pump on ships as ... Keywords: marine diesel engine, cooling water, waste heat recovery, high temperature heat pump

Shi-jie Liu; Wu Chen; Zhen-xiong Cai; Chao-yu Zheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from and efficiency of those systems. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for recovering internal combustion engines presented in [1]. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

157

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize the energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) system is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, recirculating alumina particles are heated by the flue gas in a raining bed. The hot particles are then removed from the bed and placed in a fluidized bed where they are fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is preheated. The cooled particles are then returned to the raining bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this final report, the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a full-scale FBWHR system is detailed.

Patch, K.D.; Cole, W.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750°C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hčroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling reaction quench times in the waste heat boiler of a Claus plant  

SciTech Connect

At the high temperatures found in the modified Claus reaction furnace, the thermal decomposition and oxidation of H[sub 2]S yields large quantities of desirable products, gaseous hydrogen (H[sub 2]) and sulfur (S[sub 2]). However, as the temperature of the gas stream is lowered in the waste heat boiler (WHB) located downstream of the furnace, the reverse reaction occurs leading to reassociation of H[sub 2] and S[sub 2] molecules. To examine the reaction quenching capabilities of the WHB, a rigorous computer model was developed incorporating recently published intrinsic kinetic data. A sensitivity study performed with the model demonstrated that WHBs have a wide range of operation with gas mass flux in the tubes from 4 to 24 kg/(m[sup 2] [center dot] s). Most important, the model showed that is was possible to operate WHBs such that quench times could be decreased to 40 ms, which is a reduction by 60% compared to a base case scenario. Furthermore, hydrogen production could be increased by over 20% simply by reconfiguring the WHB tubes.

Nasato, L.V.; Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Potential of organic Rankine cycle using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The performance of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) systems using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for recovering waste heat of flue gas from industrial boiler is examined on the basis of thermodynamics and thermo-economics under different operating conditions. In order to explore the potential of the mixtures as the working fluids in the ORC, the effects of various mixtures with different components and composition proportions on the system performance have been analyzed. The results show that the compositions of the mixtures have an important effect on the ORC system performance, which is associated with the temperature glide during the phase change of mixtures. From the point of thermodynamics, the performance of the ORC system is not always improved by employing the mixtures as the working fluids. The merit of the mixtures is related to the restrictive conditions of the ORC, different operating conditions results in different conclusions. At a fixed pinch point temperature difference, the small mean heat transfer temperature difference in heat exchangers will lead to a larger heat transfer area and the larger total cost of the ORC system. Compared with the ORC with pure working fluids, the ORC with the mixtures presents a poor economical performance.

You-Rong Li; Mei-Tang Du; Chun-Mei Wu; Shuang-Ying Wu; Chao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Performance Analysis of Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery System for Stationary CNG Engine Based on Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to improve the electric efficiency of a stationary compressed natural gas (CNG) engine, a set of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system with internal heat exchanger (IHE) is designed to recover exhaust energy that is used to generate electricity. R416A is selected as the working fluid for the waste heat recovery system. According to the first and second laws of thermodynamics, the performances of the ORC system for waste heat recovery are discussed based on the analysis of engine exhaust waste heat characteristics. Subsequently, the stationary CNG engine-ORC with IHE combined system is presented. The electric efficiency and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) are introduced to evaluate the operating performances of the combined system. The results show that, when the evaporation pressure is 3.5MPa and the engine is operating at the rated condition, the net power output and the thermal efficiency of the ORC system with IHE can reach up to 62.7kW and 12.5%, respectively. Compared with the stationary CNG engine, the electric efficiency of the combined system can be increased by a maximum 6.0%, while the BSFC can be reduced by a maximum 5.0%.

Songsong Song; Hongguang Zhang; Zongyong. Lou; Fubin Yang; Kai Yang; Hongjin Wang; Chen Bei; Ying Chang; Baofeng Yao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

164

A Descriptive Study of Additional Risk Minimization Measures Included in Risk Management Plans Reviewed by the United Kingdom Regulatory Authority  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ninety-five (42%) of 225 RMPs assessed by the MHRA included ARMMs. ARMMs were used more frequently for biological than chemical products (47 vs. 40%). The most common forms of ARMMs were educational materials for...

Sophie Keddie

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100Ā°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60Ā°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A new conceptual cold-end design of boilers for coal-fired power plants with waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract After conducting an in-depth analysis of the conventional boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery, this work proposed a new conceptual boiler cold-end design integrated with the steam cycle in a 1000 MW CFPP, in which the preheating of air was divided into high-temperature air preheater (HTAP), main air preheater (MAP) and low-temperature air preheater (LTAP). The HTAP and an economizer were installed in separate flue ducts, and the low temperature economizer (LTE) was situated between the MAP and the LTAP in the main flue duct to heat the condensed water. In the proposed boiler cold-end design, the flue gas waste heat was not only used to heat condensed water, but also to further preheat the combustion air. The air temperature at the air-preheater outlet increases and part of the steam bleeds with high exergy can be saved, resulting in greater energy-savings and better economics. Results showed that, for a typical 1000 MW CFPP in China, using the proposed boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery could produce 13.3 MWe additional net power output with a heat rate reduction of approximately 112.0 kJ/kW h and could yield a net benefit of up to $85.8 M per year, which is much greater than those of the conventional cases. Exergy destruction is also reduced from 49.9 MWth in the conventional boiler cold-end design to 39.6 MWth in the proposed design.

Yongping Yang; Cheng Xu; Gang Xu; Yu Han; Yaxiong Fang; Dongke Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of contamination, as necessary. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NSO

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Describes TEG systems built at MSU to mitigate couple failures and a cost-benefit analysis for a system used as an energy recovery system ? auxiliary power unit in an over-the-road truck system.

175

Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Volume II. Final report, 1 November 1976-1 November 1979  

SciTech Connect

A three-year research study on the constructive use of electric generating station waste heat in cooling effluents for fish production is presented. This volume specifically describes that part of the research conducted by Trenton State College. Water temperatures from the discharge canal of the Mercer Generating Station in New Jersey were blended with those from the Delaware River by pumps installed in strategic locations to achieve desired temperatures. The report further describes how recirculation is controlled during chlorination periods by activating and de-activating certain pumps. As a result of this procedure, plus an oxygen injection system, trout density was greatly increased. Techniques for growing and maintaining shrimp larvae and early juveniles in nursery systems are described. Harvest densities of the shellfish did not compare with those obtained for finfish.

Eble, A.F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

"Computers may be thought of as engines for transforming free energy into waste heat and mathematical work", Charles H. Bennett [Ben82  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5. "Computers may be thought of as engines for transforming free energy into waste heat the PORT section to obtain the complete input port characterization of the DUT: 1. Number of ports 2. Input port names and types (clock, connected to a constant or random value) 3. Input port parameters

Todorovich, ElĆ­as

177

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Feasibility study of heat pumps for waste heat recovery in industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. A case study was thus carried out at an applicable local industry (brewery) to assess the feasibility of implementing the heat pump for… (more)

De Waal, Devin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Brayton and Rankine alternatives for diesel waste heat exploitation  

SciTech Connect

A diesel engine may produce exhaust-gas thermal energy in excess of that needed for turbocharging. Alternatives for exploitation of the energy by producing work may be direct expansion through a gas turbine (completing a Brayton cycle that begins with the engine's compression and combustion), or transfer of heat into a Rankine cycle. It is demonstrated that either alternative may have a domain in which it is superior in work done, or in exhaust volume per unit mass of diesel exhaust. Computation models are developed and demonstrated for finding the boundaries along which the Rankine and Brayton alternatives have equal merit in either work or exhaust volume.

Woodward, J.B. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect

This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

DOE/NV

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will include rapid synthesis of thermoelectric materials, different device geometries, heat sink designs, and durability and long-term performance tests

182

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development. Semiannual report, February 1, 1983-July 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize this energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air from the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this report, the accomplishments of the proceeding six-month period are described.

Cole, W. E.; De Saro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Demonstration of and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO 2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

184

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF THERMAL-DEGRADATION RATES OF SOME CANDIDATE RANKINE-CYCLE ORGANIC WORKING FLUIDS FOR CONVERSION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT INTO POWER Mohan L. Jain, Jack Demirgian, John L. Krazinski, and H. Bushby Argonne National Laboratory..., Argonne, Illinois Howard Mattes and John Purcell U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT Serious concerns over the long-term thermal In a previous study [1] based on systems stability of organic working fluids and its effect analysis and covering...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Applications guide for waste heat recovery. Final Report, May-Dec. 1982  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey is assessed. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed: also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle R D.

