National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for include compressed natural

  1. Compressed natural gas (CNG) measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husain, Z.D.; Goodson, F.D.

    1995-12-01

    The increased level of environmental awareness has raised concerns about pollution. One area of high attention is the internal combustion engine. The internal combustion engine in and of itself is not a major pollution threat. However, the vast number of motor vehicles in use release large quantities of pollutants. Recent technological advances in ignition and engine controls coupled with unleaded fuels and catalytic converters have reduced vehicular emissions significantly. Alternate fuels have the potential to produce even greater reductions in emissions. The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) has been a significant alternative to accomplish the goal of cleaner combustion. Of the many alternative fuels under investigation, compressed natural gas (CNG) has demonstrated the lowest levels of emission. The only vehicle certified by the State of California as an Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) was powered by CNG. The California emissions tests of the ULEV-CNG vehicle revealed the following concentrations: Non-Methane Hydrocarbons 0.005 grams/mile Carbon Monoxide 0.300 grams/mile Nitrogen Oxides 0.040 grams/mile. Unfortunately, CNG vehicles will not gain significant popularity until compressed natural gas is readily available in convenient locations in urban areas and in proximity to the Interstate highway system. Approximately 150,000 gasoline filling stations exist in the United States while number of CNG stations is about 1000 and many of those CNG stations are limited to fleet service only. Discussion in this paper concentrates on CNG flow measurement for fuel dispensers. Since the regulatory changes and market demands affect the flow metering and dispenser station design those aspects are discussed. The CNG industry faces a number of challenges.

  2. Case Study - Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, M; Burnham, A.

    2014-02-01

    This case study explores the use of heavy-duty refuse trucks fueled by compressed natural gas highlighting three fleets from very different types of organizations.

  3. 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas ...

  4. Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Edward G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.

    1994-01-01

    A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

  5. Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder These slides were presented at the Onboard ...

  6. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    icon arravt051tifeinberg2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse ...

  7. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets...

  8. Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas...

  9. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas Fueling

  11. 2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2014 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas ...

  12. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas...

  13. 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas ...

  14. Price of Compressed Houlton ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Houlton ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Compressed Houlton ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year ...

  15. Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Fuel experts from China, India, and the United States shared lessons learned about deploying CNG- and hydrogen-fueled vehicles in public transit fleets and the consumer sector at the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles workshop. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) hosted the workshop on

  16. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets This report describes how NREL used the CNG Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to establish guidance for fleets making decisions about using compressed natural gas. 47919.pdf (1.06 MB) More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of American Gas Association 3 Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Summary of Experiences and Current

  17. Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles"" Workshop, December 10-11, 2009 Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons ...

  18. Apparatus for dispensing compressed natural gas and liquified natural gas to natural gas powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, Dennis A.; Clark, Michael L.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Palmer, Gary L.

    2007-05-29

    A fueling facility and method for dispensing liquid natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on-demand. The fueling facility may include a source of LNG, such as cryogenic storage vessel. A low volume high pressure pump is coupled to the source of LNG to produce a stream of pressurized LNG. The stream of pressurized LNG may be selectively directed through an LNG flow path or to a CNG flow path which includes a vaporizer configured to produce CNG from the pressurized LNG. A portion of the CNG may be drawn from the CNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of LNG flowing therethrough. Similarly, a portion of the LNG may be drawn from the LNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of CNG flowing therethrough.

  19. Compressed Houlton, ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Houlton, ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Compressed Houlton, ME Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug ...

  20. Homogenous charge compression ignition engine having a cylinder including a high compression space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agama, Jorge R.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.; Clarke, John M.

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogeneous charge compression engines. In these engines, fuel is injected upstream or directly into the cylinder when the power piston is relatively close to its bottom dead center position. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder as the power piston advances to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the power piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. Thus, the present invention divides the homogeneous charge between a controlled volume higher compression space and a lower compression space to better control the start of ignition.

  1. Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure Factors to consider in the implementation of fueling stations and equipment Margaret Smith, New West Technologies (DOE HQ Technical Support) John Gonzales, National Renewable Energy Laboratory This document has been peer reviewed by the natural gas industry. September 2014 2 Introduction This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas

  2. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report describes how NREL used the CNG Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to establish guidance for fleets making decisions about using compressed natural gas.

  3. Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4 Cylinder, translated and presented by J. P. Hsu, PhD, Smart Chemistry Reason for Defect ...

  4. Workshop Notes from "Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exchange information among experts from China, India, and the U.S. on compressed natural ... It should be noted that in 2008, there were about 490,000 CNG vehicles in China. China ...

  5. New Report Compares Performance of Compressed Natural Gas Refuse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new report that compares the performance of compressed natural gas (CNG) refuse haulers ... The study reviews the fuel economy, range, cost and emissions of CNG garbage trucks. Free ...

  6. Portal, ND Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Portal, ND Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 ...

  7. Portal, ND Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million Cubic Feet) Portal, ND Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 0 2 - No Data Reported; -- ...

  8. Calais, ME Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Calais, ME Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 ...

  9. Calais, ME Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million Cubic Feet) Calais, ME Compressed Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 24 19 15 3 8 23 22 2014 32 ...

  10. Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit Buses Poster presentaiton at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_clark.pdf (100.8 KB) More Documents & Publications Evaluating Exhaust

  11. Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. defectanalysis_naturalgas_ostw.pdf (2.31 MB) More Documents & Publications Safety analysis of in-use vehicle wrapping cylinder International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Type 4 Tank Testing, Certification and Field

  12. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  13. Safety issues relating to the liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petru, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Railroad Commission of Texas, LP-Gas Division, is statutorily responsible for the safety aspects of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) most commonly known as LP-gas or propane, compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). This presentation will address the safety issues relating to their use as alternative fuels. The paper discusses the safety of pressure vessels used for storage of the fuels at refueling facilities and the containers mounted in vehicles. Other topics include the lack of odorants in LNG, the use of protective clothing when handling cryogenic fluids, and where to obtain a copy of the safety regulations for handling these three fuels.

  14. EA-1976: Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposal by Emera CNG, LLC that would include Emera's CNG plant Emera’s CNG plant would include facilities to receive, dehydrate, and compress gas to fill pressure vessels with an open International Organization for Standardization (ISO) container frame mounted on trailers. Emera plans to truck the trailers a distance of a quarter mile from its proposed CNG facility to a berth at the Port of Palm Beach, where the trailers will be loaded onto a roll-on/roll-off ocean going carrier. Emera plans to receive natural gas at its planned compression facility from the Riviera Lateral, a pipeline owned and operated by Peninsula Pipeline Company. Although this would be the principal source of natural gas to Emera’s CNG facility for export, during periods of maintenance at Emera’s facility, or at the Port of Palm Beach, Emera may obtain CNG from other sources and/or export CNG from other general-use Florida port facilities. The proposed Emera facility will initially be capable of loading 8 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/day) of CNG into ISO containers and, after full build-out, would be capable to load up to 25 MMcf/day. For the initial phase of the project, Emera intends to send these CNG ISO containers from Florida to Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, where the trailers will be unloaded, the CNG decompressed, and injected into a pipeline for transport to electric generation plants owned and operated by Grand Bahama Power Company (GBPC). DOE is authorizing the exportation of CNG and is not providing funding or financial assistance for the Emera Project.

  15. Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-09-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  18. Compressed natural gas vehicles motoring towards a green Beijing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ming; Kraft-Oliver, T.; Guo Xiao Yan

    1996-12-31

    This paper first describes the state-of-the-art of compressed natural gas (CNG) technologies and evaluates the market prospects for CNG vehicles in Beijing. An analysis of the natural gas resource supply for fleet vehicles follows. The costs and benefits of establishing natural gas filling stations and promoting the development of vehicle technology are evaluated. The quantity of GHG reduction is calculated. The objective of the paper is to provide information of transfer niche of CNG vehicle and equipment production in Beijing. This paper argues that the development of CNG vehicles is a cost-effective strategy for mitigating both air pollution and GHG.

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  20. DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford | Department of Energy Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  2. SEP Success Story: State Energy Program Helping Arkansans Convert to Compressed Natural Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arkansas Energy Office recently launched a Compressed Natural Gas Conversion Rebate Program, which provides incentives for fleets and individuals to purchase and/or convert their Arkansas-licensed vehicles to compressed natural gas. Learn more.

  3. Method and apparatus for dispensing compressed natural gas and liquified natural gas to natural gas powered vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, Dennis A.; Clark, Michael L.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Palmer, Gary L.

    2005-05-31

    A fueling facility and method for dispensing liquid natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG) or both on-demand. The fueling facility may include a source of LNG, such as cryogenic storage vessel. A low volume high pressure pump is coupled to the source of LNG to produce a stream of pressurized LNG. The stream of pressurized LNG may be selectively directed through an LNG flow path or to a CNG flow path which includes a vaporizer configured to produce CNG from the pressurized LNG. A portion of the CNG may be drawn from the CNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of LNG flowing therethrough. Similarly, a portion of the LNG may be drawn from the LNG flow path and introduced into the CNG flow path to control the temperature of CNG flowing therethrough.

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 ...

  6. Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moussavi, M.; Al-Turk, M. . Civil Engineering Dept.)

    1993-12-01

    The use of alternative fuels in the transportation industry has gained a strong support in recent years. In this paper an attempt was made to evaluate the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and compressed natural gas (NG) by 25 LPG-bifuel and 14 NG-bifuel vehicles that are operated by 33 transit systems throughout Nebraska. A set of performance measures such as average fuel efficiency in kilometers per liter, average fuel cost per kilometer, average oil consumption, and average operation and maintenance cost for alternatively fueled vehicles were calculated and compared with similar performance measures of gasoline powered vehicles. The results of the study showed that the average fuel efficiency of gasoline is greater than those of LPG and NG, and the average fuel costs (dollars per kilometer) for LPG and NG are smaller than those for gasoline for most of the vehicles under this study.

  7. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority: Compressed Natural Gas Transit Bus Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Melendez, M.

    2006-04-01

    Evaluates compressed natural gas (CNG) powered transit buses at Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), providing a comparison between them and standard diesel transit buses.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ratio High Efficiency ICRE | Department of Energy and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE performance of a high compression ratio (32:1 to 74:1) high efficiency (50 to 60% BTE) ICRE operating on natural gas and gasoline p-02_fitzgerald.pdf (283.34 KB) More Documents & Publications A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE

  9. Comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) used by transit agencies in Texas. Research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lede, N.W.

    1997-09-01

    This study is a detailed comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG). The study provides data on two alternative fuels used by transit agencies in Texas. First, we examine the `state-of-the- art` in alternative fuels to established a framework for the study. Efforts were made to examine selected characteristics of two types of natural gas demonstrations in terms of the following properties: energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, operations, maintenance, reliability, safety costs, and fuel availability. Where feasible, two alternative fuels were compared with conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Environmental considerations relative to fuel distribution and use are analyzed, with a focus on examining flammability an other safety-related issues. The objectives of the study included: (1) assess the state-of-the-art and document relevant findings pertaining to alternative fuels; (2) analyze and synthesize existing databases on two natural gas alternatives: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG): and (3) compare two alterative fuels used by transit properties in Texas, and address selected aspects of alternative fuels such as energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, safety, costs, maintenance and operations, environmental and related issues.

  10. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Applications | Department of Energy 5 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by contacting the Docket Room Manager at 202-586-9478 or

  11. 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Applications | Department of Energy 6 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by contacting the Docket Room Manager at 202-586-9478 or

  12. EA-1976: Emera CNG, LLC Compressed Natural Gas Project, Florida...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emera's CNG plant facilities to receive, dehydrate, and compress gas to fill pressure vessels with an open International Organization for Standardization (ISO) container frame...

  13. Inspection of compressed natural gas cylinders on school buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring compressed natural gas (CNF)-powered school bus demonstrations in various locations around the country. Early in 1994, two non-DOE-sponsored CNG pickup trucks equipped with composite-reinforced-aluminum fuel cylinders experienced cylinder ruptures during refueling. As reported by the Gas Research Institute (GRI): ...analysis of the cylinder ruptures on the pickup trucks revealed that they were due to acid-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the overwrap. The overwrap that GRI refers to is a resin-impregnated fiber that is wrapped around the outside of the gas cylinder for added strength. Because ensuring the safety of the CNG vehicles it sponsors is of paramount concern to DOE, the Department, through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), conducted inspections of DOE-sponsored vehicles nationwide. The work had three objectives: inspection, documentation, and education. First, inspectors visited sites where CNG-powered school buses sponsored by DOE are based, and inspected the CNG cylinders for damage. Second, information learned during the inspections was collected for DOE. Third, the inspections found that the education and awareness of site personnel, in terms of cylinder damage detection, needed to be increased.

  14. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0INCNUS-NCAMMCF" "Date","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ...

  15. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ENCNUS-NCAMMCF" "Date","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ...

  16. Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels workshop hosted by the U.S. departments of Energy and Transportation on December 10-11, 2009 in Washington, D.C.

  17. Energy Department Authorizes Emera CNG, LLC’s Application to Export Compressed Natural Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced today that it has issued a final authorization to Emera CNG, LLC (Emera) to export domestically produced compressed natural gas to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement with the United States.

  18. Price of Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

  19. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  20. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010

  1. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  2. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  3. A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Using natural gas and gasoline modeling, indications are that a free piston-floating stroke engine configuration can realize engine efficiency greater than 60 percent.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-03-01

    This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and qualitatively demonstrated in tests on three different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

  5. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-08-01

    This report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infracture''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes a number of potential enhancements to the existing natural gas compression infrastructure that have been identified and tested on four different integral engine/compressors in natural gas transmission service.

