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1

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bio

2

Variation of Bulk-Derived Surface Flux, Stability, and Roughness Results Due to the Use of Different Transfer Coefficient Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten published bulk transfer coefficient schemes are used with more than 2600 sets of shipboard observations made in the North Atlantic at Ocean Station C over a one-year period. Using the same input data, the differences in the various ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Potential toxicological hazard due to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on Mediterranean top predators: State of art, gender differences and methodological tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Man-made endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) range across all continents and oceans. Some geographic areas are potentially more threatened than others: one of these is the Mediterranean Sea. Levels of some xenobiotics are much higher here than in other seas and oceans. In this paper we review the final results of a project supported by the Italian Ministry of the Environment, in which the hypothesis that Mediterranean top predator species (such as large pelagic fish and marine mammals) are potentially at risk due to EDCs was investigated. We illustrate the need to develop and apply sensitive methodological tools, such as biomarkers (Vitellogenin, Zona Radiata proteins and CYP1A activities) for evaluation of toxicological risk in large pelagic fish top predators (Swordfish (Xiphias gladius), Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus thynnus)) and nondestructive biomarkers (CYP1A activities and fibroblast cell culture in skin biopsy), for the hazard assessment of threatened marine mammals species (Striped Dolphin, (Stenella coeruleoalba), Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus))exposed to EDCs. Differential gender susceptibility to EDCs is also explored both in large pelagic fish and in cetaceans. In cetaceans, male specimens showed higher cytochrome P450 induction (BPMO in skyn biopsies, CYP2B in fibroblasts cell cultures) by xenobiotics with respect to females.

Fossi, M.C. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via PA Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy)]. E-mail: fossi@unisi.it; Casini, S. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via PA Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy); Marsili, L. [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Siena, Via PA Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrated pest management (IPM) is an ecological approach to pest control that combines several different techniques to maintain pests below damaging levels. Pests may include insects, spiders, mites, diseases, weeds,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their developing baby. And that includes pesticides, from the kind that farmers spray on fruit and vegetable crops because while others have linked pesticide exposure to potential developmental effects your exposure to pesticides by avoiding crops treated with the chemicals. But if you can't afford

New Hampshire, University of

5

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

6

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

7

A Flux Parameterization Including the Effects of Capillary Waves and Sea State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–sea interaction model that includes turbulent transport due to capillary waves (surface ripples) is developed. The model differs from others in that the physical premises are applicable to low wind speeds (10-m wind speed, U10 < 5 m s?1) ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Dayton G. Vincent; W. L. Wood

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electrochemical system including lamella settler crystallizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A crystallizer which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as will as in other elecrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities.

Maimoni, Arturo (Orinda, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

10

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

11

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

12

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Regional Simulations of Greenhouse Warming Including Natural Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The perception of the hypothesized greenhouse effect will differ dramatically depending upon the location on the earth at which the effect is analyzed. This is due mainly to two causes: 1) the warming signal depends upon the position on the earth,...

Kwang-Y. Kim; Gerald R. North

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

17

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

18

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

20

ALPHA ATTENUATION DUE TO DUST LOADING  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies had been done in order to show the attenuation of alpha particles in filter media. These studies provided an accurate correction for this attenuation, but there had not yet been a study with sufficient results to properly correct for attenuation due to dust loading on the filters. At the Savannah River Site, filter samples are corrected for attenuation due to dust loading at 20%. Depending on the facility the filter comes from and the duration of the sampling period, the proper correction factor may vary. The objective of this study was to determine self-absorption curves for each of three counting instruments. Prior work indicated significant decreases in alpha count rate (as much as 38%) due to dust loading, especially on filters from facilities where sampling takes place over long intervals. The alpha count rate decreased because of a decrease in the energy of the alpha. The study performed resulted in a set of alpha absorption curves for each of three detectors. This study also took into account the affects of the geometry differences in the different counting equipment used.

Dailey, A; Dennis Hadlock, D

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

Snyder, James J. (San Jose, CA); Reichert, Patrick (Hayward, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

24

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

30

2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 August 1, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) The deadline for submissions...

31

2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocation requests due September 22 2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22 August 13, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) NERSC's allocation submission system is...

32

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nonlinear response of vessel walls due to short-time thermomechanical loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during a postulated core melt accident is an important safety consideration in the design of the vessel. This study addresses the failure predictions of the vessel due to thermal and pressure loadings fro the molten core debris depositing on the lower head of the vessel. Different loading combinations were considered based on the dead load, yield stress assumptions, material response and internal pressurization. The analyses considered only short term failure (quasi static) modes, long term failure modes were not considered. Short term failure modes include plastic instabilities of the structure and failure due to exceeding the failure strain. Long term failure odes would be caused by creep rupture that leads to plastic instability of the structure. Due to the sort time durations analyzed, creep was not considered in the analyses presented.

Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

35

Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption ... Development and Application of SAMI's Low Voltage Energy-Saving Technology.

36

Independent Mineral Processing Project Technical Due Diligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Independent Mineral Processing Project Technical Due Diligence ... CRIMM Energy-saving Magnetic Separation Equipment and Industrial ...

37

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compaction, computers, geothermal energy, pore-waternot MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION Opromise f o r developing geothermal energy i n the United

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

2013 INCITE Proposals due June 27  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INCITE Proposals 2013 INCITE Proposals due June 27 June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) The Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE)...

39

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS...

40

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The effects of atomic diffusion and of the choice of the adopted solar mixture were also studied. We also tested and compared the theoretical tools used for the modeling of stars for which p-modes frequencies are detected by performing this analysis with three different stellar evolution codes and two different calibration methods. We found that the different evolution codes and calibration methods we used led to perfectly coherent results.

P. Eggenberger; A. Miglio; F. Carrier; J. Fernandes; N. C. Santos

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

SciTech Connect

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pore-water pressures , subsidence. DISCLAIMER NeiIher ( h ehere," do not MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUIDSecond Syhposium on Land Subsidence 1976 a t Anaheim, I n t

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

46

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

47

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

48

Is Hubble's Expansion due to Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{\\it The universe is expanding} is known (through Galaxy observations) since 1929 through Hubble's discovery ($V = H D$). Recently in 1999, it is found (through Supernovae observations) that the universe is not simply expanding but is accelerating too. We, however, hardly know only $4\\%$ of the universe. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite observational data suggest $73\\%$ content of the universe in the form of dark-energy, $23\\%$ in the form of non-baryonic dark-matter and the rest $4\\%$ in the form of the usual baryonic matter. The acceleration of the universe is ascribed to this dark-energy with bizarre properties (repulsive-gravity). The question is that whether Hubble's expansion is just due to the shock of big-bang & inflation or it is due to the repulsive-gravity of dark-energy? Now, it is believed to be due to dark-energy, say, by re-introducing the once-discarded cosmological-constant $\\Lambda$. In the present paper, it is shown that `the formula for acceleration due to dark-energy' is (almost) exactly of same-form as `the acceleration formula from the Hubble's law'. Hence, it is concluded that: yes, `indeed it is the dark-energy responsible for the Hubble's expansion too, in-addition to the current on-going acceleration of the universe'.

R. C. Gupta; Anirudh Pradhan

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Plasma Frequency Shift Due to a Slowly Rotating Compact Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of a slowly rotating compact gravitational source on plasma oscillations using the gravitoelectromagnetic approximation to General Relativity. It is shown that there is a shift in the plasma frequency and hence in the refractive index of the plasma due to the gravitomagnetic force. Estimates for the difference in frequency of radially transmitted electromagnetic signals are given for typical compact star candidates. 1

Babur M. Mirza; Hamid Saleem

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energetics of a Symmetric Circulation Including Momentum Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of available potential energy (APE) for symmetric circulations, which includes momentum constraints, is presented. The theory is a generalization of the classical theory of APE, which includes only thermal constraints on the circulation. ...

Sorin Codoban; Theodore G. Shepherd

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

53

Scheduling optimization of a real flexible job shop including side ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... including side constraints regarding preventive maintenance, fixture availabil- ...... Engineering and Engineering Management, pp. 787–791.

54

ENSO Amplitude Changes due to Climate Change Projections in Different Coupled Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four climate system models are chosen here for an analysis of ENSO amplitude changes in 4 × CO2 climate change projections. Despite the large changes in the tropical Pacific mean state, the changes in ENSO amplitude are highly model dependant. To ...

Sang-Wook Yeh; Ben P. Kirtman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EAC Meeting Cancelled Due to Weather  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This week's Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) meeting has been cancelled due to a strong winter storm which is predicted to impact the Washington DC area on Wednesday. Originally scheduled to be held March 6 and March 7 in Arlington, Virginia, the EAC meeting may possibly be rescheduled for a later date. If the meeting is rescheduled, details will be posted online and will be published in a new Federal Register notice.

56

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

57

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

58

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

59

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination ...

60

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be diverse and widespread, including renewables, distributed generation, and energy storage. And they will increase rapidly all along the value chain, from suppliers to...

62

Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

63

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.2 Retro-Cx in Federal ESPCs Including Retro-Commissioning In Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Retro-commissioning generally reduces operating and maintenance costs,...

64

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

66

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

67

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

69

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

70

Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates 03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates April 15, 2011 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates PLATFORM: For Mac OS X Server v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Mac OS X Server v10.6.7 ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025362 APPLE-SA-2011-04-14-4 Security Update 2011-002 Apple Support Downloads IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A partner of Comodo with Registration Authority capabilities suffered an internal security breach and the attacker caused seven certificates to be

72

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

73

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

75

Characterizations of Aircraft Icing Environments that Include Supercooled Large Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft icing environments that include supercooled large drops (SLD) greater than 50 ?m in diameter have been made during 38 research flights. These flights were conducted during the First and Third Canadian Freezing Drizzle ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. Walter Strapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

79

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

80

Plasma Frequency Shift Due to a Slowly Rotating Compact Star  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of a slowly rotating compact gravitational source on electron oscillations in a homogeneous electrically neutral plasma in the absence of an external electric or magnetic field. Neglecting the random thermal motion of the electrons we assume the gravitoelectromagnetic approximation to the general theory of relativity for the gravitational field. It is shown that there is a shift in the plasma frequency and hence in the dielectric constant of the plasma due to the gravitomagnetic force. We also give estimates for the difference in the frequency of radially transmitted electromagnetic signals for typical compact star candidates.

Babur M. Mirza; Hamid Saleem

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Subsidence due to geothermal fluid withdrawal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Single-phase and two-phase geothermal reservoirs are currently being exploited for power production in Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, the U.S. and elsewhere. Vertical ground displacements of upto 4.5 m and horizontal ground displacements of up t o 0.5 m have been observed at Wairakei, New Zealand that are clearly attributable to the resource exploitation. Similarly, vertical displacements of about 0.13 m have been recorded at The Geysers, California. No significant ground displacements that are attributable to large-scale fluid production have been observed at Larderello, Italy and Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Observations show that subsidence due to geothermal fluid production is characterized by such features as an offset of the subsidence bowl from the main area of production, time-lag between production and subsidence and nonlinear stress-strain relationships. Several plausible conceptual models, of varying degrees of sophistication, have been proposed to explain the observed features. At present, relatively more is known about the physical mechanisms that govern subsidence than the relevant therma mechanisms. Although attempts have been made to simulate observed geothermal subsidence, the modeling efforts have been seriously limited by a lack of relevant field data needed to sufficiently characterize the complex field system.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Goyal, K.P.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

83

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

84

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

85

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

86

CMB temperature anisotropy from broken spatial isotropy due to a homogeneous cosmological magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy two-point correlation function (including off-diagonal correlations) from broken spatial isotropy due to an arbitrarily oriented homogeneous cosmological magnetic field.

Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Lavrelashvili, George [Department of Theoretical Physics, A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute, 1 M. Aleksidze, Tbilisi, GE-0193 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

Hummel, J.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

93

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

94

Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

Ben-Zvi I.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

96

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

106

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

108

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

109

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction $f_s$ between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

119

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The e...

Eggenberger, P; Carrier, F; Fernandes, J; Santos, N C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Residual Circulations Due to Bottom Roughness Variability under Tidal Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal flows over irregular bathymetry are known to produce residual circulation flows due to nonlinear interaction with gradients of depth. Using the depth-averaged vorticity equations, the generation of residual vorticity and residual flows due ...

Thomas F. Gross; Francisco E. Werner

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion which govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced which is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It also found that the fi...

Dutykh, Denys

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT); Campbell, David V. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Costs of Land Subsidence Due to Groundwater Withdrawal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years the area around Houston and Baytown, Texas, has been affected to an increasing degree by land subsidence. Sinking of the land surface has reached critical proportions in many areas, and subsidence of as much as eight feet has occurred. The severity of this phenomenon has been aggravated by the proximity of much of the affected area to bay waters, and tidal flooding has resulted in significant damages and property loss. Subsidence has been linked by engineers to the decline of subsurface water levels due to heavy ground water withdrawals in the area. An alternative source for water demands has been introduced, although price differentials have slowed its acceptance. Major objectives of this study included estimation of historical costs attributable to subsidence, projecting estimated costs, and examining the economics of the two alternatives for water supply. A study area of 300 square miles was identified and sampling of residences, businesses, and public officials was carried out. The cost data resulting from those samples formed the basis for economic analysis. Historical costs and property losses that were attributable to subsidence were estimated to be $60.7 million and $48.9 million, respectively, or $109.6 million total. Of the $109.6 million, $53.2 million were incurred in 1973, principally due to a six foot tide. Probability of the occurrence of a six foot tide in any one year is 20 percent. Given five additional feet of subsidence in the study area the occurrence of a six foot tide was projected to cause an estimated $63,5 million in costs and losses, $10.3 million more than were incurred in 1973. Estimated annual subsidence-related costs and losses of $14.6 million for the study area, based on 1969 to 1973 data, were used to evaluate total costs associated with supplying water needs from two alternative sources, A break-even analysis indicated that to minimize total water costs, pumping only that quantity of water that would result in no subsidence could be economically justified; i,e,, water needs or demand above that rate would need to be purchased from an alternative source. This implied that when pumping is continued to the point that subsidence occurs, the cost of pumping plus associated subsidence- related costs and losses exceed water costs from an alternative source, per unit of water.

Warren, J. P.; Jones, L. L.; Griffin, W. L.; Lacewell, R. D.

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hydrodynamic Interactions of Two Micro-bubbles Due to an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Hydrodynamic Interactions of Two Micro-bubbles Due to an ... A Review of Pyro, Hydro and Electro-metallurgical Processes for Recovering ...

130

Degradation of Wellbore Cement Due to CO2 Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production. This is due to value-added opportunities such as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), enhanced gas recovery (EGR), and enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. There...

131

Project due (before) Wednesday, April 13 (5 pm) Two to three pages of write-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Project due (before) Wednesday, April 13 (5 pm) Two to three pages of write often as informative other methods of unsupervised learning include projection methods "classification measure Dii = p j=1 |xij - xi j| manhattan Dii = p j=1 |xij - xi j| |xij + xi j| Canberra STA 450/4000 S

Reid, Nancy

132

Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! Renewable Energy Loan Applications Due Today! October 5, 2010 - 12:15pm Addthis Ebony Meeks Former Assistant Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs If you haven't submitted your Part I application for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program's Renewables Solicitation yet, today is your last day! Round 8, Part I applications for DOE's Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Advanced Transmission and Distribution Technologies Solicitation (2009) are due today by midnight EDT. Applicants can submit information through either the online application portal or by using FedConnect and Express Mail. Round 7 and Round 8 Part II applications are due December 31, 2010. The "Renewables Solicitation" invites the submission of applications

133

Theory, design, and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, including operational health physics  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive evaluation was conducted of the radiation protection practices and programs at prototype LMFBRs with long operational experience. Installations evaluated were the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Richland, Washington; Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), Idaho Falls, Idaho; Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) Dounreay, Scotland; Phenix, Marcoule, France; and Kompakte Natriumgekuhlte Kernreak Toranlange (KNK II), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. The evaluation included external and internal exposure control, respiratory protection procedures, radiation surveillance practices, radioactive waste management, and engineering controls for confining radiation contamination. The theory, design, and operating experience at LMFBRs is described. Aspects of LMFBR health physics different from the LWR experience in the United States are identified. Suggestions are made for modifications to the NRC Standard Review Plan based on the differences.

Adams, S.R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Alignment of fee Crystals due to Transient Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alignment of columnar ice crystals due to the electric field surrounding a moving charged object, such as an aircraft, is modeled. The model allows the conditions of charge, velocity, ambient electric field, and size and shape of crystal to ...

D. A. Burrows; J. L. Stith

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spectral Energy Dissipation due to Surface Wave Breaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semiempirical determination of the spectral dependence of the energy dissipation due to surface wave breaking is presented and then used to propose a model for the spectral dependence of the breaking strength parameter b, defined in the O. M. ...

Leonel Romero; W. Kendall Melville; Jessica M. Kleiss

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Protect the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protect the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change, Says Joint White House and Department of Energy Report Print E-mail Using Technology to Bring...

137

Study finds radioactivity around Los Alamos largely due to natural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

received by Los Alamos residents are natural. Less than 1 percent is due to global fallout resulting from worldwide early-stage nuclear weapons testing. Where the LANL study...

138

Solar Radiation Absorption due to Water Vapor: Advanced Broadband Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate parameterizations for calculating solar radiation absorption in the atmospheric column due to water vapor lines and continuum are proposed for use in broadband shortwave radiative transfer codes. The error in the absorption values is ...

Tatiana A. Tarasova; Boris A. Fomin

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

140

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change Protecting the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change August 12, 2013 - 5:25pm Addthis Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Transmission lines along Highway 15 outside Victorville, California. | Photo courtesy of Abby Rowling. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Jim Stock Member - White House Council of Economic Advisers EDITOR'S NOTE: This article originally appeared on WhiteHouse.gov. This week marks the tenth anniversary of one of the worst power outages in the United States, during which tens of millions of Americans were affected

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Gary Hodges; Tom Stoffel; Mark Kutchenreiter; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Michael Ritsche; Victor Morris; Mary Anderberg

142

Ground subsidence due to mining operations. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ground subsidence associated with mining operations. Mine subsidence is discussed with reference to mathematical modeling, forecasting extent of cavitation, and rock mechanics and mechanisms of stress relaxation. Damage to above and below-ground structures as well as agricultural areas, and mining techniques designed to prevent or reduce subsidence are included. Monitoring of subsidence and detection of cavitation for surface, underground, and ocean floor mining areas are discussed and examples are analyzed. Subsidence due to aquifer water removal is referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Turbine Nozzles Failure Due to Bird Strike - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Turbine Nozzles Failure Due to Bird Strike ... crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy with environmental coatings on the flow path ... was caused by clogged cooling holes and film cooling reduction, resulting in ... Analysis of Crack Development Involving a Pressure Vessel in a Synthetic Gas Production Plant.

144

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES DENYS DUTYKH AND HENRIK KALISCH Abstract. Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface distinct generation mechanisms of a tsunami are underwater earth- quakes, and submarine mass failures

145

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES DENYS DUTYKH # AND HENRIK KALISCH Abstract. Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a tsunami are underwater earth­ quakes, and submarine mass failures. Among the broad class of submarine mass

146

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES DENYS DUTYKH AND HENRIK KALISCH Abstract. Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface tsunamis. Two distinct generation mechanisms of a tsunami are underwater earthquakes, and submarine mass

147

Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Gasoline Price Differences Caused by:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: While my agency cannot be expert in every local gasoline market in the United States, we are familiar with a number of factors that can account for significant differences in prices between markets: Proximity of supply - distance from the refineries supplying the local market. Additionally, the proximity of those refineries to crude oil supplies can be a factor, as well as shipping logistics, including pipeline or waterborne, from refinery to market. Cost of supply - including crude oil, refinery operating, and transportation costs. Supply/demand balance - some regions are typically in excess or short supply, while others may vary seasonally, or when supply interruptions (such as refinery shutdowns) occur. Competitive environment - including the number of suppliers, and the

149

Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough.

O' Neil, Richard W. (Pleasanton, CA); Davin, James M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough. 4 figs.