Moynihan, P.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States? Contributing factors include smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the risk of stroke or heart attack. Ā· Weight loss will improve heart health and heart function. Ā· Reduced6:00 AM Wake up Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States history of heart disease. 7:30 AM Breakfast: Whole grain cereal, 1 medium orange and 1 cup fat-free milk

188

Specifying Waste Heat Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, refineries,kilns, incineration systems and cogeneration and combined cycle plants,to mention a few applications.Depending on several factors such as quantity of gas or steam floW,cleanl1ness of gas,gas and steam pressure and space availabilitY,they may... of incinerator.whether fixed bed.rotary kiln or fluid bed.Sla9ging constituents present in the gas can result in bridging of tubes by molten salts if tube spacing is not wide,particularly at the boiler inlet.Ash hoppers ,soot blowers and cleaning lanes...

Ganapathy, V.

189

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews of some twelve recuperator manufacturers and research organizations. Of the reports reviewed, the consensus was that the majority of recuperators used in the U.S. are constructed of 300...

Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement in the United States Petroleum Refining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam  Install SRU Waste Heat Boiler  Reduce Boiler Steam  Install SRU Waste Heat Boiler  Reduce Boiler Blowdown Steam  Install SRU Waste Heat Boiler  Install SMR 

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Proactive Design of n-Type (In, Ce) Filled Skutterudites Enabling High-Temperature Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermoelectric and structural properties of n-type (In, Ce) filled skutterudites including power factors and ZT as a function of temperature are presented

193

Charging of the Experimental High Temperature BTES Via CHP Unit - Early Results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new, experimental borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) has been constructed in Paskov, Czech Republic. The storage consists of 16 energy boreholes performed to the depth of 60 m. In the boreholes the excessive waste heat from the CHP unit is stored. In this paper the BTES design and results of the rock environment response to the BTES charging and resting phase are briefly presented.

David Grycz; Petr Hemza; Zdenek Rozehnal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Modeling the Combination of Impacts Caused by Waste Heat Discharge from Power Plant Cooling Systems into Offshore Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology for spatial modeling of thermal discharge into water systems, including calculations of velocity field evolution, pressure and temperature fields for gas and liquid media, d...

A. Andrijievskij; A. Lukashevich…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development and experimental study on organic Rankine cycle system with single-screw expander for waste heat recovery from exhaust of diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A single-screw expander with 155 mm diameter screw has been developed. A spiral-tube type evaporator and an aluminum multi-channel parallel type condenser have also been developed with weight of 147 kg and 78 kg, respectively. Based on the development of above components, an ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system prototype was assembled and tested for waste heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust. An experimental system was built for this ORC system, and experiments were conducted for different expander torque and diesel engine loads. Influences of expander torque and diesel engine loads on the performances of ORC system were studied. The results indicated that the maximum of the power output is 10.38 kW and the biggest ORC efficiency and overall system efficiency are respectively 6.48% and 43.8%, which are achieved at 250 kW of diesel engine output. Meanwhile the biggest improvement of overall system efficiency is 1.53%. The maximums of volume efficiency, adiabatic efficiency and total efficiency of single-screw expander are 90.73%, 73.25% and 57.88%, respectively.

Ye-Qiang Zhang; Yu-Ting Wu; Guo-Dong Xia; Chong-Fang Ma; Wei-Ning Ji; Shan-Wei Liu; Kai Yang; Fu-Bin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Application guide for waste heat recovery with organic Rankine cycle equipment. Final report May-Dec 82  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed; also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle RandD.

Moynihan, P.I.

1983-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

A newly designed economizer to improve waste heat recovery: A case study in a pasteurized milk plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An economizer is normally employed to perform heat recovery from hot exhaust gases to cold fluid. In this work, a newly designed economizer is devised to achieve high heat recovery in a pasteurized milk plant. In the economizer, the hot exhaust gas is divided into two channels flowing up on the left and right sides. After that, it is moving down passing over aligned banks of tubes, which water is flowing inside, in a triple passes fashion. Moreover, three dimensional (3D) models with heat transfer including fluid dynamic have been developed, validated by actual plant data and used to evaluate the performance of the economizer. Simulation results indicate that the newly designed economizer can recover the heat loss of 38% and can achieve the cost saving of 13%.

Sathit Niamsuwan; Paisan Kittisupakorn; Iqbal M. Mujtaba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Unit - Final Technical Report for EE0002856  

SciTech Connect

This binary plant is the first high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a butane based cycle are not necessary. The unit is modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. This project proves the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy for Nevada, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

McDonald, Dale Edward

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced ''adiabatic'' diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum improvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

Bailey, M.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the results of Phase I sampling, the analytical program for Phase II investigation may be reduced. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will concentrate on geophysical surveys to confirm the presence or absence of disposed waste within a CAS and verify the boundaries of disposal areas; penetrate disposal feature covers via excavation and/or drilling; perform geodetic surveys; and be used to collect both soil and environmental samples for laboratory analyses. Phase II will deal only with those CASs where a contaminant of concern has been identified. This phase will involve the collection of additional soil and/or environmental samples for laboratory analyses. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Status and Opportunities for Improving the Consistency of Technical Reference Manuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include parameters such as waste-heat factors, in-servicegreater than 1. Generally, waste heat factors are determinedusing ASHRAE’s lighting waste heat factors (Rundquist,

Jayaweera, Tina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

station. In all cases waste heat sales are a criticalequipment to capture waste heat from the engine exhaust.including capturing waste heat for export, an additional $

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

Schwede, Jared

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

Jackson, H. Z.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat  

SciTech Connect

Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

Schwede, Jared

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pump apparatus including deconsolidator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

SCALE UP OF Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 AND B4C/B9C SUPERLATTICES FOR HARVESTING OF WASTE HEAT IN DIESEL ENGINES  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric devices show significant promise for harvesting and recovery of waste heat from diesel engines, exhaust systems and industrial heat sources. While these devices convert a heat flow directly into electrical energy, cooling can be accomplished by the same device with application of a direct current (Peltier effect). Conversion efficiencies of bulk thermoelectric systems, however, are still too low for economical power conversion in diesel powered vehicles and heavy vehicles. Thermoelectric superlattice devices have demonstrated the potential for increased efficiencies and utilization of waste heat. Although reported efficiencies are well above 15%, fabrication costs are still too high for use in diesel engine systems. To realize this efficiency goal of {approx} 20% and power generation in the kWMW range, large quantities of superlattice materials are required. Additionally, if the figure of merit (ZT) of these superlattices can be increased to > 2, even less superlattice material will be required to generate electric power from heat in diesel engines. We report on development of and recent progress in scale up of Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 and B4C/B9C superlattices for thermoelectric applications, and particularly for fabrication of large quantities of these materials. We have scaled up the magnetron sputtering process to produce large quantities of Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 and B4 C/B9C superlattices with high ZT at low cost. Quantum well films with up to 1000 layers were deposited onto substrate areas as large as 0.5 m2 by magnetron sputtering. Initial studies showed that the power factor of these SL's was high enough to produce a ZT significantly greater than 1. Both p- and n-type superlattices were fabricated to form a complete thermoelectric power generating device. ZT measurements will be reported, and based on measured power factor of these materials, should be significantly greater than 1. These results are encouraging for the use of quantum well materials in thermoelectric power generation.

Martin, P; Olsen, L

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

PSERC 97-12 "Thermal Unit Commitment Including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iteration to another. The complexity of a given iteration becomes linear in the number of generators instead of the coupling between generator time- spanning constraints and system-wide instantaneous constraints, su ers from combinatoric complexity as the number of generators increases. It is this feature

213

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iteration to another. The complexity of a given iteration becomes linear in the number of generators instead of the coupling between generator time- spanning constraints and system-wide instantaneous constraints, suers from combinatoric complexity as the number of generators increases. It is this feature that dooms

214

Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laboratory Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for...

215

Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices at the Army Research Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for surveillance

216

API unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API unit [An arbitrary unit of the American Petroleum Institute for measuring natural radioactivity; used in certain well logging methods] ? API-Einheit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; • hot wateris limited by generated waste heat Regulatory constraints: -might favor the use of waste heat from DG units or from

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHP Technologies and Applications CHP Technologies and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and useful thermal energy from a single energy stream." * CHP is not a single technology but a suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use. * CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few geographic limitations. 11/1/2011 Slide 6 5/20/11 Slide 7 What is CHP? * On-site generation of Power and Thermal Energy from a single fuel source * 'Conventional' grid based generators are located remote from thermal applications while CHP plants are located close to thermal applications

219

Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified...

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

Darby, D. F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel Economy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The largest automakers strive to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to meet regulations by improving engine efficiency. A device that recovers a portion of the… (more)

Capano, Gianmarco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

223

Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Finding More Free Steam From Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corning & Midland Plant • Thermal Heat Recovery Oxidation Process • Opportunities • Implementing Improvements • Demonstrating Success • Questions About me • Mike Stremlow – Midland Site Energy Leader – Senior mechanical engineer at Dow Corning charged...-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Questions Mike Stremlow, Midland Site Energy Leader Dow Corning Corporation PO Box 994 Midland, MI 48686 mike.stremlow@dowcorning.com (989)496-5662 18 ESL-IE-14-05-01 Proceedings...