  6. State Energy Program Helping Arkansans Convert to Compressed Natural Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As President Obama highlighted in his State of the Union speech last night, developing natural gas here at home is part of the solution to getting off foreign oil and putting Americans to work.

  7. Hazard analysis of compressed natural gas fueling systems and fueling procedures used at retail gasoline service stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-28

    An evaluation of the hazards associated with operations of a typical compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station is presented. The evaluation includes identification of a typical CNG fueling system; a comparison of the typical system with ANSI/NFPA (American National Standards Institute/National Fire Protection Association) Standard 52, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicular Fuel System, requirements; a review of CNG industry safety experience as identified in current literature; hazard identification of potential internal (CNG system-specific causes) and external (interface of co-located causes) events leading to potential accidents; and an analysis of potential accident scenarios as determined from the hazard evaluation. The study considers CNG dispensing equipment and associated equipment, including the compressor station, storate vessels, and fill pressure sensing system.

  8. Development of a Liquid to Compressed Natural Gas (LCNG) Fueling Station. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J. A.

    1999-06-30

    The program objective was the development of equipment and processes to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) from liquified natural gas (LNG) for heavy duty vehicular applications. The interest for this technology is a result of the increased use of alternative fuels for the reduction of emissions and dependency of foreign energy. Technology of the type developed under this program is critical for establishing natural gas as an economical alternative fuel.

  9. Workshop Notes from ""Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles"" Workshop, December 10-11, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These notes provide information about the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels workshop in December 2009.

  10. Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An award-winning compressor design that decreases the energy required to compress and transport natural gas, lowers operating costs, improves efficiencies and reduces the environmental footprint of well site operations has been developed by a Massachusetts-based company with support from the U.S. Department of Energy

  11. Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running refuse haulers on compressed natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-07-01

    This document details the experience of New York City`s compressed natural gas refuse haulers. These 35 ton vehicles have engines that displace 10 liters and provide 240 horsepower. Fuel economy, range, cost, maintenance, repair issues, and emissions are discussed. Photographs and figures illustrate the attributes of these alternative fuel vehicles.

  12. Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.

    2015-03-19

    Natural gas is a clean-burning, abundant, and domestically produced source of energy. Compressed natural gas (CNG) has recently garnered interest as a transportation fuel because of these attributes and because of its cost savings and price stability compared to conventional petroleum fuels. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Vehicle Infrastructure and Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to help businesses and fleets evaluate the financial soundness of CNG vehicle and CNG fueling infrastructure projects.

  13. THE SLOW-MODE NATURE OF COMPRESSIBLE WAVE POWER IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Bale, S. D.; Chen, C. H. K.; Salem, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross-correlation C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) between proton density fluctuations {delta}n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field {delta}B{sub ||} is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) on the ion plasma beta {beta}{sub i} is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

  14. Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Robert C. Motta Kenneth J. Kelly William W. Warnock Executive Summary The National Renewable Energy

  15. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalle; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-07-01

    This report documents work performed in the third quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: first field test; test data analysis.

  16. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2003-10-01

    This report documents work performed in the fourth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: second field test; test data analysis for the first field test; operational optimization plans.

  17. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-01-01

    This report documents work performed in the fifth quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: completion of analysis of data from first visit to second site; preparation for follow-up testing.

  18. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2006-05-31

    This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel

  19. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  20. Emissions and performance evaluation of a dedicated compressed natural gas saturn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, J.W.; Taylor, J.D.

    1997-07-01

    The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel has been identified as one strategy that can help ameliorate some problems, which include a growing dependence on imported oil (and all its ramifications) and the persistent contributions that mobile sources make to urban air pollution, associated with the use of conventional petroleum fuels. The attributes and limitations of CNG as a fuel for spark-ignition engines have been presented by others. The attributes are associated with its high octane rating, low cost relative to other alternative fuels, its availability, the absence of running and diurnal evaporative emissions, and its demonstrated potential for producing extremely low exhaust emissions-particularly if the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted are expressed in terms of reactivity adjusted non-methane organic gases (RANMOG). The limitations associated with the use of CNG include its limited refueling infrastructure, the cost of refueling facilities, the cost of on-board fuel storage tanks, and its relatively low energy density. Because one impediment to CNG use is the cost associated with producing a CNG-powered vehicle, a study was initiated at the University of Tennessee under sponsorship by the Saturn Corporation to determine how a CNG vehicle (specifically, a 1991 Saturn SL1) could be engineered so it could be produced with a minimal impact on the production of the base vehicle. The present study was undertaken to further investigate the emissions reduction potential of the Saturn CNG vehicle. In the previous study the role of exhaust gas recirculation was not thoroughly investigated. Those involved in the study agreed that the NO{sub x} levels could be brought down well below California ULEV levels without increasing either the non-methane organic gases or the CO levels.

  1. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  2. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTNG NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-28

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey test performed on an HBA-6 engine/compressor installed at Duke Energy's Bedford Compressor Station. This is one of several tests planned, which will emphasize identification and reduction of compressor losses. Additionally, this report presents a methodology for distinguishing losses in compressor attributable to valves, irreversibility in the compression process, and the attached piping (installation losses); it illustrates the methodology with data from the survey test. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  3. Ten Years of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Operations at SunLine Transit Agency: April 2003--December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the lesson learned at the SunLine Transit Agency after it converted in 1994 its entire operating transit bus fleet to compressed natural gas (CNG).

  4. Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet Applications

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet Applications George Mitchell National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-63707 March 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National

  5. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  6. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-10-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a GMW10 engine/compressor after modifications to add high pressure Fuel and a Turbocharger. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  7. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn

    2004-07-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed in Phase I of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report documents the second series of tests performed on a turbocharged HBA-6T engine/compressor. It also presents baseline testing for air balance investigations and initial simulation modeling of the air manifold for a Cooper GMVH6.

  8. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris

    2003-01-01

    This report documents work performed in the first quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: preparation and submission of the Research Management Plan; preparation and submission of the Technology Status Assessment; attendance at the Project Kick-Off meeting at DOE-NETL; formation of the Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) for the project; preparation of the Test Plan; acquisition and assembly of the data acquisition system (DAS).

  9. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley

    2003-04-01

    This report documents work performed in the second quarter of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report describes the following work: preparation and submission of the Technology Status Assessment; formation of the Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) for the project; attendance at the first IAC meeting; preparation of the Test Plan; completion of the data acquisition system (DAS); plans for the first field test.

  10. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","6/2016" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","09/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  14. Evaluation of the Effects of Natural Gas Contaminants on Corrosion in Compressed Natural Gas Storage Systems - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle, F.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a research program that was conducted to define natural gas contaminant levels necessary to insure that internal corrosion of compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders does not constitute a hazard over the lifetimes of the cylinders. A literature search was performed and companies in the natural gas transmission and distribution industries were contacted: to identify and determine the composition ranges of contaminants in natural gases; and to obtain information regarding corrosion damage of CNG cylinders and cylinder materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed on the cylinder materials most widely used in CNG cylinders in the United States (4130X and 15B30 steels and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy). Tests were conducted in: natural gases from several producing wells and from an interstate pipeline; and in aqueous solutions saturated with varying concentrations of natural gas contaminants. Also, metallurgical analyses of nine (eight steel and one aluminum), used CNG cylinders were performed. Limiting concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and other CNG contaminants necessary to prevent internal corrosion of CNG fuel and storage cylinders were defined. This knowledge will minimize potential hazards of using CNG as a vehicle fuel. It should also lead to reduced costs of CNG use, since it has been shown that reduction of contaminants to the very low levels currently specified by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Canadian Transport Commission (CTC) is not necessary. A gas-quality standard based on program results is recommended. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has adopted the recommended gas-quality standard.

  15. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  16. Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

    1994-06-01

    A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

  17. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratapas, John; Mather, Daniel; Kozlovsky, Anton

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen’s significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  18. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-10-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first summarizes key results from survey site tests performed on an HBA-6 installed at Duke Energy's Bedford compressor station, and on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. The report then presents results of design analysis performed on the Bedford HBA-6 to develop options and guide decisions for reducing pulsations and enhancing compressor system efficiency and capacity. The report further presents progress on modifying and testing the laboratory GMVH6 at SwRI for correcting air imbalance.

  19. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-07-27

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.

  20. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  1. Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, R.C.; Kelly, K.J.; Warnock, W.W.

    1996-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with conversion companies in six states to convert approximately 900 light-duty Federal fleet vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The contracts were initiated in order to help the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) during a period of limited original equipment manufacturer (OEM) model availability. Approximately 90% of all conversions were performed on compact of full-size vans and pickups, and 90% of the conversions were to bi-fuel operation. With a positive response from the fleet managers, this program helped the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT for fiscal years 1993 and 1994, despite limited OEM model availability. The conversions also helped to establish the infrastructure needed to support further growth in the use of alternative fuel vehicles. In conclusion, the program has been successful in helping the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT, establishing infrastructure, increasing the displacement of imported oil, and evaluating the emissions performance of converted vehicles. With the relatively widespread availability of OEM vehicles in the 1996 model year, the program is now being phased out.

  2. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony J. Smalley; Ralph E. Harris; Gary D. Bourn; Danny M. Deffenbaugh

    2005-01-01

    This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents tests performed on a KVG103 engine/compressor installed at Duke's Thomaston Compressor Station. This is the first series of tests performed on a four-stroke engine under this program. Additionally, this report presents results, which complete a comparison of performance before and after modification to install High Pressure Fuel Injection and a Turbocharger on a GMW10 at Williams Station 60. Quarterly Reports 7 and 8 already presented detailed data from tests before and after this modification, but the final quantitative comparison required some further analysis, which is presented in Section 5 of this report. The report further presents results of detailed geometrical measurements and flow bench testing performed on the cylinders and manifolds of the Laboratory Cooper GMVH6 engine being employed for two-stroke engine air balance investigations. These measurements are required to enhance the detailed accuracy in modeling the dynamic interaction of air manifold, exhaust manifold, and in-cylinder fuel-air balance.

  3. Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S.

  4. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  5. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

    2005-11-01

    The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

  6. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at St. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, October 1992--May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    Results are presented from a demonstration program conducted on the comparative evaluations of the combustion of compressed natural gas as an alternative fuel for gasoline. General Motors pick-up trucks were utilized in the study.

  7. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  8. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  9. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

  10. Feasibility study of Northeast Thailand Gas Pipeline Project. Final report. Part 2. Compressed natural gas. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The volume is the second part of a three part study submitted to the Petroleum Authority of Thailand. Part II analyzes the potential use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel for high mileage vehicles traveling the highway system of Thailand. The study provides an initial estimate of buses and trucks that are potential candidates for converting to natural gas vehicles (NGV). CNG technology is briefly reviewed. The types of refueling stations that may be sited along the highway are discussed. The estimated capital investments and typical layouts are presented. The report also discusses the issues involved in implementing a CNG program in Thailand, such as safety, user acceptability and the government's role.

  11. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.

    2015-01-07

    Fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.94 and 1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 7. Similar to previous studies using a cylindrical store, the aerodynamic store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Moreover, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response was much more limited.

  12. Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, George

    2015-03-01

    VICE 2.0 is the second generation of the VICE financial model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for fleet managers to assess the financial soundness of converting their fleets to run on CNG. VICE 2.0 uses a number of variables for infrastructure and vehicles to estimate the business case for decision-makers when considering CNG as a vehicle fuel. Enhancements in version 2.0 include the ability to select the project type (vehicles and infrastructure or vehicle acquisitions only), and to decouple vehicle acquisition from the infrastructure investment, so the two investments may be made independently. Outputs now include graphical presentations of investment cash flow, payback period (simple and discounted), petroleum displacement (annual and cumulative), and annual greenhouse gas reductions. Also, the Vehicle Data are now built around several common conventionally fueled (gasoline and diesel) fleet vehicles. Descriptions of the various model sections and available inputs follow. Each description includes default values for the base-case business model, which was created so economic sensitivities can be investigated by altering various project parameters one at a time.

  13. Compressed Air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Compressed Air ESUE Motors Federal Agriculture Compressed Air Compressed Air Roadmap The Bonneville Power Administration created the roadmap to help utilities find energy...

  14. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  15. Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002-September 30, 2004

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado F. Lynch Hydrogen Components Inc. Littleton, Colorado S. Munshi Westport Innovations Inc. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada S. Wayne West Virginia University Morgantown, West Virginia Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38707 November 2005

  16. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a

  17. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  18. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  19. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Dan; Cook, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 Kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 Kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  20. Magnetic compression laser driving circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.; Cook, E.G.

    1993-01-05

    A magnetic compression laser driving circuit is disclosed. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit compresses voltage pulses in the range of 1.5 microseconds at 20 kilovolts of amplitude to pulses in the range of 40 nanoseconds and 60 kilovolts of amplitude. The magnetic compression laser driving circuit includes a multi-stage magnetic switch where the last stage includes a switch having at least two turns which has larger saturated inductance with less core material so that the efficiency of the circuit and hence the laser is increased.

  1. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less

  2. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monday, February 14, 2011 - Compressed Hydrogen Storage Purpose: Identify strategies and R&D needs for lowering the cost of high pressure hydrogen storage systems. Meeting scope includes the on-board system including but limited to its design, materials of construction, manufacturing processes and operating specifications. The meeting scope does not include the refueling infrastructure, such as hydrogen dispensing, compression and cooling, nor the vehicle powertrain, such as fuel cell, ICE

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of natural gas vehicles. The Department of Energys Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reports that there were 841 compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel stations and 41...