O' Neil, R.W.; Davin, J.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Expanded rock blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST, including buffer blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC{_}BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting. This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in 2-D. DMC{_}BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts. The blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST have been expanded to include independently dipping geologic layers, top surface, bottom surface and pit floor. The pit can also now be defined using coordinates based on the toe of the bench. A method for modeling decked explosives has been developed which allows accurate treatment of the inert materials (stemming) in the explosive column and approximate treatment of different explosives in the same blasthole. A DMC{_}BLAST user can specify decking through a specific geologic layer with either inert material or a different explosive. Another new feature of DMC{_}BLAST is specification of an uplift angle which is the angle between the normal to the blasthole and a vector defining the direction of explosive loading on particles adjacent to the blasthole. A buffer (choke) blast capability has been added for situations where previously blasted material is adjacent to the free face of the bench preventing any significant lateral motion during the blast.

Preece, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidman, J.P.; Chung, S.H. [ICI Explosives (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising Sea Levels Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W. Washington) Select to enlarge. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could greatly lessen the impacts of climate change. However, the gases already added to the atmosphere ensure a certain amount of sea level rise to come, even if future emissions are reduced. A study by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

153

MIGRATION RATES OF PLANETS DUE TO SCATTERING OF PLANETESIMALS  

SciTech Connect

Planets migrate due to the recoil they experience from scattering solid (planetesimal) bodies. To first order, the torques exerted by the interior and exterior disks will cancel, analogous to the cancellation of the torques from the gravitational interaction with the gas (Type-I migration). Assuming the dispersion-dominated regime and power laws characterized by indices {alpha} and {beta} for the surface density and eccentricity profiles, we calculate the net torque on the planet. We consider both distant encounters and close (orbit-crossing) encounters. We find that the close and distant encounter torques have opposite signs with respect to {alpha} and {beta}; and that the torque is especially sensitive to the eccentricity gradient {beta}. Compared to Type-I migration due to excitation of density waves, the planetesimal-driven migration rate is generally lower due to the lower surface density of solids in gas-rich disk, although this may be partially or fully offset when their eccentricity and inclinaton are small. Allowing for the feedback of the planet on the planetesimal disk through viscous stirring, we find that under certain conditions a self-regulated migration scenario emerges, in which the planet migrates at a steady pace that approaches the rate corresponding to the one-sided torque. If the ratio of the local disk mass in planetesimals to planet mass is low, however, migration will stall. We quantify the boundaries separating the three accretion regimes.

Ormel, C. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ida, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, H., E-mail: ormel@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: hide@lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders:...

155

This book is intended for a wide readership including engineers, ap plied mathematicians, computer scientists, and graduate students who  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface This book is intended for a wide readership including engineers, ap­ plied mathematicians on the Lyapunov matrix equation. The book presents different techniques for solving and ana­ lyzing the algebraic interest. The book provides easy and quick references for the solution of many engineering and mathematical

Gajic, Zoran

156

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

157

AC-DC Difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST ac-dc Difference Project provides US industry with the essential link between ac ... Facilities/Tools Used: ... NIST CNST Nanofabrication facility. ...

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

158

PREDICTION OF SURFACE SETTLEMENT DUE TO THE DISPLACEMENT OF SOFT ZONES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In areas composed of coastal plain sediments, soft zones subjected to partial overburden may be present in the subsurface. During or after a seismic event, these soft zones may be compressed. The resulting displacement due to the deformation of the soft zones will propagate to the ground surface and cause the surface to settle. This paper presents a method to predict the settlement at the surface due to the propagation of the displacement from the soft zones. This method is performed by discretizing the soft zones into multiple clusters of finite sub-areas or subspaces. Settlement profile at the ground surface due to the displacement of each sub-area or subspace is computed assuming the shape is a normal distribution function. Settlement due to the displacement of the soft zones can then be approximated by adding the settlements computed for all the sub-areas or subspaces. This method provides a simple and useful tool for the prediction of the settlement profile and the results are consistent with those obtained from the finite difference analysis.

Li, W

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Drop Growth Due to High Supersaturation Caused by Isobaric Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new conceptual model is proposed for enhanced cloud droplet growth during condensation. Rapid droplet growth may occur in zones of high supersaturation resulting from isobaric mixing of saturated volumes with different temperatures. Cloud ...

Alexei V. Korolev; George A. Isaac

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between charge transport and microstructure, in particular, to identify the inherent bottlenecks to charge transport. In semicrystalline and polycrystalline materials, charge transport is most likely dominated by grain-boundary effects, although the exact mechanism is not well understood. Unfortunately, grain boundaries in semicrystalline thin films are difficult to characterize: the grains are too small to allow for measurements across individual grain boundaries (as is often done for polycrystalline films of small molecules) and bulk measurements are complicated by the unknown orientation of polymer chains within the grain. To better understand the effect of chain orientation on grain boundaries, we use anisotropic thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) - one of the most well-studied polymeric semiconductors, as a tool to study charge transport.

162

that full credit, including © notice, is given to the source. Shale Gas Development and Property Values: Differences across Drinking Water Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Resources for data on well completions. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research. NBER working papers are circulated for discussion and comment purposes. They have not been peerreviewed or been subject to the review by the NBER Board of Directors that accompanies official NBER publications.

Lucija Muehlenbachs; Elisheba Spiller; Christopher Timmins; Jackie Willwerth; Lucija Muehlenbachs; Elisheba Spiller; Christopher Timmins; Lucija Muehlenbachs; Elisheba Spiller; Christopher Timmins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Extended three-dimensional ADCIRC hydrodynamic model to include baroclinic flow and sediment transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to identify the circulation patterns of the water and sediment fluxes in coastal and estuarine zones, where the shoaling processes correlate with tide generating flow patterns. The research provides a better understanding of the characteristics of spatial and temporal variability of currents. An important deviation from previous research is the inclusion of the baroclinic term, which becomes very important in density driven flows. The understanding of this process provides a basis for determining how the water circulation three-dimensionally controls the hydrodynamics of the system and ultimately transports the suspended and soluble materials due to combined currents and waves. A three-dimensional circulation model is used to calculate the water circulation. The model is based on the three-dimensional (3D) version of Advanced Circulation (AD-CIRC) Hydrodynamic Model with extending the Sediment Transport module. The model is based on the finite element method on unstructured grids. The output of the hydrody-namic model is used to estimate spatial and temporal advections, dispersions and bottom shear stress for the erosion, suspension, deposition and transport of sediment. The model development includes extending the existing three-dimensional (3D) ADCIRC Model with (1) baroclinic forcing term and (2) transport module of suspended and soluble materials. The transport module covers the erosion, material suspension and deposition processes for both cohesive and non-cohesive type sediments. The inclusion of the baroclinic demonstrates the potential of over or underpredicting the total net transport of suspended cohesive sediment under influence of currents. The model provides less than 6% error of theoretical mass conservation for eroded, suspended and deposited sediment material. The inclusion of the baroclinic term in stratified water demonstrates the prevailing longshore sediment transport. It is shown that the model has an application to the transport of the cohesive sediments from the mouth of the Mississippi River along the north shore of the Gulf of Mexico towards and along the Texas coast. The model is also applicable to determine the design erosion thickness of a cap for isolating contaminated dredged material and to evaluate the appro-priate grain size of cap sediments to minimize the erosion.

Pandoe, Wahyu Widodo

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Differences of Random Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of woodscrews containing a variety of sizes for a local DIY store. The weight W (in kilograms) of boxes happen if the DIY store bought in similar products from different manufacturers. Before we can solve

Vickers, James

165

Nonlinear dissipation of circularly polarized Alfven waves due to the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, the dissipation processes of circularly polarized Alfven waves in solar wind plasmas including beam components are numerically discussed by using a 2-D hybrid simulation code. Numerical results suggest that the parent Alfven waves are rapidly dissipated due to the presence of the beam-induced obliquely propagating waves, such as kinetic Alfven waves. The nonlinear wave-wave coupling is directly evaluated by using the induction equation for the parent wave. It is also observed both in the 1-D and 2-D simulations that the presence of large amplitude Alfven waves strongly suppresses the beam instabilities.

Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Hada, T. [Department of Earth System Science and Technology, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga City, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Tsubouchi, K. [Department of Earth and Planetary Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Changes in dimethyl sulfide oceanic distribution due to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here we report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. We find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associated with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Erickson III, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

DOT Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data up to 1995. The data includes motor-fuel...

169

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including Ionization Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including A molecular dynamics model of UV-MALDI including ionization processes is presented. In addition/desorption of molecular systems, it includes radiative and nonradiative decay, exciton hopping, two pooling processes

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

170

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE Differing Professional Opinions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE has established a variety of work processes for its employees (including DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees) to raise concerns so that they are assessed and appropriate actions are taken. Employees are to use these processes to resolve issues at the lowest possible level. In rare cases, an employee may decide that despite those efforts, there remains a concern about a technical issue with a potential for a significant impact on environment, safety or health.

172

Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

SciTech Connect

The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by having the coupler location alternate from above to below the beam pipe so that the coupler kick from one cavity is compensated by that of the next. While this is correct, alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes in superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We show here that cavities with high external $Q$ have coupler kicks that change the sign of their phase when the coupler is moved from before to after the cavity, as long as one accelerates on crest. This implies that the emittance growth from one cavity can be canceled by the next, pr...

Buckley, Brandon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with temperature controlled cells for potentiostatic and potentiodynamic testing (Figure 2).

Farmer, J C

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Triboluminescent properties of zinc sulfide phosphors due to hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The emission of light due to crystal fracture, or triboluminescence (TL), is a phenomenon that has been known for centuries. One of the most common examples of TL is the flash created from chewing Wint-O-Green Lifesavers . From 2004 to 2006, research was completed using the two-stage light gas gun located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama to measure the TL properties for zinc sulfide doped with both manganese (ZnS:Mn) and copper (ZnS:Cu). Results clearly show that hypervelocity impact-induced TL has been observed for both ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. For ZnS:Mn, TL produced during 4.7 and 5.7km/s impacts was statistically more luminous than was observed from similar data collected at 3.3km/s. The TL decay time for ZnS:Mn was found to be 292 58 s, which is totally consistent with earlier measurements that did not use impact as an excitation source. Further, the emission of TL from ZnS:Mn undergoing hypervelocity impact has been demonstrated to have a significant component at the known peak emission wavelength of ZnS:Mn of 585nm. Small TL emission generated as a result of hypervelocity impact was also observed from ZnS:Cu. The most intriguing conclusion from this research is that it may be possible to discriminate impact velocity by measuring the time-integrated luminosity of TL phosphors. An ability to measure the velocity of a hypervelocity impact is a significant indicator of the potential usefulness for this concept for use as an impact sensor in future spacecraft.

Bergeron, Mr. Noah P. [Louisiana Tech University; HollermanPh.D., Dr. William A. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette; Goedeke, Shawn [ORNL; Moore, R. J. [University of Louisiana, Lafayette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hard particle spectra from parallel shocks due to turbulence transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If taken into account, the transmission of the particle-scattering turbulence --in addition to just the particles-- through the shock front can change the effective compression ratio felt by the accelerating particles significantly from the compression of the underlying plasma. This can lead to significantly harder energy spectra than what are traditionally predicted assuming frozen-in turbulence. I consider the applicability and limitations of turbulence transmission scenario in parallel shock waves of different thickness, its consequences in AGN and microquasar environments, and discuss the possible effects to the spectrum of the accelerated particles.

Joni Tammi

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including 0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders: DOE and NNSA employees Scope: DOE Order 440.1 B establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Summary: Among the requirements of DOE Order 440.1 B, the Department must provide its employees, including NNSA, a number of protections relating to whistle blowing guidelines. The relevant section of requirements includes: 4. REQUIREMENTS. DOE elements must:

178

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Does anyone know what pieces of electric rates are included in the NREL/Ventyx database of rates by utility, i.e. is it supply only or does the file include supply, transmission & distribution costs? Thanks! Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather the Ventyx rates found here: http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/georeserv/service/utility_rates If so, then the Ventyx rates do include all bundled rates (which includes supply, trans, and distr costs). However, there's a small but non-zero possibility that a few energy-only or delivery-only rates may not have been cleaned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening  

SciTech Connect

Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Accounting for the energy consumption of personal computing including portable devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption, questions are also being asked about the contribution of computing equipment. Though studies have documented the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these ... Keywords: computing, electricity, energy, environment, networking, portable devices

Pavel Somavat; Shraddha Jadhav; Vinod Namboodiri

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Multi-objective design and optimization of district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present context of finding ways to decrease CO2 emissions linked with human activity, district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies are likely… (more)

Weber, Céline Isabelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Stocks of Crude Oil (Including SPR) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

186

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation describes the projections for petroleum-based gasoline and distillate in the Update AEO 2008, which includes the impacts of the Energy Independence and Security Act.

Information Center

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

ORISE: REAC/TS Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA ADVISORY: REACTS International Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima crisis FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 31, 2011 FY11-42 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center...

188

Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to other angiosperms. BMC Genomics 2006, 7:61. 20.history of chloroplast genomics. Photosynth Res 2003, 76:Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Combustion Analysis of Different Olive Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) techniques and concretely the study of the burning profile provide information that can be used to estimate the behaviour of the combustion of carbonous materials. Commonly, these techniques have been used for the study of carbons, but are also interesting for the analysis of biomass wastes, due to the different species present on the wastes affect directly to its thermal properties. In this work, techniques of thermal analysis have been applied to compare the behaviour of different wastes coming from olive oil mills. From these results, it is remarkable that the Concentrated Olive Mill Waste Water (COMWW) presents more unfavourable conditions for its combustion.

Teresa Mir; Alberto Esteban; Sebastián Rojas; Irene Montero; Antonio Ruiz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

191

Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

SciTech Connect

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to wind and solar power. Environ. Sci. Technol. (2)Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power” Andrew Mills, ? , †due to wind and solar power. Environ. Sci. Technol. (2)

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. These include a characteristic suppression of the continuum below ~2 keV, absorption features such as a redshifted O K-edge, and diminished intensity of resonance emission lines. Spectra including the effects of intrinsic absorption are not well fit by foreground absorbing models. Attempting to fit such models to the spatially resolved spectra can lead to underestimates of the true absorbing column by factors of 3-20. Fits to integrated spectra of the entire cooling flow region can either underestimate or overestimate the mass of the absorbing gas depending on the specifics of the model. We discuss the potential detection of these effects with AXAF, XMM, and Astro-E.

Michael W. Wise; Craig L. Sarazin

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

196

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT (IEPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT solutions. Overview Past Energy Commission Integrated Energy Policy Reports (IEPRs) have recognized (IEPR) Submitted By: Steven Weissman Associate Director Center for Law, Energy and the Environment

Kammen, Daniel M.

197

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of Particulate Matter R degradation, chemostat, models, growth rate, equilibrium, bistability. 1. INTRODUCTION Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron and ion collective effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

976 Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron of 4 MeV energy with very short pulses. (`ompared to ISlectron Ring Accelerators, ECRIPAC presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Code Thrust 1400 Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering (including Aerodynamics, Aerospace Engineering, and Space Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (including Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technologies, Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, Gerontology, Health and Medical Administrative Services, Other Health Professions and Related Services, Environmental health, Geotechnical, Hydraulic, Hydrologic, Sanitary, Structural, and Transportation) 1404

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modification of the Köhler Equation to Include Soluble Trace Gases and Slightly Soluble Substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized reformulation of the Köhler theory to include the effect of soluble gases and slightly soluble aerosol substances is presented. A single equation is derived that takes into account 1) the Kelvin effect; 2) the Raoult effect caused ...

Ari Laaksonen; Pekka Korhonen; Markku Kulmala; Robert J. Charlson

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature-Dependent Ice Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new bulk microphysical parameterization (BMP) scheme is presented that includes a diagnosed riming intensity and its impact on ice characteristics. As a result, the new scheme represents a continuous spectrum from pristine ice particles to ...

Yanluan Lin; Brian A. Colle

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling and Controller Design of a Wind Energy Conversion System Including a Matrix Converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a grid-connected wind-energy converter system including a matrix converter is proposed. The matrix converter, as a power electronic converter, is used to… (more)

Barakati, Seyed Masoud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Including Surface Kinetic Effects in Simple Models of Ice Vapor Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for kinetically-limited vapor growth and aspect ratio evolution of atmospheric single ice crystals is presented. The method is based on the adaptive habit model of Chen and Lamb (1994), but is modified to include the deposition ...

Chengzhu Zhang; Jerry Y. Harrington

205

A Simple Model of Abyssal Circulation, Including Effects of Wind, Buoyancy and Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine problems of steady abyssal circulation using an inviscid planetary geostrophic layered model. The model includes an active wind-driven upper layer and arbitrary topography; forcing is in the form of specified interlayer mass fluxes ...

Susan L. Hautala; Stephen C. Riser

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Including cognitive biases and distance-based rewards in a connectionist model of complex problem solving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a cognitive, connectionist-based model of complex problem solving that integrates cognitive biases and distance-based and environmental rewards under a temporal-difference learning mechanism. The model is tested against experimental data obtained ... Keywords: Cognitive biases, Computational modeling, Distance-reduction heuristic, Problem solving, Reinforcement learning, Temporal-difference learning

Frédéric Dandurand; Thomas R. Shultz; Arnaud Rey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Options for Removing Multiple Pollutants Including CO2 at Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical review of the fuel changes and technology options for existing coal-fired power plants in response to potential new requirements for increasingly stringent multi-pollutant air emissions reductions, possibly including carbon dioxide (CO2). Preliminary costing of the major options is included. A database of the U.S. coal-fired power plants has been developed for further, more specific analyses.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Water mass transformation due to mixed layer entrainment and mesoscale stirring: In series or parallel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The convergence of advective and di#usive buoyancy flux must match the air-sea buoyancy flux between two outcropping isopycnals. This leads to a diagnostic framework for water mass transformation in which a myriad of di#erent processes can be incorporated under a unifying balance. We review how the diapycnal advection due to ubiquitous mixed layer entrainment can be included in this framework, and we estimate its contribution to the large scale transformation. We also consider how decomposing the flow and buoyancy field into mean, eddy and turbulent parts leads to clarifying the interaction of mixed layer and mesoscale (or sub-mesoscale) eddies in the overall large scale balance. 1.

A. Tandon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

X-ray Absorption Due to Cold Gas in Cluster Cooling Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the emergent X-ray properties for models of cluster cooling flows including the effects of accumulated cooled material. The opacity of this cooled gas can reduce the overall X-ray luminosity of the cooling flow, and values of Mdot based on these luminosities can underestimate the true value by factors of ~2. We find that accumulated cooled material can produce emergent surface brightness profiles much like those observed even for nearly homogeneous gas distributions. Consequently, much more of the gas may be cooling below X-ray emitting temperatures in the central regions of cooling flows (r cooling flows may have been underestimated. We show that distributed absorption in cooling flows produces a number of observable effects in the spectrum which may allow it to be differentiated from absorption due to gas in our Galaxy. Th...

Wise, M W; Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Statistics of Storm Updraft Velocities from TWP-ICE Including Verification with Profiling Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons between direct measurements and modeled values of vertical air motions in precipitating systems are complicated by differences in temporal and spatial scales. On one hand, vertically profiling radars more directly measure the vertical ...

Scott Collis; Alain Protat; Peter T. May; Christopher Williams

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal

213

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors who support advocacy, research, scholarships, hands-on training, funding, and networking opportunities to prepare and inspire young women to enter and thrive in STEM fields. C3E Network participants have pledged many types of commitments, from highlighting female role models to creating hands-on activities for young girls. Ongoing activities include: * Filming and featuring women in clean energy fields on online / TV outlets (Earth Day Network); * Designing pilot projects and expanding Young Women's Conferences at DOE's

214

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

215

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-wind-energy- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind module, which can be used to project the cost and production of a wind

216

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 25, 2009 - 4:52pm Addthis President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. As outlined in the legislation, these funds are an investment in a

217

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE 40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

218

1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the (1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the deployment of new Smart Grid applications, and how are these needs being met? The current communication needs of SCE include: telephony, data, video, voice dispatch, mobile data, grid monitoring, grid control, tele-protection, customer communication, load management, automated meter reading, and collaboration capabilities ranging from virtual meetings to e-learning. SCE is using a combination of private, leased, and shared telecommunication networks to support these requirements. Those applications that require high availability, low latency, and stringent security rely on a private telecommunications network (SCEnet). A combination of transport media are

219

Estimates of thermal fatigue due to beam interruptions for an ALMR-type ATW  

SciTech Connect

Thermal fatigue due to beam interruptions has been investigated in a sodium cooled ATW using the Advanced Liquid Metal mod B design as a basis for the subcritical source driven reactor. A k{sub eff} of 0.975 was used for the reactor. Temperature response in the primary coolant system was calculated, using the SASSYS- 1 code, for a drop in beam current from full power to zero in 1 microsecond.. Temperature differences were used to calculate thermal stresses. Fatigue curves from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code were used to determine the number of cycles various components should be designed for, based on these thermal stresses.