Stremlow, M. D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

226

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

227

Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

228

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

229

Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

230

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

231

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

232

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

233

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

174 10 12 92 UNIT NAME: C-745-K Low Level Storage Area REGULATORY STAU: -AOC LOCATION: Inside Security Fence , South of C-333 Cascade Building. APPROXIMATE...

234

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

235

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 KOW Toluene SDill Area UNIT NAME: REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of plant site APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 800 feet ong FUNCTION: Storage of Toluene...

236

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME C-746-Al REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner of C-746-A APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 4000 gallons FUNCTION: Underground storage tanks OPERATIONAL STATUS:...

237

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Gasoline Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately east of C-61l APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 50 ga on FUNCTION: Gasoline storage OPERATIONAL...

238

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

239

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-333 North Side PCB Soil Contamination REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: North side of C-333 Building APPROXIMATE OIMENSIONS: 150 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Dust Palliative...

240

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 KPDES Outfall Ditch 017 Flume- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South of plant on the west side of the access road APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 30 feet wide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 C-617-A Sanitarv Waterline- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: - REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Between southeast corner of C-531 Switchyard and C-617-A Water Treatment Facility. 4 feet...

242

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-720 Inactive TCE Oegreaser REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: C-720 Building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Approx. 10 ft by 10 ft by 20 f1: deep FUNCTION: Used for cleaning...

243

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 46 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: 2000 ft southwest of curve on Kentucky Highway 473- near east end of Mitchell Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft...

244

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME Rubble oile 45 REGULATORY STATUS AOC LOCATION: West end of Mitche Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2000 ft long, ft thick 4 ft wide FUNCTION: Control erosion on face of dam...

245

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 43 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION:...

246

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 UNIT NAME C-740 TCE Soill Site REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Northwest corner C-740 concrete pad area) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 5 ft by 5 ft spill FUNCTION: Drum storage area...

247

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 C-I00 South Side Berms UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: South Side C-IOO APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2 berms approximately 200 ft long by SO ft wide eac FUNCTION:...

248

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 UNIT NAME: C-331 PCB Soil Contamination -West Side REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West side C-331 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 100 feet wide by 420 feet long FUNCTION: Dust...

249

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

250

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-633 PCB So111 Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-633 Transformer area (Mac location 75) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS I Unknown FUNCTION Soill site OPERATIONAL STATUS...

251

Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (S-3 Ponds, Boneyard/Burnyard, Oil Landfarm, Sanitary Landfill 1, and the Burial Grounds, including Oil Retention Ponds 1 and 2) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

The intent and scope of the work plan are to assemble all data necessary to facilitate selection of remediation alternatives for the sites in Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 1 (BCV OU 1) such that the risk to human health and the environment is reduced to acceptable levels based on agreements with regulators. The ultimate goal is to develop a final Record Of Decision (ROD) for all of the OUs in BCV, including the integrator OU. However, the initial aim of the source OUs is to develop a ROD for interim measures. For source OUs such as BCV OU 1, data acquisition will not be carried out in a single event, but will be carried out in three stages that accommodate the schedule for developing a ROD for interim measures and the final site-wide ROD. The three stages are as follows: Stage 1, Assemble sufficient data to support decisions such as the need for removal actions, whether to continue with the remedial investigation (RI) process, or whether no further action is required. If the decision is made to continue the RI/FS process, then: Stage 2, Assemble sufficient data to allow for a ROD for interim measures that reduce risks to the human health and the environment. Stage 3, Provide input from the source OU that allows a final ROD to be issued for all OUs in the BCV hydrologic regime. One goal of the RI work plan will be to ensure that sampling operations required for the initial stage are not repeated at later stages. The overall goals of this RI are to define the nature and extent of contamination so that the impact of leachate, surface water runoff, and sediment from the OU I sites on the integrator OU can be evaluated, the risk to human health and the environment can be defined, and the general physical characteristics of the subsurface can be determined such that remedial alternatives can be screened.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

253

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

254

Meals included in Conference Registrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meals included in Conference Registrations Meals included as part of the cost of a conference the most reasonable rates are obtained. Deluxe hotels and motels should be avoided. GSA rates have been for Georgia high cost areas. 75% of these amounts would be $21 for non- high cost areas and $27 for high cost

Arnold, Jonathan

255

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1973 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 67 Prepared by STATISTICS a review of the fishery statistics for the year 1973 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment 1n the fish- eries, quantity of gear operated, number

256

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1971 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 65 Prepared by STATISTICS ry statistics for the year 1971 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment in the fishe ries, quantity of gear operated, number of fishing craft e

257

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

258

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

259

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

260

Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsorship includes: Ā· Agriculture in the Classroom Ā· Douglas County Farm Bureau Ā· Gifford Farm Ā· University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center Ā· University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

262

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

263

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

264

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

265

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

266

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

267

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

268

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

269

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

270

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

271

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

272

Termination unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to stochastic hydrologic properties and flow processes.

C. Tsang

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

274

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CBR-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to Big Rivers Electric Corporation and includes the City of Henderson, Kentucky (hereinafter called the Customer). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 hertz. The power shall be delivered at nominal voltages

275

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Integrated solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an integral solar heating unit with an integral solar collector and hot water storage system, the unit comprising: (a) a housing; (b) a flat plate solar collector panel mounted in the housing and having a generally horizontal upper edge and an uninsulated, open back surface; (c) a cylindrical hot water tank operatively connected to the solar collector panel and mounted in the housing generally parallel to and adjacent to the upper edge; (d) the housing comprising a hood around the tank a pair of side skirts extending down at the sides of the panel. The hood and side skirts terminate at lower edges which together substantially define a plane such that upon placing the heating unit on a generally planar surface, the housing substantially encapsulates the collector panel and hot water tank in a substantially enclosed air space; (e) the collector including longitudinally extended U-shaped collector tubes and a glazed window to pass radiation through to the collector tubes, and a first cold water manifold connected to the tubes for delivering fresh water thereto and a second hot water manifold connected to the tubes to remove heated water therefrom. The manifolds are adjacent and at least somewhat above and in direct thermal contact with the tank; and, (f) the skirts and hood lapping around the collector panel, exposing only the glazed window, such that everything else in the heating unit is enclosed by the housing such that heat emanating from the uninsulated, open back face of the collector and tank is captured and retained by the housing to warm the manifolds.

Larkin, W.J.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

278

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

279

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,5.8,6.2,2.8,2.8,1.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

280

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Not Asked (Apartments in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,9.6,5,2.2,1.5,0.8 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

282

Impending United States Energy Crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ERAB) of the U.S. Department of Energy and published in a report on future...this context are excerpted. The energy substructure of the United States...cogenerators of heat and electricity, wind-energy farmers, etc. It also includes...

ROBERT L. HIRSCH

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

285

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 .*. United States Government . memorandum DATE: JUNZO 1994 -... REPLY TO A?TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) Authority Determination -- Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, SUBJECT: Connecticut To' The File The attached review, documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the Combustion Engineering (CE) Site in Windsor, Connecticut, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CE was a prime contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and performed high-enriched uranium fuel fabrication work from 1955 to 1967. The services furnished at the CE site included some experimental work; however, it primarily consisted of fabrication of high-enriched uranium

286

Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hard surface overlays on their impellers and scrolls to prevent erosion. The use of linings was selected after a comprehensive study was performed investi gating the expected wear on unlined equipment, additional cost of linings, frequency of main... is provided fr the pump discharge head r for of the bypass steam e tering carbon steel steam sal s line line of the refine is feet long. The st am is metered by a primary venturi flow nozzle, essure transmitters, and temperature elements ne r...

Coles, R. L.

287

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

SciTech Connect

Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.

Hopman, Ulrich,; Kruiswyk, Richard W.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Turbine . . . . . .and A. Ghaffari. “Steam Turbine Model. ” Simulation= m ? v (h in ? h out ) Steam Turbine As with the pump, the

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

290

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

291

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

292

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

293

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

294

Novel thermoelectric generator for stationary power waste heat recovery .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Internal combustion engines produce much excess heat that is vented to the atmosphere through the exhaust fluid. Use of solid-state thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion technology… (more)

Engelke, Kylan Wynn.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System Advances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCESS DOOR (TYPICAL) 1.. LEVEL . PUTFORII ?n'if~~??? FLUIDIZED L--lJ FLUE ';:S ! "'D I DUCT , PRQVISK>N FOR 14" I.P.S. : FLUE GAS . LFr UN! J-~DU~C~T~CL!:!:E~ANO~UT~? RE~':aL:"-~L_--WL:!:!J~~~=:IAIR 1." I.P.S. PREHEATED COMBUSTION AIR... of six months. Data gathered will be used to evaluate performance, energy savings. and economic attractiveness of the FBWHR system. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work was jointly funded by the Depart ment of Energy and Thermo Electron Corporation...

Patch, K. D.; Cole, W. E.

296

Heavy Duty Roots Expander for Waste Heat Energy Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

297

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project...