  4. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  5. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  6. Specialized control panels designed for on-site compression of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specialized control panels designed for on-site compression of natural gas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Specialized control panels designed for on-site compression of ...

  7. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  8. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benton, N.

    2014-11-01

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  9. Recent advances in use of magnesium-enhanced FGD processes include a natural oxidation limestone scrubber conversion and the first commercial ThioClear{reg{underscore}sign} application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Babu, M; Inkenhaus, W.

    1998-07-01

    The magnesium-enhanced Thiosorbic FGD process, originally developed by the Dravo Lime Company (DLC) in the early 1970's, is used by over 1,400 MW of power generation in the US primarily by high sulfur coal burning utilities. The excellent SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies, high reliability, and cost effectiveness are the hallmarks of this process. DLC personnel working with Alabama Electric Cooperative's (AEC) personnel converted AEC's Units 2 and 3 at the Lowman Station in Alabama from limestone scrubbing to magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing process in early 1996. These units totaling 516 MW have been in continuous operation, enabling AEC to save on fuel costs by switching to a lower cost, higher sulfur containing coal, made possible by the higher removal efficiency Thiosorbic process modification. The first part of this paper details the modification that were made and compares the performance differences between the limestone and Thiosorbic FGD processes. ThioClear{reg{underscore}sign} FGD is a forced oxidized magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing process that produces high quality gypsum and magnesium hydroxide as by-products. The recycle liquor in this process is nearly clear and the capability for SO{sub 2} removal is as high as the Thiosorbic process. DLC working with Applied Energy Systems (AES) of Monaca, Pennsylvania, is currently constructing a 130 Mwe station modification to convert from the natural oxidation Thiosorbic process to the forced oxidation ThioClear{reg{underscore}sign} process. The plant is scheduled to start up by the end of the third quarter of this year. The second part oft his paper details the ThioClear process modifications at AES and describes the by-products and their potential uses.

  10. Recent advances in use of magnesium-enhanced FGD processes include a natural oxidation limestone scrubber conversion and the first commercial ThioClear{reg_sign} application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Babu, M.; Inkenhaus, W.

    1998-04-01

    The magnesium-enhanced Thiosorbic FGD process, originally developed by the Dravo Lime Company (DLC) in the early 1970`s, is used by over 1400 MW of power generation in the US primarily by high sulfur coal burning utilities. The excellent SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies, high reliability, and cost effectiveness are the hallmarks of this process. DLC personnel working with Alabama Electric Cooperative`s (AEC) personnel converted AEC`s Units 2 and 3 at the Lowman Station in Alabama from limestone scrubbing to magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing process in early 1996. These units totaling 516 MW have been in continuous operation, enabling AEC to save on fuel costs by switching to a lower cost, higher sulfur containing coal, made possible by the higher removal efficiency Thiosorbic process modification. The first part of this paper details the modifications that were made and compares the performance differences between the limestone and Thiosorbic FGD processes. ThioClear{reg_sign} FGD is a forced oxidized magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing process that produces high quality gypsum and magnesium hydroxide as by-products. The recycle liquor in this process is nearly clear and the capability for SO{sub 2} removal is as high as the Thiosorbic process. DLC working with Applied Energy Systems (AES) of Monaca, Pennsylvania, is currently constructing a 130 Mwe station modification to convert from the natural oxidation Thiosorbic process to the forced oxidation ThioClear{reg_sign} process. The plant is scheduled to start up by the end of the third quarter of this year. The second part of this paper details the ThioClear process modifications at AES and describes the by-ducts and their potential uses.

  11. ASE/CAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASECAGI Meeting about Compressors and Compressed Air System Efficiency On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy ... Natural Gas Transmission, Storage and Distribution System ...

  12. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and stored in a reservoir, then when electricity is needed, air is heated with natural gas and expanded through a turbine. Adiabatic Adiabatic compressed air energy storage...

  13. Natural Gas Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    gaseous (compressed natural gas, CNG) or liquefied (liquefied natural gas, LNG) state. ... To produce LNG, natural gas is purified and condensed into liquid by cooling to -260F ...

  14. Conducting fiber compression tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeTeresa, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention measures the resistance across a conductive fiber attached to a substrate place under a compressive load to determine the amount of compression needed to cause the fiber to fail.

  15. Minimize Compressed Air Leaks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This tip sheet outlines a strategy for compressed air leak detection and provides a formula for cost savings calculations.

  16. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  17. Hardware compression using common portions of data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jichuan; Viswanathan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-03-24

    Methods and devices are provided for data compression. Data compression can include receiving a plurality of data chunks, sampling at least some of the plurality of data chunks extracting a common portion from a number of the plurality of data chunks based on the sampling, and storing a remainder of the plurality of data chunks in memory.

  18. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2004-12-21

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  19. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-02-27

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  20. Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compressio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline ... A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE Advanced CombustionModeling ...

  1. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-30

    This document provides specifications for the process air compressor for a compressed air storage project, requests a budgetary quote, and provides supporting information, including compressor data, site specific data, water analysis, and Seneca CAES value drivers.

  2. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  3. Case Study - Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Fleets

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    CNG ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Financial Benefits ........................................................................................................................................................... 4 Environment and Energy Benefits .............................................................................................................................. 4 Other Benefits

  4. BNL Compressed Natural Gas Release Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Michael Kretschmann, P.E., Manager, Fire Protection Engineering - Brookhaven National Laboratory

  5. Compression Technology and Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M ohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. HYDROGEN TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION WORKSHOP NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY GOLDEN, COLORADO COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY AND NEEDS Hooshang Heshmat, PH.D. February 25 TH , 2014 ® M ohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. * Overall pipeline delivery steps, production to file up * Different types of compressors * Pipeline compressor development steps and accomplishments * Need for Forecourt Compression system * Other major components: drive, sealing, pipeline,

  6. Fundamentals of Compressed Air Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how a compressed air system works and the benefits of optimal compressed air system performance. This initial class demonstrates how to compute the current cost of your plant's compressed...

  7. President's FY 2017 Budget Includes $878 Million for Fossil Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... are applicable to both coal and natural gas generation. ... pre-combustion CO2 capture and compression technologies for new and existing fossil fuel-fired power plants and industrial ...

  8. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  9. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2005-05-15

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard associated with compressed gas cylinders and methods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  10. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  11. Internal combustion engine for natural gas compressor operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagen, Christopher L.; Babbitt, Guy; Turner, Christopher; Echter, Nick; Weyer-Geigel, Kristina

    2016-04-19

    This application concerns systems and methods for compressing natural gas with an internal combustion engine. In a representative embodiment, a system for compressing a gas comprises a reciprocating internal combustion engine including at least one piston-cylinder assembly comprising a piston configured to travel in a cylinder and to compress gas in the cylinder in multiple compression stages. The system can further comprise a first pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the first pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure, and a second pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly and the first pressure tank. The second pressure tank can be configured to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the second pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure. When the first and second pressure tanks have reached the predetermined pressures, the first pressure tank can be configured to supply gas to the piston-cylinder assembly, and the piston can be configured to compress the gas supplied by the first pressure tank such that the compressed gas flows into the second pressure tank.

  12. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung; Petrich, Loren I.

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  13. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  14. Method for preventing jamming conditions in a compression device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul M.; Faller, Kenneth M.; Bauer, Edward J.

    2002-06-18

    A compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor includes a waste material feed assembly having a hopper, a supply tube and a compression tube. Each of the supply and compression tubes includes feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends. A feed-discharge valve assembly is located between the feed-outlet end of the compression tube and the reactor. A feed auger-screw extends axially in the supply tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. A compression auger-screw extends axially in the compression tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. The compression tube is sloped downwardly towards the reactor to drain fluid from the waste material to the reactor and is oriented at generally right angle to the supply tube such that the feed-outlet end of the supply tube is adjacent to the feed-inlet end of the compression tube. A programmable logic controller is provided for controlling the rotational speed of the feed and compression auger-screws for selectively varying the compression of the waste material and for overcoming jamming conditions within either the supply tube or the compression tube.

  15. Compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul M.; Faller, Kenneth M.; Bauer, Edward J.

    2001-08-21

    A compression device for feeding a waste material to a reactor includes a waste material feed assembly having a hopper, a supply tube and a compression tube. Each of the supply and compression tubes includes feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends. A feed-discharge valve assembly is located between the feed-outlet end of the compression tube and the reactor. A feed auger-screw extends axially in the supply tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. A compression auger-screw extends axially in the compression tube between the feed-inlet and feed-outlet ends thereof. The compression tube is sloped downwardly towards the reactor to drain fluid from the waste material to the reactor and is oriented at generally right angle to the supply tube such that the feed-outlet end of the supply tube is adjacent to the feed-inlet end of the compression tube. A programmable logic controller is provided for controlling the rotational speed of the feed and compression auger-screws for selectively varying the compression of the waste material and for overcoming jamming conditions within either the supply tube or the compression tube.

  16. Hybrid Rotor Compression for Multiphase and Liquids-Rich Wellhead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but also allows for compression of wet gas, or gas that contains liquid content. At many natural gas wellheads, liquids-typically heavier hydrocarbons and water-are present in the...

  17. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  18. Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2006-03-07

    A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

  19. Transit Users Group Supports Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-04-01

    Fact sheet describes the benefits of the Transit Users Group, which supports transit groups with compressed natural gas (CNG) buses.

  20. System using data compression and hashing adapted for use for multimedia encryption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffland, Douglas R.

    2011-07-12

    A system and method is disclosed for multimedia encryption. Within the system of the present invention, a data compression module receives and compresses a media signal into a compressed data stream. A data acquisition module receives and selects a set of data from the compressed data stream. And, a hashing module receives and hashes the set of data into a keyword. The method of the present invention includes the steps of compressing a media signal into a compressed data stream; selecting a set of data from the compressed data stream; and hashing the set of data into a keyword.

  1. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  2. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  3. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  4. Compressed Air System Control Strategies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This tip sheet briefly discusses compressed air system control strategies as a means to improving and maintaining system performance.

  5. Survey of data compression techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gryder, R.; Hake, K.

    1991-09-01

    PM-AIM must provide to customers in a timely fashion information about Army acquisitions. This paper discusses ways that PM-AIM can reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted between sites. Although this paper primarily discusses techniques of data compression, it also briefly discusses other options for meeting the PM-AIM requirements. The options available to PM-AIM, in addition to hardware and software data compression, include less-frequent updates, distribution of partial updates, distributed data base design, and intelligent network design. Any option that enhances the performance of the PM-AIM network is worthy of consideration. The recommendations of this paper apply to the PM-AIM project in three phases: the current phase, the target phase, and the objective phase. Each recommendation will be identified as (1) appropriate for the current phase, (2) considered for implementation during the target phase, or (3) a feature that should be part of the objective phase of PM-AIM's design. The current phase includes only those measures that can be taken with the installed leased lines. The target phase includes those measures that can be taken in transferring the traffic from the leased lines to the DSNET environment with minimal changes in the current design. The objective phase includes all the things that should be done as a matter of course. The objective phase for PM-AIM appears to be a distributed data base with data for each site stored locally and all sites having access to all data.

  6. Survey of data compression techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gryder, R.; Hake, K.

    1991-09-01

    PM-AIM must provide to customers in a timely fashion information about Army acquisitions. This paper discusses ways that PM-AIM can reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted between sites. Although this paper primarily discusses techniques of data compression, it also briefly discusses other options for meeting the PM-AIM requirements. The options available to PM-AIM, in addition to hardware and software data compression, include less-frequent updates, distribution of partial updates, distributed data base design, and intelligent network design. Any option that enhances the performance of the PM-AIM network is worthy of consideration. The recommendations of this paper apply to the PM-AIM project in three phases: the current phase, the target phase, and the objective phase. Each recommendation will be identified as (1) appropriate for the current phase, (2) considered for implementation during the target phase, or (3) a feature that should be part of the objective phase of PM-AIM`s design. The current phase includes only those measures that can be taken with the installed leased lines. The target phase includes those measures that can be taken in transferring the traffic from the leased lines to the DSNET environment with minimal changes in the current design. The objective phase includes all the things that should be done as a matter of course. The objective phase for PM-AIM appears to be a distributed data base with data for each site stored locally and all sites having access to all data.

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of natural gas vehicles. The Department of Energys Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reports that there were 841 compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel stations and 41...

  8. Fuel cell stack compressive loading system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fahle, Ronald W.; Reiser, Carl A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell module comprising a stack of fuel cells with reactant gas manifolds sealed against the external surfaces of the stack includes a constraint system for providing a compressive load on the stack wherein the constraint system maintains the stack at a constant height (after thermal expansion) and allows the compressive load to decrease with time as a result of the creep characteristics of the stack. Relative motion between the manifold sealing edges and the stack surface is virtually eliminated by this constraint system; however it can only be used with a stack having considerable resiliency and appropriate thermal expansion and creep characteristics.