Dunn, F. E.; Wade, D. C.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fourier and Cauchy-Stieltjes transforms of power laws including stable distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of probability measures whose densities near infinity are mixtures of Pareto distributions. This class can be characterized by the Fourier transform which has a power series expansion including real powers, not only integer powers. This class includes stable distributions in probability and also non-commutative probability theories. We also characterize the class in terms of the Cauchy-Stieltjes transform and the Voiculescu transform. If the stability index is greater than one, stable distributions in probability theory do not belong to that class, while they do in non-commutative probability.

Takahiro Hasebe

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Problems in electromagnetic mass-difference calculations  

SciTech Connect

A brief discussion is given on the progress made thus far in calculating the electromagnetic mass differences of elementary particles. Some of the methods discussed include Feynman's method, Cottinghams method, the methods involving Bjorken scaling iunctions, and the formalism of Dashen and Frautschi. (LBS)

Majumdar, D.P.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets College-harvested wood o natural building techniques o a composting toilet o a net-metering solar electric

Baltisberger, Jay H.

226

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such as solid lithium-aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Palos Hills, IL); Olszanski, Theodore W. (Roselle, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

228

Postgraduate Handbook Courses, programs and any arrangements for programs including staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn oil; Camelina oil. One of the following: Trans-Esterification, Esterification, Hydrotreating-process renewable biomass and petroleum. 5 POTENTIALLY RELEVANT I Naphtha, LPG Camelina oil Hydrotreating 5 including peat, dung, plant-oils, bees wax, rendered animal fats, draft animals, natural derived sources

Benatallah, Boualem

229

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND ACUTE. This study was undertaken to obtain these data for the tropical tuna species, yellowfin tuna, Tkunnl tuna, KatsltWOO1t8 pelamis, previously published. The effect of acute temperature change on the SMR

232

Faddeev-type calculations of few-body nuclear reactions including Coulomb interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The method of screening and renormalization is used to include the Coulomb interaction between the charged particles in the description of few-body nuclear reactions. Calculations are done in the framework of Faddeev-type equations in momentum-space. The reliability of the method is demonstrated. The Coulomb effect on observables is discussed.

A. Deltuva

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

235

Selecting Optional Fees Optional fees include meal plans, money on Tigerstripe, and a TAPS yearbook. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supports all of the services at Redfern and includes: · Professional services of primary health care on pharmaceuticals, psychological testing, laboratory and x- ray services. · After Hours Nursewise telephone service. http://sisweb.clemson.edu/ Health Fee Policy University policy requires all students registered for six

Bolding, M. Chad

236

Solar water heater installation guidelines. A manual for homeowners and professionals. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The guidelines include detailed diagrams, a selected glossary, a bibliography of books and manuals which might prove useful and a checklist which should be used during and after the installation. The guidelines explain generally how to install a liquid solar hot water heater, but not a specific system. The following are covered: collector location, collector installation, plumbing, solar storage tanks, electrical, and insulation. (MHR)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the cell distance is 170µm. Keywords: PV module, Encapsulation, Simulation, Reliability, Mechanics 1THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1, *, Matthias by a comparison to displacement experiments where the thermomechanical deformation of solar cells in a PV laminate

240

Seismic fracture analysis of concrete gravity dams including dam-reservoir interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the seismic fracture response of concrete gravity dams is investigated with considering the effects of dam-reservoir interaction. A co-axial rotating crack model (CRCM), which includes the strain softening behavior, is selected for concrete ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Dam-reservoir interaction, Non-linear analysis, Seismic fracture

Yusuf Calayir; Muhammet Karaton

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences facilities. Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Over extended breaks, the doors of all residence halls will be secured around the clock. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary

Escher, Christine

242

The Fuels and Lubricants Research Division of Southwest Research includes extensive engines, fuels and lubricants research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caterpillar 1K Lubricant Test This test evaluates the piston deposits, liner wear, and oil consumption and oil consumption. The test is proposed for inclusion in the PC-10 category. Mack T8/T8A/T8E Lubricant of Mack engine oil specification EON+ 03, CI-4+ and will be included in PC-10. Mack T12 Lubricant Test

Chapman, Clark R.

243

Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Inducing Order from Disordered Copolymers: On Demand Generation of Triblock Morphologies Including Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disordered block copolymers are generally impractical in nanopatterning applications due to their inability to self-assemble into well-defined nanostructures. However, inducing order in low molecular weight disordered systems permits the design of periodic structures with smaller characteristic sizes. Here, we have induced nanoscale phase separation from disordered triblock copolymer melts to form well-ordered lamellae, hexagonally packed cylinders, and a triply periodic gyroid network structure, using a copolymer/homopolymer blending approach, which incorporates constituent homopolymers into selective block domains. This versatile blending approach allows one to precisely target multiple nanostructures from a single disordered material and can be applied to a wide variety of triblock copolymer systems for nanotemplating and nanoscale separation applications requiring nanoscale feature sizes and/or high areal feature densities.

Tureau, Maëva S.; Kuan, Wei-Fan; Rong, Lixia; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Epps, III, Thomas H. (Delaware); (SUNYB)

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Ellen Colligan, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Contract Management, Office of Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1776, Ellen.colligan@hq.doe.gov Policy Flash 2013-49.pdf Attch_FA_RepReqChecklist_COMBINED_FINAL_4-23-13 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications ATTACHMENT FLASH 2011-46(6) Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects

247

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

248

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

249

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

250

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

251

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

252

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

253

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

254

2008 CIM-XML Interoperability Including CIM-Based Tools Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Initiatives have produced a number of drafts that have now become International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, including the Common Information Model (CIM) and the Generic Interface Definition (GID) specifications. These standards provide the basis for model-driven information exchange both within and between control centers and other systems in utility operations across the enterprise. Previous interoperability tests validated the use and acceptance of the CIM standard translated into...

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such a solid lithium--aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided. 1 figure, 1 table.

Tomczuk, Z.; Olszanski, W.; Battles, J.E.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, HCl, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClONO{sub 2} are calculated.

Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Motor Management Guide Supporting Plant License Renewal Including Environmental Qualification Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute’s Large Electric Motor Users Group Information Working Group, which includes motor engineers, motor specialist consultants, and vendors. Environmental qualification (EQ) program owners were also involved in the development of this report. This report addresses the most important elements of a sound motor management program to support an informed decision on motor preservation and motor life extension. Motor life extensions of ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

259

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Evaluation of the electromagnetic effects due to direct lighting to nuclear explosive areas at Pantex. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the effort to quantify the electromagnetic environments in the nuclear explosive areas at Pantex due to direct lightning. The fundamental measure of the threat to nuclear safety is assumed to be the maximum voltage between any two points in an assembly area, which is then available for producing arcing or for driving current into critical subsystems of a nuclear weapon. This maximum voltage has been computed with simple analytical models and with three-dimensional finite-difference computer codes.

Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Security assessment of power systems including energy storage. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on system response data provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, it has been confirmed that 10 MW is an adequate capacity for the IC unit which is proposed for supplementary damping of the West Coast intertie, for the degree of damping which BPA considers as adequate. Some preliminary investigations have shown that IC units, with appropriate controls, should be capable of preventing the buildup of torsional oscillations in turbogenerators connected to series compensated transmission lines (subsynchronous resonance). The implementation of an adequate ''white noise'' generator has allowed confirmation of an analog simulation of a power system with load variations. Autocorrelation estimates of signals measured on this simulation indicate that machine rotor angle dynamics should be readily identifiable, but dynamics due to exciters and governors are probably not identifiable. Likelihood functions (as a weighted sum of squares of residuals produced by a Kalman filter) appear to attain maximum value for the ''true'' parameters of the system, but the computational burden of doing dynamic estimation in a point estimation problem is prohibitive. The use of canonical forms for system linearized dynamics is being investigated, with the prospect of formulating point estimation type algorithms.

Carroll, D.P.; Triezenberg, D.M.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Seismic fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems including the impact of differential ground subsidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though Differential Ground Subsidence (DGS) impacts the seismic response of segmented buried pipelines augmenting their vulnerability, fragility formulations to estimate repair rates under such condition are not available in the literature. Physical models to estimate pipeline seismic damage considering other cases of permanent ground subsidence (e.g. faulting, tectonic uplift, liquefaction, and landslides) have been extensively reported, not being the case of DGS. The refinement of the study of two important phenomena in Mexico City - the 1985 Michoacan earthquake scenario and the sinking of the city due to ground subsidence - has contributed to the analysis of the interrelation of pipeline damage, ground motion intensity, and DGS; from the analysis of the 48-inch pipeline network of the Mexico City's Water System, fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems for two DGS levels are proposed. The novel parameter PGV{sup 2}/PGA, being PGV peak ground velocity and PGA peak ground acceleration, has been used as seismic parameter in these formulations, since it has shown better correlation to pipeline damage than PGV alone according to previous studies. By comparing the proposed fragilities, it is concluded that a change in the DGS level (from Low-Medium to High) could increase the pipeline repair rates (number of repairs per kilometer) by factors ranging from 1.3 to 2.0; being the higher the seismic intensity the lower the factor.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ordaz, Mario [UNAM, MEXICO CITY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry  

SciTech Connect

Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Alleviation of effective permeability reduction of gas-condensate due to condensate buildup near wellbore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the reservoir pressure is decreased below dew point pressure of the gas near the wellbore, gas-condensate wells start to decrease production because condensate is separated from the gas around the wellbore causing a decrease in gas relative permeability. This effect is more dramatic if the permeability of the reservoir is low. The idea proposed for reducing this problem is to eliminate the irreducible water saturation near the wellbore to leave more space for the gas to flow and therefore increase the productivity of the well. In this research a simulation study was performed to determine the range of permeabilities where the cylinder of condensate will seriously affect the wellÂ?s productivity, and the distance the removal of water around the wellbore has to be extended in order to have acceleration of production and an increase in the final reserves. A compositional-radial reservoir was simulated with one well in the center of 109 grids. Three gas-condensate fluids with different heptanes plus compositions ( 4, 8 and 11 mole %), and two irreducible water saturations were used. The fitting of the Equation of State (EOS) was performed using the method proposed by Aguilar and McCain. Several simulations were performed with several permeabilities to determine the permeabilities for which the productivity is not affected by the presence of the cylinder of condensate. At constant permeability, various radii of a region of zero initial water saturation around the wellbore were simulated and comparisons of the effects of removal of irreducible water on productivity were made. Reservoirs with permeabilities lower than 100 mD showed a reduction in the ultimate reserves due to the cylinder of condensate. The optimal radius of water removal depends on the fluid composition and the irreducible water saturation of the reservoir. The expected increase in reserves due to water removal varies from 10 to 80 % for gas production and from 4 to 30% for condensate production.

Carballo Salas, Jose Gilberto

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

X-ray Thomson scattering for partially ionized plasmas including the effect of bound levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Thomson scattering is being developed as a method to measure the temperature, electron density, and ionization state of high energy density plasmas such as those used in inertial confinement fusion. Most experiments are currently done at large laser facilities that can create bright X-ray sources, however the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) provides a new bright source to use in these experiments. One challenge with X-ray Thomson scattering experiments is understanding how to model the scattering for partially ionized plasmas in order to include the contributions of the bound electrons in the scattered intensity. In this work we take the existing models of Thomson scattering that include elastic ion-ion scattering and the electron-electron plasmon scattering and add the contribution of the bound electrons in the partially ionized plasmas. We validated our model by analyzing existing beryllium experimental data. We then consider several higher Z materials such as Cr and predict the existe...

Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint therebetween. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint.

Obermeyer, Franklin D. (Pensacola, FL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

RELAP5-3D Code Includes Athena Features and Models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, sf6, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5- 3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper.

Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard R. Schultz

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint there between. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint. 10 figures.

Obermeyer, F.D.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Controlling Deformation in Elastic and Viscoelastic Beams Due to Temperature and Moisture Changes Using Piezoelectric Actuator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes the implementation of surface bonded piezoelectric actuators to control or minimize the deformation in elastic or viscoelastic cantilever beams due to simultaneous heat and moisture diffusion. The problem is addressed in the context of linearized elasticity and linearized viscoelasticity. The constitutive equations are derived from the balance laws for mass, linear and angular momenta, energy, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics. The constitutive equations for linearized elasticity are then obtained as a consequence of small deformation assumption. The temperature and moisture induced deformation is introduced through the coefficient of thermal expansion CTE and coefficient of moisture expansion CME. The constitutive equations for linearized viscoelasticity are obtained by correspondence principle. The coupled temperature and moisture diffusion equations are obtained as a consequence of Clausius-Duhem inequality. The extent of coupling between heat conduction and moisture diffusion phenomena is studied by varying the ratio of their diffusivities and a non-dimensional coupling parameter. The effect of coupled unsteady heat conduction and moisture diffusion phenomena on the short and long term response characteristics of the beam such as displacement, stress and strain fields is studied. Based on these response characteristics, the magnitude of external actuating voltage required to minimize deformation is predicted. This is followed by a comparative study of the field variables in cases of actuated and unactuated beams. Four materials are chosen for this study; aluminium, epoxy, carbon fiber reinforced polymer with fiber volume fraction of 60 percent, and an epoxy-like viscoelastic material. The viscoelastic material is assumed to be thermorheologically simple. The shift factor is assumed to be a linear function of temperature and moisture fields. To address this problem numerically, a finite difference formulation is presented for the field equations and boundary conditions. This numerical scheme is validated by solving the problem of uniformly loaded cantilever beam and comparing the results with the analytical solution known a priori. The results obtained numerically are validated by comparison with experimental results. It is observed that the under the effect of external actuation, the stress and displacement fields are largely minimized in all four cases chosen for study. The bending in the unactuated viscoelastic beam is more pronounced than bending in the unactuated elastic beam. This is due to the softening of the material with time due to evolving temperature and moisture fields. However, relatively lesser external actuating voltage is necessary to minimize bending in the former case compared to the latter. The magnitude of actuating electric field required in the piezoelectric layer suggests a need to address the problem with in a non-linear framework, no such attempt is made in this study.

Kuravi, Ramachandra Srinivasa Chaitanya

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electromagnetic analysis of forces and torques on the baseline and enhanced ITER shield modules due to plasma disruption.  

SciTech Connect

An electromagnetic analysis is performed on the ITER shield modules under different plasma-disruption scenarios using the OPERA-3d software. The models considered include the baseline design as provided by the International Organization and an enhanced design that includes the more realistic geometrical features of a shield module. The modeling procedure is explained, electromagnetic torques are presented, and results of the modeling are discussed.

Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Human Bathtub: Safety and Risk Predictions Including the Dynamic Probability of Operator Errors  

SciTech Connect

Reactor safety and risk are dominated by the potential and major contribution for human error in the design, operation, control, management, regulation and maintenance of the plant, and hence to all accidents. Given the possibility of accidents and errors, now we need to determine the outcome (error) probability, or the chance of failure. Conventionally, reliability engineering is associated with the failure rate of components, or systems, or mechanisms, not of human beings in and interacting with a technological system. The probability of failure requires a prior knowledge of the total number of outcomes, which for any predictive purposes we do not know or have. Analysis of failure rates due to human error and the rate of learning allow a new determination of the dynamic human error rate in technological systems, consistent with and derived from the available world data. The basis for the analysis is the 'learning hypothesis' that humans learn from experience, and consequently the accumulated experience defines the failure rate. A new 'best' equation has been derived for the human error, outcome or failure rate, which allows for calculation and prediction of the probability of human error. We also provide comparisons to the empirical Weibull parameter fitting used in and by conventional reliability engineering and probabilistic safety analysis methods. These new analyses show that arbitrary Weibull fitting parameters and typical empirical hazard function techniques cannot be used to predict the dynamics of human errors and outcomes in the presence of learning. Comparisons of these new insights show agreement with human error data from the world's commercial airlines, the two shuttle failures, and from nuclear plant operator actions and transient control behavior observed in transients in both plants and simulators. The results demonstrate that the human error probability (HEP) is dynamic, and that it may be predicted using the learning hypothesis and the minimum failure rate, and can be utilized for probabilistic risk analysis purposes. (authors)

Duffey, Romney B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, ON, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Saull, John W. [International Federation of Airwothiness, 14 Railway Approach, East Grinstead, West Sussex, RH19 1BP (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

279

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

280

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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281

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

282

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

283

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

284

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

285

Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

Duffy, Dorothy [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)]|[EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rutherford, Alexis [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dispersion in a thermal plasma including arbitrary degeneracy and quantum recoil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The longitudinal response function for a thermal electron gas is calculated including two quantum effects exactly, degeneracy, and the quantum recoil. The Fermi-Dirac distribution is expanded in powers of a parameter that is small in the nondegenerate limit and the response function is evaluated in terms of the conventional plasma dispersion function to arbitrary order in this parameter. The infinite sum is performed in terms of polylogarithms in the long-wavelength and quasistatic limits, giving results that apply for arbitrary degeneracy. The results are applied to the dispersion relations for Langmuir waves and to screening, reproducing known results in the nondegenerate and completely degenerate limits, and generalizing them to arbitrary degeneracy.

Melrose, D. B. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Mushtaq, A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Residential sidewall insulation case histories, including experiences and problems in the field application of loose fill  

SciTech Connect

An unbonded fiberglass loose-fill insulation was selected for this sidewall application study. The insert tube technique is described and the parameters that affect pneumatic application of the product are identified. The initial evaluation was conducted in the laboratory and included density and thermal testing. The laboratory results were then utilized in field studies. Ten homes with no sidewall insulation were retrofitted. Thermographic scans of sidewalls before and after retrofit confirmed the predicted reductions in heat loss based on calculation techniques given in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. The improvement was further confirmed by comparing utility bills. Typical problems that occur while preparing a house for sidewall retrofit are discussed. The simple payback for typical houses is presented. Good correlation is shown between laboratory test results and field performance. Test data indicate that the application procedure used gave an effective R-value per product claim.

Infante, L.J.; Aller, P.F.; Fay, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Engine including hydraulically actuated valvetrain and method of valve overlap control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust valve control method may include displacing an exhaust valve in communication with the combustion chamber of an engine to an open position using a hydraulic exhaust valve actuation system and returning the exhaust valve to a closed position using the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly. During closing, the exhaust valve may be displaced for a first duration from the open position to an intermediate closing position at a first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a first mode. The exhaust valve may be displaced for a second duration greater than the first duration from the intermediate closing position to a fully closed position at a second velocity at least eighty percent less than the first velocity by operating the hydraulic exhaust valve actuation assembly in a second mode.

Cowgill, Joel (White Lake, MI)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

A high liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process. 2 figs.

Coburn, T.T.

1988-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

High liquid yield process for retorting various organic materials including oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a continuous retorting process for various high molecular weight organic materials, including oil shale, that yields an enhanced output of liquid product. The organic material, mineral matter, and an acidic catalyst, that appreciably adsorbs alkenes on surface sites at prescribed temperatures, are mixed and introduced into a pyrolyzer. A circulating stream of olefin enriched pyrolysis gas is continuously swept through the organic material and catalyst, whereupon, as the result of pyrolysis, the enhanced liquid product output is provided. Mixed spent organic material, mineral matter, and cool catalyst are continuously withdrawn from the pyrolyzer. Combustion of the spent organic material and mineral matter serves to reheat the catalyst. Olefin depleted pyrolysis gas, from the pyrolyzer, is enriched in olefins and recycled into the pyrolyzer. The reheated acidic catalyst is separated from the mineral matter and again mixed with fresh organic material, to maintain the continuously cyclic process.