298

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Caterpillar/U.S. Department of Energy

299

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operated as a peaking or load follow- ing power plant. Fordemand loads are given to the RC’s expander to follow, the

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loading and Power Load Following . . . . . . . . . . . . .RC without Power Load Following under Constant Driv- ingRC without Power Load Following under Constant Driv- ing

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 K to room temperature * High temperature transport property measurements (ORNL) * Neutron scattering for phonon DOS and phonon mode analysis (NCNR) * Computational research...

302

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

304

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

305

Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

truck system. schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste...

306

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration maranville.pdf More...

307

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a reciprocat- ing steam engine (SE). ” Energy, 34:1315–5 ? 1): the steam flows out of the engine, and the pressure

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The GTE Ceramic Recuperator for High Temperature Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Bllffalo Metal Casting Standard St.eel N.ati_onal Forge Ladish Co. Pr.Jt.t & \\.fllitney Ama", Specl."11t.v Metals Bethlehem Steel Cape Ann Forge Staolev Spring (TRw) Box Forge Reheat, Steel Box Forge Reheat, Steel 1 Box Forge Reheat...,807 1.9 1.8 31 St.andard Steel Burnham, PA Box forge. Reheat, Steel 32 National Forge Erie, PA Ladle Preheater. Steel :,.} Lad isb Co. Cyntbiaca, ....'Y Box Heat Treat, Steell 188.426 77,527 3. Pra t t & \\.on i tney East Hart.ford, CT Box...

Dorazio, R. E.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Ferri, J. L.; Rebello, W. J.; Ally, M. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Steel Mill Powered by Waste Heat Recovery System  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

ArcelorMittal USA reduces carbon dioxide emissions by 340,000 tons annually with new efficient recovery boiler.

310

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Th Developing a System Architecture to Manage Wide Variations in Th ermal Power ermal Power Catalytic Converter Primary Heat Exchanger Rear Exhaust with Muffler Pump DCDC...

311

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace051lagrandeur2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications...

312

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ect of working ?uids on organic Rankine cycle for waste heatof such devices. Organic Rankine cycles and Stirling engines

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Dual Loop Parallel/Series Waste Heat Recovery System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This system captures all the jacket water, intercooler, and exhaust heat from the engine by utilizing a single condenser to reject leftover heat to the atmosphere.

315

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

316

Waste Heat Recovery Using a Circulating Heat Medium Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thing of the past. This paper presents results of a refinery-wide survey to identify potential high temperature heat sources that are not being recovered and low temperature systems that consume fuel. The best candidates in each category were connected...

Manning, E., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Electrical...

318

Composites for Multi-energy conversion & waste heat recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Discusses development of a composite that transfers energy between thermal, electrical, magnetic, and mechanical types and a composite material that improves performance through in situ strengthening

319

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .other pyroelectric energy conversion methods . . . . Chapter6 Pyroelectric Energy Conversion using PLZT and

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(January 2012) More Documents & Publications Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer Considerations When Selecting a Condensing Economizer Use Steam Jet Ejectors or...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Using Waste Heat for External Processes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer...

322

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents successful incorporation of one of the most promising classes of the new materials, the skutterudites, into a working automotive TEG prototype and test results on its performance

323

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Skutterudite TE modules were fabricated and assembled into prototype thermoelectric generators (TEGs), then installed on a standard GM production vehicle and tested for performance

324

Quantum Well Thermoelectrics for Converting Waste Heat to Electricity  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development of high efficiency quantum well (QW) thermoelectric continues with the P-type and N-type Si/Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} films with encouraging results. These films are fabricated on Si substrates and are being developed for low as well as high temperature operation. Both isothermal and gradient life testing are underway. One couple has achieved over 4000 hours at T{sub H} of 300 C and T{sub C} of 50 C with little or no degradation. Emphasis is now shifting towards couple and module design and fabrication, especially low resistance joining between N and P legs. These modules can be used in future energy conversion systems as well as for air conditioning.

Saeid Ghamaty

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expander Models The components that generate power from steam expansion can be classified into two categories: turbo-

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget Barriers * Interactionscollaborations ORNL - High temperature transport and mechanical property measurements UNLV - Computational materials development Marlow - TE module...

327

Waste Heat Recovery by Organic Fluid Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In organic vapor cycles, the compression work is often comparatively more important than in steam cycles. The efficiency of the pump should not be neglected. T, , Tr2 " Tr " 3 "" " 12 '--_L----L__-i tc Qv,>Qv2~Qv3 flowrole 'lturb ' 0.85 12~ 3JO... In organic vapor cycles, the compression work is often comparatively more important than in steam cycles. The efficiency of the pump should not be neglected. T, , Tr2 " Tr " 3 "" " 12 '--_L----L__-i tc Qv,>Qv2~Qv3 flowrole 'lturb ' 0.85 12~ 3JO...

Verneau, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in where ? is the valve coefficient, µ is the throttle valve? T in where ? is the valve coefficient, µ is throttle valveC kg s kJ kg kg s 3. Valve Coefficient ?: 0.03 4. Throttle

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chloro?uoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE-CFE)] ?lms of compositionuoroethylene (P(VDF- TrFE-CFE)) [2, 57], 4. biologicalTrFE) 61.3/29.7/9 P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) PZN-4.5PT PZN-5.5PT PMN-

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Waste Heat Recovery in the Metal Working Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recuperators supplying four 3" burners. The smaller (1,500 lb. capacity) forge furnace was not equipped with eductors. No furnace pres sure control was used. This furnace had one 10,000 scfh recuperator supplying two 2~" hot air burners. The heat treat... furnaces were both constant com bustion air, throttled fuel control. The motor ized valve in the fuel line was positioned by a position proportioning temperature controller according to a manually set set point and thermo couple input. Both furnaces...

McMann, F. C.; Thurman, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

unit process | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

unit process unit process Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included. Source US Life Cycle Inventory Database Date Released May 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords ASCC FRCC HICC interconnect region LCI life cycle inventory MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE unit process US utilities WECC Data application/zip icon interconnect_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 6.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

332

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.4,1,0.5,0.5,3.4,2.4,0.6,0.5 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

333

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2.3,16.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N",2.3,16.8,"N","N" "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

334

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,2,0.7,1.3,2.6,4.1,3.5,2.5,2.4 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

335

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"With 5 or More Units)",19.1,6.2,3.5,0.5,0.5,1.1,0.6,"Q",0.7,0.4,0.2,2,1.4,0.6 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

336

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,4.7,0.9,0.4,0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4,"Q",3.8,2.9,0.9 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

337

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in Buildings" "With 5 or More Units)",19.1,3.7,2.7,0.9,0.6,0.3,0.9,1,0.2,0.6,0.2 "FoundationBasement of Single-Family" "Units and Apartments in Buildings With" "2 to 4 Units...

338

Unit Testing Discussion C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation Ā­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

339

Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Vernon, George E. (Rio Rancho, NM); Hoke, Darren A. (Albuquerque, NM); De Marquis, Virginia K. (Tijeras, NM); Harris, Steven M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transmission Business Unit Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Transmission Services, (J7300) Transmission Busiess Unit 615...

342

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

343

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

344

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

345

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

346

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

347

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

348

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

349

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

350

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

351

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

352

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Second United Nations International Conference  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Second United Nations Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy ON THE ANALYSIS O F BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Q Hugh Bradner and F r a n k Solmitz INTRODUCTION A j , L. - i Since i t s iyvention by Glaser in 1953, the bubble chamber has become a m o s t valuable tool $high-energy physics. It combines a number of advan- tages of various older methods of particle detection: resolution, rapid accumulation of data, some time resolution, and some choice of the nucleus whose interaction one wants to study (bubble chambers have been -'made to operate with a large number of different liquids, including Hz, D2, He, Xe, and s e v e r a l hydrocarbons). resolution and rapid data accumulation, high- speed high-precision analysis procedures m u s t be developed.

354

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

355

Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

Namboodiri, Vinod

358

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Roadmap with a strong linkage to utility programs Scan for Technologies 1. How does it address the NW Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

359

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Topics Include Freshman Inquiry Course Open Advisement/ Group Advisement Dinning Campus: End of Spring 2012, Commencement May 18: Grades available on MAX after 4:30pm AdvisementYouTubeVideoSeries I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : YouTube Video Series 1 Mark Your Calendar 1 Exploring Major Tips 2

Hardy, Christopher R.

360

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

SciTech Connect

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

363

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

364

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

365

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ‘‘incoherent’’ jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics.

L. M. Jones; R. Migneron; K. S. S. Narayanan

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Use of combined steam-water and organic rankine cycles for achieving better efficiency of gas turbine units and internal combustion engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Innovative concepts of recovering waste heat using low-boiling working fluids, due to which the the efficiency can be increased to 28–30%, are presented. If distributed generation of electricity or combined pr...