  9. Investigating the effect of compression on solute transport through degrading municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodman, N.D. Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The influence of compression on MSW flushing was evaluated using 13 tracer tests. • Compression has little effect on solute diffusion times in MSW. • Lithium tracer was conservative in non-degrading waste but not in degrading waste. • Bromide tracer was conservative, but deuterium was not. - Abstract: The effect of applied compression on the nature of liquid flow and hence the movement of contaminants within municipal solid waste was examined by means of thirteen tracer tests conducted on five separate waste samples. The conservative nature of bromide, lithium and deuterium tracers was evaluated and linked to the presence of degradation in the sample. Lithium and deuterium tracers were non-conservative in the presence of degradation, whereas the bromide remained effectively conservative under all conditions. Solute diffusion times into and out of less mobile blocks of waste were compared for each test under the assumption of dominantly dual-porosity flow. Despite the fact that hydraulic conductivity changed strongly with applied stress, the block diffusion times were found to be much less sensitive to compression. A simple conceptual model, whereby flow is dominated by sub-parallel low permeability obstructions which define predominantly horizontally aligned less mobile zones, is able to explain this result. Compression tends to narrow the gap between the obstructions, but not significantly alter the horizontal length scale. Irrespective of knowledge of the true flow pattern, these results show that simple models of solute flushing from landfill which do not include depth dependent changes in solute transport parameters are justified.

  10. New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition was one of 25 recipients to receive funding from the EERE Clean Cities' Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The approximately $15 million in funding allowed he city to purchase nearly 300 compressed natural gas vehicles, including 190 Atlantic City

  11. International magnetic pulse compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12--14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card -- its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  12. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  13. Compression-ignition fuel properties of Fischer-Tropsch syncrude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suppes, G.J.; Terry, J.G.; Burkhart, M.L.; Cupps, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    Fischer-Tropsch conversion of natural gas to liquid hydrocarbon fuel typically includes Fischer-Tropsch synthesis followed by refining (hydrocracking and distillation) of the syncrude into mostly diesel or kerosene with some naphtha (a feedstock for gasoline production). Refining is assumed necessary, possibly overlooking the exception fuel qualities of syncrude for more direct utilization as a compression-ignition (CI) fuel. This paper evaluates cetane number, viscosity, cloud-point, and pour-point properties of syncrude and blends of syncrude with blend stocks such as ethanol and diethyl ether. The results show that blends comprised primarily of syncrude are potentially good CI fuels, with pour-point temperature depression being the largest development obstacle. The resulting blends may provide a much-needed and affordable alternative CI fuel. Particularly good market opportunities exist with Environmental Policy Act (EPACT) applications.

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. compressed-gas storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage ...

  16. General Compression | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Newton, Massachusetts Zip: 2458 Product: Massachusetts-based developer of compressed air energy storage systems. Coordinates: 43.996685, -87.803724 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Turner, Terry D.; Raterman, Kevin T.; Palmer, Gary L.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Vranicar, John J.

    2007-05-22

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  18. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Turner, Terry D.; Rateman, Kevin T.; Palmer, Gary L.; Klinger, Kerry M.; Vranicar, John J.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO2) clean-up cycle.

  19. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Turner, Terry D.; Raterman, Kevin T.; Palmer, Gary L.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Vranicar, John J.

    2005-05-03

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO2) clean-up cycle.

  20. Apparatus For The Liquefaaction Of Natural Gas And Methods Relating To Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Turner, Terry D.; Raterman, Kevin T.; Palmer, Gary L.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Vranicar, John J.

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  1. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  2. Population attribute compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes that represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete look-up table (LUT). Color space containing the LUT color values is successively subdivided into smaller volumes until a plurality of volumes are formed, each having no more than a preselected maximum number of color values. Image pixel color values can then be rapidly placed in a volume with only a relatively few LUT values from which a nearest neighbor is selected. Image color values are assigned 8 bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8 bit pointer value to provide 24 bit color values from the LUT.

  3. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  4. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications | Department of Energy Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical report describing DOE's assessment of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well an independent reviews of system cost

  5. R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen ...

  6. Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles | Department of Energy Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_mauderly.pdf (324.89 KB) More Documents & Publications Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples

  7. Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated Optical Compressive Load Sensors Authors: Cole, G D ; Lin, K L ; ...

  8. Spectroscopic Evidence for Negative Electronic Compressibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopic Evidence for Negative Electronic Compressibility in a Quasi-three-dimensional Spin-orbit Correlated Metal Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Negative compressibility is a sign of...

  9. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  10. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-11-30

    Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a hybrid energy storage and generation concept that has many potential benefits especially in a location with increasing percentages of intermittent wind energy generation. The objectives of the NYSEG Seneca CAES Project included: for Phase 1, development of a Front End Engineering Design for a 130MW to 210 MW utility-owned facility including capital costs; project financials based on the engineering design and forecasts of energy market revenues; design of the salt cavern to be used for air storage; draft environmental permit filings; and draft NYISO interconnection filing; for Phase 2, objectives included plant construction with a target in-service date of mid-2016; and for Phase 3, objectives included commercial demonstration, testing, and two-years of performance reporting. This Final Report is presented now at the end of Phase 1 because NYSEG has concluded that the economics of the project are not favorable for development in the current economic environment in New York State. The proposed site is located in NYSEG’s service territory in the Town of Reading, New York, at the southern end of Seneca Lake, in New York State’s Finger Lakes region. The landowner of the proposed site is Inergy, a company that owns the salt solution mining facility at this property. Inergy would have developed a new air storage cavern facility to be designed for NYSEG specifically for the Seneca CAES project. A large volume, natural gas storage facility owned and operated by Inergy is also located near this site and would have provided a source of high pressure pipeline quality natural gas for use in the CAES plant. The site has an electrical take-away capability of 210 MW via two NYSEG 115 kV circuits located approximately one half mile from the plant site. Cooling tower make-up water would have been supplied from Seneca Lake. NYSEG’s engineering consultant WorleyParsons Group thoroughly evaluated three CAES designs and concluded that any

  11. Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Currently, DOE's physical hydrogen storage R&D focuses on the development of high-pressure (10,000 psi) composite tanks, cryo-compressed tanks, conformable tanks, and other advanced concepts...

  12. Microsoft Word - Negative_compressibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compressibility (NEC) in a three dimensional spin-orbit correlated metal (Sr 1-x La x ) 3 Ir 2 O 7 , utilizing the high-resolution angle- resolved photoemission spectroscopy...

  13. Natural gas industry directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-11-01

    This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864...

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6,537 6,903 6,950 5,791 7,780 6,957 8,161 9,020 8,835 8,864 9,644 9,127 2002 9,857 10,737 9,131 9,186 10,030 9,602 7,965...

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497...

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 142,216 130,664 149,294 2000's 156,692 143,330 175,072 150,692 159,259 164,740 169,504 175,820...

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Connecticut (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 18,442 15,861 16,485 10,646 7,197 7,730 7,420 9,010 11,276 11,370 12,345 15,400 2002 19,009 18,410 17,585 13,782 12,805...

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,109 11,224 12,435 1970's 14,500 16,073 17,005 15,420 16,247 15,928 16,694 16,813 16,940 16,830...

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 35,295 37,886 39,962 1970's 39,169 30,832 32,457 33,789 31,040 33,291 34,011 33,913 34,612 33,442 1980's 30,690 28,282 29,438 27,739 28,995 26,731 24,949 24,603 27,457 27,271 1990's 25,129 25,986 25,314 28,998 27,407 27,409 31,006 29,441 28,062 27,898 2000's 33,180 32,031 32,928 31,746 29,821 31,521 31,286 32,187 36,924 36,373 2010's 40,232 39,986 41,435 47,636

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 184,630 189,903 206,861 1970's 209,945 239,685 231,536 232,774 228,988 240,239 219,840 227,543 221,441 258,490 1980's 258,151 236,910 236,202 215,918 191,838 205,044 182,794 212,904 248,397 259,118 1990's 285,090 287,608 285,008 250,283 261,989 278,761 235,068 253,923 282,153 244,701 2000's 246,439 245,795 238,308 232,912 231,597 233,082 244,432 251,024 251,045

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 39,942 47,287 52,256 1970's 59,081 62,805 63,154 69,844 68,322 76,288 75,959 72,597 71,422 74,831 1980's 66,952 58,913 66,991 64,615 71,890 68,975 61,620 64,355 68,515 67,477 1990's 66,290 68,938 66,420 71,647 65,870 66,639 68,914 69,074 63,132 59,346 2000's 60,874 65,011 66,939 62,616 61,956 62,099 59,851 63,231 65,806 62,441 2010's 57,658 55,843 51,795 58,787

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,968 2,084 2,526 1970's 2,804 3,010 3,205 3,093 3,169 2,964 3,078 2,815 3,005 2,842 1980's 3,246 3,783 3,577 3,428 3,827 3,412 3,514 3,741 4,041 4,184 1990's 4,042 4,253 4,965 5,195 5,459 5,743 6,694 6,608 5,590 6,119 2000's 5,125 5,680 7,477 8,437 8,465 8,383 8,134 8,628 8,868 11,684 2010's 12,193 10,478 10,034 11,170 11,882 11,189

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,501 21,890 24,721 1970's 26,914 25,478 23,243 24,315 22,527 31,745 39,681 41,236 35,386 36,638 1980's 30,182 33,702 29,788 29,228 30,481 30,674 35,829 37,492 37,834 35,105 1990's 36,306 39,264 41,727 41,151 39,935 40,383 41,810 36,700 37,659 36,269 2000's 47,904 49,286 55,803 54,283 56,321 57,690 50,625 51,097 50,901 50,371 2010's 54,065 53,532 54,659 59,971

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,202 36,034 39,020 1970's 38,726 41,881 44,992 47,253 44,317 49,438 46,351 55,268 60,266 62,437 1980's 58,763 57,139 54,718 56,280 55,909 51,519 50,405 54,592 55,963 53,089 1990's 49,486 51,036 53,861 57,525 54,051 56,536 61,377 57,220 55,419 43,581 2000's 58,793 50,645 48,631 50,273 55,047 52,902 48,137 48,591 51,518 53,627 2010's 60,153 56,602 51,918 57,195

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200 2,199 2,132 1,751 1,747 1,749 2000's 1,771 1,749 1,720 1,751 1,803 1,838 1,813 1,836 1,769 1,752 2010's 1,777 1,768 1,850 1,873 1,931 1,908

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's 5,756 5,422 5,729 5,758 8,493 8,999 8,543 7,618 8,252 9,024 1990's 8,535 9,582 8,932 10,675 10,088 10,360 11,506 11,433 11,676 12,618 2000's 13,414 13,623 13,592 12,019 12,995 13,231 13,573 14,274 16,333 15,740 2010's 15,033 16,855 15,838 18,485 16,963 16,171

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Illinois (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 175,281 174,565 189,006 1970's 193,434 210,424 224,488 218,530 216,114 215,718 246,659 243,686 251,895 237,199 1980's 228,178 223,427 218,751 204,834 232,170 213,528 204,979 191,047 215,257 196,171 1990's 200,267 193,844 196,964 203,157 197,558 203,802 218,054 202,850 174,687 188,520 2000's 201,768 189,160 204,570 211,710 204,039 201,882 196,361 203,368 222,382

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 37,141 46,232 54,062 1970's 52,632 56,246 61,286 52,674 53,461 51,705 57,310 51,815 64,532 60,931 1980's 58,880 52,036 55,470 52,535 57,516 56,522 55,730 53,609 61,120 58,554 1990's 56,045 58,571 53,973 56,023 52,253 53,122 57,229 41,482 41,788 38,952 2000's 40,297 37,560 38,802 37,781 36,779 29,616 27,505 30,546 33,531 32,512 2010's 31,799 32,117 25,452 33,198

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 32,313 36,089 41,934 1970's 42,461 42,352 42,843 45,797 42,320 38,497 57,203 50,170 46,647 40,509 1980's 39,359 36,379 35,260 34,111 36,138 33,758 32,666 33,298 35,718 36,148 1990's 31,806 33,700 35,419 37,817 36,744 38,610 40,972 38,627 32,464 35,798 2000's 38,669 35,255 35,942 38,212 36,989 36,894 32,590 34,386 37,167 35,438 2010's 36,818 34,592 30,771 37,422

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 51,062 56,937 54,010 1970's 70,321 67,515 66,331 59,518 58,097 50,662 43,567 44,563 65,300 115,743 1980's 39,996 39,507 33,729 34,906 33,088 30,228 27,985 27,845 27,475 27,156 1990's 24,937 25,452 28,445 25,157 24,184 23,833 25,746 25,613 24,042 24,559 2000's 25,687 24,604 25,540 25,161 24,700 25,085 22,240 23,863 22,869 23,672 2010's 27,009 25,925 26,294 28,875

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864 1,043 1,192 1,124 1,124 1,139 1,214 1,250 1,461 1,660 1990's 1,678 1,860 2,209 2,311 2,381 2,426 2,566 2,713 2,456 2,547 2000's 2,770 2,642 5,167 4,781 4,811 4,792 4,701 5,749 5,878 5,541 2010's 5,830 6,593 7,313 8,146 9,030 9,795

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maryland (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,154 30,419 34,674 1970's 37,529 40,988 43,950 42,953 43,080 37,466 42,422 40,532 39,821 47,326 1980's 28,576 32,055 30,871 30,758 25,299 24,134 23,816 25,544 25,879 26,920 1990's 24,051 38,117 42,464 43,635 44,136 46,874 45,842 49,802 57,370 58,103 2000's 55,669 59,802 63,999 70,557 70,195 69,718 62,868 70,852 70,411 69,119 2010's 67,555 67,505 64,146 71,145