Coburn, Thomas T. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Estimating parameters of coalescing compact binaries with a detector network including LIGO Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the goals of gravitational-wave astronomy is simultaneous detection of gravitational-wave signals from merging compact-object binaries and the electromagnetic transients from these mergers. With the next generation of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors under construction, we examine the benefits of the proposed extension of the detector network to include a fourth site in Australia in addition to the network of Hanford, Livingston and Cascina sites. Using Bayesian parameter-estimation analyses of simulated gravitational-wave signals from a range of coalescing-binary locations and orientations, we study the improvement in parameter estimation. We find that an Australian detector can break degeneracies in several parameters; in particular, the localization of the source on the sky is improved by a factor of ~4, with more modest improvements in distance and binary inclination estimates. This enhanced ability to localize sources on the sky will be crucial in any search for electromagnetic c...

Aylott, Benjamin; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Mandel, Ilya; Raymond, Vivien; Rodriguez, Carl; van der Sluys, Marc; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state  

SciTech Connect

We present a systematic study of exclusive charmless nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state. We calculate branching ratios of B{yields}PA, VA, and AA decays, where A, V, and P denote an axial vector, a vector, and a pseudoscalar meson, respectively. We assume a naive factorization hypothesis and use the improved version of the nonrelativistic Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise quark model for form factors in B{yields}A transitions. We include contributions that arise from the effective {delta}B=1 weak Hamiltonian H{sub eff}. The respective factorized amplitudes of these decays are explicitly shown and their penguin contributions are classified. We find that decays B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup +}K{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup -}, B{sup -}{yields}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400){eta}{sup (')}, B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(K{sup -}) have branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -5}. We also study the dependence of branching ratios for B{yields}K{sub 1}P(V,A) decays [K{sub 1}=K{sub 1}(1270), K{sub 1}(1400)] with respect to the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}.

Calderon, G.; Munoz, J. H.; Vera, C. E. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, CP 27000, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Tolima, Apartado Aereo 546, Ibague (Colombia)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Including realistic tidal deformations in binary black-hole initial data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A shortcoming of current binary black-hole initial data is the generation of spurious gravitational radiation, so-called junk radiation, when they are evolved. This problem is a consequence of an oversimplified modeling of the binary's physics in the initial data. Since junk radiation is not astrophysically realistic, it contaminates the actual waveforms of interest and poses a numerical nuisance. The work here presents a further step towards mitigating and understanding the origin of this issue, by incorporating post-Newtonian results in the construction of constraint-satisfying binary black-hole initial data. Here we focus on including realistic tidal deformations of the black holes in the initial data, by building on the method of superposing suitably chosen black hole metrics to compute the conformal data. We describe the details of our initial data for an equal-mass and nonspinning binary, compute the subsequent relaxation of horizon quantities in evolutions, and quantify the amount of junk radiation that is generated. These results are contrasted with those obtained with the most common choice of conformally flat (CF) initial data, as well as superposed Kerr-Schild (SKS) initial data. We find that when realistic tidal deformations are included, the early transients in the horizon geometries are significantly reduced, along with smaller deviations in the relaxed black hole masses and spins from their starting values. Likewise, the junk radiation content in the $l=2$ modes is reduced by a factor of $\\sim$1.7 relative to CF initial data, but only by a factor of $\\sim$1.2 relative to SKS initial data. More prominently, the junk radiation content in the $3\\leq l\\leq8$ modes is reduced by a factor of $\\sim$5 relative to CF initial data, and by a factor of $\\sim$2.4 relative to SKS initial data.

Tony Chu

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Multimedia Resources, including the CMS Eye, from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at CERN  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is one of two large general-purpose particle physics detectors built on the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Switzerland and France. The CMS detector is located in an underground cavern at Cessy in France. The CMS detector will study many aspects of proton collisions at 14 TeV, the center-of-mass energy of the LHC particle accelerator. [from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compact_Muon_Solenoid]

The US CMS collaboration, with 48 institutions, 420 Ph.D. physicists, over 100 graduate students, and nearly 200 engineers, technicians, and computer scientists is the largest national group in the CMS collaboration. US groups have made significant contributions to nearly every aspect of the detector throughout all phases including construction, installation and preparation for data-taking. The US collaboration also made major contributions to the construction and operation of the computing facilities needed to analyze the unprecedented amount of data to be generated by CMS. This work includes the software that allows physicists to operate the CMS detector, reconstruct the data, analyze it and extract new physics.

The CMS media website from CERN provides images, videos, presentations, and the CMS Eye, a system of webcams looking into the underground cavern at Cessy, into the control room, and even out of the window of the control room at the village of Cessy and the Jura Mountains. Many event displays are available in the image collections, as well as the CMS Photo Book covering 1998 û 2008 when CMS was being assembled, installed, and commissioned.

US-LHC and the International CMS Collaboration

297

Dye lasing arrangement including an optical assembly for altering the cross-section of its pumping beam and method  

SciTech Connect

An optical assembly is disclosed herein along with a method of operation for use in a dye lasing arrangement, for example a dye laser oscillator or a dye amplifier, in which a continuous stream of dye is caused to flow through a given zone in a cooperating dye chamber while the zone is being illuminated by light from a pumping beam which is directed into the given zone. This in turn causes the dye therein to lase and thereby produce a new dye beam in the case of a dye laser oscillator or amplify a dye beam in the case of a dye amplifier. The optical assembly so disclosed is designed to alter the pump beam such that the beam enters the dye chamber with a different cross-sectional configuration, preferably one having a more uniform intensity profile, than its initially produced cross-sectional configuration. To this end, the assembly includes a network of optical components which first act on the beam while the latter retains its initially produced cross-sectional configuration for separating it into a plurality of predetermined segments and then recombines the separated components in a predetermined way which causes the recombined beam to have the different cross-sectional configuration.

O' Neil, Richard W. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William C. (Alburquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Intergroup Differences and Its Impact on Professional Exchanges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine how misperceptions of intergroup differences affect the working and professional relationships among Hispanic teachers, European American (White) teachers, and European American (White) administrators in urban schools. As this was an exploratory study to examine the professional exchanges among racio-ethnically diverse groups of teachers and administrators, a qualitative case study methodology was used to collect and report the data for the study. This case study approach was helpful in examining administrators' and teachers' perceptions of intergroup conflict and how these cultural differences affected their exchanges. The data were collected through interviews and through observations made while attending various school functions, such as faculty meetings. The study took place in two urban public schools in South Central Texas, each with a European American administrator, Hispanic teachers, and European American teachers. Included in this study were 14 teachers, 7 European American and 7 Hispanic, two principals, and four assistant principals who participated in two focus groups to validate the teachers' responses. The intergroup properties that were identified in this study were areas of conflict between majority and minority groups that affected the working relationships and active collaboration in instructional matters between school professionals. The properties of intergroup conflict were used to identify causes of conflict among different group members. The properties of intergroup conflict areas revealed in the study were incompatible goals, competitions for resources, cultural and power differences, group boundaries, and leadership behaviors. The quick increase in the diverse populations, primarily Hispanic, of urban schools in South Texas has not allowed sufficient time for Hispanic teachers to enter the workforce, much less Hispanic administrators. As identified in the study and through the properties of intergroup conflict, cultural differences among various demographically diverse groups, such as the principals and teachers studied here, lead to misperceptions that eventually lead to conflicts. Potential conflicts, due to leadership and followership diversity, and to opposing interests, occurred in the day-to-day exchanges between the principals and teachers. Responses made by the European American principals to the opposing interests provided opportunities to create an inclusive school organization.

Rodriguez, Eddie

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: March 28, 8: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the...

Vieser, W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron and ion collective effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECKIPAC is a new ion-electron accelerator concept using IXX, GYRAC and IUS4I~E effects, which is being studied in a collaboration betweeii (‘EA/l~KI;M ~ (Grenoble), INS (Saclay) and GANII * ((‘am). A 611 Vlasov code using the “particle method ” was dcvelopped to simulate the electron heating process, the plasma compression and the energy transfer from electrons to ions. Two versions are available: the first one allows a precise description of the plasma during small time intervals, at different stages of the process. The second corresponds to an adiabatic approximation of electron motions, where electron superparticles are replaced hy circles obemg special equations coupled with collective effects. Exlernal electromagnetic fields depending on x, y, 7 rind t are accurately computed. while collective fields are calculated using the “cloud in cell ” scheme.

P. Bertrand

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Differing forms, differing purposes: A typology of health impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is currently considerable diversity in health impact assessment (HIA) practice internationally. Historically this diversity has been described as simple dichotomies, for example the differences between HIAs of projects and policies. However these distinctions have failed to adequately describe the differences that can be observed between different forms of HIAs. This paper describes the three historical and disciplinary fields from which HIA has emerged - environmental health, a social view of health, and health equity. It also puts forward a typology of four different forms of HIA that can be observed in current HIA practice: mandated, decision-support, advocacy, and community-led HIAs. This paper argues that these different forms of HIA serve different purposes and are not necessarily in competition; rather they allow HIA to be responsive to a range of population health concerns and purposes.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.au; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NE Nebraska Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations NE Nebraska Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $18,810,300 NE Nebraska State Energy Office $9,593,500 NE Bellevue City $194,200 NE Fremont City $106,400 NE Grand Island City $199,000 NE Hastings City $109,900 NE Kearney City $131,100 NE Lincoln City $2,401,000 NE Norfolk City $101,500 NE North Platte City $105,300 NE Omaha City $4,331,500 NE Papillion City $91,300 NE Cass County $99,900 NE Dakota County $87,300 NE Dawson County $106,300 NE Douglas County $255,800 NE Gage County $98,000 NE Lancaster County $110,300 NE Platte County $139,200 NE Sarpy County $312,600 NE Saunders County $80,600 NE Scotts Bluff County $155,600 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

306

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NM New Mexico Total Sum City, County, and SEO NM New Mexico Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $20,608,300 NM New Mexico State Energy Office $9,593,500 NM Alamogordo City $147,700 NM Albuquerque City $5,051,200 NM Carlsbad City $107,800 NM Clovis City $139,800 NM Farmington City $191,800 NM Hobbs City $128,700 NM Las Cruces City $888,000 NM Rio Rancho City $697,000 NM Roswell City $195,500 NM Santa Fe City $781,600 NM Bernalillo County $459,500 NM Dona Ana County $446,900 NM Grant County $126,400 NM McKinley County $299,600 NM Rio Arriba County $166,500 NM San Juan County $329,400 NM Sandoval County $169,500 NM Santa Fe County $264,000 NM Taos County $134,100 NM Valencia County $289,800 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

307

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV NV Nevada Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $31,983,500 NV Nevada State Energy Office $9,593,500 NV Boulder City City $61,600 NV Carson City City $538,900 NV Elko City $76,500 NV Fernley City $52,000 NV Henderson City $2,237,000 NV Las Vegas City $5,449,200 NV Mesquite City $69,900 NV North Las Vegas City $1,907,400 NV Reno City $2,142,800 NV Sparks City $840,000 NV Churchill County $104,900 NV Clark County $7,663,500 NV Douglas County $195,000 NV Elko County $123,600 NV Humboldt County $75,600 NV Lyon County $165,200 NV Nye County $185,700 NV Pershing County $50,000 NV Washoe County $401,200 NV White Pine County $50,000 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

308

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Information management for global environmental change, including the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of global change is international in scope. A body of international organizations oversees the worldwide coordination of research and policy initiatives. In the US the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) was established in November of 1993 to provide coordination of science, space, and technology policies throughout the federal government. NSTC is organized into nine proposed committees. The Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources (CERN) oversees the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). As part of the USGCRP, the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program aims to improve the understanding of Earth systems and to strengthen the scientific basis for the evaluation of policy and government action in response to potential global environmental changes. This paper examines the information and data management roles of several international and national programs, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) global change information programs. An emphasis will be placed on the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which also serves as the World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases.

Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies including Heat Conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Chandra observations of clusters of galaxies revealed the existence of a sharp ridge in the X-ray surface brightness where the temperature drops across the front. This front is called the cold front. We present the results of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the time evolution of a dense subcluster plasma moving in a cluster of galaxies. Anisotropic heat conduction along the magnetic field lines is included. In the models without magnetic fields, the numerical results indicate that the heat conduction from the hot ambient plasma heats the cold dense plasma of the subcluster and diffuses out the cold front. When magnetic fields exist in a cluster of galaxies, however, cold fronts can be maintained because the heat conduction across the magnetic field lines is suppressed. We found that, even when the magnetic fields in a cluster of galaxies are disordered, heat conduction across the front is restricted because the magnetic field lines are stretched along the front. Numerical results reproduced the X-ray intensity distribution observed in the A3667 cluster of galaxies.

Naoki Asai; Naoya Fukuda; Ryoji Matsumoto

2004-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solar energy collector including a weightless balloon with sun tracking means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar energy collector having a weightless balloon, the balloon including a transparent polyvinylfluoride hemisphere reinforced with a mesh of ropes secured to its outside surface, and a laminated reflector hemisphere, the inner layer being clear and aluminized on its outside surface and the outer layer being opaque, the balloon being inflated with lighter-than-air gas. A heat collection probe extends into the balloon along the focus of reflection of the reflective hemisphere for conducting coolant into and out of the balloon. The probe is mounted on apparatus for keeping the probe aligned with the sun's path, the apparatus being founded in the earth for withstanding wind pressure on the balloon. The balloon is lashed to the probe by ropes adhered to the outer surface of the balloon for withstanding wind pressures of 100 miles per hour. Preferably, the coolant is liquid sodium-potassium eutectic alloy which will not normally freeze at night in the temperate zones, and when heated to 4,000.degree. R exerts a pressure of only a few atmospheres.

Hall, Frederick F. (2452 Villaneuva Way, Mountain View, CA 94040)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

High accuracy power spectra including baryonic physics in dynamical Dark Energy models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The next generation mass probes will obtain information on non--linear power spectra P(k,z) and their evolution, allowing us to investigate the nature of Dark Energy. To exploit such data we need high precision simulations, extending at least up to scales of k\\simeq 10 h^-1 Mpc, where the effects of baryons can no longer be neglected. In this paper, we present a series of large scale hydrodynamical simulations for LCDM and dynamical Dark Energy (dDE) models, in which the equation of state parameter is z-dependent. The simulations include gas cooling, star formation and Supernovae feedback. They closely approximate the observed star formation rate and the observationally derived star/Dark Matter mass ratio in collapsed systems. Baryon dynamics cause spectral shifts exceeding 1% at k > 2-3 hMpc^-1 compared to pure n-body simulations in the LCDM simulations. This agrees with previous studies, although we find a smaller effect (~50%) on the power spectrum amplitude at higher k's. dDE exhibits similar behavior, ev...

Casarini, Luciano; Bonometto, Silvio A; Stinson, Greg S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

QCD Equation of State From a Chiral Hadronic Model Including Quark Degrees of Freedom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents an effective model for strongly interacting matter and the QCD equation of state (EoS). The model includes both hadron and quark degrees of freedom and takes into account the transition of chiral symmetry restoration as well as the deconfinement phase transition. At low temperatures $T$ and baryonic densities $\\rho_B$ a hadron resonance gas is described using a SU(3)-flavor sigma-omega model and a quark phase is introduced in analogy to PNJL models for higher $T$ and $\\rho_B$. In this way, the correct asymptotic degrees of freedom are used in a wide range of $T$ and $\\rho_B$. Here, results of this model concerning the chiral and deconfinement phase transitions and thermodynamic model properties are presented. Large hadron resonance multiplicities in the transition region emphasize the importance of heavy-mass resonance states in this region and their impact on the chiral transition behavior. The resulting phase diagram of QCD matter at small chemical potentials is in line with latest lattice QCD and thermal model results.

Philip Rau; Jan Steinheimer; Stefan Schramm; Horst Stöcker

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Estimating parameters of coalescing compact binaries with a detector network including LIGO Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the goals of gravitational-wave astronomy is simultaneous detection of gravitational-wave signals from merging compact-object binaries and the electromagnetic transients from these mergers. With the next generation of advanced ground-based gravitational wave detectors under construction, we examine the benefits of the proposed extension of the detector network to include a fourth site in Australia in addition to the network of Hanford, Livingston and Cascina sites. Using Bayesian parameter-estimation analyses of simulated gravitational-wave signals from a range of coalescing-binary locations and orientations, we study the improvement in parameter estimation. We find that an Australian detector can break degeneracies in several parameters; in particular, the localization of the source on the sky is improved by a factor of ~4, with more modest improvements in distance and binary inclination estimates. This enhanced ability to localize sources on the sky will be crucial in any search for electromagnetic counterparts to detected gravitational-wave signals.

Benjamin Aylott; Benjamin Farr; Vassiliki Kalogera; Ilya Mandel; Vivien Raymond; Carl Rodriguez; Marc van der Sluys; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Applying environmental externalities to US Clean Coal Technologies for Asia. [Including external environmental costs  

SciTech Connect

The United States is well positioned to play an expanding role in meeting the energy technology demands of the Asian Pacific Basin, including Indonesia, Thailand, and the Republic of China (ROC-Taiwan). The US Department of Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program provides a proving ground for innovative coal-related technologies that can be applied domestically and abroad. These innovative US CCTs are expected to satisfy increasingly stringent environmental requirements while substantially improving power generation efficiencies. They should also provide distinct advantages over conventional pulverized coal-fired combustors. Finally, they are expected to be competitive with other energy options currently being considered in the region. This paper presents potential technology scenarios for Indonesia, Thailand, and the ROC-Taiwan and considers an environmental cost-benefit approach employing a newly developed method of applying environmental externalities. Results suggest that the economic benefits from increased emission control can indeed be quantified and used in cost-benefit comparisons, and that US CCTs can be very cost effective in reducing emissions.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

SEARCHING FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE SIGNALS IN ASTRONOMICAL SPECTRA, INCLUDING EXISTING DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this article is to make astronomers aware that Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETIs) can be carried out by analyzing standard astronomical spectra, including those they have already taken. Simplicity is the outstanding advantage of a search in spectra. The spectra can be analyzed by simple eye inspection or a few lines of code that uses Fourier transform software. Theory, confirmed by published experiments, shows that periodic signals in spectra can be easily generated by sending light pulses separated by constant time intervals. While part of this article, like all articles on SETIs, is highly speculative the basic physics is sound. In particular, technology now available on Earth could be used to send signals having the required energy to be detected at a target located 1000 lt-yr away. Extraterrestrial Intelligence (ETI) could use these signals to make us aware of their existence. For an ETI, the technique would also have the advantage that the signals could be detected both in spectra and searches for intensity pulses like those currently carried out on Earth.

Borra, Ermanno F., E-mail: borra@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1 K 7P4 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Case for Including Atmospheric Thermodynamic Variables in Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading Parameter Identification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper makes the case for establishing efficient predictor variables for atmospheric thermodynamics that can be used to statistically correlate the fatigue accumulation seen on wind turbines. Recently, two approaches to this issue have been reported. One uses multiple linear-regression analysis to establish the relative causality between a number of predictors related to the turbulent inflow and turbine loads. The other approach, using many of the same predictors, applies the technique of principal component analysis. An examination of the ensemble of predictor variables revealed that they were all kinematic in nature; i.e., they were only related to the description of the velocity field. Boundary-layer turbulence dynamics depends upon a description of the thermal field and its interaction with the velocity distribution. We used a series of measurements taken within a multi-row wind farm to demonstrate the need to include atmospheric thermodynamic variables as well as velocity-related ones in the search for efficient turbulence loading predictors in various turbine-operating environments. Our results show that a combination of vertical stability and hub-height mean shearing stress variables meet this need over a period of 10 minutes.

Kelley, N. D.