M. A. Gotovskiy; M. I. Grinman; V. I. Fomin; V. K. Aref’ev…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

370

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

371

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

372

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

373

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

374

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

375

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

376

United Cool Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical.  Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

377

Associative list processing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

379

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings Research Station. 130 p. Declinesinhabitatofgreatersage, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil

380

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

382

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

383

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

384

Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

G. Li; C. Tsang

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Complex shell model representation including antibound states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generalization of the complex shell model formalism is presented that includes antibound states in the basis. These states, together with bound states, Gamow states, and the continuum background, represented by properly chosen scattering waves, form a representation in which all states are treated on the same footing. Two-particle states are evaluated within this formalism, and observable two-particle resonances are defined. The formalism is illustrated in the well-known case of Li11 in its bound ground state and in Ca70(g.s.), which is also bound. Both cases are found to have a halo structure. These halo structures are described within the generalized complex shell model. We investigated the formation of two-particle resonances in these nuclei, but no evidence of such resonances was found.

R. Id Betan; R. J. Liotta; N. Sandulescu; T. Vertse; R. Wyss

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Best Buys and Unit Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

Anding, Jenna

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Second United Nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nations Nations . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

391

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG .2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ . 001 United States Government Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 9, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-07 REPLY TO ATTN OF; IG-32 (A050R014) SUBJECT: Audit of "The Department's Management of United States Enrichment Corporation Site Services" TO: Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office INTRODUCTTON AND OBJECTIVE The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), located in western Kentucky, was constructed by the Department of Energy (Department) in the early 1950s to enrich uranium for use in various military and commercial applications. The Department operated the plant until the Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a Government-owned

392

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution Forest, New Hampshire, began in 1932. One of the studies, still maintained today, consisted of severalUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station Research Paper NRS

393

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station at Durham, New Hampshire. The computer program described in this publication was created usingUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station General Technical://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by: For additional copies: U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200

394

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

395

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copies: USDA FOREST SERVICE USDA Forest Service 11 CAMPUS BLVD SUITE 200 Publications Distribution at Durham, New Hampshire; JENNIFER C. JENKINS, jjenkins@fs.fed.us, is a research foresterUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General

396

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

play an important role in a national program for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The conversion potential through conversion of nonforest land to forest land and through the management of forest lands and sinks in the United States can be identified. International treaties on greenhouse gas reduction require

397

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an offset, or for registering carbon dioxide reductions using the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b. Brown Richard A. Birdsey #12;Visit our homepage at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ Published by forestry companies and managers of utility company lands, within the United States who are interested

398

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme Development Programme with support from the Government of Norway #12;The views expressed in this volume. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

399

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; preventionUnited States Environmental Protection Agency Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry/R-02/008 January 2002 Hydrogeologic Framework, Ground-Water Geochemistry, and Assessment of Nitrogen

400

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hills National Forest uses such a habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy is largely unknown, Wildlife Biologist with Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD 2 South Dakota State UniversityUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Managing Habitats for White-tailed DeerForest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 General Technical Report RM-GTR-274 Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming Carolyn Hull Sieg and Kieth E

402

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 25 p. Estimates of forest of California's legislatively mandated green- house gas inventory. Reliable estimates of live-tree carbon stores

Fried, Jeremy S.

403

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terneus 1012009 - 1182012 Philadelphia, PA NovaThermal Energy Waste Heat Geothermal Heat Pump System Perform field testing, data collection and analysis of smallest unit of...

404

Request for Information on Efficiency Standards for Natural Gas Compressors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ormat Technologies is headquartered in Reno Nevada and designs and manufactures waste heat recovery units that are commonly applied on natural gas pipeline compressor stations

405

Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for...

406

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family...

407

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uv /uu/u* Ā±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . uv /uu/u* Ā±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . 'A4 .. Ā± OO, I U444 flmI I.j102 ' -f- $I)002 EP<.1 (o-.vu) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 30, 2004 REP.YTO: IG-35 (A03DN039) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-10 SUBJECT: Audit of the Safeguards and Security Program at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site To: Frazer Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Because of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy (Department) instituted additional security requirements beyond those already in place for normal security operations. These "Security Conditions" requirements were established by Department Notice 473.8 (Notice). The requirements are based on

408

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

409

l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT lb 15 SUBJECT: THORFJM PROCURENENT PMF'N:TBU Jesse C. Johnson, Gtnager of IRaw Materials Operations3s.Office 3 R. W. Cook, Director of Production ~',LL:::+ I--- DATE: MAR ! 9 1951 The following list of suppliers of thorium and the amounts of materials procured from them by the Mew York Operations Office during calendar year 1950 is being supplied in accordance with Mr. Spelmanls telephone request of March 19. Thorium Lannett Bleachery iinde Air Products Co. Lindsey Light & Chemical Co. lliscellaneous NY0 Liscensing Division Rare Earths, Inc. Wolff-Alport Total - (kilograms) 179 38,2;2 -3 4,210 /vyeoi 4 -q- 2 : i ' \ iti 1 i 0 ;;\I:' --' I F 10 i;;;?/ \ --' L & ;:I :,- :,j( EZi 5 1 :' -I I ri _ I ' R i; .- . )- .i

410

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ng ng United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: APR 18 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PR010) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-15 SUBJECT: Audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program TO: Director, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, EE-2K The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Weatherization Assistance Program (Program) was established to increase energy efficiency in dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons to reduce their residential energy expenditures and improve their health and safety. Since its inception in 1976, the Program has reported that approximately 5 million dwelling units owned or occupied by low-income individuals have been weatherized.

411

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE r 1325.0 OE r 1325.0 (01.93) United States Government Department of memorandum DATE: March 23, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A060R040) SUBJECT: Audit of"The Department of Energy's Management of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve" TO, Deputy Assistant Secrctary for Petroleum Reserves INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Energy Act of 2000 authorized the Secretary of Energy to create a Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve was established as an "emergency buffer" to supplement commercial supplies should a severe supply disruption occur in the heavily heating oil-dependent northeast United States. The Reserve consists of 2 million barrels of emergency home heating oil, enough to provide Northeast consumers adequate supplies for approximately

412

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Government United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 29, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A05HQ002) Audit Report No. OAS-L-05-10 SUBJECT: Agreed-Upon Procedures for Federal Payroll TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statement," dated October 16, 2000, requires an annual audit of civilian payroll of executive departments and other Government agencies. Auditors are required to follow the agreed-upon procedures in Appendix I-1 of OMB Bulletin No. 01-02, to assess the reasonableness of life insurance, health benefits, and retirement withholdings and contributions.

413

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Menxmmhmz 9 Menxmmhmz 9 1 / UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo ,sYmOL: DH:ARP . . : OnJuly 8,&g the uriterattendedameeting at the Navy Oxdnce Depot at Farle, Ii. J. for the purpose of advising the navy on i-adlatlon hazards involved In the dmping of contadnated AEC wastes at /?ea. " Presint were: J. Cook - Traffic & Transportation, AEC ~J.Moren- Utilifation, AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -~Hadiation Section, AEC Captain Blossoin - Navy Captain hall - Navy ThefoSkndngwas agreedupcmby AFC andthe l&v. 1. 2. 3. 4. Contaminatedmaterial dnmied, I (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at'

414

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Contamination analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jEĀ©wftamfsĆ½Ć½pc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

417

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Replacing ESP controls brings large utility units into compliance  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the effect of retrofitting an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) digital control system on the emissions compliance of a large utility unit. The topics of the article include evaluation of ESP performance, determination of course of action, unit 1 and 2 installation of a digital control system, and results to emissions and performance of the ESP.

Hack, P. (Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Lusby, MD (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Rooftop Unit Campaign  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the RTU Campaign with partners (including market leaders, utilities, manufacturers, and energy efficiency programs) to engage building owners to make large scale efficiency...

420

Microsoft Word - UPDATE 4 - Unit 4.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 to: 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads ENSR Corporation December 23, 2005 Document Number 10350-002-410 (Update 4) December, 2005 1-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Unit 4, operating alone under minimum and maximum loads will not cause or contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Section 2 of this report presents the stack and emission parameters included in the modeling. Section

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Defense Energy Support Center: Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Defense Energy Support Center's (DESC's) Installation Energy Commodity Business Unit (CBU) including its intent, commitment, pilot project, lessons learned, and impending barriers.

422

United States Science Offices Abroad  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... PLANS for United States Science ...Offices at A home and abroad are proposed in the extensive report entitled " ...

C. E. SUNDERLIN

1950-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

An adaptive load dispatching and forecasting strategy for a virtual power plant including renewable energy conversion units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The increasing awareness on the risky state of conventional energy sources in terms of future energy supply security and health of environment has promoted the research activities on alternative energy systems. However, due to the fact that the power production of main alternative sources such as wind and solar is directly related with meteorological conditions, these sources should be combined with dispatchable energy sources in a hybrid combination in order to ensure security of demand supply. In this study, the evaluation of such a hybrid system consisting of wind, solar, hydrogen and thermal power systems in the concept of virtual power plant strategy is realized. An economic operation-based load dispatching strategy that can interactively adapt to the real measured wind and solar power production values is proposed. The adaptation of the load dispatching algorithm is provided by the update mechanism employed in the meteorological condition forecasting algorithms provided by the combination of Empirical Mode Decomposition, Cascade-Forward Neural Network and Linear Model through a fusion strategy. Thus, the effects of the stochastic nature of solar and wind energy systems are better overcome in order to participate in the electricity market with higher benefits.