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 24,737 25,396 29,821 1970's 35,356 36,994 36,778 39,288 37,384 37,812 37,763 40,598 45,657 46,701 1980's 53,462 50,131 61,286 39,640 41,271 41,382 43,661 46,522 48,915 51,508 1990's 50,618 53,188 64,352 65,429 84,534 82,270 96,187 105,813 90,092 65,136 2000's 63,793 61,677 64,763 62,590 56,879 56,665 52,283 61,504 72,303 71,546 2010's 72,053 81,068 73,040

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 16,547 18,297 17,667 1970's 23,846 25,853 24,604 23,701 25,504 23,922 20,214 19,304 21,312 27,224 1980's 20,886 19,267 17,213 17,158 17,860 16,591 16,891 17,922 18,108 17,568 1990's 17,548 17,743 17,942 19,199 19,232 19,904 22,225 22,070 21,358 20,208 2000's 21,673 21,585 21,221 22,933 22,130 20,882 19,425 20,774 20,181 19,095 2010's 21,179 20,247 17,834

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,524 79,821 79,019 1970's 87,644 89,534 97,506 91,038 90,291 90,719 98,435 93,323 98,680 94,629 1980's 76,054 68,455 69,913 66,106 67,218 60,345 61,890 58,205 63,839 63,039 1990's 59,387 63,191 60,963 69,670 66,196 65,086 72,802 69,829 61,995 63,100 2000's 62,673 64,924 61,897 61,516 61,755 60,369 56,722 59,224 64,993 61,433 2010's 61,194 62,304 54,736 64,522

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,516 13,651 16,593 1970's 18,564 18,109 19,151 19,143 16,602 18,654 17,831 16,706 17,766 17,396 1980's 14,265 13,725 15,987 13,534 14,256 14,820 12,536 10,989 12,041 13,141 1990's 12,164 12,846 11,557 13,880 12,981 13,489 14,823 13,911 12,952 12,088 2000's 13,533 13,245 14,704 15,119 13,407 13,136 13,181 13,223 14,340 23,575 2010's 20,459 22,336 19,205 20,971

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 41,443 41,765 46,041 1970's 46,824 47,261 45,518 38,690 42,298 43,117 48,713 46,989 40,736 43,507 1980's 43,356 40,612 43,022 39,055 41,900 39,404 36,357 34,205 39,388 37,351 1990's 36,489 40,291 34,490 34,745 38,946 40,044 40,833 33,853 28,911 27,586 2000's 28,907 27,792 28,185 28,368 29,858 27,401 28,087 30,067 34,813 31,790 2010's 31,993 32,115 26,503 32,214

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,164 6,997 8,204 1970's 9,633 11,014 12,755 13,144 14,078 14,965 18,389 17,436 19,940 19,638 1980's 10,207 8,294 8,449 11,758 12,012 12,232 11,451 13,747 14,879 15,116 1990's 15,073 16,960 16,101 17,549 18,694 18,703 20,421 21,958 23,314 22,710 2000's 25,586 22,912 22,685 24,099 26,862 26,552 28,046 28,224 28,920 29,531 2010's 29,475 30,763 28,991 31,211 29,105

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Jersey (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,656 32,546 34,510 1970's 55,953 60,230 62,917 61,846 58,210 53,346 90,463 53,896 48,005 52,314 1980's 60,481 74,627 78,750 79,624 83,906 83,467 85,775 94,459 101,325 117,385 1990's 115,591 121,240 130,891 128,942 132,008 138,965 150,432 168,760 146,653 163,759 2000's 158,543 131,417 146,176 159,647 168,768 169,857 152,501 168,778 168,574 180,404 2010's

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 27,447 30,713 28,680 1970's 33,035 33,760 32,354 25,569 25,221 22,800 33,708 25,476 25,706 26,371 1980's 24,505 20,446 21,715 22,413 22,947 16,733 20,642 19,939 31,032 28,459 1990's 23,694 24,993 27,884 27,898 24,964 23,934 26,466 27,403 27,206 27,103 2000's 27,009 27,133 25,476 23,745 25,458 24,186 23,404 24,876 25,183 24,701 2010's 25,155 25,035 24,898 26,790

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New York (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 122,050 122,885 128,282 1970's 139,498 145,458 147,326 142,736 136,332 128,273 143,530 130,898 142,988 143,512 1980's 161,813 167,253 164,784 161,770 170,365 165,498 167,503 167,178 188,037 196,380 1990's 194,990 199,598 217,214 220,729 223,256 231,352 253,075 320,862 335,343 360,188 2000's 365,879 347,253 362,247 339,371 359,070 275,721 259,972 285,030 290,150

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,100 20,624 24,524 1970's 21,532 26,331 24,200 23,044 21,002 21,615 20,042 18,303 20,366 23,916 1980's 26,172 26,367 24,891 24,705 26,174 25,029 25,474 30,010 32,464 33,145 1990's 31,277 34,313 36,418 37,370 38,940 37,362 40,467 38,021 36,427 38,019 2000's 43,113 38,583 40,198 44,262 45,383 47,696 46,321 45,434 48,567 51,303 2010's 56,225 49,898 48,951

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,059 7,072 7,444 1970's 8,315 9,059 9,874 9,875 11,528 12,425 12,202 11,234 11,845 12,044 1980's 11,026 9,419 11,361 9,828 9,961 10,118 9,084 7,908 9,827 10,609 1990's 10,236 10,732 9,759 10,642 10,783 11,644 12,150 10,870 10,082 10,023 2000's 11,060 10,456 11,675 10,952 10,473 9,903 9,355 10,296 11,101 10,987 2010's 10,302 10,973 10,364 13,236 13,999 12,334

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011 172,429 158,117 1980's 166,210 161,110 157,664 143,568 155,350 143,311 139,119 146,983 158,790 161,516 1990's 143,503 150,339 160,645 164,044 166,798 175,160 189,966 183,838 156,630 167,573 2000's 177,917 172,555 163,274 179,611 170,240 166,693 146,930 160,580 167,070

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 38,459 42,751 41,151 1970's 43,921 41,978 43,852 40,403 41,074 41,806 44,862 48,253 45,729 52,036 1980's 47,135 40,833 45,664 44,177 44,423 40,791 36,517 32,428 47,870 38,509 1990's 37,208 39,588 35,190 40,766 36,504 39,639 46,152 45,086 43,800 39,565 2000's 43,125 40,558 40,229 37,472 37,103 39,359 35,492 40,846 40,772 41,421 2010's 41,822 40,393 36,106 44,238

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,961 7,874 9,965 1970's 11,360 13,563 14,530 13,722 13,401 15,896 13,995 10,861 12,124 13,820 1980's 15,171 14,922 16,330 15,143 17,012 19,043 16,843 16,718 18,406 20,249 1990's 20,449 22,328 19,570 24,047 22,960 22,419 25,597 25,465 25,986 28,510 2000's 28,589 27,884 27,714 26,110 26,214 27,631 27,844 29,007 30,444 29,744 2010's 27,246 30,359 28,805 30,566 28,377

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Pennsylvania (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,702 87,620 95,720 1970's 99,339 110,014 122,518 116,265 102,495 98,991 124,517 111,885 110,620 111,498 1980's 118,462 128,561 125,557 115,222 126,211 115,329 114,442 114,800 127,382 132,421 1990's 125,673 125,546 134,254 131,776 138,473 143,735 154,642 144,084 130,996 143,256 2000's 145,319 136,468 136,202 149,458 142,608 144,971 130,328 145,852 144,603

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,142 3,416 3,850 1970's 5,064 4,530 4,734 4,648 4,397 4,233 2,895 3,019 4,783 6,169 1980's 6,751 6,867 7,156 6,976 7,466 7,590 6,718 9,395 8,352 8,767 1990's 8,071 8,269 9,080 9,205 12,049 12,064 12,298 12,303 11,477 11,804 2000's 12,974 12,808 11,468 11,391 11,289 11,043 9,950 11,247 10,843 10,725 2010's 10,458 10,843 10,090 11,633 13,178 11,734

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,840 10,544 12,938 1970's 13,850 14,371 14,137 16,053 14,820 17,202 35,062 32,117 24,681 17,943 1980's 22,885 19,436 15,560 16,548 16,635 15,270 15,894 17,195 17,472 16,525 1990's 15,394 15,796 16,644 17,014 17,870 18,868 20,328 19,560 19,828 20,566 2000's 22,105 20,743 21,029 22,365 22,255 22,048 20,691 20,927 22,283 21,953 2010's 24,119 22,113 21,416

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,444 10,723 11,201 1970's 11,361 10,592 11,204 10,568 11,671 11,488 15,344 14,786 13,547 9,951 1980's 8,507 8,188 9,384 8,651 9,128 9,987 9,166 8,199 8,396 8,826 1990's 8,555 9,473 9,122 10,696 10,274 10,685 11,598 10,422 9,264 9,564 2000's 10,119 9,711 10,258 10,375 9,958 9,819 9,525 10,337 11,362 11,563 2010's 11,025 11,101 9,330 12,151 12,310 10,497

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,380 38,325 41,069 1970's 42,720 44,062 45,704 45,974 44,651 42,488 38,244 35,127 30,917 42,714 1980's 44,048 42,686 38,697 42,903 46,544 43,399 42,589 44,144 45,852 47,513 1990's 43,552 45,953 46,532 50,754 50,760 51,235 58,497 55,117 52,394 52,572 2000's 53,365 53,010 53,710 56,576 54,201 54,264 51,537 51,056 54,094 51,879 2010's 56,194 52,156 44,928 53,888

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 139,727 139,442 140,854 1970's 146,090 142,423 141,128 155,070 134,418 116,749 135,452 158,683 168,946 233,758 1980's 168,513 157,199 189,447 157,481 165,700 151,774 146,972 156,509 175,368 182,670 1990's 172,333 180,973 184,673 175,988 180,232 209,584 178,549 216,333 169,610 171,714 2000's 190,453 171,847 226,274 218,565 192,901 159,972 147,366 161,255 167,129

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330 343 21,831 7,986 8,569 8,505 4,636 14,811 17,911 16,522 1990's 16,220 19,276 16,584 22,588 26,501 26,825 29,543 31,129 30,955 30,361 2000's 31,282 30,917 33,501 30,994 31,156 34,447 34,051 34,447 37,612 37,024 2010's 38,461 40,444 35,363 41,398 38,156 35,552

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672 2,825 3,051 2,979 2,309 2000's 2,595 2,473 2,470 2,757 2,724 2,610 2,374 2,631 2,495 2,483 2010's 2,384 2,479 2,314 4,748 4,830 5,949

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,756 24,594 27,155 1970's 30,090 34,672 34,176 37,632 35,281 32,358 34,887 34,685 43,064 33,946 1980's 38,467 35,255 38,157 38,457 34,825 33,975 35,453 39,401 42,013 44,181 1990's 41,038 44,077 50,757 52,880 52,944 56,948 59,262 61,895 58,283 61,516 2000's 66,098 59,809 62,699 64,004 64,518 65,838 62,352 66,444 67,006 67,709 2010's 68,911 64,282 60,217 68,126

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,133 16,244 17,166 1970's 18,490 20,612 23,254 32,333 33,221 31,988 31,652 29,946 25,330 33,369 1980's 30,754 28,629 30,559 28,728 32,371 35,459 32,022 32,366 36,674 38,502 1990's 38,671 41,738 37,800 43,620 42,982 42,568 48,139 46,686 45,561 50,735 2000's 50,462 57,160 46,455 47,845 48,455 49,745 51,292 53,689 56,205 55,697 2010's 51,335 56,487 53,420 55,805

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 18,511 20,402 21,534 1970's 21,678 23,106 26,654 25,854 24,586 24,776 20,462 19,556 22,501 22,337 1980's 21,980 22,191 20,548 18,771 18,780 17,224 15,995 16,792 22,416 23,258 1990's 21,391 21,043 24,419 24,381 24,979 25,872 28,025 25,913 24,986 27,301 2000's 26,167 27,737 24,729 26,681 25,177 25,084 23,477 22,633 25,299 23,761 2010's 24,907 24,094 22,634

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890 80,756 1980's 77,107 68,075 69,694 68,020 70,230 72,803 55,275 57,750 66,939 70,090 1990's 66,339 71,516 71,314 77,079 78,609 84,888 93,816 88,729 81,316 81,689 2000's 81,139 76,095 85,811 87,131 82,187 86,086 86,342 89,016 97,137 91,459 2010's 82,204 87,040 76,949 99,434

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443 8,700 8,551 1990's 8,440 9,101 8,009 10,268 9,231 9,833 9,721 10,754 10,414 9,838 2000's 9,752 9,535 10,414 9,986 9,916 9,184 9,500 9,442 10,180 10,372 2010's 11,153 11,680 10,482 12,013 12,188 12,498

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,752 14,993 15,881 15,945 11,680 11,921 11,934 13,999 15,012 15,741 1990's 13,473 15,550 16,103 16,229 14,742 17,035 16,347 18,012 16,862 17,837 2000's 17,728 16,546 18,332 17,098 17,384 17,683 17,107 19,297 18,411 18,705 2010's 18,547 16,892 15,363 17,234 17,498 15,79

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    144,844 183,603 204,793 220,747 230,099 241,802 285,213 323,054 347,818 1950's 387,838 464,309 515,669 530,650 584,957 629,219 716,871 775,916 871,774 975,107 1960's 1,020,222...

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    21,979 2008 24,390 22,834 18,534 10,680 9,169 6,082 8,246 8,425 7,661 12,575 16,948 23,030 2009 28,831 22,774 20,061 12,767 9,617 8,062 8,926 9,970 9,486 12,390 14,237 23,283...