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state includes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT MT Montana Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $13,971,000 MT Montana State Energy Office $9,593,500 MT Anaconda-Deer Lodge City $50,000 MT Billings City $1,003,000 MT Bozeman City $175,500 MT Butte-Silver Bow City $138,700 MT Great Falls City $570,100 MT Havre City $50,000 MT Helena City $138,600 MT Kalispell City $96,700 MT Miles City City $50,000 MT Missoula City $680,400 MT Cascade County $94,400 MT Flathead County $274,200 MT Gallatin County $198,700 MT Lake County $119,500 MT Lewis and Clark County $120,400 MT Lincoln County $80,000 MT Missoula County $151,000 MT Park County $67,100 MT Ravalli County $167,400 MT Yellowstone County $151,800 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal

320

Time-dependent 2-D modeling of edge plasma transport with high intermittency due to blobs  

SciTech Connect

The results on time-dependent 2-D fluid modeling of edge plasmas with non-diffusive intermittent transport across the magnetic field (termed cross-field) based on the novel macro-blob approach are presented. The capability of this approach to simulate the long temporal evolution ({approx}0.1 s) of the background plasma and simultaneously the fast spatiotemporal dynamics of blobs ({approx}10{sup -4} s) is demonstrated. An analysis of a periodic sequence of many macro-blobs (PSMB) is given showing that the resulting plasma attains a dynamic equilibrium. Plasma properties in the dynamic equilibrium are discussed. In PSMB modeling, the effect of macro-blob generation frequency on edge plasma parameters is studied. Comparison between PSMB modeling and experimental profile data is given. The calculations are performed for the same plasma discharge using two different models for anomalous cross-field transport: time-average convection and PSMB. Parametric analysis of edge plasma variation with transport coefficients in these models is presented. The capability of the models to accurately simulate enhanced transport due to blobs is compared. Impurity dynamics in edge plasma with macro-blobs is also studied showing strong impact of macro-blob on profiles of impurity charge states caused by enhanced outward transport of high-charge states and simultaneous inward transport of low-charge states towards the core. Macro-blobs cause enhancement of sputtering rates, increase radiation and impurity concentration in plasma, and change erosion/deposition patterns.

Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Lithium enhancement in X-ray binaries due to stellar rotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the high lithium abundances in the secondary stars of X-ray binaries. We show that no lithium production in these stars is necessary, and that the abundances can be explained simply due to the tidally locked rotation of the stars, which lead naturally to slower lithium destruction rates. The differences in abundances of CVs' secondaries from those of LMXBs had previously been put forth as evidence that the compact object was related to the lithium abundance, but this scenario also accounts for the lower lithium abundances in the secondary stars in cataclysmic variable systems (CVs) than in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), since these stars have typically lived much longer before becoming tidally locked short period systems. We point out that if this scenario is correct, then the globular cluster X-ray binaries' donor stars should, as a class, show less lithium enhancement relative to other stars of the same spectral type in the clusters than the field X-ray binaries' donor stars show.

T. J. Maccarone; P. G. Jonker; A. I. Sills

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heating of near-Earth objects and meteoroids due to close approaches to the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that near-Earth objects (NEOs) during their orbital evolution may often undergo close approaches to the Sun. Indeed it is estimated that up to ~70% of them end their orbital evolution colliding with the Sun. Starting from the present orbital properties, it is possible to compute the most likely past evolution for every NEO, and to trace its distance from the Sun. We find that a large fraction of the population may have experienced in the past frequent close approaches, and thus, as a consequence, a considerable Sun-driven heating, not trivially correlated to the present orbits. The detailed dynamical behaviour, the rotational and the thermal properties of NEOs determine the exact amount of the resulting heating due to the Sun. In the present paper we discuss the general features of the process, providing estimates of the surface temperature reached by NEOs during their evolution. Moreover, we investigate the effects of this process on meteor-size bodies, analyzing possible differences with the NEO...

Marchi, S; Morbidelli, A; Paolicchi, P; Lazzarin, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the streaming plasma and the cloud, so that the timescale for the onset of KH instabilities increases, and the surface of the cloud becomes less susceptible to KH instabilities. The stabilisation effect of heat conduction against KH instability is more pronounced for smaller and less massive clouds. As in the static case more realistic cloud conditions allow heat conduction to transfer hot material onto the cloud's surface and to mix the accreted gas deeper into the cloud.

W. Vieser; G. Hensler

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Determination of pion and kaon fragmentation functions including spin asymmetries data in a global analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new functional form of pion and kaon fragmentation functions up to next-to-leading order obtained through a global fit to single-inclusive electron-positron annihilation data and also employ, the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering asymmetry data from HERMES and COMPASS to determine FFs. In this analysis we consider the impression of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering asymmetry data on the fragmentation functions, where the produced hadrons of different electric charge are identified. We break symmetry assumption between quark and anti-quark fragmentation functions for favored partons by using the asymmetry data. The results of our analysis are in good agreement with electron-positron annihilation data and also with all the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering asymmetry data. Also we apply the obtained fragmentation functions to predict the scaled-energy distribution of $\\pi^+/K^+$ inclusively produced in top-quark decays at next-to-leading order using the zero-mass variable-flavor-number scheme exploiting the universality and scaling violations of fragmentation functions.

M. Soleymaninia; A. N. Khorramian; S. M. Moosavinejad; F. Arbabifar

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Electric double layer for spherical particles in salt-free concentrated suspensions including ion size effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equilibrium electric double layer (EDL) that surrounds the colloidal particles is determinant for the response of a suspension under a variety of static or alternating external fields. An ideal salt-free suspension is composed by the charged colloidal particles and the ionic countercharge released by the charging mechanism. The existing macroscopic theoretical models can be improved by incorporating different ionic effects usually neglected in previous mean-field approaches, which are based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PB). The influence of the finite size of the ions seems to be quite promising because it has been shown to predict phenomena like charge reversal, which has been out of the scope of classical PB approximations. In this work we numerically obtain the surface electric potential and the counterions concentration profiles around a charged particle in a concentrated salt-free suspension corrected by the finite size of the counterions. The results show the large importance of such corrections for moderate to high particle charges at every particle volume fraction, specially, when a region of closest approach of the counterions to the particle surface is considered. We conclude that finite ion size considerations are obeyed for the development of new theoretical models to study nonequilibrium properties in concentrated colloidal suspensions, particularly the salt-free ones with small and highly charged particles.

R. Roa; F. Carrique; E. Ruiz-Reina

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Shi, Xun (Troy, MI); Bai, Shengqiang (Shanghai, CN); Zhang, Wenqing (Shanghai, CN); Chen, Lidong (Shanghai, CN); Yang, Jiong (Shanghai, CN)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Efficient Evaluation of Doubly Periodic Green Functions in 3D Scattering, Including Wood Anomaly Frequencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present efficient methods for computing wave scattering by diffraction gratings that exhibit two-dimensional periodicity in three dimensional (3D) space. Applications include scattering in acoustics, electromagnetics and elasticity. Our approach uses boundary-integral equations. The quasi-periodic Green function is a doubly infinite sum of scaled 3D free-space outgoing Helmholtz Green functions. Their source points are located at the nodes of a periodicity lattice of the grating. For efficient numerical computation of the lattice sum, we employ a smooth truncation. Super-algebraic convergence to the Green function is achieved as the truncation radius increases, except at frequency-wavenumber pairs at which a Rayleigh wave is at exactly grazing incidence to the grating. At these "Wood frequencies", the term in the Fourier series representation of the Green function that corresponds to the grazing Rayleigh wave acquires an infinite coefficient and the lattice sum blows up. At Wood frequencies, we modify the Green function by adding two types of terms to it. The first type adds weighted spatial shifts of the Green function to itself with singularities below the grating; this yields algebraic convergence. The second-type terms are quasi-periodic plane wave solutions of the Helmholtz equation. They reinstate (with controlled coefficients) the grazing modes, effectively eliminated by the terms of first type. These modes are needed in the Green function for guaranteeing the well-posedness of the boundary-integral equation that yields the scattered field. We apply this approach to acoustic scattering by a doubly periodic 2D grating near and at Wood frequencies and scattering by a doubly periodic array of scatterers away from Wood frequencies.

Oscar P. Bruno; Stephen P. Shipman; Catalin Turc; Stephanos Venakides

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

Border flow rights and Contracts for differences of differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Border flow rights and Contracts for differences of differences: Models for Electric Transmission Property Rights Ross Baldick Abstract--In this paper a property rights model for electric transmission-- Electricity market, Property rights, Transmission invest- ment, Financial transmission rights, Energy

329

Border flow rights and Contracts for differences of differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for differences of differences." These financial rights allow for forward trading of both energy and transmission by a unified exchange, avoiding the bifurcation in current markets between decentralized long-term energy transmission rights, Energy and transmission trading. I. INTRODUCTION This paper builds on recent work

Baldick, Ross

330

Individual differences in sentence processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to elucidate shared mechanisms between retrieval in sentence processing and memory retrieval processes in nonlinguistic domains using an individual differences approach. Prior research in individual ...

Troyer, Melissa L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wear of Zircaloy-4 Grid Straps Due to Fretting and Periodic Impact ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Wear of Zircaloy-4 Grid Straps Due to Fretting and Periodic ... Applicability of Lean Grade of Duplex Stainless Steels in Nuclear Power Plants.

332

Development of ontology through different advances of ontology mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing ontology mapping tools differ in terms of the task for which the mapping tools are designed. As a result, direct comparison is difficult to conduct due to the disparate nature of the tools. In this paper, a benchmark case of manual mapping is ... Keywords: comparative study, ontology, ontology development, ontology mapping, performance evaluation

Syerina Azlin Md Nasir; Nor Laila Md Noor

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Odd-Z Transactinide Compound Nucleus Reactions Including the Discovery of 260Bh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several reactions producing odd-Z transactinide compound nuclei were studiedwith the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to produce the same compound nucleus ator near the same excitation energy with similar values of angular momentum via differentnuclear reactions. In doing so, it can be determined if there is a preference in entrancechannel, because under these experimental conditions the survival portion of Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilcznska, and Wilczynski's"Fusion By Diffusion" model is nearly identical forthe two reactions. Additionally, because the same compound nucleus is produced, theexit channel is the same. Four compound nuclei were examined in this study: 258Db, 262Bh, 266Mt, and 272Rg. These nuclei were produced by using very similar heavy-ion induced-fusion reactions which differ only by one proton in the projectile or target nucleus (e.g.: 50Ti + 209Bi vs. 51V + 208Pb). Peak 1n exit channel cross sections were determined for each reaction in each pair, and three of the four pairs' cross sections were identical within statistical uncertainties. This indicates there is not an obvious preference of entrancechannel in these paired reactions. Charge equilibration immediately prior to fusionleading to a decreased fusion barrier is the likely cause of this phenomenon. In addition to this systematic study, the lightest isotope of element 107, bohrium, was discovered in the 209Bi(52Cr,n) reaction. 260Bh was found to decay by emission of a 10.16 MeV alpha particle with a half-life of 35 ms. The cross section is 59 pb at an excitation energy of 15.0 MeV. The effect of the N = 152 shell is also seen in this isotope's alpha particle energy, the first evidence of such an effect in Bh. All reactions studied are also compared to model predictions by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilcznska, and Wilczynski's"Fusion By Diffusion" theory.

Nelson, Sarah L; Nelson, Sarah L

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

An analysis of muscle fatigue due to complex tasks and its relation to the strain index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Strain Index was originally designed to analyze mono-task jobs. An experiment using a grip dynamometer was used to simulate six multiple task jobs to study the effect of complex tasks on localized muscle fatigue and to evaluate six different models used to calcula te a Complex Strain Index score. These models included average Strain Index score, unadjusted summation, duration adjusted summation, complex equation, minimum intensity, and peak intensity. Two methods of calculating a continuous Strain Index score were also analyzed. Ratings of perceived exertion, hand and forearm fatigue and discomfort, Difficulty Rating, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and percent strength loss were recorded for each of the six treatments. Electromyography (EMG) was also recorded for the 24 subjects (12 males and females) who completed the experiment. The EMG signal was analyzed using root mean square (RMS), initial mean power frequency (IMnPF), and slope of the mean power frequency (MnPF). Each treatment, lasting one hour each, contained a primary exertion (Task 1) of either 10% or 40% MVC for three seconds and a secondary exertion (Task 2) of either 10% or 40% MVC for one or three seconds. Subjective variables linearly increased (R2 > 0.88) over the duration of the treatments and significantly differed between treatments (p 0.05). A significant difference was found for MnPF slope pre and post treatment, but no treatment effect was found (p > 0.05). The complex equation method of calculating a Strain Index score was the only model of the six evaluated that met all criteria for being an acceptable method of calculating a Complex Strain Index score. The two continuous methods presented for calculating a Strain Index score should not be used for job analysis until further research evaluates their reliability, validity, and critical scores for Hazard Classification.

Stephens, John-Paul

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Improvements in the Shortwave Cloud-free Radiation Budget Accuracy. Part I: Numerical Study Including Surface Anisotropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shortwave radiation field, i.e., in the solar spectral range, emerging at the top of the atmosphere is anisotropic due to the optical properties of the atmosphere and the reflectance characteristics of the underlying surface. Thus, anisotropy ...

P. Koepke; K. T. Kriebel

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Relative Performance of Automatic Rain Gauges under Different Rainfall Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six different types of automatic rain gauges, including tipping bucket, weighing, capacitance, optical, disdrometer, and acoustical sensors, were deployed for 17 months (September 1993–January 1995) at the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and ...

Jeffrey A. Nystuen

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times, which vary as a convex function of the amounts of a continuously divisible common resource allocated to individual jobs. Finished ... Keywords: Batch delivery, Common due date, Resource allocation, Scheduling

Yunqiang Yin, T. C. E. Cheng, Shuenn-Ren Cheng, Chin-Chia Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runnels, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Wisconsin #include gcc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_time.tv_sec = current_time.tv_sec + 2; /* convert from micro to nano */ timeout_time.tv_nsec = current_time.tv_usec

Liblit, Ben

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The contact-temperature ignition (CTI) criteria for propagating chemical reactions including the effect of moisture and application to Hanford waste  

SciTech Connect

To assure the continued absence of uncontrolled condensed-phase chemical reactions in connection with the Hanford waste materials, efforts have been underway including both theoretical and experimental investigations to clarify the requirements for such reactions. This document defines the differences and requirements for homogeneous runaway and propagating chemical reactions incuding a discussion of general contact-temperature ignition (CTI) condition for propagating reactions that include the effect of moisture. The CTI condition implies that the contact temperature or interface temperature between reacted and unreacted materials must exceed the ignition temperature and is compared to experimental data including both synthetic ferrocyanide and surrogate organic materials. In all cases, the occurrences of ignition accompanied by self-propagating reactions are consistent with the theoretical anticipations of the CTI condition.

Cash, R.J.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

ON THE MESON MASS DIFFERENCES  

SciTech Connect

In view of ihe recent experimental evidence indicating lfmasses is reinvestigated. A semi-phenomenological approach is used by the introduction of a nonlocal effective interaction hamiltonian, gauge invariant up to the order e/ sup 2/ where new terms corresponding to one-photon and twophoton vertices are considered to take into account the effects of the strong interactions. It is shown thai the contrasting experimental results can be explained as the result of the different nature of the neutral kaons as c npared with the neutral pion. Some different ways to realize the experimental results are explicitly discussed. (auth)

Bund, G.W.; Ferreira, P.L.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 9 Protein Alterations Due to Lipid Oxidation in Multiphase Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 9 Protein Alterations Due to Lipid Oxidation in Multiphase Systems Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 P

344

Characterization of unsteady loading due to impeller-diffuser interaction in centrifugal compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time dependent simulations are used to characterize the unsteady impeller blade loading due to imipeller-diffuser interaction in centrifugal compressor stages. The capability of simulations are assessed by comparing results ...

Lusardi, Christopher (Christopher Dean)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Spectral Distribution of Energy Dissipation of Wind-Generated Waves due to Dominant Wave Breaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers an experimental attempt to estimate the spectral distribution of the dissipation due to breaking of dominant waves. A field wave record with an approximately 50% dominant-breaking rate was analyzed. Segments of the record, ...

Ian R. Young; Alexander V. Babanin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Simplified Scheme to Simulate Asymmetries Due to the Beta Effect in Barotropic Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified scheme to generate vortex asymmetries due to the beta effect from an initially symmetric vortex on a beta plane is described. This approach, based on the time integration of the nondivergent barotropic vorticity equation, was ...

Rebecca J. Ross; Yoshio Kurihara

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

Hu, Shiyin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Spectral Parameterization of Mean-Flow Forcing due to Breaking Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral parameterization of mean-flow forcing due to breaking gravity waves is described for application in the equations of motion in atmospheric models. The parameterization is based on linear theory and adheres closely to fundamental ...

M. J. Alexander; T. J. Dunkerton

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Stratospheric Ozone Decrease Due to Chlorofluoromethane Photolysis: Predictions of Latitude Dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional model is used to predict the 1990 reduction in ozone due to the chlorine compounds formed by chlorofluoromethane (CFM) photolysis when the CFM release rate is held constant at the 1975 value. The predicted globally averaged ...

W. J. Borucki; R. C. Whitten; H. T. Woodward; L. A. Capone; C. A. Riegel; S. Gaines

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Deviation of Stellar Orbits from Test Particle Trajectories Around Sgr A* Due to Tides and Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring the orbits of stars around Sgr A* offers the possibility of detecting the precession of their orbital planes due to frame dragging, of measuring the spin and quadrupole moment of the black hole, and of testing the no-hair theorem. Here we investigate whether the deviations of stellar orbits from test-particle trajectories due to wind mass loss and tidal dissipation of the orbital energy compromise such measurements. We find that the effects of stellar winds are, in general, negligible. On the other hand, for the most eccentric orbits (e>0.96) for which an optical interferometer, such as GRAVITY, will detect orbital plane precession due to frame dragging, the tidal dissipation of orbital energy occurs at timescales comparable to the timescale of precession due to the quadrupole moment of the black hole. As a result, this non-conservative effect is a potential source of systematic uncertainty in testing the no-hair theorem with stellar orbits.

Dimitrios Psaltis; Gongjie Li; Abraham Loeb

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Dynamic Response of a Rotor-air Bearing System Due to Base Induced Periodic Motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-free microturbomachinery (MTM) are inevitably subjected to base or foundation excitations: multiple periodic load excitations from internal combustion (IC) engines in turbochargers, for example. Too large base excitations can produce severe damage, even failure, due to hard collision or rubbing contact between a rotor and its bearings. Therefore, it is paramount to evaluate the reliability of rotor-air bearing systems to withstanding base load excitations. In 2008, intermittent shock excitations, up to 30 g (pk-pk), were introduced to a test rig consisting of a rotor (0.825 kg) supported on two hybrid flexure pivot tilting pad gas bearings (FPTPBs). The experiments demonstrated the reliability of the gas bearings to withstanding external transient load excitations. Presently, a shaker delivers periodic load excitations to the base plate supporting the test rig. The whole system, weighing 48 kg, is supported on two soft coil springs and its lowest natural frequency is ~5 Hz. The rod connecting the shaker to the base plate is not affixed rigidly to the test rig base. The rod merely pushes on the base plate and hence the induced based motions are intermittent with multiple impacts and frequencies. As with most practical conditions, the base motion frequencies (5-12 Hz) are low respective to the operating speed of the rotor-bearing system. Rotor speed coast down tests evidence the rotor-bearing system natural frequency when the gas bearings are supplied with feed pressures increasing from 2.36 to 5.08 bar (ab). Shaker excitation induced rotor response, relative to the bearing housings, contains the main input frequency (5-12 Hz) and its super harmonics; and because of the intermittency of the base motions, it also excites the rotor-bearing system natural frequency, with smaller motion amplitudes than synchronous motion components. The excitation of the system natural frequency does not mean rotordynamic instability. With base induced motions, the rotor motion amplitude at the system natural frequency increases as the gas bearing feed pressure decreases, as the rotor speed increases, and as the shaker input excitation frequency increases (5-12 Hz). Hence, the test rotor-air bearing system is highly sensitive to base motions, intermittent in character, in particular when the gas bearings are supplied with a low feed pressure. Predicted rotor motion responses obtained from XLTRC2 and an analytical rigid rotor model, both including the (measured) periodic base motions, show good correlation with the measurements. The research results demonstrate further the applicability of gas bearings into oil-free high speed MTM.

Niu, Yaying

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined, including a shore perpendicular source and shore parallel source with steady winds, and a shore perpendicular source with oscillating alongshore winds. Freshwater flux is used to define plume penetration. Alongshore penetration of buoyant currents is proportional to freshwater input and inversely proportional to upwelling wind stress strength. Strong wind more quickly prevents fresh water’s penetration. Under upwelling favorable winds, the plume is advected offshore by Ekman transport as well as upcoast by the mean flow. This causes the bulge to detach from the coast and move to upcoast and offshore with a 45 degree angle. The path of the bulge is roughly linear, and is independent of wind strength. The bulge speed has a linear relationship with the wind stress strength, and it matches the expected speed based on Ekman theory. Sinusoidal wind leads to sequential upwelling and downwelling events. The plume has an asymmetric response to upwelling and downwelling and fresh water flux is changed immediately by wind. During downwelling, the downcoast fresh water transport is greatest, while it is reduced during upwelling. Background mean flow in the downcoast direction substantially increases alongshore freshwater transport.