A. Tascikaraoglu; O. Erdinc; M. Uzunoglu; A. Karakas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

425

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

426

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

427

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based topics including climate change, wildlife, fire, bioenergy, geo-spatial extensions, monitoring over time and Issues encountered while Investigating southern Forest Industry and Market responses to changing economic

428

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

429

United States Government DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 United States Government DATE: MAR 0 8 1994 REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authority Determination -- Former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co., Hamilton, Ohio TO: The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co. facility in Hamilton, Ohio, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The facility was used for the shaping and machining of uranium metal by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) during the Second World War. The following factors are significant in reaching a decision and are discussed in more detail in the attached authority review:

430

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' z United States Government &mtrne&' of Energy DATE: &uG 3, 9 394 REPLY TO AITN OF: EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Toukay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

431

Unite2 States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

+39J +39J t% (3740~ - Unite2 States Government m e m o randuin L3 DATE: AU6 3, 9 %g4 REPLY TO All-N OF: m -421 (U. A. W illiams, 427-1719) -. - >' SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Toukay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recouwndations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

432

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LICE F 137: r.e Electr LICE F 137: r.e Electr onic Form App roved by CllR - 1010fJI2002 i/JI~~I United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Admi istration memorandum DATE : REPLY TO AnN OF : KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Stephen Duncan Project Manager - TERS-3 Proposed Action: Removal of de-stabilized and downed trees resulting from a December 200 8 wind storm on the de-energized Lyons Ultra High Voltage Test Line NO.1. PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1309 Budget Information: Work Order # 184006 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart 0, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 1.3 Routine maintenance/custodial services for buildings, structures, infrastructures, equipment. Location: Fee-owned ROW on the de-energized Lyons UHV Te st Line No .1 to the south of

433

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.89) B.89) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Energ Memorandum SEP 24 20t DATE: REPLY TO: IG-34 (A04TG032) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-21 SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program - 2004" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our annual evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's unclassified cyber security program. This evaluation was initiated in June 2004 and our field work was conducted through September 2004. The evaluation methodology is described in the attachment to this report. Introduction and Objective The Commission's increasing reliance on information technology (IT) is consistent with satisfying the President's Management Agenda initiative of expanding electronic

434

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- /18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- + HQ 1002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: March 17, 2004 Audit Report No. OAS-L-04-1 1 REPLY TO IG-36 (A04DN003) ATTN OF: SUBJECT; Audit of "Requests for Equitable Adjustment at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site" TO: Frazer R. Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Project Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Effective February 1, 2000, the Department of Energy's (Department) Rocky Flats Project Office (RFPO) and Kaiser-Hill Co., LLC (Kaiser-Hill), entered into a cost- plus-incentive-fee contract to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by December 15, 2006. Under the contract terms, Kaiser-Hlill's final incentive fee earned will be based on how well it meets established cost targets. For

435

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . .... ...... ..... .. . .. . . .. . , . . . . ..- - --. -- -. , . . DOEF 1325,8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 1 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-21 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06PR047) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected National Nuclear Security Administration Sites TO: Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed fourN* Lti nai-.AL 4 ... :.. ,._*i Amiinistration (NiNSA)SsitCe. Speuiiiu-~l we reviewed executive cormpeisation costs incurred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories, and the Y-12

436

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. v-w. . v-w. ' ;H; (07.901 United States Government 0' ; Td 2, <.<~ Department of Energy ' m e m o randum DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Alba Craft Laboratory in Oxford, Ohio L. Price, OR TO: The former Alba Craft Laboratory site at lo-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Dr. and M rs. Gilbert Pacey, of Oxford, Ohio, own the site. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey letter report and the authority review are provided for your information.

437

UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 Ojice Memornndz~nz 0 UNITED STATES GOVERKMENT By application dated ;!ay 11, 1959, as a~zen:ii:d Hay 25, 1959, the a--T+- I-r-- cant requests that its license SW-33 be amend,ed to authorizt? proced- ures for t>e CCLl-ect conversion of LT6 to '3$ and by applicaticn datzci June 29, 1959, a.3 n:odifizd July 15, 1059, the shipment of uranium rdioxide pellets. Based on our rexiew of the information finished by the applicant, it is hereby determined that the applicant is qualified, by training and experience, to use special nuclear material for the pwpose requested and that the ap@icant's procedures, facilities and equip- ment are adequate to protect health and minimize danger to life and property. It is, therefore, determined that ~NM-33 may be amended to

438

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ocy F 1325.8 ocy F 1325.8 rcro1 . 6Fo0?-001 w 2 3-q United States Government Department of Energ) ~mc DATE: AUG 3,9 1994 y$Jf EH-421 (W. A. Yllliams, 427-1719) MA. \tQ SUBJECT: _ Elirinrtion of the Sites froa the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program TQ The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Hr. Nlchelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Forwrly Utilized Sites Remedial A&Ion Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites l hd to ratify and confim the

439

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

:)Ā£ F 13 :)Ā£ F 13 ;' 5 H e Etectroou: Form Approved by CGJR - 01120195 (nĀ·/w! United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum DATE: 0 I. 7 20D 9 REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO : Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Perform routine access road maintenance to the Rockdale Microwave site . Budget Information: Work Order #180709 PP&A Project No.: 1389 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective .... are required to maintain ... infrastructures . ..in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

440

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE:F 1325.8 7 DOE:F 1325.8 7 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05AL045) Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-12 SUBJECT: Audit of Sandia National Laboratories' Safeguards and Security Path Forward Management Plan TO: Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE From 2001 to 2003, approximately 500 security-related findings and observations were identified at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA), the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Sandia Site Office (SSO), and Sandia's self assessments. Sandia senior management acknowledged the significance of the numerous findings and, in

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441

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: January 26, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-05 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT035) SUBJECT: Report on "The Department of Energy's Implementation of Revised OMB Circular No. A-123" TO: Acting Chief Financial Officer, CF-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management arid Budget's (OMB) revised Circular No. A-123 (Circular) requires Federal agencies to assess the adequacy of their internal controls. Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, the Circular requires agencies to strengthen their assessment, documentation and testing of internal controls over financial reporting and prepare an annual assurance statement on the operating effectiveness of those controls. In August 2005, the Department of Energy's

442

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 23, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-16 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A04YT023) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Modernization Activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex" TO: Richard Speidel, Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) performs critical roles in strengthening national security and reducing the global threat from weapons of mass destruction. The Y-12 modernization plan (plan) seeks to foster the development of a physical plant that is efficient and effective in serving its national security missions. The

443

. United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,:n5.5.8 ,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG pw, . United States Government DATE: AUG 2 i994 y#J;; EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sUBJECT: -Elimination of the Robbins & Myers Site, Springfield, Ohio 11179 I The File TO: I have reviewed the attached elimination recommendation and the original historical records for the Myers & Robbins facility in Springfield, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at these sites. The only record of activity at this site by Department of Energy predecessors is an equipment test of a pump in March 1975. This test involved limited amounts of radioactive materials and there was a serious effort to decontaminate the equipment at the conclusion of the tests. Based on the above, the Myers & Robbins site in Springfield, Ohio, is

444

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F 1325.8 DOE F 1325.8 E&M&& +\A .wz United States Government Department of Energy DATE: RUG 3, 9 %g4 y;;;; EM-421 (W. A. W illiaas, 427-1719) "; :+ 1 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tohkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate then from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

445

Uniter+ States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFG (07-90) EFG (07-90) Uniter+ States Government ~L.aQ-i; Department of Energy inemorandum DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at the Former Dow Chemical Company Facility in M a d ison, Illinois TO: L. Price, OR The site of the Former Dow Chemical Company in M a d ison, Illinois, which is currently owned and operated by the Spectrulite Consortium, is designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based upon the results of a preliminary radiological survey and other information described in the attached Designation Summary. The authority determination and preliminary survey report also are attached for information. The site has been assigned a low priority under the FUSRAP protocol, as

446

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

# Xx i' # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoumendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

447

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFS (07-W EFS (07-W United States Government memorandukn Department of Energy j ; I.-- ' -i;: /J DATE: j.gjG 2 9 1994 REPLY TO En-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) AlTN OF: h p)\;--/ ;,;' J ( SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Ur. Doug Tonkay and Us. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoPraendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

448

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nUnited States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Access road improvement and bridge replacement for the Raver-Paul No. transmission line structure 18/1. Budget Information: Work Order # 00220048 PP&A Project No.: 954 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ....are required to

449

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

450

,. United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i. 001 i. 001 DOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) ,. United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: September 11, 2003 REPLYTO: IG-34 (A03NE045) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-20 SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement Administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our survey of procurement administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Laboratory). This review was initiated in May 2003 and fieldwork was conducted through August 2003. Our review methodology is described in an attachment to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In Fiscal Year (FY) 2002, the Department of Energy's (Department) management contractors procured approximately $6.4 billion worth of goods and services from