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    66,915 64,734 60,519 49,200 58,308 1980's 50,588 46,804 51,536 46,854 48,104 47,643 43,709 38,057 44,955 46,142 1990's 43,953 46,615 46,095 50,337 47,922 50,325 54,571 50,191...

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    63,224 70,083 74,231 1980's 70,048 71,178 71,900 65,409 71,819 69,641 64,821 64,903 71,709 73,625 1990's 67,223 68,383 72,720 78,047 75,819 82,726 87,456 81,753 73,117 73,643...

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,647 1990 4,168 3,115 3,057 2,477 1,557 1,131 1,049 961 1,016 1,095 1,686 2,738 1991 5,709 5,334 4,545 3,320 2,108 1,602 1,545 1,465 1,486 2,289 3,582 5,132 1992 6,323 6,382...

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-9 1990's 396,107 363,738 376,409 2000's 389,543 356,915 381,498 391,185 380,014 406,550 369,353 395,519 406,723 385,418 2010's 369,924 391,128 400,876 439,741 458,999 454,450

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-9 1990's 150,978 156,295 159,338 2000's 156,975 138,866 181,648 143,833 161,283 169,605 172,514 173,092 167,473 188,081 2010's 216,783 226,089 241,434 229,768 229,454 270,546

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1990's 514,038 497,685 550,157 2000's 532,297 534,331 676,854 679,179 722,326 767,566 877,977 905,828 932,172 1,044,872 2010's 1,131,142 1,199,247 1,306,024 1,207,573 1,221,666...

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 293,981 299,146 299,872 2000's 315,202 299,631 343,913 316,665 350,734 323,143 358,141 385,209 369,750 418,677 2010's 496,051 558,116 622,359 573,981 599,473 640,707

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298 221,983 230,488 2010's 256,102 266,194 278,304 263,281 249,549 270,209

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360 426,034 420,500 2010's 396,083 345,663 327,108 361,779 367,021 NA

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46,499 40,794 55,968 2000's 48,325 50,090 52,167 46,143 48,019 46,863 43,172 48,139 48,144 50,126 2010's 54,685 79,251 100,630 95,008 99,736 99,543

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,466 605,262 617,310 645,253 683,796

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646 78,166 2010's 75,647 77,343 83,274 98,843 87,647 98,782

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080 954,100 987,137 931,329 2010's 942,205 960,018 910,611 1,024,851 1,062,377 960,624

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 545,839 514,407 549,639 2000's 564,919 494,706 533,754 520,352 519,785 524,415 489,881 528,655 544,202 500,135 2010's 564,904 619,977 642,209 664,817 703,637 712,946

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 243,181 223,287 222,943 2000's 224,299 215,348 215,482 220,263 216,625 229,717 225,929 280,954 311,672 301,340 2010's 300,033 296,098 285,038 314,742 317,784 NA

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,275 259,783 240,248 2000's 253,037 224,367 239,449 227,436 213,122 206,537 217,981 246,094 244,181 243,199 2010's 235,316 241,473 223,188 241,292 246,547 NA

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497 2010's 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,362

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,890 185,583 193,142 2000's 208,894 175,611 193,766 194,280 192,242 200,336 179,949 198,715 193,613 193,988 2010's 205,688 187,921 201,550 193,232 201,199 205,407

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502 748,655 703,346 2010's 713,533 745,769 761,544 787,603 824,527 NA

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 275,838 253,157 259,054 2000's 277,206 281,875 273,073 259,526 260,708 265,485 250,290 269,825 288,847 260,976 2010's 274,361 265,534 250,902 271,341 290,421 271,116

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 54,138 54,093 55,129 2000's 57,725 54,529 58,451 56,074 54,066 55,200 60,602 60,869 64,240 66,613 2010's 60,517 68,113 61,963 68,410 71,435

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 128,092 127,840 118,536 2000's 123,791 118,933 117,427 113,320 110,725 114,402 125,202 145,253 160,685 156,161 2010's 161,284 162,219 150,961 166,233 165,620 149,107

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997 566,176 2010's 582,389 559,215 587,287 539,056 508,363 539,439

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 172,588 216,058 224,767 2000's 213,063 218,632 193,006 205,415 225,263 225,277 214,346 242,371 261,105 240,765 2010's 232,900 194,336 211,232 236,276 216,365 233,523

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 664,782 609,779 648,194 2000's 659,042 596,041 632,035 651,938 662,513 656,097 625,944 711,945 705,284 755,938 2010's 811,209 866,775 918,490 959,041 1,042,647 1,078,18

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237 192,281 182,187 2010's 185,228 184,581 178,941 199,684 198,278 187,452

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's 8,428 8,558 8,077 9,512 10,554 11,7

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 240,244 252,233 267,269 2000's 258,975 228,670 247,351 254,008 268,674 292,043 264,954 309,866 286,497 304,266 2010's 359,208 352,281 392,255 401,623 404,939

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 247,530 281,143 279,656 2000's 280,617 303,060 227,360 243,072 253,663 256,580 256,842 265,211 291,535 302,930 2010's 278,139 257,945 255,356 308,148 298,088 296,056

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in West Virginia (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 119,976 105,099 104,219 2000's 106,057 102,110 103,119 102,567 98,525 90,436 85,507 88,317 84,485 75,475 2010's 79,432 77,189 74,459 80,393 86,978 NA

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 70,792 77,652 60,593 2000's 63,384 60,385 69,633 67,627 65,639 64,753 65,487 67,693 66,472 61,774 2010's 67,736 70,862 73,690 74,597 73,096 72,979

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,401 34,749 37,275 1970's 36,254 36,657 37,389 33,126 35,349 33,439 34,450 34,303 29,649 36,717 1980's 28,525 26,860 25,876 26,665 27,567 25,836 25,128 22,384 25,562 26,469 1990's 24,287 23,711 25,232 25,723 25,526 26,228 29,000 32,360 25,705 27,581 2000's 25,580 26,391 25,011 25,356 26,456 25,046 24,396 23,420 25,217 24,293 2010's 27,071 25,144 21,551 25,324

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-9 1990's 877,039 792,617 823,448 2000's 871,444 787,719 813,735 832,563 812,084 811,759 729,264 791,733 780,187 723,471 2010's 767,704 808,509 832,437 901,087 982,855 949,865

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 116,058 138,724 146,471 2000's 184,542 218,613 230,493 254,720 333,746 304,004 337,429 372,536 ...

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Massachusetts (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-9 1990's 400,273 356,942 342,136 2000's 340,923 345,916 388,972 402,003 370,777 376,257 369,166 406,968 405,562 394,759 2010's 428,471 444,537 412,637 418,241 412,268 434,781

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,658,039 2000's 4,073,007 3,917,933 3,966,512 3,747,467 3,595,474 3,154,632 3,068,002 3,133,456 3,128,339 2,947,542 2010's 3,185,011 3,305,730 3,377,217 3,350,645 3,415,789...

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 32,294 29,390 28,910 2000's 30,667 30,766 35,018 37,011 34,900 36,259 34,809 47,675 60,026 62,376 2010's 66,195 66,320 62,969 74,182 73,917...

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,722 4,713 11,018 1970's 12,519 14,256 16,011 12,277 13,106 14,415 14,191 14,564 15,208 15,862 1980's 16,513 16,149 24,232 24,693...

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 131,463 147,747 153,880 2000's 188,288 175,966 175,739 184,152 212,723 224,919 246,865 251,425 ...

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200...

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the U.S. (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 392,315 394,281 310,799 231,943 174,258 135,165 107,728 105,681 103,831 126,540 216,762 297,734 1974 406,440 335,562 301,588 243,041 165,233 128,032 109,694 107,828 106,510 143,295 199,514 308,879 1975 346,998 345,520 312,362 289,341 164,629 119,960 107,077 104,332 106,655 133,055 179,518 298,845 1976 405,483 364,339 285,912 221,383 169,209 129,058 112,070 113,174 113,284 145,824 252,710

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 23,335 23,389 24,501 1970's 22,705 25,604 26,905 31,812 32,742 32,638 36,763 34,076 29,581...

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New York (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,315,909 1,224,520 1,265,646 2000's 1,236,734 1,166,162 1,190,745 1,093,319 1,090,023 1,069,062...

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,231 31,904 29,422 27,137 23,855 18,345 18,349 16,283 15,107 23,527 30,172 37,445 2002 29,531 27,361 27,117 20,531 ...

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,325 27,001 23,081 15,728 ... 25,949 18,966 16,884 20,579 36,086 2006 27,027 31,003 26,918 15,287 13,141 18,076 ...

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 27,838 29,591 25,963 15,899 ... 7,970 15,118 19,910 29,245 1991 35,376 26,327 22,768 13,059 8,214 5,162 6,031 5,693 7,979 ...

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-9 1990's 206,845 201,303 271,218 2000's 266,008 298,296 312,317 235,345 254,727 274,431 278,563 328,487 316,214 325,132 2010's 399,073 401,561 440,741 393,161 390,396 NA

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,361,995 1,313,827 1,267,668 2000's 1,286,353 1,069,808 1,193,418 1,079,213 1,132,186 1,121,178 ...

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 107,796 117,124 130,062 1970's 132,708 146,217 159,970 180,274 189,192 181,949 178,220 131,266 ...

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,357 1,414 1,111 852 521 368 285 233 268 396 724 1,022 1990 1,305 1,199 1,085 822 628 410 247 234 241 378 759 1,132 1991 ...

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 149,171 147,435 150,062 2000's 150,745 132,441 129,292 109,707 120,974 127,140 113,933 99,281 ...

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 151,699 132,638 117,186 62,934 ... 35,830 52,062 78,310 137,991 2009 159,394 132,967 112,576 80,429 47,369 40,772 35,663 ...

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 36,984 28,384 27,217 23,714 21,027 21,010 22,537 23,488 21,619 24,186 23,647 25,742 2002 36,559 33,467 32,355 26,061 23,580 27,901 29,889 30,615 26,781 22,744 22,838 31,044 2003 39,779 34,222 26,412 23,422 20,310 22,858 27,147 32,162 21,482 18,885 20,502 29,389 2004 38,499 36,343 31,829 27,460 26,994 26,923 32,691 29,710 24,787 23,688 22,042 29,661 2005 32,785 29,012 29,689 22,622 22,525 26,381 30,759 31,841

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 12,927 11,677 12,492 10,557 9,618 8,588 9,860 10,185 9,784 11,290 11,926 13,523 2002 12,414 11,258 11,090 10,310 10,076 11,260 10,510 9,907 9,717 10,827 10,291 11,621 2003 9,731 8,407 9,561 9,112 8,639 8,518 8,461 8,717 8,895 10,027 9,481 10,141 2004 12,414 10,221 10,996 9,967 9,462 9,831 9,829 8,537 9,512 9,377 9,374 11,436 2005 11,592 10,185 10,627 9,847 9,809 9,712 10,596 10,360 10,325 10,740 11,792 11,516 2006

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 253 237 247 243 237 244 242 227 226 220 217 225 2002 236 226 225 234 226 224 239 222 224 215 227 236 2003 251 236 234 229 226 218 224 218 223 218 216 239 2004 243 230 239 240 221 235 229 222 226 221 230 236 2005 242 225 240 240 245 238 224 225 226 218 229 240 2006 241 226 242 237 239 235 229 222 233 223 223 231 2007 259 226 229 232 234 244 241 218 223 244 256 244 2008 245 237 235 238 225 233 238 211 211 206 204

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038 2,812 3,303 4,162 5,950 7,000 2003 7,519 7,632 7,150 5,498 4,487 3,443 4,268 3,399 3,902 3,977 6,312 7,657 2004 10,168 9,168 7,032 4,556 4,391 3,602 3,672 3,601 3,844 4,668 6,536 8,238 2005 9,355 8,465 6,757 6,168 3,946 3,381 3,511 3,614 3,733 4,635 6,142 9,403 2006 8,375 8,140 7,439 5,455 3,877

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,479 16,635 19,646 21,739 20,948 20,348 30,696 31,715 28,537 28,525 24,653 28,356 2002 29,331 28,518 28,650 25,702 23,117 27,335 33,509 29,104 24,492 19,663 18,433 24,444 2003 29,743 24,826 20,395 19,195 18,492 16,946 17,613 19,394 16,780 14,228 16,133 21,577 2004 23,187 23,828 21,311 19,087 24,565 21,821 24,034 23,064 18,228 18,641 15,628 21,305 2005 23,881 20,984 23,827 18,047 21,247 24,690 29,577 32,966

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 51,986 40,694 34,239 22,717 13,209 12,679 16,175 16,218 12,056 13,682 18,230 29,876 2002 39,936 35,157 34,198 24,362 15,624 13,116 15,351 13,593 11,804 14,038 22,945 32,834 2003 42,257 42,379 33,569 21,083 13,307 10,498 12,889 15,215 9,788 10,817 17,229 30,354 2004 41,477 43,268 30,344 20,642 15,737 12,404 12,556 11,676 12,399 11,977 16,704 31,367 2005 42,227 35,965 31,014 19,890 15,686 13,519 13,855 14,649 12,548

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,993 8,301 5,782 5,036 3,055 2,439 2,359 2,152 2,135 3,446 5,081 6,696 2002 7,738 6,859 7,247 5,853 4,084 2,965 2,265 2,298 2,711 4,300 5,929 6,147 2003 7,471 6,977 6,706 4,682 3,515 2,729 2,042 2,006 2,468 3,629 6,282 7,503 2004 8,787 6,926 5,508 3,906 3,279 2,725 2,154 2,098 2,533 3,912 5,268 6,895 2005 8,717 6,227 5,828 4,563 3,517 2,678 2,135 2,426 2,551 4,121 4,933 7,501 2006 7,064 7,060 7,344 4,972 3,562