Baek, Seong-Ho

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Contact transformations for difference schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define a class of transformations of the dependent and independent variables in an ordinary difference scheme. The transformations leave the solution set of the system invariant and reduces to a group of contact transformations in the continuous limit. We use a simple example to show that the class is not empty and that such "contact transformations for discrete systems" genuinely exist.

Levi, Decio; Winternitz, Pavel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Audits that Make a Difference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents guidance on how to perform internal audits that get management's attention and result in effective corrective action. It assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basic constructs of auditing and knows how to perform them. Instead, it focuses on additional techniques that have proven to be effective in our internal auditing program. Examples using a theoretical audit of a calibration program are included.

Malsbury, Judith

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

Sopori, B.L.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Biological Damage due to Photospheric, Chromospheric and Flare Radiation in the Environments of Main-Sequence Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the biological damage initiated in the environments of F, G, K, and M-type main-sequence stars due to photospheric, chromospheric and flare radiation. The amount of chromospheric radiation is, in a statistical sense, directly coupled to the stellar age as well as the presence of significant stellar magnetic fields and dynamo activity. With respect to photospheric radiation, we also consider detailed synthetic models, taking into account millions or hundred of millions of lines for atoms and molecules. Chromospheric UV radiation is increased in young stars in regard to all stellar spectral types. Flare activity is most pronounced in K and M-type stars, which also has the potential of stripping the planetary atmospheres of close-in planets, including planets located in the stellar habitable zone. For our studies, we take DNA as a proxy for carbon-based macromolecules, guided by the paradigm that carbon might constitute the biochemical centerpiece of extraterrestrial life forms. Planetary atmospheric ...

Cuntz, M; Kurucz, R L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

P and n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including band gap widening elements, devices utilizing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; a method of fabricating p-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; and electronic and photovoltaic devices incorporating said n-type and p-type materials.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electrolytic/fuel cell bundles and systems including a current collector in communication with an electrode thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytic/fuel cell bundles and systems including such bundles include an electrically conductive current collector in communication with an anode or a cathode of each of a plurality of cells. A cross-sectional area of the current collector may vary in a direction generally parallel to a general direction of current flow through the current collector. The current collector may include a porous monolithic structure. At least one cell of the plurality of cells may include a current collector that surrounds an outer electrode of the cell and has at least six substantially planar exterior surfaces. The planar surfaces may extend along a length of the cell, and may abut against a substantially planar surface of a current collector of an adjacent cell. Methods for generating electricity and for performing electrolysis include flowing current through a conductive current collector having a varying cross-sectional area.

Hawkes, Grant L.; Herring, James S.; Stoots, Carl M.; O& #x27; Brien, James E.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

360

MD-Predicted Phase diagrams for Pattern Formation due to Ion Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energetic particle irradiation of solids can cause surface ultra-smoothening, self-organized nanoscale pattern formation, or degradation of the structural integrity of nuclear reactor components. Periodic patterns including high-aspect ratio quantum dots, with occasional long-range order and characteristic spacing as small as 7 nm, have stimulated interest in this method as a means of sub-lithographic nanofabrication. Despite intensive research there is little fundamental understanding of the mechanisms governing the selection of smooth or patterned surfaces, and precisely which physical effects cause observed transitions between different regimes has remained a matter of speculation. Here we report the first prediction of the mechanism governing the transition from corrugated surfaces to flatness, using only parameter-free molecular dynamics simulations of single-ion impact induced crater formation as input into a multi-scale analysis, and showing good agreement with experiment. Our results overturn the paradigm attributing these phenomena to the removal of target atoms via sputter erosion. Instead, the mechanism dominating both stability and instability is shown to be the impact-induced redistribution of target atoms that are not sputtered away, with erosive effects being essentially irrelevant. The predictions are relevant in the context of tungsten plasma-facing fusion reactor walls which, despite a sputter erosion rate that is essentially zero, develop, under some conditions, a mysterious nanoscale topography leading to surface degradation. Our results suggest that degradation processes originating in impact-induced target atom redistribution effects may be important, and hence that an extremely low sputter erosion rate is an insufficient design criterion for morphologically stable solid surfaces under energetic particle irradiation.

Scott A. Norris; Juha Samela; Laura Bukonte; Marie Backman; Djurabekova Flyura; Kai Nordlund; Charbel S. Madi; Michael P. Brenner; Michael J. Aziz

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to Routine Mammographic Screening Featured Project Description David J. Brenner, Steve Marino, and Charles Geard, Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York Summary: To obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Abstract: The aim of this work is to obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Given the increasing emphasis on clinical mammographic screening for breast cancer, it is of societal importance to provide realistic risk estimates with realistic confidence bounds for breast cancer

362

Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in June  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in June for September Event Hanford to Host ISMS Safety Workshop in Kennewick: Abstracts Due in June for September Event May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Hanford will hold its annual DOE Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Champions Workshop on September 12-15, 2011, at the Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, Wash. DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection are hosting this year's event. The purpose of the workshop is to promote a robust safety culture and educate attendees on safety developments and environmental compliance methods for effective implementation of the

363

Residual stress relief due to fatigue in tetragonal lead zirconate titanate ceramics  

SciTech Connect

High energy synchrotron XRD was employed to determine the lattice strain {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}and diffraction peak intensity ratio R{l_brace}200{r_brace}in tetragonal PZT ceramics, both in the virgin poled state and after a bipolar fatigue experiment. It was shown that the occurrence of microstructural damage during fatigue was accompanied by a reduction in the gradient of the {epsilon}{l_brace}111{r_brace}-cos{sup 2} {psi} plot, indicating a reduction in the level of residual stress due to poling. In contrast, the fraction of oriented 90 Degree-Sign ferroelectric domains, quantified in terms of R{l_brace}200{r_brace}, was not affected significantly by fatigue. The change in residual stress due to fatigue is interpreted in terms of a change in the average elastic stiffness of the polycrystalline matrix due to the presence of inter-granular microcracks.

Hall, D. A.; Mori, T. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Comyn, T. P. [Institute for Materials Research, Woodhouse Lane, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ringgaard, E. [Meggitt Sensing Systems, Hejreskovvej 18A, 3490 Kvistgaard (Denmark); Wright, J. P. [ESRF, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

Neutrino Energy Loss Rates due to {sup 54,55,56}Fe in Stellar Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino energy loss rates are required as a key nuclear physics input parameter in the simulation codes of core-collapse supernovae of massive stars. The weak interaction rates due to isotopes of iron, {sup 54,55,56}Fe, are considered to play an important role during the presupernova evolution of massive stars. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently being used for a microscopic calculation of stellar weak interaction rates of iron isotopes with success. The calculation of neutrino energy loss rates due to {sup 54,55,56}Fe is presented along with a comparison with large scale shell model results.

Nabi, Jameel-Un [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi 23640, Swabi, NWFP (Pakistan)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EXTENSION OF ISO 14001 ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE METAL CASTING INDUSTRY TO INCLUDE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions legislation in the United States is forthcoming. Manufacturers have dealt with past emissions regulations differently, some through implementing environmental management systems… (more)

Miller, Gretchen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ground subsidence due to mining operations. October 1976-November 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for October 1976-November 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning ground subsidence associated with mining operations. Mine subsidence is discussed with reference to mathematical modeling, forecasting extent of cavitation, and rock mechanics and mechanisms of stress relaxation. Damage to above- and below-ground structures as well as agricultural areas, and mining techniques designed to prevent or reduce subsidence are included. Monitoring of subsidence and detection of cavitation for surface, underground, and ocean-floor mining areas are discussed and examples are analyzed. Subsidence due to aquifer water removal is referenced in a related published bibliography. (Contains 213 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

Kerr, Kent

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

368

RECONSTRUCTION OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES DUE TO MEDICAL EXPOSURES FOR MEMBERS OF THE TECHA RIVER COHORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a methodology for reconstruction of doses due to medical exposures for members of the Techa River Cohort (TRC) who received diagnostic radiation at the clinic of the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) in 1952–2005. To calculate doses of medical exposure for the TRC members and compare with the doses that resulted from radioactive contamination of the Techa River. Material and Methods: Reconstruction of individual medical doses is based on data on x-ray diagnostic procedures available for each person examined at the URCRM clinics and values of absorbed dose in 12 organs per typical x-ray procedure calculated with the use of a mathematical phantom. Personal data on x-ray diagnostic examinations have been complied in the computerized “Registry of x-ray diagnostic procedures.” Sources of information are archival registry books from the URCRM x-ray room (available since 1956) and records on x-ray diagnostic procedures in patient-case histories (since 1952). The absorbed doses for 12 organs of interest have been evaluated per unit typical x-ray procedure with account taken of the x-ray examination parameters characteristic for the diagnostic machines used at the URCRM clinics. These parameters have been evaluated from published data on technical characteristics of the x-ray diagnostic machines used at the URCRM clinics in 1952–1988 and taken from the x-ray room for machines used at the URCRM in 1989–2005. Absorbed doses in the 12 organs per unit typical x-ray procedure have been calculated with use of a special computer code, EDEREX, developed at the Saint-Petersburg Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene after Professor P.V. Ramzaev. Individual accumulated doses of medical exposure have been calculated with a computer code, MEDS (Medical Exposure Dosimetry System), specifically developed at the URCRM. Results: At present, the “Registry of x-ray diagnostic procedures” contains information on individual x-ray examinations for over 9,500 persons including 6,415 TRC members. Statistical analysis of the Registry data showed that the more frequent types of examinations were fluoroscopy and radiography of the chest and fluoroscopy of the stomach and the esophagus. Average absorbed doses accumulated by year 2005 calculated for the 12 organs varied from 4 mGy for testes to 40 mGy for bone surfaces. Maximum individual medical doses could reach 500–650 mGy and in some cases exceeded doses from exposure at the Techa River. Conclusions: For the first time the doses of medical exposure were calculated and analyzed for members of the Techa River Cohort who received diagnostic radiation at the URCRM clinics. These results are being used in radiation-risk analysis to adjust for this source of confounding exposure in the TRC.

Shagina, N. B.; Golikov, V.; Degteva, M. O.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Greenhouse impact due to the use of combustible fuels: Life cycle viewpoint and relative radiative forcing commitment  

SciTech Connect

Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels.

Kirkinen, J.; Palosuo, T.; Holmgren, K.; Savolainen, I. [VTT Technical Research Center Finland, Espoo (Finland)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

A TIME ACCURATE PREDICTION OF THE VISCOUS FLOW IN A TURBINE STAGE INCLUDING A ROTOR IN MOTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??AbstractA TIME ACCURATE PREDICTION OF THE VISCOUS FLOW IN A TURBINE STAGE INCLUDING A ROTOR IN MOTIONBy Akamol ShavalikulThe actual flow field in a turbine… (more)

Shavalikul, Akamol

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Echolocation-based foraging by harbor porpoises and sperm whales, including effects of noise and acoustic propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I provide quantitative descriptions of toothed whale echolocation and foraging behavior, including assessment of the effects of noise on foraging behavior and the potential influence of ocean acoustic ...

DeRuiter, Stacy L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

An Inferred Climatology of Icing Conditions Aloft, Including Supercooled Large Drops. Part II: Europe, Asia, and the Globe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of a lack of regular, direct measurements, limited information is available about the frequency and the spatial and temporal distribution of icing conditions aloft, including supercooled large drops (SLD). Research aircraft provide in ...

Ben C. Bernstein; Christine Le Bot

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Inferred Climatology of Icing Conditions Aloft, Including Supercooled Large Drops. Part I: Canada and the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of a lack of regular, direct measurements, little information is available about the frequency and spatial and temporal distribution of icing conditions aloft, including supercooled large drops (SLD). Research aircraft provide in situ ...

Ben C. Bernstein; Cory A. Wolff; Frank McDonough

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Diagnostic Method for Computing the Surface Wind from the Geostrophic Wind Including the Effects of Baroclinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic procedure to compute the surface wind from the geostrophic wind including the effects of baroclinity is designed and tested. Expressions are derived to calculate the similarity functions A and B for use when only the surface ...

Maurice Danard

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Purchasing in PBIO: Any emergency orders must include justification as to why it is an emergency and should be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purchasing in PBIO: Any emergency orders must include justification as to why it is an emergency of justification for emergency purchase in the Internal Notes area under "Review." If a shopper only, you

Arnold, Jonathan

376

Bias in Differential Reflectivity due to Cross Coupling through the Radiation Patterns of Polarimetric Weather Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examined is bias in differential reflectivity and its effect on estimates of rain rate due to coupling of the vertically and horizontally polarized fields through the radiation patterns. To that end, a brief review of the effects of the bias on ...

Dusan Zrni?; Richard Doviak; Guifu Zhang; Alexander Ryzhkov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Deformation of a liquid surface due to an impinging gas jet: A conformal mapping approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformation of a liquid surface due to an impinging gas jet: A conformal mapping approach Andong He on it. The problem of a gas jet impinging on a liquid surface arises in several important industrial and Stewart11 observed two types of instabilities of the gas-liquid system: oscillations of the interface

378

An Analytical Model of the Diurnal Oscillation of the Inversion Base Due to the Sea Breeze  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal oscillation of the height of the inversion due to the sea breeze is studied analytically by use of a linear model. The base of the inversion over the sea moved downward during daytime and upward during nighttime. Over the land the ...

Yizhak Feliks

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Slippery Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean Arising Due to Daytime Solar Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements made in the Equatorial Atlantic during the 35th cruise of the R/V Akademic Vernadsky using a free-rising profiler and drifters revealed a near-surface slippery layer of the ocean arising due to daytime solar heating. The solar ...

Vladimir N. Kudryavtsev; Alexander V. Soloviev

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Resolving stereo matching errors due to repetitive structures using model information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study regards the problem of incorrect stereo matches due to the occurrence of repetitive structures in the scene. In stereo vision, repetitive structures may lead to ''phantom objects'' in front of or behind the true scene which cause severe problems ... Keywords: Correspondence analysis, Model-based 3D scene analysis, Stereo vision

Björn Barrois; Marcus Konrad; Christian Wöhler; Horst-Michael Groí

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Orbital characteristics due to the three dimensional swing-by in the Sun-Jupiter system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analytical and numerical study about orbital characteristics of trajectories due to a three dimensional swing-by maneuver between a planet and a particle. The model used has the same hypothesis of the circular restricted three-body ... Keywords: celestial mechanics, orbital dynamics, orbital maneuver, three dimensional swing-by

Jorge K. S. Formiga; Antonio F. B. A. Prado

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Church and White, 2006]. This rate may be currently accelerating due to an increased influence of climate reservoirs (based on the work by Vorosmarty et al. [1997]), which are used in this paper's calculations. (b 1a), and added six additional post1997 dams from Chao et al. [2008] (specifically, the Three Gorges

Conrad, Clint

383

CS 6100 Program 1 Mars Explorer (20 points) Due Feb 3, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenario was presented by L Steels. The objectives are to explore a distant planet, and in particularCS 6100 Program 1 Mars Explorer (20 points) Due Feb 3, 2011 Create an applet (or other visual program) which allows the user to see the behavior of reactive agents. The Mars Explorer

Allan, Vicki H.

384

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects temperatures have increased much more than can be explained by changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases traffic round the clock and around the globe which is contributing to higher concentrations of greenhouse

Murty, Katta G.

385

Climatic Effects Due to Halogenated Compounds in the Earth’s Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by 0.2 K due to ...

Wei-Chyung Wang; Joseph P. Pinto; Yuk Ling Yung

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Changes in cosmic ray cut-o rigidities due to secular variations of the geomagnetic eld  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in cosmic ray cut-o rigidities due to secular variations of the geomagnetic ®eld A. Bhattacharyya1 , B. Mitra2 1 Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Colaba, Bombay 400005, India 2 Department rays arriving at a point in an arbitrary direction, when the main geomagnetic ®eld is approximated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Critical-Current Reduction in Thin Superconducting Wires Due to Current Crowding  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate experimentally that the critical current in superconducting NbTiN wires is dependent on their geometrical shape, due to current-crowding effects. Geometric patterns such as 90{degrees} corners and sudden expansions of wire width are shown to result in the reduction of critical currents. The results are relevant for single-photon detectors as well as parametric amplifiers.

Hortensius, H.L.; Driessen, E.F.C.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Berggren, K.K.; Clem, John

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Night and Day Difference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 11 PNNL-SA-80423 A Night-and-Day Difference "Grand Challenge" demonstrates team-based science approach; provides new systems-level understanding of microbes important for biofuels and carbon sequestration. In late 2004, when Dr. Himadri Pakrasi walked into the crowded EMSL Auditorium, he recognized only one scientist he knew. In the hours that followed, discussions circled around a single challenge: designing a multi- disciplinary, multi-institutional effort to understand the ways unique cyanobacteria harness energy from sunlight by day and generate their own fertilizer at night. The ultimate goal? To make discoveries that support engineering of such microbes for energy and environmental purposes. The day was the original scoping meeting

389

Heating oil prices rise due to winter demand and crude oil prices ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

390

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

391

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

392

What are the different coal prices published by EIA? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What are the different coal prices published by EIA? EIA publishes various coal prices including futures prices, mine prices, captive and open market sales prices ...

393

What are the different coal prices published by EIA? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What are the different coal prices published by EIA? EIA publishes various coal prices including futures prices, mine prices, captive and open market sales prices ...

394

Enhanced electro-magnetic energy transfer between a hot and cold body at close spacing due to evanescent fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical studies have demonstrated that the energy transfer between a hot and cold body at close spacing (on the order of the radiation wavelength) can greatly exceed the limit for black body radiation (ie, Power = {sigma}T{sup 4}). This effect, due to the coupling of evanescent fields, presents an attractive option for thermo-photovoltaic (TPV) applications (assuming the considerable technical challenges can be overcome). The magnitude of the enhanced energy transfer depends on the optical properties of the hot and cold bodies as characterized by the dielectric functions of the respective materials. The present study considers five different situations as specified by the materials choices for the hot/cold sides: metal/metal, metal/insulator, metal/semiconductor, insulator/insulator, and semiconductor/semiconductor. For each situation, the dielectric functions are specified by typical models. An increase in energy transfer (relative to the black body law) is found for all situations considered, for separations less than one micron, assuming a temperature difference of 1,000 C. The metal/metal situation has the highest increase vs. separation while the semiconductor/semiconductor has the lowest. Factor-of-ten increases are obtained at roughly 0.1 microns for the metal/metal and roughly 0.02 microns for the metal/semiconductor. These studies are helping to increase the understanding of the close-spaced effect in the context of a radiator/TPV context.

Raynolds, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approx.0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong ..nu../sub 3/ band at 7.8 ..mu..m, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K (ppbv)/sup -1/ with and without taking into account overlap with CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/O bands. At concentration higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the ..nu../sub 3/ band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

Wang, W.; Pinto, J.P.; Yung, Y.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Apparent spatial blurring and displacement of a point optical source due to cloud scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo algorithm is used to determine the apparent spatial blurring of a terrestrial 1.07 micron optical point source due to cloud scattering as seen from space. The virtual image of a point source over a virtual source plane area 22.4 x 22.4 square kilometers arising from cloud scattering was determined for stratus clouds (NASA cloud number 5) and altostratus clouds optical source arises from photon scattering by cloud water droplets. Displacement of the virtual source is due to the apparent illumination of the cloud top region directly about the actual source which when viewed at a nonzero look angle gives a projected displacement of the apparent source relative to the actual source. These features are quantified by an analysis of the Monte Carlo computational results.