451

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 00 DOE F 1325.8 (08&93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 31, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-13 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07RL048) SUBJECT: Audit of Safety Allegations Related to the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site TO: Manager, Office of River Protection INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Hanford Site is responsible for treating and preparing 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste for disposal. Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) is designing, building and commissioning the Waste Treatment Plant (Plant), a category II nuclear facility, which is comprised of a complex of treatment facilities to vitrify and immobilize radioactive waste into a

452

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OEF 1325.8 OEF 1325.8 (U8-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 11, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-I1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07DN056) SUSJECT: Audit of the Department of Energy's Community and Regulatory Support Funding at the Richland Operations Office TO: Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management provided $60.1 million in Community and Regulatory Support funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 to a number of Departm- nt sites. The funding is intended to be used for activities indirectly related to nuclear and hazardous waste cleanup, such as agreements with state regulatory agencies and transportation departments. During FY 2005, the Department's Richland

453

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a . a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (iNEEL) subsurface disposal area was established in 1952 for disposal of solid radioactive waste and now encompasses an area of approximately 88 acres. Wastes from the INEEL and other Department of Energy (Department) sites, rmost notably Rocky Flats, were buried in

454

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vu & . vu & . ,I / v a L U ; .8 " ',X v &..'*. "o uu V"x Ijo tf J ,*- , , i 4 w i tiJ U U 1 OEF S.a 135 (0B93) United States Government - Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 27, 2007 REPLY TO Audit Repor Number: OAS-L-07-08 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06ID015) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Design of the Engineered Barrier System at the Yucca Mountain Site" TO: Principal Deputy Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTrVE In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for designing, licensing, constructing, and operating a repository, known as Yucca Mountain, for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level -

455

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 . . Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR061) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory TO: Manager, Brookhaven Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed executive compensation at the Office of Science's Brookhaven National La --- _ .r . . tc. av .... n . Ou audit covered executive cuupoci'A ;is in curred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, operated Brookhaven under Department of Energy (Department) contract number DE-AC02-98CH10886. The amount of executive compensation that can be reimbursed to Department

456

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG ')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 1o001 ,O " F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-11 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05ID043) SUBJECT: Audit of "Contract Transition Activities at the Idaho Operations Office" TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office has ongoing missions focused primarily in the areas of nuclear energy and environmental cleanup. From October 1, 1999 to February 1, 2005, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC (Bechtel) managed facility operations for both of these missions. In Fiscal Year 2005, two separate contracts began in order to add focus and clarity to each respective mission. First, the Idaho National

457

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-93) -93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: July 12, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-15 REPLY TO ATnN OF: IG-32 (A07ID055) SUBJECr: Audit of the Idaho National Laboratory Facility Footprint Reduction TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTTVE On February 1, 2005, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) assumed responsibility for managing and operating the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (Department) under a new 10 year contract. ThI m.ion for ,the L s to nntance the Nation's energy security by becoming the preeminent, internationally recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory.. To accomplish this mission, BEA proposed aggressive infrastructure initiatives

458

United States Government Departmen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Departmen of Energy memorandum DATE: December 20, 2005 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-03 REPLY TO A1TN OF; IG-36 (A05SR025) SUBJECT: Audit of "Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site" TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site stores approximately 36 million gallons of liquid, high-level radioactive waste in 49 underground waste storage tanks. The contents of the waste tanks are broadly characterized as either "sludge waste" or "salt waste". Sludge waste is insoluble and settles to the bottom of a waste tank, beneath a layer of liquid supernate. Salt

459

* United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the American Potash and Chemical Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager

460

United States Goveinment  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,325.B ,325.B jO8.93) United States Goveinment ~~~rntir-andu~rvi Depr?rtnient of Energy \L, IO' " 1' !ATE:' MAY i o 1995 ,' Kzb9. ":cz$ EM-421 (W.,A. Williams, 301-903-8149) SUBJECT: Records for the West Chicago Site .The File TO: After review.of the available r&rds concerning the former 'Lindsay Light and Chemical.Corhpany site in West Chicago, Illinois. I have determined that it is not necessary to transmit Department of Energy (DOE) records to the municipa,llty to inform public officials of the activities at this ~ site. This site has been licgnsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for many.years, and the nature of the. rare'earth and thorium production at the site, are well known. Remediation of this faci'lity ii~ being addressed by the current owner, 'the NRC, the U.S; Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

462

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'.... '|le , * f C. '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum Ā· UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a perpetual .ease- ment right to a strip of land, 10 feet wide and 3600 feet long. The area is located in North Tonawanda, New York near the Niagara River. Because of the growth of adjacent industries, this particular piece of property has appreciated in value. During its tenure as responsible property management office, Oak

463

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OOE F 1325.8 OOE F 1325.8 - EFgzk3) United States Government tiemorandum 0 wt;? -J Department of Energy DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Diamond Magnesium Site in Painesville, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The former Diamond Magnesium Company site located at 720 Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is owned by Uniroyal Chemical Company and by Lonza Chemical, Incorporated. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey reports and the authority

464

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Z&Et,? y-p . c' Z&Et,? y-p . c' )7q/ I cuq,~ United States Government Department of Energy memoranduin I " . : I ;/ ,I DATE: hufi 2 9 1594 \ ' - y:oTFq M-421 (W. A. Ylllius, 427-1719) ' ii Y - SIJWECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilfzed Sites Remedial Actjon Progru TO The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. reviewed a number of sites that had services to the Fernald facility as sites, recommendations were made to ___ _- _ consideration under Formerly Utiltzed Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the prior elimination of each site froa FUSRAP.

465

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F t325.8 DOE F t325.8 (s8s) Dl? l 36-z EFG (07-90) United States Government m e m o randum Department of Energy DATE: LUG 2 ' 3 1394 ",cl,'," EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoamnendations were aade to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

466

- United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 my EFG (07.90) . - United States Government . * Department of. Energy * inemorandum DATE: DEC :! ;j 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W.'A. W illiams, 903-8149) : NY 41 I .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination recommendation for the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Company. I have determined that the potential for radiological contamination is low because of the lim ited duration of the activities at the site. Further, at least some of the contractual activities at the site were licensed under the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensed activities are thereby disqualified from further consideration under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites

467

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I8 891 I8 891 EFG (07.90) United States Government m e m o randum bepartrne% of Energy -P ' ; N. A *I Pi id : DATE: AUG 3, 9 1994 REPLY TO Al-iN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) r, )' \, ! c ' d, ' t ' 3 ' 2 -L SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonlsay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a nmber of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

468

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

81278 81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical Exclusion for Removal Actions at Elza Gate, Tennessee TO: Lester K. Price, OR Attached is a copy of the approved Categorical Exclusion (CX) for removal of contaminated material at the Elza Gate site in Tennessee. The removal action involves the removal of radioactive contaminated soil and concrete as well as the removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil. This CX was approved by Carol Borgstrom, Office of National Environmental Policy Act Oversight (EH-25), September 9, 1991. Paul F. Blom Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

469

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

470

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ooc F r325.8 ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams Designation and Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration Attachment - I . b e e : W e s to n E M - 4 0 ( 3 ) E M - 4 2 ( 2 ) W illiams r

471

United States Attorney General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) 93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General ***1 *293 January 16, 1981 **1 The President The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 MY DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked my opinion concerning the scope of currently existing legal and constitutional authorities for the continuance of government functions during a temporary lapse in appropriations, such as the Government sustained on October 1, 1980. As you know, some initial determination concerning the extent of these authorities had to be made in the waning hours of the last fiscal year in order to avoid extreme administrative confusion that might have arisen from Congress' failure timely to enact 11 of the 13 anticipated regular appropriations bills, FN;B1[FN1]FN;F1 or a

472

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC (Westinghouse) to manage and operate the Savannah River Site (Savannah River) through September 30, 2006. As of August 2, 2002, Westinghouse had 534 open and active service procurements worth $100,000 or more each, with a total value of about $518 million, that it had awarded since October 1996.

473

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 DOE-F 1325.8 (68-93) Depament of Energy United States Goverment Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF .NSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: February 26, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02CG004) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-11 SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Science Infrastructure Modernization Initiatives TO: Acting Associate Director, Office of Laboratory Operations and Environment, Safety and Health, SC-80 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Office of Science's infrastructure modernization initiatives. The audit was performed between May and September 2002 at Departmental Headquarters, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. The audit methodology is described in

474

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - w w f.b wr w f k--w .^^- - - r - T- - * -* p -ldt - f f - - -J -vv- A n JV DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government ------- Department of Energy memorandum DATE: June 15, 2006 REPLY TO Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-15 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05SR029) SUBJECT Audit of "Storage Capacity of the Iligh Level Waste Tanks at the Savannah River TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Savannah River Site in South Carolina currently stores about 36 million gallons of waste in 49 active underground storag,* .ks. Twenty-two of these .anks do not meet Environmcntal Protection A&-.y (EPA) requirements ybr full secondary containment and must be emptied and closed by 2022 in accordance with a closure schedule approved by the EPA and the 5oith Carolina Department

475

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG 0/02 WED 09:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -.- +-+ HQ ]002 rFG (07-;1) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: October 29, 2002 REPLY TO 1G-36 (A02DN028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-01 ATTN OF; SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site TO: Eugene Schmitt, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office ' INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) and its site contractor, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser-Hill), contracted in January 2000 to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by a target date of December'15, 2006. As of May 2002, Kaiser-Hill had awarded 784 procurements worth more than $25,000 each, with a total value of about $368.6 million, to support the complex activities required for site closure.