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,952 19,433 17,795 12,312 12,723 11,650 12,329 14,023 12,067 12,854 12,525 17,842 2002 18,621 16,951 15,943 11,123 11,789 13,044 14,033 14,618 13,988 13,798 14,840 16,521 2003 17,053 15,548 15,238 12,410 12,410 13,355 17,113 17,666 15,088 14,301 14,598 18,798 2004 19,886 20,030 14,760 11,514 13,220 16,819 20,333 19,864 17,480 16,556 18,897 22,720 2005 23,220 21,494 17,907 16,239 13,790 15,823 20,156 20,490

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29,800 21,808 20,434 14,585 11,544 11,979 13,229 15,763 11,364 14,905 15,898 19,179 2002 27,750 25,444 22,993 16,550 13,274 14,816 16,400 17,088 13,640 15,047 19,024 27,257 2003 32,135 30,180 20,979 15,717 12,038 9,338 12,359 13,177 11,210 12,814 16,520 25,999 2004 31,785 30,416 22,379 16,242 16,033 12,711 12,866 13,027 11,970 11,729 15,635 24,946 2005 30,538 27,324 26,203 17,851 13,162 12,669 15,688 16,197

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 21,689 25,019 21,080 18,224 15,822 14,891 14,036 15,541 15,102 16,822 18,239 22,097 2002 25,687 22,100 21,179 14,501 12,612 11,363 9,336 12,198 12,978 14,195 16,780 20,005 2003 23,496 19,260 18,102 13,784 12,066 11,146 16,560 16,275 17,015 16,463 19,222 21,940 2004 26,773 24,112 19,699 16,486 14,346 12,752 16,235 16,733 16,179 17,146 21,137 23,569 2005 25,874 23,392 21,951 20,274 11,452 11,481 14,502 16,348 15,706

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Carolina (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,028 13,472 12,569 10,957 8,683 9,367 10,138 11,625 9,077 11,870 11,334 12,725 2002 20,494 17,611 16,270 14,448 14,921 14,889 16,325 15,616 11,675 10,993 12,221 16,164 2003 18,666 17,514 12,917 11,948 9,803 8,615 10,304 12,231 8,766 8,909 9,675 14,460 2004 19,029 19,575 14,664 11,619 12,602 10,686 12,311 13,363 11,234 9,815 10,497 15,861 2005 19,494 16,945 17,212 12,523 11,619 12,506 16,813 18,833 10,439

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 43,045 30,197 26,202 21,053 13,399 12,059 12,967 13,230 11,569 16,135 19,011 23,239 2002 37,019 31,272 27,242 19,932 14,058 12,918 12,293 12,439 11,103 13,432 20,337 31,833 2003 37,778 37,692 27,915 18,989 14,580 13,392 11,615 12,627 12,016 13,775 16,202 27,807 2004 34,375 33,788 24,928 18,001 14,262 11,211 10,988 11,553 11,041 11,874 13,718 24,756 2005 30,997 29,214 25,561 19,122 13,849 11,579 11,055 13,522

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in West Virginia (Including Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 14,634 12,224 11,221 9,393 5,380 4,688 5,050 5,820 5,703 7,694 9,286 10,802 2002 12,686 11,546 11,965 8,927 7,125 5,425 5,123 5,557 4,801 6,781 10,011 12,951 2003 15,151 14,627 10,226 7,588 5,910 5,006 4,985 5,571 5,552 7,192 8,076 12,413 2004 14,651 15,031 11,525 9,338 5,321 4,737 4,621 4,572 4,754 5,775 6,898 10,999 2005 13,027 12,645 12,670 7,853 5,985 4,008 3,754 4,142 3,627 4,345 6,919 11,453 2006

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,434 3,514 3,395 2,369 1,720 1,215 1,673 1,117 1,189 1,382 1,955 3,507 1990 4,550 3,040 2,645 2,167 1,626 984 1,157 1,164 1,195 1,353 1,921 2,487 1991 3,334 3,576 2,761 1,886 1,332 1,149 1,128 1,052 1,093 1,311 2,120 2,968 1992 3,739 3,833 2,671 2,287 1,513 1,225 1,108 1,078 1,136 1,320 1,983 3,338 1993 3,532 3,599 3,655 2,569 1,551 1,179 1,084 1,070 1,111 1,259 2,073 3,041 1994 4,325

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alaska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,500 2,691 2,258 1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171 1,069 1,073 1,198 1,561 1,930 2,308 1992 2,414 2,372 2,319 1,935 1,597 1,206 1,084 1,013 1,252 1,790 1,928 2,390 1993 2,487 2,471 2,051 1,863 1,441 1,055 917 957 1,112 1,563 1,785 2,301 1994 2,367 2,156

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arizona (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,945 3,572 2,845 2,275 1,994 1,951 1,805 1,579 1,597 1,634 2,296 3,108 1990 3,706 3,577 3,165 2,338 2,174 1,854 1,686 1,580 1,610 1,555 2,018 3,139 1991 3,716 3,091 2,935 2,785 2,039 1,637 1,669 1,722 1,375 1,609 1,941 3,077 1992 3,647 3,011 2,898 2,352 1,620 1,754 1,690 1,505 1,601 1,580 1,858 3,573 1993 3,422 2,954 3,056 2,408 1,851 2,035 1,654 1,601 1,521 1,551 2,100 3,416 1994 3,689

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,522 10,845 9,208 6,135 4,160 3,082 2,328 2,119 2,303 3,232 5,441 8,102 1990 10,718 9,546 8,633 6,902 5,116 3,122 2,167 2,127 2,069 2,918 5,301 7,682 1991 12,120 9,991 7,910 6,328 4,849 2,826 2,180 2,040 2,087 3,017 6,096 9,494 1992 10,794 9,450 7,609 5,965 3,631 3,055 2,430 2,183 2,312 3,078 5,594 10,319 1993 11,775 10,132 9,435 6,499 4,292 3,119 2,445 2,357 3,012 3,108 6,080 9,396

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Connecticut (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992 4,417 4,374 3,940 2,941 1,779 1,149 1,046 1,061 1,075 1,562 2,623 3,871 1993 4,666 4,995 4,461 3,038 1,583 1,161 1,122 1,070 1,121 1,789 2,896 3,525 1994 5,882

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 632 605 624 398 249 166 128 133 144 182 294 630 1990 784 530 530 419 239 174 139 138 136 163 309 480 1991 677 653 579 414 237 161 146 142 145 203 354 541 1992 744 755 686 537 308 198 166 152 162 240 395 622 1993 739 818 858 574 284 140 165 155 155 229 412 666 1994 945 1,076 856 510 259 209 157 156 172 221 345 554 1995 829 935 854 527 341 223 182 168 205 209 417 851 1996 1,099 1,181 885

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,127 7,499 5,163 3,921 2,982 2,340 2,411 2,360 2,589 3,475 4,834 8,389 1990 8,162 5,935 5,172 3,960 2,844 2,498 2,359 2,535 2,416 3,098 4,228 6,280 1991 7,680 6,782 5,905 3,348 2,820 2,387 2,381 2,482 2,346 3,082 5,153 6,670 1992 8,066 6,952 5,778 4,381 3,103 2,596 2,536 2,503 2,462 3,201 4,640 7,642 1993 7,627 7,915 7,796 4,837 3,069 2,544 2,570 2,481 2,440 3,312 5,214 7,719 1994 9,543

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 187 178 174 175 181 175 182 173 175 179 172 177 1990 190 188 188 180 181 188 195 180 180 183 184 185 1991 192 177 169 187 173 173 187 172 179 177 178 185 1992 190 180 174 183 177 184 174 173 178 168 178 184 1993 185 190 179 177 168 183 174 170 168 173 183 172 1994 195 176 190 185 181 184 177 178 184 177 189 185 1995 200 180 185 183 185 188 186 178 179 179 178 177 1996 200 192 184 190 172

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Indiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 11,170 11,376 9,613 5,768 3,297 1,904 1,579 1,659 2,217 3,850 7,577 13,614 1990 11,991 9,374 7,958 6,087 3,191 1,963 1,658 1,860 1,991 4,087 6,640 10,462 1991 13,081 10,656 8,567 4,535 2,546 1,648 1,613 1,710 2,358 3,614 7,821 10,233 1992 12,060 10,265 8,437 6,172 3,400 2,004 1,811 1,955 2,131 4,253 8,135 12,097 1993 12,941 12,125 10,972 6,557 2,866 2,100 1,819 1,838 2,442 4,559 8,381

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Iowa (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,372 7,466 6,928 4,133 2,216 1,380 1,190 1,234 1,247 179 3,738 7,110 1990 8,087 6,374 5,719 4,261 2,409 1,602 1,226 1,204 1,302 2,087 3,726 5,955 1991 9,237 6,828 5,412 3,305 1,993 1,308 1,090 1,198 1,308 2,482 5,287 7,167 1992 7,145 6,709 4,949 3,883 1,877 1,427 1,100 1,257 1,433 2,645 5,843 7,827 1993 8,688 7,779 6,773 4,316 2,029 1,481 1,214 1,214 1,637 2,869 5,694 6,642 1994 9,353 8,260

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,155 7,697 6,870 5,433 3,660 2,547 3,366 4,812 3,081 2,785 4,386 6,763 1990 8,061 6,230 5,114 4,800 3,112 2,848 4,906 4,462 3,836 2,893 3,877 5,907 1991 10,250 7,397 5,694 4,278 3,082 2,657 4,321 3,994 2,629 2,656 6,075 5,538 1992 6,844 5,862 4,372 4,571 3,736 2,814 3,609 3,462 3,132 3,162 4,867 7,543 1993 8,768 7,385 7,019 4,938 2,840 2,559 3,348 3,324 2,395 2,469 4,413 6,565 1994 8,139

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,139 5,507 4,546 2,840 1,766 1,167 1,099 991 1,147 954 3,327 6,648 1990 5,355 4,280 3,496 2,702 1,576 1,129 1,037 1,077 1,025 2,050 3,194 4,884 1991 6,313 5,098 3,647 1,925 1,198 1,029 941 991 1,338 1,862 4,197 5,161 1992 6,191 4,758 3,874 2,612 1,600 1,132 1,066 1,158 1,209 2,237 4,064 5,519 1993 5,878 5,863 5,207 2,934 1,330 1,449 1,029 1,060 1,220 2,417 3,997 5,433 1994 8,181 6,018

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,399 3,365 3,462 2,362 1,790 1,479 1,399 1,340 1,433 1,568 2,035 3,524 1990 4,528 2,757 2,490 2,135 1,628 1,499 1,361 1,238 1,275 1,487 2,082 2,491 1991 3,639 3,555 2,713 1,974 1,539 1,418 1,504 1,253 1,229 1,440 2,347 2,842 1992 4,060 4,003 2,743 2,367 1,769 1,564 1,556 1,431 1,508 1,577 2,295 3,574 1993 3,260 3,207 3,075 2,376 1,742 1,454 1,267 1,277 1,290 1,346 2,091 2,771 1994 3,925

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 229 226 221 160 106 63 51 50 60 96 128 269 1990 268 227 211 175 108 70 52 47 62 83 157 219 1991 282 265 236 180 101 73 65 65 59 103 152 278 1992 322 318 315 229 157 80 79 52 67 116 188 285 1993 356 364 291 192 107 80 71 67 77 166 224 316 1994 458 364 302 181 128 79 63 71 84 135 207 309 1995 350 373 288 211 128 77 70 71 86 129 254 389 1996 413 386 356 208 132 82 74 75 78 172 280 310 1997 433

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,394 6,984 7,234 5,392 3,703 2,150 1,726 1,894 1,799 2,720 3,647 6,864 1990 8,247 6,548 6,367 5,235 3,381 2,491 2,009 2,040 1,906 2,416 4,275 5,704 1991 7,617 7,579 6,948 5,504 3,772 2,466 2,435 2,188 1,939 2,666 4,048 6,027 1992 8,184 8,736 8,217 7,049 4,450 2,768 3,072 2,884 2,753 3,776 5,530 6,933 1993 8,556 9,118 9,026 6,491 4,195 3,184 2,692 2,802 2,766 3,878 5,622 7,098 1994

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Michigan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Minnesota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 13,112 13,607 11,411 6,916 3,980 2,416 2,112 2,011 2,475 4,718 8,764 13,661 1990 12,696 11,412 9,846 6,734 4,032 2,369 2,100 2,060 2,342 4,865 7,491 12,066 1991 15,649 11,426 10,026 6,092 4,220 2,541 2,315 2,304 2,930 5,399 10,392 12,580 1992 13,000 11,075 10,134 7,517 3,602 2,467 2,244 2,296 2,631 5,092 9,526 12,795 1993 14,685 12,874 11,396 7,267 3,588 2,549 2,190 2,207 2,952 5,614

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,372 2,502 2,411 1,407 947 739 718 701 754 939 1,350 2,727 1990 3,199 2,007 1,675 1,541 1,070 884 819 818 841 1,137 1,508 2,050 1991 2,704 2,572 1,977 1,291 901 875 806 834 865 989 1,721 2,208 1992 2,817 2,595 1,758 1,473 994 888 885 867 847 942 1,489 2,387 1993 2,663 2,583 2,559 1,756 1,108 925 904 864 843 985 1,710 2,298 1994 3,417 2,993 2,136 1,456 1,012 942 992 973 1,000 1,050