Brower, K.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Experimental Evidence for a Reduction in Electron Thermal Diffusion due to Trapped Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New high time resolution measurements of the electron thermal diffusion {chi}{sub e} throughout the sawtooth cycle of the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch have been made by utilizing the enhanced capabilities of the upgraded multipoint, multipulse Thomson scattering system. These measurements are compared to the {chi}{sub e} due to magnetic diffusion predicted by using information from a new high spectral resolution zero-{beta} nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation performed, for the first time, at the Lundquist number of high current Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas (S{approx_equal}4x10{sup 6}). Agreement between the measured and predicted values is found only if the reduction in thermal diffusion due to trapped particles is taken into account.

Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Schnack, D. D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Stephens, H. D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Slowing down of ions due to Coulomb collisions in a plasma  

SciTech Connect

Lenard's form of the plasma kinetic equation incorporating dynamic shielding was used to calculate the rate of energy loss by fast ions due to Coulomb collisions inside a plasma. The rate thus calculated is significantly larger than the results obtained on the basis of convential theories with static especially if the plasma is very dense and the ion speed is not too high.

Nishimura, K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Subsidence due to fluid withdrawal: a survey of analytical capabilities. [1225 citations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive review of the literature was conducted in the area of land subsidence due to the withdrawal of fluids. A method of categorizing the citations was developed to facilitate identification of references relating to specific fields of interest. A brief review of the materials represented by the bibliography indicates the state-of-the-art within this area. The bibliography (containing 1225 citations) is presented in its categorized form. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Engi, D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Dose distribution for /sup 125/I implants due to anisotropic radiation emission and unknown seed orientation  

SciTech Connect

Variations in dose distribution due to anisotropic radiation emission around /sup 125/I seeds and a lack of knowledge about the orientation of the implanted seeds have been investigated. Upper and lower bounds for dose distributions have been calculated for planar implants using the experimentally determined angular dose distribution around a typical /sup 125/I seed. Results of our study suggest that significant dose variations in the center and the periphery of the implanted area are possible.

Prasad, S.C.; Bassano, D.A.; Fear, P.I.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assignment 3 MECH 6511 Due on Mar. 22, 06 Question 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Calculate the volume of air space in the walls of an expanded polystyrene foam cup of 50 kg/m3 densityAssignment 3 MECH 6511 Due on Mar. 22, 06 Question 1: The density of polystyrene is 1.05 g/cm3 (graphite): 2.25 g/cm3 . #12;Question 3: The time dependence of crystallization can be described by Avrami

Medraj, Mamoun

402

Assignment 3 MECH 421 Due on Mar. 22, 06 Question 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Calculate the volume of air space in the walls of an expanded polystyrene foam cup of 50 kg/m3 densityAssignment 3 MECH 421 Due on Mar. 22, 06 Question 1: The density of polystyrene is 1.05 g/cm3 (graphite): 2.25 g/cm3 . #12;Question 3: An extruder has a barrel diameter = 5.0 inch and length = 12 ft

Medraj, Mamoun

403

UCSC EMPLOYEE HOUSING APARTMENTS APPLICATION Rental rates include: rent, refuse collection, common area utilities, groundskeeping services, and repairs and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCSC EMPLOYEE HOUSING APARTMENTS APPLICATION Rental rates include: rent, refuse collection, common. Tenants pay for their own utilities (i.e., electricity, gas, water, telephone and cable services). A $750 for current rental rates): 1 bedroom 1 bdrm deluxe 2 bdrm/1 bath 2 bdrm/2 bath) If you are interested in a two

California at Santa Cruz, University of

404

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Chemical transformations are essential to all living organisms--and also to the manufacture of many products including fuels,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interests include plasma waste gasification, plasma torches, spectroscopy, plasma medicine, and holographic2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation-power microwave breakdown based on measured laser breakdown observations. Comparison of 193-nm laser

Kemner, Ken

406

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form) EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu apply: When to Report: · All chemical exposures or explosions requiring medical attention must

Yener, Aylin

407

UW Madison Fleet Fiscal Year 2010 Rates: Fuel, maintenance and insurance costs are included. If fuel prices exceed the budgeted  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UW Madison Fleet Fiscal Year 2010 Rates: Fuel, maintenance and insurance costs are included. If fuel prices exceed the budgeted amount by a significant margin, the rates will be amended with a fuel surcharge at that time and the change notice will be posted in the fleet web site, rates page. Some rate

Sheridan, Jennifer

408

Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990  

SciTech Connect

Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

arXiv:submit/0451583[physics.gen-ph]8Apr2012 Including Nuclear Degrees of Freedom in a Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:submit/0451583[physics.gen-ph]8Apr2012 Including Nuclear Degrees of Freedom in a Lattice and Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology. Lahore, Pakistan Abstract. Motivated by many condensed matter and nuclear systems are described initially on the same footing. Since it may be possible

Williams, Brian C.

410

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

SciTech Connect

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

Comment on"Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Katzenstein and Apt investigate the important question of pollution emission reduction benefits from variable generation resources such as wind and solar. Their methodology, which couples an individual variable generator to a dedicated gas plant to produce a flat block of power is, however, inappropriate. For CO{sub 2}, the authors conclude that variable generators 'achieve {approx} 80% of the emission reductions expected if the power fluctuations caused no additional emissions.' They find even lower NO{sub x} emission reduction benefits with steam-injected gas turbines and a 2-4 times net increase in NO{sub x} emissions for systems with dry NO{sub x} control unless the ratio of energy from natural gas to variable plants is greater than 2:1. A more appropriate methodology, however, would find a significantly lower degradation of the emissions benefit than suggested by Katzenstein and Apt. As has been known for many years, models of large power system operations must take into account variable demand and the unit commitment and economic dispatch functions that are practiced every day by system operators. It is also well-known that every change in wind or solar power output does not need to be countered by an equal and opposite change in a dispatchable resource. The authors recognize that several of their assumptions to the contrary are incorrect and that their estimates therefore provide at best an upper bound to the emissions degradation caused by fluctuating output. Yet they still present the strong conclusion: 'Carbon dioxide emissions reductions are likely to be 75-80% of those presently assumed by policy makers. We have shown that the conventional method used to calculate emissions is inaccurate, particularly for NO{sub x} emissions.' The inherently problematic methodology used by the authors makes such strong conclusions suspect. Specifically, assuming that each variable plant requires a dedicated natural gas backup plant to create a flat block of power ignores the benefits of diversity. In real power systems, operators are required to balance only the net variations of all loads and all generators, not the output of individual loads or generators; doing otherwise would ensure an enormous amount of unnecessary investment and operating costs. As a result, detailed studies that aggregate the variability of all loads and generators to the system level find that the amount of operating reserves required to reliably integrate variable resources into the grid are on the order of 10% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generators, even when upto25%of gross demand is being met by variable generation. The authors implicit assumption that incremental operating reserves must be 100% of the nameplate capacity of the variable generation, and be available at all times to directly counter that variability, excludes the option of decommitting conventional units when the load net of variable generation is low. In real power systems, generation response to wind variation can typically be met by a combination of committed units, each operating at a relatively efficient point of their fuel curves. In the Supporting Information, we conceptually demonstrate that the CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} efficiency penalty found by the authors can be significantly reduced by considering the unit commitment decision with just five plants. Real systems often have tens to hundreds of plants that can be committed and decommitted over various time frames. Ignoring the flexibility of the unit commitment decision therefore leads to unsupportable results. Anumber of analyses of the fuel savings and CO{sub 2} emission benefits of variable generation have considered realistic operating reserve requirements and unit commitment decisions in models that include the reduction in part load efficiency of conventional plants. The efficiency penalty due to the variability of wind in four studies considered by Gross et al. is negligible to 7%, for up to a 20% wind penetration level. In short, for moderate wind penetration levels, 'there is no evidence available to

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Milligan, Michael; O'Malley, Mark

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

Multiscale Momentum Flux and Diffusion due to Whitecapping in Wave–Current Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whitecapping affects the Reynolds stresses near the ocean surface. A model for the conservative dynamics of waves and currents is modified to include the averaged effect of multiple, short-lived, and random wave-breaking events on large ...

Juan M. Restrepo; Jorge M. Ramírez; James C. McWilliams; Michael Banner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Uncertainties in CMIP5 climate projections due to carbon cycle feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, most climate simulations use prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentration and therefore do not interactively include the effect of carbon cycle feedbacks. However, the RCP8.5 scenario ...

Pierre Friedlingstein; Malte Meinshausen; Vivek K. Arora; Chris D. Jones; Alessandro Anav; Spencer K. Liddicoat; Reto Knutti

414

Parametric examination of the destruction of availability due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive second law analysis of combustion for a range of conditions and fuels was completed. Constant pressure, constant volume and constant temperature combustion processes were examined. The parameters studied were reactant temperature, reactant pressure, equivalence ratio and the fuels themselves. In addition, the contribution and relative significance of the various components (thermo-mechanical, reactive and diffusion) to the mixture availability was examined. Also, the effect of reactant mixture dissociation was incorporated into the combustion analysis. It was found that for similar initial conditions, constant pressure combustion and constant volume combustion exhibited similar trends. For constant temperature combustion, the trend is significantly different from the constant pressure and constant volume combustion, with almost the entire reactant availability being destroyed due to combustion at lower temperatures. Amongst the parameters examined, reactant mixture temperature had the most significant effect on the fraction of availability destroyed during combustion. The percentage availability destroyed reduced from 25 to 30% at 300 K to about 5% at 6000 K for constant pressure and constant volume combustion processes. The effect of the reactant mixture pressure on the fraction of availability destroyed was more modest. The values for the percentage availability destroyed for pressures ranging from 50 kPa to 5000 kPa were found to lie within a range of 5%. The effect of equivalence ratio on the fraction of reactant mixture availability destroyed was also documented. In general, it was found that the destruction of availability decreased with increasing equivalence ratios. This value, however, accounts for the availability due to fuel like species in the product mixture. Therefore, for practical applications, combustion of the stoichiometric mixture would be preferred over the rich equivalence ratios. It was found that the fraction of reactant availability destroyed increased with increasing complexity of the fuel??s molecular structure. In addition, it was shown that the diffusion availability terms is small and may be neglected, while the reactive availability and thermo-mechanical availability are more significant.

Chavannavar, Praveen Shivshankar

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Calculation of pressure waves in substation buildings due to arcing faults  

SciTech Connect

Pressure stress from internal arcing includes static and dynamic phenomena. These phenomena can be distinguished with the help of the pulsation factor. The ray tracing technique presented allows the three-dimensional calculation of pressure stresses including transient effects. Two examples demonstrating the importance of pressure waves on the stress of rooms are presented. A calculation procedure is given which enables an improvement of the design of substation buildings.

Dasbach, A.; Pietsch, G.J. (Grundegebiete der Elektrotechnik und Gasentladungstechnik, Aachen Univ. of Technology, Aachen (DE))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Workshop on induced Seismicity due to fluid injection/production from Energy-Related Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy, carbon sequestration, and enhanced oil and gas recovery have a clear role in U.S. energy policy, both in securing cost-effective energy and reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} accumulations. Recent publicity surrounding induced seismicity at several geothermal and oil and gas sites points out the need to develop improved standards and practices to avoid issues that may unduly inhibit or stop the above technologies from fulfilling their full potential. It is critical that policy makers and the general community be assured that EGS, CO{sub 2} sequestration, enhanced oil/gas recovery, and other technologies relying on fluid injections, will be designed to reduce induced seismicity to an acceptable level, and be developed in a safe and cost-effective manner. Induced seismicity is not new - it has occurred as part of many different energy and industrial applications (reservoir impoundment, mining, oil recovery, construction, waste disposal, conventional geothermal). With proper study/research and engineering controls, induced seismicity should eventually allow safe and cost-effective implementation of any of these technologies. In addition, microseismicity is now being used as a remote sensing tool for understanding and measuring the success of injecting fluid into the subsurface in a variety of applications, including the enhancement of formation permeability through fracture creation/reactivation, tracking fluid migration and storage, and physics associated with stress redistribution. This potential problem was envisaged in 2004 following observed seismicity at several EGS sites, a study was implemented by DOE to produce a white paper and a protocol (Majer et al 2008) to help potential investors. Recently, however, there have been a significant number of adverse comments by the press regarding induced seismicity which could adversely affect the development of the energy sector in the USA. Therefore, in order to identify critical technology and research that was necessary not only to make fluid injections safe, but an economic asset, DOE organized a series of workshops. The first workshop was held on February 4, 2010, at Stanford University. A second workshop will be held in mid-2010 to address the critical elements of a 'best practices/protocol' that industry could use as a guide to move forward with safe implementation of fluid injections/production for energy-related applications, i.e., a risk mitigation plan, and specific recommendations for industry to follow. The objectives of the first workshop were to identify critical technology and research needs/approaches to advance the understanding of induced seismicity associated with energy related fluid injection/production, such that: (1) The risk associated with induced seismicity can be reduced to a level that is acceptable to the public, policy makers, and regulators; and (2) Seismicity can be utilized/controlled to monitor, manage, and optimize the desired fluid behavior in a cost effective fashion. There were two primary goals during the workshop: (1) Identify the critical roadblocks preventing the necessary understanding of human-induced seismicity. These roadblocks could be technology related (better imaging of faults and fractures, more accurate fluid tracking, improved stress measurements, etc.), research related (fundamental understanding of rock physical properties and geochemical fluid/rock interactions, development of improved constitutive relations, improved understanding of rock failure, improved data processing and modeling, etc.), or a combination of both. (2) After laying out the roadblocks the second goal was to identify technology development and research needs that could be implemented in the near future to address the above objectives.

Majer, E.L.; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Rueter, Horst; Stump, Brian; Segall, Paul; Zoback, Mark; Nelson, Jim; Frohlich, Cliff; Rutledge, Jim; Gritto, Roland; Baria, Roy; Hickman, Steve; McGarr, Art; Ellsworth, Bill; Lockner, Dave; Oppenheimer, David; Henning, Peter; Rosca, Anca; Hornby, Brian; Wang, Herb; Beeler, Nick; Ghassemi, Ahmad; Walters, Mark; Robertson-Tait, Ann; Dracos, Peter; Fehler, Mike; Abou-Sayed, Ahmed; Ake, Jon; Vorobiev, Oleg; Julian, Bruce

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Terrestrial laser scanning for measuring the solid wood volume, including branches, of adult standing trees in the forest environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to assess the solid wood volume (i.e., stem and branch diameters of more than 7cm) of adult standing trees in the forest environment. The solid wood volume of 42 trees of different ... Keywords: 3D tree modelling, Forestry, LiDAR, Terrestrial laser scanning, Wood volume

Mathieu Dassot; AuréLie Colin; Philippe Santenoise; Meriem Fournier; ThiéRy Constant

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Correlated change in normalized difference vegetation index and the seasonal trajectory of photosynthetic capacity in a conifer stand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal changes in canopy photosynthetic activity play an important role in carbon assimilation. However, few simulation models for estimating carbon balances have included them due to scarcity in quality data. This paper investigates some important ...

Q. Wang; J. Tenhunen; T. Vesala

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Well-balanced bicharacteristic-based scheme for multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a new well-balanced finite volume scheme for two-dimensional multilayer shallow water flows including wet/dry fronts. The ideas, presented here for the two-layer model, can be generalized to a multilayer case in a ... Keywords: Bicharacteristics, Evolution galerkin, Finite volume method, Two-layer shallow water, Well-balance, Wet/dry front

M. Dudzinski; M. Luká?Ová-Medvid'Ová

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Permeability reduction of unconsolidated media due to stress-induced silica dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Permeability measurements were made on both glass beads and Ottowa sand under uniform confining stress conditions. Extreme permeability reduction (95%) of the glass beads was observed at temperatures exceeding 150/sup 0/C and confining pressures of 13.8 MPa with distilled water as the flowing fluid. Permeability reduction in the Ottowa sand (40%) was also observed at high temperature and confining pressure. Effluent analysis revealed high concentrations of silica. Subsequent 300 hour experiments with Ottowa sand exhibited a steady decrease in permeability with time. SEM photographs of post experiment cores, indicate that the permeability reduction is mainly due to stress induced silica dissolution at grain contacts.

Udell, K.S.; Lofy, J.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Reduction of Statistical Power Per Event Due to Upper Lifetime Cuts in Lifetime Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cut on the maximum lifetime in a lifetime fit not only reduces the number of events, but also, in some circumstances dramatically, decreases the statistical significance of each event. The upper impact parameter cut in the hadronic B trigger at CDF, which is due to technical limitations, has the same effect. In this note we describe and quantify the consequences of such a cut on lifetime measurements. We find that even moderate upper lifetime cuts, leaving event numbers nearly unchanged, can dramatically increase the statistical uncertainty of the fit result.

Jonas Rademacker

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

Level set simulation of coupled advection-diffusion and pore structure evolution due to mineral precipitation in porous media  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear coupling of fluid flow, reactive chemical transport and pore structure changes due to mineral precipitation (or dissolution) in porous media play a key role in a wide variety of processes of scientific interest and practical importance. Significant examples include the evolution of fracture apertures in the subsurface, acid fracturing stimulation for enhanced oil recovery and immobilizations of radionuclides and heavy metals in contaminated groundwater. We have developed a pore-scale simulation technique for modeling coupled reactive flow and structure evolution in porous media and fracture apertures. Advection, diffusion, and mineral precipitation resulting in changes in pore geometries are treated simultaneously by solving fully coupled fluid momentum and reactive solute transport equations. In this model, the reaction-induced evolution of solid grain surfaces is captured using a level set method. A sub-grid representation of the interface, based on the level set approach, is used instead of pixel representations of the interface often used in cellular-automata and most lattice-Boltzmann methods. The model is validated against analytical solutions for simplified geometries. Precipitation processes were simulated under various flow conditions and reaction rates, and the resulting pore geometry changes are discussed. Quantitative relationships between permeability and porosity under various flow conditions and reaction rates are reported.

Xiaoyi Li; Hai Huang; Paul Meakin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments  

SciTech Connect

In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Polarization of Thermal Microwave Atmospheric Radiation Due to Scattering by Ice Particles in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The polarization difference ?Tb between the vertical and horizontal components of thermal radiation emitted by clouds was studied using 37- and 85-GHz radiometers. The measurements were conducted during the Alliance Icing Research Project in ...

A. V. Troitsky; A. M. Osharin; A. V. Korolev; J. W. Strapp

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electromagnetic analysis of forces and torques on the ITER shield modules due to plasma disruption.  

SciTech Connect

An electromagnetic analysis is performed on the ITER shield modules under different plasma disruption scenarios using the OPERA-3d software. The modeling procedure is explained, electromagnetic torques are presented, and results of the modeling are discussed.

Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Overview of TEPP presentated by Tom Clawson. Transportation...

430

An evaluation of an empirical model for stall delay due to rotation for HAWTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the Corrigan and Schillings stall delay model for predicting rotor performance for horizontal axis wind turbines. Two-dimensional (2D) wind tunnel characteristics with and without stall delay were used in the computer program PROP93 to predict performance for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) and a lower solidity commercial machine. For the CER, predictions were made with a constant-chord/twisted blade and a hypothetical tapered/twisted blade. Results for the constant-chord/twisted blade were compared with CER data. Predicted performance using this empirical stall-delay method provided significant increases in peak power over 2D post-stall airfoil characteristics. The predicted peak power increase due to stall delay for the CER was found to be quite large (20% to 30%) as a result of its high blade solidity. For a more typical, lower-solidity commercial blade the predicted peak power increase was 15% to 20%. As described in the paper, correlation with test data was problematic due to factors not related to the stall-delay model.

Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities  

SciTech Connect

In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Optical losses of solar mirrors due to atmospheric contamination at Liberal, Kansas and Oologah, Oklahoma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment is presented of the effect of outdoor exposure on mirrors located at two sites selected for potential solar cogeneration/repowering facilities: Liberal, Kansas and Oologah, Oklahoma. Mirror coupons were placed on tracking heliostat simulators located in the proposed heliostat fields and were removed periodically. The spectral hemispherical and diffuse reflectances of these coupons were measured. Representative samples were analyzed for the chemical composition of the dust particulates using SEM/EDX. Other samples were washed with a high pressure spray and recharacterized to determine the effects of the residual dust. Average specular reflectance losses over the entire test period (up to 504 days) were 6 to 12%, with a range of 1 to 30%. Specular reflectance losses varied widely from day to day depending on local weather conditions. The losses due to scattering were 2 to 5 times greater than the losses due to absorptance. The average degradation rate over the first thirty days was an order of magnitude larger than the average degradation rate over the entire sampling period. Specular reflectance loss rates averaged 0.5% per day and greater between periods of natural cleaning. The chemical composition of the dust on the mirrors was characteristic of the indigenous soil, with some samples also showing the presence of sulfur and chlorine, possibly from cooling tower drift.