476

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. 0 r 'Ā± J o ,. NL . Jurt -. rur.mO rI[ V Jg, ]VJUU"/UU4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: January 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT029) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-06 SUBJECT: Review of the Independent Auditor's Report on The Institute for Genomic Research for the Year Ending December 31, 2004 * TO: Manager, Chicago Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Institute for Genomic Research (Institute) in Rockville, Maryland is a not-for- profit center that studies areas such as plant, microbial and mammalian genomics. The Institute receives funding from seven Federal agencies to advance its research and development. As required by the Office of Management and Budget (0MB)

477

Heap/stack guard pages using a wakeup unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a memory access check on a processor including the steps of detecting accesses to a memory device including level-1 cache using a wakeup unit. The method includes invalidating level-1 cache ranges corresponding to a guard page, and configuring a plurality of wakeup address compare (WAC) registers to allow access to selected WAC registers. The method selects one of the plurality of WAC registers, and sets up a WAC register related to the guard page. The method configures the wakeup unit to interrupt on access of the selected WAC register. The method detects access of the memory device using the wakeup unit when a guard page is violated. The method generates an interrupt to the core using the wakeup unit, and determines the source of the interrupt. The method detects the activated WAC registers assigned to the violated guard page, and initiates a response.

Gooding, Thomas M; Satterfield, David L; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

478

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Rooftop Unit A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit: Oak Ridge National Lab A typical commercial rooftop air-conditioning unit (RTU) Credit:...

479

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

480

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ecosystem services, includ- ing air quality improvement, energy conservation, stormwater interception of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information

Standiford, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include waste-heat units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and provide many ecosystem services, including air quality improvement, energy conservation, stormwater is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print

Standiford, Richard B.

482

United States Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the production of woody biomass-related energy. It includes a summary and synthesis of published literature of total energy generation during the next two decades in many countries of the industrialized world (Roos is experiencing a rapidly growing demand for commercially traded wood fuel for energy production. Forest biomass

483

Innovative New Industrial Technologies: An Industry/DOE Joint Endeavor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rugged and less susceptible to joint leakage prob lems, corrosion, fouling and breakage. The waste heat recovery program includes work in advanced heat pumps utilizing chemical absorp tion systems, chemical heat of reaction sys tems and magnetic... for additional improved models for other plants. Two high temperature burner duct recuperators, with somewhat different designs, are being developed by Garrett and Babcock & Wilcox under cost-sharing contracts. The Garrett unit uses ceramic tubes with a...

Gross, T. J.

484

Second United Nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i' i' Second United Nations t Jnternational Conference 1 , of Atomic Energy on the Peaceful Uses 4 i \ Confidential until official release during Conference ORIGINAL: ENGLISH METHODS O F PARTICLE DETECTION FOR HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS t * H. B r a d n e r and D. A. Glaser - INTRODUCTION J 1 % c Recent advances in our knowledge of t h e phenomena of high-energy physics and o'f the e l e m e n t a r y p a r t i c l e s h a s r e s u l t e d f r o m rapid advances in the technology of p a r t i c l e a c c e l e r a t o r s and the art of p a r t i c l e detection. cl'asses: (1) the "track-imaging" device in which one s e e s o r photographs t r a c k s which coincide with the a c t u a l path taken by the p a r t i c l e s , and ( 2 ) counting d e - v i c e s which give only an indication that the p a r t i c l e s p a s s somewhere in the

485

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.lĀ± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.lĀ± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u O000DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: March 31,2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-10 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department's Information Technology Capital Planning and Investment Control Process" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Federal guidance requires that Agencies develop and implement capital planning and investment control (CPIC) processes to help ensure that their major information technology investments achieve intended outcomes, represent the best allocation of resources, and reach strategic goals and objectives. The Department of Energy

486

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/04 THU 14:52 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -**- HQ l015 2/04 THU 14:52 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -**- HQ l015 ol: Fi 13 5.8 (8-09) Ā£1*G (in'mi^)) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: April. 22, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: T -36 (A04RL018) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-15 SUBJECT: Audit of Disposition of Excess Facilities at the Hanford Site TO: Keith A. Klein, Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Hanford Site (Hanford) is the largest of the three original defense production sites founded during World War II. Between 1943 and 1963, nine plutonium production reactors were built along the Columbia River and five processing facilities were built on the site's Central Plateau, with about 1,000 support facilities. Currently, Hanford has a total of 1,500 facilities of which an estimated 1,000 are excess to current and future mission

487

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UO/JĀ±0ou4 TcdJ Ā± O:S'. Aa. ou* o *.I. I 01j ' . UO/JĀ±0ou4 TcdJ Ā± O:S'. Aa. ou* o *.I. I 01j ' . - - 00E F 1325,8 (08-93) United States Goverment Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-19 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR059) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected Office of Science Sites TO: Chief Operating, Officer, Office of Science INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed seven Office of Science sites. Specifically, we reviewed executive compensation costs incurred ~,r claim~.- fr- F".*l*- Y. rs 2003, 2 , and 2005 at - Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics

488

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1/03 07:45 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION -* FORS FIVEA I002/004 1/03 07:45 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION -* FORS FIVEA I002/004 DOE F 1325 ' (8-69) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Eneray memorandum DATE: PR17 2003 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-14 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A03PT040) SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EE) Grants, Subsidies, and Cost Sharing Arrangements TO: Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, EE-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our review of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EE) incentive payments and cost-share arrangements. The review was initiated in February 2003, and fieldwork was conducted through April 2003 at Department of Energy (Department) Headquarters. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report.

489

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

490

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

491

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

492

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

493

Analysis of the Energy-Saving Potential of a Three-Rotary Wheel Fresh Air-Handling Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, TRWFAHU can save 10.2% of primary energy and greatly decrease the energy consumption of chiller. If waste heat is available for regenerating the desiccant, the system can achieve greater energy savings. It is feasible to improve indoor air quality (IAQ...

Hao, X.; Zhang, G.; Zou, S.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability: Resources for Instructors - Unit 5, Other Direct Marketing Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

topics related to innovative direct marketing opportunities,including direct marketing to restaurants.6 | Unit 5.5 Direct Marketing to Restaurants Resources

Miles, Albie; Brown, Martha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

496

Unit Process Library | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unit Process Library LCA Projects Models-Tools Presentations Unit Process Library A unit process is the smallest building block in a life cycle model. Each unit process contains...

497

Rooftop package unit diagnostician  

SciTech Connect

A diagnostic system for an HVAC system includes a number of sensors used to measure the operation of the HVAC system. Sensor readings are measured by timing the delay between when a strobe signal is sent to a sensor and when an interrupt signal from the sensor is received. A device driver used to measure the sensor readings stores the sensor readings in pseudo-character device files, which are universally accessible by different subsystems of the diagnostic system. Based on the readings from these sensors, this diagnostic system is able to determine the operational status of the HVAC system and if an economizer in the HVAC system is operating properly.

Chassin, David P [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Robert G [Kennewick, WA; Reid, Larry Dean [Benton City, WA

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

498

United States Government Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC02 1325.8 DC02 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 16, 2003 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-16 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A03DC006) SUBJECT: Audit of "Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Incident Response Program" TO: Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Nuclear Weapons Incident Response Program (Emergency Response Program) provides a national capability to rapidly respond to any radiological emergency or nuclear accident within the United States and abroad. The program is comprised of seven major capabilities/assets, including the Search Response Team (SRT) and the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP). SRT provides technical assistance with activities involving lost or stolen nuclear devices, weapons, or materials.

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DYNAMIC MODELLING OF AUTONOMOUS POWER SYSTEMS INCLUDING RENEWABLE POWER SOURCES.  

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(thermal, gas, diesel) and renewable (hydro, wind) power units. The objective is to assess the impact - that have a special dynamic behaviour, and the wind turbines. Detailed models for each one of the power system components are developed. Emphasis is given in the representation of different hydro power plant

Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

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DZone, Inc. | www.dzone.com CONTENTS INCLUDE  

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Annotations EasyMock Object Lifecycle Recording Behavior in EasyMock Hot Tips and more... Unit testing and test driven development are proven ways to improve both the productivity of a developer and the quality of their software. JUnit and EasyMock are the predominant choices for testing tools in the Java space

Schmitt, Peter H.