Dake, L.S.; Lind, M.A.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Variations in environmental tritium doses due to meteorological data averaging and uncertainties in pathway model parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are: (1) to calculate and compare off site doses from atmospheric tritium releases at the Savannah River Site using monthly versus 5 year meteorological data and annual source terms, including additional seasonal and site specific parameters not included in present annual assessments; and (2) to calculate the range of the above dose estimates based on distributions in model parameters given by uncertainty estimates found in the literature. Consideration will be given to the sensitivity of parameters given in former studies.

Kock, A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF THE THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS INCLUDING EFFICIENT PARTICLE ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the major contributors to Galactic cosmic rays. The detection of non-thermal emission from SNRs demonstrates the presence of energetic particles, but direct signatures of protons and other ions remain elusive. If these particles receive a sizeable fraction of the explosion energy, the morphological and spectral evolution of the SNR must be modified. To assess this, we run three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of a remnant coupled with a nonlinear acceleration model. We obtain the time-dependent evolution of the shocked structure, impacted by the Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities at the contact discontinuity and by the back-reaction of particles at the forward shock. We then compute the progressive temperature equilibration and non-equilibrium ionization state of the plasma, and its thermal emission in each cell. This allows us to produce the first realistic synthetic maps of the projected X-ray emission from the SNR. Plasma conditions (temperature and ionization age) can vary widely over the projected surface of the SNR, especially between the ejecta and the ambient medium owing to their different composition. This demonstrates the need for spatially resolved spectroscopy. We find that the integrated emission is reduced with particle back-reaction, with the effect being more significant for the highest photon energies. Therefore, different energy bands, corresponding to different emitting elements, probe different levels of the impact of particle acceleration. Our work provides a framework for the interpretation of SNR observations with current X-ray missions (Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku) and with upcoming X-ray missions (such as Astro-H).

Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Decourchelle, Anne, E-mail: gferrand@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: anne.decourchelle@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM (CEA/Irfu, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris VII), CEA Saclay, bat. 709, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Evaluation of Lithium Hydride for Use in a Space Nuclear Reactor Shield, Including a Historical Perspective  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiH was one of the five primary shield materials the NRPCT intended to develop (along with beryllium, boron carbide, tungsten, and water) for potential Prometheus application. It was also anticipated that {sup 10}B metal would be investigated for feasibility at a low level of effort. LiH historically has been selected as a low mass, neutron absorption material for space shields (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), Topaz, SP-100). Initial NRPCT investigations did not produce convincing evidence that LiH was desirable or feasible for a Prometheus mission due to material property issues (primarily swelling and hydrogen cover gas containment), and related thermal design complexity. Furthermore, if mass limits allowed, an option to avoid use of LiH was being contemplated to lower development costs and associated risks. However, LiH remains theoretically the most efficient neutron shield material per unit mass, and, with sufficient testing and development, could be an optimal material choice for future flights.

D. Poeth

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

438

Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assay of natural and synthetic crude oils including a Fischer-Retorted Estonian shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DMSO extracts of a variety of natural and synthetic crude oils were tested for genotoxic activity in the Ames/Salmonella bioassay. Both mutagenic and cytotoxic potentials are cited. Natural crude oils and their refined products and upgraded synfuels are less mutagenic than parent crude shale oils which in turn are less mutagenic than the coal derived distillate blend sample, SRC II. However, this order is not true for cytotoxicity induced by these oil samples; therefore, caution must be exercised in the assessment of their mutagenic potential without consideration of other influential factors including cytotoxicity.

Strniste, G.F.; Nickols, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The uncertainties due to quark energy loss on determining nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of two different parametrizations of quark energy loss and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order phenomenological analysis is performed on the nuclear Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei for E772 experimental data. It is shown that there is the quark energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss effect is quantified on determining nuclear sea quark distribution by using nuclear Drell-Yan data. It is found that the quark energy loss effect on nuclear Drell-Yan cross section ratios make greater with the increase of quark momentum fraction in the target nuclei. The uncertainties from quark energy loss become bigger as the nucleus A come to be heavier. The Drell-Yan data on proton incident mi...

Duan, C G; Li, G L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The uncertainties due to quark energy loss on determining nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of two different parametrizations of quark energy loss and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order phenomenological analysis is performed on the nuclear Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei for E772 experimental data. It is shown that there is the quark energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process apart from the nuclear effects on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering. The uncertainties due to quark energy loss effect is quantified on determining nuclear sea quark distribution by using nuclear Drell-Yan data. It is found that the quark energy loss effect on nuclear Drell-Yan cross section ratios make greater with the increase of quark momentum fraction in the target nuclei. The uncertainties from quark energy loss become bigger as the nucleus A come to be heavier. The Drell-Yan data on proton incident middle and heavy nuclei versus deuterium would result in an overestimate for nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions with neglecting the quark energy loss. Our results are hoped to provide good directional information on the magnitude and form of nuclear modifications on sea quark distribution functions by means of the nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data.

C. G. Duan; N. Liu; G. L. Li

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONS IN HYDRAULIC CAPTURE DUE TO CHANGING FLOW PATTERNS USING MAPPING AND MODELING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

Robust performance evaluation represents one of the most challenging aspects of groundwater pump-and-treat (P&T) remedy implementation. In most cases, the primary goal of the P&T system is hydraulic containment, and ultimately recovery, of contaminants to protect downgradient receptors. Estimating the extent of hydraulic containment is particularly challenging under changing flow patterns due to variable pumping, boundaries and/or other conditions. We present a systematic approach to estimate hydraulic containment using multiple lines of evidence based on (a) water-level mapping and (b) groundwater modeling. Capture Frequency Maps (CFMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-level maps developed for each available water level data set using universal kriging. In a similar manner, Capture Efficiency Maps (CEMs) are developed by particle tracking on water-levels calculated using a transient groundwater flow model: tracking is undertaken independently for each stress period using a very low effective porosity, depicting the 'instantaneous' fate of each particle each stress period. Although conceptually similar, the two methods differ in their underlying assumptions and their limitations: their use together identifies areas where containment may be reliable (i.e., where the methods are in agreement) and where containment is uncertain (typically, where the methods disagree). A field-scale example is presented to illustrate these concepts.

SPILIOTOPOULOS AA; SWANSON LC; SHANNON R; TONKIN MJ

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal. 17 figs.

Dong, Q.; Jenkins, M.V.; Bernadas, S.R.

1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

444

Gender differences in the disposition and toxicity of metals  

SciTech Connect

There is increasing evidence that health effects of toxic metals differ in prevalence or are manifested differently in men and women. However, the database is small. The present work aims at evaluating gender differences in the health effects of cadmium, nickel, lead, mercury and arsenic. There is a markedly higher prevalence of nickel-induced allergy and hand eczema in women compared to men, mainly due to differences in exposure. Cadmium retention is generally higher in women than in men, and the severe cadmium-induced Itai-itai disease was mainly a woman's disease. Gender differences in susceptibility at lower exposure are uncertain, but recent data indicate that cadmium has estrogenic effects and affect female offspring. Men generally have higher blood lead levels than women. Lead accumulates in bone and increased endogenous lead exposure has been demonstrated during periods of increased bone turnover, particularly in women in pregnancy and menopause. Lead and mercury, in the form of mercury vapor and methylmercury, are easily transferred from the pregnant women to the fetus. Recent data indicate that boys are more susceptible to neurotoxic effects of lead and methylmercury following exposure early in life, while experimental data suggest that females are more susceptible to immunotoxic effects of lead. Certain gender differences in the biotransformation of arsenic by methylation have been reported, and men seem to be more affected by arsenic-related skin effect than women. Experimental studies indicate major gender differences in arsenic-induced cancer. Obviously, research on gender-related differences in health effects caused by metals needs considerable more focus in the future.

Vahter, Marie [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: Marie.Vahter@imm.ki.se; Akesson, Agneta [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Liden, Carola [Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska, Institutet and Stockholm County Council (Sweden); Ceccatelli, Sandra [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Berglund, Marika [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Lowe's "Toolbox for Education" grant applications due by October 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowe's "Toolbox for Education" Grant Applications Lowe's "Toolbox for Education" Grant Applications Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lowe's "Toolbox for Education" grant applications due by October 12 Five million dollars is available for the 2012-13 school year. September 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Over the past five years, Lowe's "Toolbox for Education " program has provided almost $25 million to more than 5,000 schools across the country. Five million dollars is available for the 2012-13 school year; grant requests must be between $2,000 and $5,000 and will be accepted until October 12, or until 1,500 requests have been received. The grants must be

446

Cosmic ray spectral hardening due to dispersion of source injection spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cosmic ray (CR) energy spectra measured with ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA showed that there is remarkable hardening for rigidity of several hundred GV. We propose that this hardening is due to the superposition of spectra from a population of sources, e.g., supernova remnants (SNRs), whose injection spectral indices have a dispersion. Adopting proper model parameters the observational data can be well explained. It is interesting that the injection source parameters are similar with that derived from gamma-ray observations of SNRs, which may support the SNR-origin of CRs. Furthermore this mechanism provides an alternative explanation of the "ankle-cutoff" structure of the ultra high energy CR spectra.

Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

New perspectives on the damage estimation for buried pipeline systems due to seismic wave propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past three decades, seismic fragility fonnulations for buried pipeline systems have been developed following two tendencies: the use of earthquake damage scenarios from several pipeline systems to create general pipeline fragility functions; and, the use of damage scenarios from one pipeline system to create specific-system fragility functions. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of both tendencies are analyzed and discussed; in addition, a summary of what can be considered the new challenges for developing better pipeline seismic fragility formulations is discussed. The most important conclusion of this paper states that more efforts are needed to improve the estimation of transient ground strain -the main cause of pipeline damage due to seismic wave propagation; with relevant advances in that research field, new and better fragility formulations could be developed.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The change in permeability spectra due to ion irradiation in the Co-based amorphous ribbon  

SciTech Connect

The Ar ion has been irradiated by an ion implanter with energy of 50, 70, and 100 keV and an ion dosage was set to 1.0x10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2} at a beam flux of 3.7 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The ion irradiation decreased the initial permeability and increased the relaxation frequency, and the behavior of permeability spectra due to ion irradiation was explained with damped harmonic model of domain wall on the general basis of magnetization mechanism. The ion irradiation gives rise to a significant change on the restoring force of domain wall but minor effect on the spin rotation. The enhancement in the permeability of the amorphous ribbon upon ion irradiation leads to a parallel improvement of giant magneto impedance response of the material, which is of practical use for sensing applications.

Park, D. G.; Song, H.; Cheong, Y. M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, P.O. Box 105, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [Department of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. G. [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length  

SciTech Connect

With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electron Scattering in InSb Quantum Wells due to Micro-twin Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport electron scattering due to micro-twin (MT) defects in InSb quantum wells (QWs) has been investigated at room temperature (RT). A linear-regression-based scattering analysis showed that Matthiessen's rule is applicable to the RT electron mobility in 20-nm-thick InSb QWs that contain MTs (whose density is 5.6x10{sup 2}-1.2x10{sup 4} /cm) and threading dislocations (8.7x10{sup 8}-3.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}) as dominant structural defects. For such an InSb QW whose local electron mobility in its non-MT regions is 2.8x10{sup 4}-4.5x10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/(Vs), the MT-originated energy barrier against the electron transport is deduced to be 0.081-0.093 eV at RT.

Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Stellite 6 Friction Changes Due to Aging and In-Service Testing  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have been investigating the ability of motor-operated valves to close or open when subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. The nuclear industry has developed methods to analytically predict the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions; the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces affects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the accumulation of a surface film due to aging of these surfaces increase the coefficient of friction and if so, how much? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue with emphasis on the following: • The change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages and whether the friction reaches a plateau. • The effect periodic gate valve cycling due to in-service testing has on the friction coefficient. • The results of an independent review of the test methods, processes, and the results of the research to date. • The status of ongoing aging and friction testing.

Watkins, John Clifford; DeWall, Kevin George

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Macroscopic coherence between quantum condensates formed at different times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate macroscopic coherence between quantum condensates generated at different times, separated by more than the particle dephasing time. This is possible due to the dressed light-matter nature of exciton-polaritons, which can be injected resonantly by optical excitation at well-defined momenta. We show that the build-up of coherence between condensates depends on the interaction between the particles, particle density, as well as temperature despite the non-equilibrium nature of the condensate, whereas the mass of the particles plays no role in the condensation of resonantly injected polaritons. This experiment also makes it possible for us to measure directly the large nonlinear phase shift resulting from the polariton-polariton interaction energy. Our results provide direct evidence for coherence between different condensates and demonstrate a new approach for probing their ultrafast dynamics, opening new directions in the study of matter coherence as well as in practical applications such as quantum information and ultrafast logic.

Alex Hayat; Christoph Lange; Lee A. Rozema; Rockson Chang; Shreyas Potnis; Henry M. van Driel; Aephraim M. Steinberg; Mark Steger; David W. Snoke; Loren N. Pfeiffer; Kenneth W. West

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud fields in a realistic way and how to use them in a relatively simple one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer model to compute the domain averaged irradiance. To address this issue, a simple shortwave radiative transfer model that can treat the vertical cloud optical property correlation is developed. The model is based on the gamma-weighted

457

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

458

Workplan for FY1978 to FY1982 including a computerized reporting and monitoring system for geothermal energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed that the on-going compilation and critical evaluation of data be expanded to include a computerized system for monitoring and reporting the development of geothermal resources from the discovery phase to power on-line. Data would be covered which is site-specific and therefore unique to the geothermal area. Computer printouts are to contain a listing of each geothermal site which will be classified according to the status of development for producing electrical power. The result of the work will consist of a report containing a description of the data at each site and recommendaions for additional data needs in technological, economic, or institutional areas. The computerized system will allow for ease in updating and remote accessing by off-site users.

Phillips, S.L.; Tavana, M.; Leung, K.; Steyer, M.; Palen, W.A.; Schwartz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy star compliant voice over internet protocol (VoIP) telecommunications network including energy star compliant VoIP devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications system, a method of managing a communications network in such a system and a program product therefore. The system/network includes an ENERGY STAR (E-star) aware softswitch and E-star compliant communications devices at system endpoints. The E-star aware softswitch allows E-star compliant communications devices to enter and remain in power saving mode. The E-star aware softswitch spools messages and forwards only selected messages (e.g., calls) to the devices in power saving mode. When the E-star compliant communications devices exit power saving mode, the E-star aware softswitch forwards spooled messages.

Kouchri, Farrokh Mohammadzadeh

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

UPDATE February 2012 - The Food Crises: Predictive validation of a quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in global food prices have led to widespread hunger and social unrest---and an imperative to understand their causes. In a previous paper published in September 2011, we constructed for the first time a dynamic model that quantitatively agreed with food prices. Specifically, the model fit the FAO Food Price Index time series from January 2004 to March 2011, inclusive. The results showed that the dominant causes of price increases during this period were investor speculation and ethanol conversion. The model included investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take advantage of increased expected returns. Here, we extend the food prices model to January 2012, without modifying the model but simply continuing its dynamics. The agreement is still precise, validating both the descriptive and predictive abilities of the analysis. Policy actions are needed to avoid a third speculative bubble that would cause prices to rise above recent peaks by the end of 2012.

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "include differences due" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Practical method for including material scattering effects in determining the amount of intercepted sunlight in solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In imaging solar concentrators, the amount of solar radiation incident on a receiver surface depends upon both the overall concentrator shape and the angular distribution of light rays (sunshape) that reach the receiver. Sunshape broadening effects, which include the specular reflectance or transmittance properties of mirrors or glazings, image degradation caused by surface slope errors, and tracking errors are combined into an effective error cone. Broadened sunshapes for a variety of effective error-cone distributions are calculated and presented in graphical form. It is found that when the root-mean-square (RMS) width of the effective error cone is approximately 2 to 3 times the RMS width of the incident sunshape, the broadened sunshape can be adequately described by a circular normal distribution.

Pettit, R.B.; Vittitoe, C.N.; Biggs, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

463

STA665 Spring 2005 Due Friday, May 6, 11:59pm, by email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

debilitating lack of excitement in life. To this end, you example 5 different vehicles - a Saturn, a Prius (1=Saturn, 2=Prius, 3=TransAm, 4=Element, 5=Hummer). 1. Fit a poisson regression to these data=graduate degree, S=Saturn, P=Prius, T=TransAm, E=Element. 2. Using your final model, compute a confidence interval

Viele, Kert

464

CP Asymmetry in the Higgs Decay into the Top Pair Due to the Stop Mixing  

SciTech Connect

We investigate a potentially large CP violating asymmetry in the decay of a neutral scalar or pseudoscalar Higgs boson into the top-anti-top pair. The source of the CP nonconservation is the complex mixing in the (left-right) stop sector. One of the interesting consequence is the different rates of the Higgs boson decays into CP conjugate polarized states.

Chang, Darwin

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

465

Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to provide data and methodology assisting the transfer and acceptance of composting technology for the remediation of explosives-contaminated soils and sediments. Issues and activities addressed included: (a) chemical and toxicological characterization of compost samples from new field composting experiments, and the environmental availability of composting efficiency by isolation of bacterial consortia and natural surfactants from highly efficient composts, and (c) improved assessment of compost product suitability for land application.

Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.A.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

OVERVIEW OF TUNA FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC OCEAN, INCLUDING ECONOMIC CONDITIONS – 2011 WCPFC-SC8-2012/GN WP-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a broad description of the major fisheries in the WCPFC Statistical Area (WCP-CA) highlighting activities during the most recent calendar year (2011) and covering the most recent version of catch estimates by gear and species. The provisional total WCP–CA tuna catch for 2011 was estimated at 2,244,776 mt, the lowest since 2005 and 300,000 mt lower than the record in 2009 (2,544,679 mt); this catch represented 79 % of the total Pacific Ocean catch of 2,833,020 mt, and 55 % of the global tuna catch (the provisional estimate for 2011 is 4,077,814 mt, which is the lowest for 10 years). The 2011 WCP–CA catch of skipjack (1,540,189 mt – 69 % of the total catch) was only the fifth highest recorded and around 215,000 mt less than the record catch of 2009 (1,756,628 mt). The WCP–CA yellowfin catch for 2011 (430,506 mt – 19%) was the lowest since 1996 and more than 170,000 mt lower than the record catch taken in 2005 (602,892 mt) due to poor catches in the purse seine fishery. The WCP–CA bigeye catch for 2011 (151,533 mt – 7%) was close to the average for the past decade. The 2011 WCP–CA albacore catch (122,548 mt- 5%) was relatively stable and close to the average for the past decade. The 2011 WCP–CA albacore catch includes catches of north

Republic Of Korea; Peter Williams; Peter Terawasi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Comparative study of different solar cooling systems for buildings in subtropical city  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, more and more attention has been paid on the application potential of solar cooling for buildings. Due to the fact that the efficiency of solar collectors is generally low at the time being, the effectiveness of solar cooling would be closely related to the availability of solar irradiation, climatic conditions and geographical location of a place. In this paper, five types of solar cooling systems were involved in a comparative study for subtropical city, which is commonly featured with long hot and humid summer. The solar cooling systems included the solar electric compression refrigeration, solar mechanical compression refrigeration, solar absorption refrigeration, solar adsorption refrigeration and solar solid desiccant cooling. Component-based simulation models of these systems were developed, and their performances were evaluated throughout a year. The key performance indicators are solar fraction, coefficient of performance, solar thermal gain, and primary energy consumption. In addition, different installation strategies and types of solar collectors were compared for each kind of solar cooling system. Through this comparative study, it was found that solar electric compression refrigeration and solar absorption refrigeration had the highest energy saving potential in the subtropical Hong Kong. The former is to make use of the solar electric gain, while the latter is to adopt the solar thermal gain. These two solar cooling systems would have even better performances through the continual advancement of the solar collectors. It will provide a promising application potential of solar cooling for buildings in the subtropical region. (author)

Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S. [Division of Building Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs  

SciTech Connect

The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results