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,118 10,280 9,192 5,246 2,799 2,359 1,829 1,780 2,021 2,798 4,716 9,903 1990 11,634 7,979 6,849 5,622 3,309 2,310 2,034 1,971 2,083 2,863 4,811 7,921 1991 12,748 9,932 7,479 4,261 2,760 2,181 1,853 1,896 2,056 2,689 6,471 8,864 1992 10,201 9,060 6,835 5,601 3,144 2,547 1,849 1,993 2,024 2,728 5,335 9,646 1993 12,062 10,467 10,336 6,750 3,580 2,266 2,066 1,959 2,222 2,864 5,974 9,124

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,029 1,923 1,841 1,208 687 478 330 381 442 806 1,235 1,781 1990 1,912 1,705 1,402 998 766 487 323 348 347 782 1,206 1,889 1991 2,425 1,435 1,450 1,053 843 431 357 341 438 724 1,559 1,790 1992 1,726 1,464 1,099 930 568 377 365 331 523 810 1,271 2,095 1993 2,465 1,705 1,741 1,137 682 434 437 416 535 819 1,508 1,999 1994 1,844 1,936 1,465 1,100 699 452 362 348 423 860 1,447 2,043 1995 2,085

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,202 4,825 4,252 2,505 1,648 1,757 3,381 4,240 1,634 2,109 2,602 4,196 1990 4,765 4,019 3,355 2,799 1,480 1,325 4,837 2,596 2,333 2,334 2,552 4,094 1991 5,452 4,111 3,382 2,193 1,771 1,779 5,675 4,406 1,961 2,056 3,468 4,037 1992 4,332 3,760 2,970 2,411 1,781 1,330 2,366 2,393 1,710 2,508 3,988 4,941 1993 5,784 3,806 4,611 3,119 1,629 1,388 1,324 1,828 1,333 2,164 3,495 4,263 1994 5,469

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New York (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,789 1,669 1,514 1,027 508 335 269 238 340 464 951 1,506 1990 1,666 1,457 1,243 1,048 616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477 1,339 925 477 347 317 294 381 629 1,068 1,478 1994 2,016 1,812 1,339 932 526 302 284 288 315 530 1,241 1,198 1995 1,807

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,884 3,283 2,761 1,724 1,140 989 823 804 882 972 1,624 2,363 1990 2,984 3,031 2,562 1,550 1,268 1,157 821 769 823 1,050 1,697 2,737 1991 4,074 2,764 2,407 2,048 1,610 1,274 902 812 855 927 1,898 2,758 1992 3,231 2,465 1,925 1,542 1,171 884 784 782 863 1,105 1,652 3,166 1993 4,148 3,370 2,880 1,927 1,448 1,010 915 840 934 1,099 1,918 3,557 1994 3,388 3,166 2,480 1,836 1,234 1,078 865 801

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,339 1,454 1,253 776 413 276 203 197 255 434 851 1,374 1990 1,398 1,234 1,064 769 537 306 230 223 239 459 825 1,269 1991 1,723 1,243 1,076 713 543 303 263 251 309 588 1,176 1,286 1992 1,314 1,174 1,007 828 460 303 291 284 324 558 1,104 1,476 1993 1,847 1,496 1,344 995 531 342 315 291 392 632 1,083 1,429 1994 1,738 1,695 1,285 846 524 347 239 322 329 531 946 1,472 1995 1,619 1,491

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,960 6,840 6,382 4,054 2,529 1,916 1,802 1,659 1,843 2,355 3,769 7,404 1990 8,672 5,800 4,578 3,811 2,474 1,988 1,652 1,791 1,597 2,276 3,426 5,490 1991 7,499 7,400 5,761 3,131 2,231 1,829 1,640 1,708 1,837 2,454 4,304 6,158 1992 7,343 6,834 5,069 4,205 2,436 2,016 1,838 1,681 1,933 2,368 3,963 6,846 1993 7,296 7,526 7,354 4,605 2,613 1,992 1,884 1,811 1,992 2,565 4,648 6,470 1994 9,690

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981 1991 26,377 18,723 16,796 15,181 11,439 10,763 12,769 11,125 8,843 11,156 17,192 20,608 1992 22,907 19,049 15,866 14,174 12,557 10,879 13,768 12,966 11,356 11,672 17,386 22,093 1993 21,489 18,444 16,162 14,455 12,175 12,943

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61 55 58 82 133 188 284 1992 366 354 320 231 118 75 79 75 77 144 211 269 1993 347 368 350 199 124 80 62 67 83 143 235 324 1994 476 455 341 269 150 90 65 69 88 144 187 334 1995 388 406 352 277 140 89 70 72 95 130 242 410 1996 458 445 381 279 153 97 67 69 90 162 276 348 1997

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,164 6,056 5,721 4,051 2,446 2,129 1,866 1,485 1,985 2,192 3,612 6,474 1990 6,162 5,181 5,100 4,541 2,412 1,831 1,802 1,772 1,671 2,233 3,251 5,081 1991 6,667 5,956 5,270 3,581 2,481 2,159 1,867 2,057 1,860 2,625 3,855 5,701 1992 7,072 6,690 5,985 4,523 3,289 2,271 2,085 2,055 1,903 3,275 4,714 6,895 1993 7,432 7,800 7,347 4,850 2,842 2,177 1,987 2,033 2,106 3,073 4,355 6,877 1994 8,677

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,343 5,561 5,424 3,672 2,194 1,851 1,671 1,548 1,357 2,083 3,366 4,433 1990 5,136 5,666 4,496 3,289 2,728 1,951 1,639 1,476 1,575 2,249 3,444 5,071 1991 6,279 5,277 4,597 4,047 3,025 2,400 1,831 1,635 1,689 2,099 3,802 5,057 1992 5,564 4,840 3,855 3,179 2,343 1,830 1,575 1,514 1,734 2,240 3,418 5,709 1993 7,058 5,670 5,157 3,785 2,774 1,905 1,801 1,750 1,829 2,236 3,639 6,016 1994

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,177 3,265 2,807 2,041 1,476 881 785 853 859 1,373 2,036 3,704 1990 3,701 2,707 2,391 2,064 1,224 924 889 845 862 1,237 1,963 2,585 1991 3,061 2,971 2,522 1,725 1,068 810 848 823 915 1,365 2,169 2,767 1992 3,659 3,565 2,986 2,322 1,341 999 812 855 910 1,482 2,092 3,396 1993 3,123 3,522 3,444 2,169 1,218 992 818 914 983 1,510 2,404 3,286 1994 4,653 3,681 3,246 2,031 1,437 982 812 973

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130 1,686 1,617 1,786 3,865 6,030 10,074 1991 13,062 10,137 8,785 5,471 3,084 1,643 1,853 1,415 2,229 4,335 8,565 10,938 1992 11,235 10,037 9,113 6,870 3,632 1,986 1,759 1,615 1,954 4,108 7,918 11,087 1993 12,658 11,647 10,442 7,011 3,438 2,418 1,843 1,719 2,326 4,637 7,976

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Massachusetts (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,181 40,868 39,690 30,815 23,495 19,798 19,305 23,154 22,753 24,627 24,646 31,456 2002 44,559 40,420 40,295 29,989 ...

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 45,337 36,026 35,468 29,023 ... 2005 42,941 41,516 38,987 36,599 35,972 45,327 48,696 49,698 42,454 32,097 30,402 ...

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 842 753 771 551 339 188 154 140 176 248 393 817 1990 899 803 618 518 307 221 153 153 170 265 380 585 1991 795 798 672 484 ...

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 20,824 19,105 20,311 2000's 24,918 23,374 24,841 54,122 61,150 70,463 62,530 62,115 71,170 ...

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,116 4,376 4,414 4,437 4,100 4,955 4,438 4,601 5,034 5,371 1990's 5,073 5,028 5,862 6,142 6,412 ...

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Hampshire (Including...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3,171 3,309 2,951 2,280 1,441 1,134 1,003 888 1,182 1,589 1,904 2,520 2002 2,917 3,188 2,833 2,179 1,815 1,423 1,657 1,055 ...

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Texas (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    377,943 379,876 294,294 281,431 267,757 293,156 2004 308,056 300,833 284,762 266,451 286,412 311,889 339,873 336,875 299,518 291,473 268,077 298,771 2005 283,104 246,886 ...

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16,571 1991 21,026 18,276 16,026 10,882 5,835 4,162 3,760 3,859 4,580 7,438 12,251 17,451 1992 21,204 19,482 17,679 12,210 6,793 4,520 4,046 4,132 4,579 8,439 12,784 18,385 1993 ...

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    13,264 12,147 11,254 14,924 25,902 2006 25,596 23,451 22,320 16,673 12,748 14,289 18,023 17,171 12,559 13,555 17,451 24,135 2007 29,886 31,709 22,007 16,753 13,449 14,165 ...

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arizona (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    23,349 23,090 26,140 2005 24,400 22,209 17,591 20,779 22,660 23,609 35,036 34,587 26,451 24,130 22,651 28,011 2006 26,212 24,177 22,606 21,814 22,339 30,548 34,718 36,448 30,678 ...

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,652 2,870 3,515 4,876 2006 5,025 4,699 4,451 2,549 2,659 3,204 3,812 3,447 2,516 2,972 ... 7,928 7,616 9,230 10,239 2015 10,439 8,451 8,652 9,744 8,377 7,661 8,917 8,330 7,939 ...

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 334,583 310,419 322,572 2000's 340,988 321,867 348,523 351,009 339,407 345,573 332,257 368,428 ...

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 63,740 65,536 70,232 1970's 76,585 76,441 79,987 80,219 90,412 89,651 76,981 67,839 81,121 ...

  3. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    77.5 67.3 65.2 65.8 65.8 65.9 1987-2015 Alabama 79.3 78.9 76.2 76.6 78.4 77.6 1990-2015 Alaska 87.7 88.6 94.9 94.5 94.5 98.1 1990-2015 Arizona 88.7 87.8 86.6 85.5 84.4 83.8 1990-2015 Arkansas 55.6 51.5 40.2 43.7 45.5 42.5 1990-2015 California 54.1 54.3 50.0 49.9 48.4 50.0 1990-2015 Colorado 94.6 93.8 92.2 94.7 94.5 NA 1990-2015 Connecticut 65.4 65.4 65.1 57.9 67.2 76.2 1990-2015 Delaware 49.8 53.4 43.7 45.0 46.2 45.7 1990-2015 District of Columbia 100.0 16.9 17.9 19.1 19.9 21.4 1990-2015 Florida

  4. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    97.4 96.3 95.8 95.7 95.5 95.7 1989-2015 Alabama 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.0 1989-2015 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 Arizona 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 Arkansas 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 California 98.5 98.3 97.5 96.1 94.8 94.9 1989-2015 Colorado 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 NA 1989-2015 Connecticut 97.3 96.8 96.7 95.3 95.9 96.3 1989-2015 Delaware 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1989-2015 District of Columbia 75.5 75.0 73.9

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 202,620 187,054 199,511 2000's 208,848 191,608 211,950 206,134 212,666 222,249 200,361 214,546 ...

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in North Carolina (Including...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,369 207,427 210,606 2000's 226,543 200,542 229,338 212,534 219,814 225,423 218,379 232,374 ...

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 259,790 262,598 263,607 2000's 256,821 242,184 243,955 244,484 220,602 221,088 212,864 211,020 ...

  8. Training: Compressed Air Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Air Systems Training: Compressed Air Systems April 16, 2014 - 6:32pm Addthis Learn about the diverse training sessions offered. The courses are taught by highly qualified instructors who have met rigorous standards. View additional compressed air system resources. Compressed Air Systems Tools Training - 2-hour webcast Availability: Online webcast A two-hour webcast on the use of the Compressed Air Challenge (CAC®) Toolkit and the AIRMaster+ software tool is available that introduces

  9. Concrete Company Moving to Natural Gas with Clean Cities | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG), thanks to the help of the Vehicle ... project covered the incremental cost of 14 CNG cement mixing vehicles for Ozinga Brothers ...

  10. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  11. Internal roll compression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Graydon E.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a machine for squeezing water out of peat or other material of low tensile strength; the machine including an inner roll eccentrically positioned inside a tubular outer roll, so as to form a gradually increasing pinch area at one point therebetween, so that, as the rolls rotate, the material is placed between the rolls, and gets wrung out when passing through the pinch area.

  12. RF pulse compression development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2016-02-16

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. In conclusion, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  14. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blinov, Nikita; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2015-10-29

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. Furthermore, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  15. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  16. Low emissions compression ignited engine technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Gerald N.; Kilkenny, Jonathan P.; Fluga, Eric C.; Duffy, Kevin P.

    2007-04-03

    A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas...

  18. Word aligned bitmap compression method, data structure, and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Kesheng; Shoshani, Arie; Otoo, Ekow

    2004-12-14

    The Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) bitmap compression method and data structure is a relatively efficient method for searching and performing logical, counting, and pattern location operations upon large datasets. The technique is comprised of a data structure and methods that are optimized for computational efficiency by using the WAH compression method, which typically takes advantage of the target computing system's native word length. WAH is particularly apropos to infrequently varying databases, including those found in the on-line analytical processing (OLAP) industry, due to the increased computational efficiency of the WAH compressed bitmap index. Some commercial database products already include some version of a bitmap index, which could possibly be replaced by the WAH bitmap compression techniques for potentially increased operation speed, as well as increased efficiencies in constructing compressed bitmaps. Combined together, this technique may be particularly useful for real-time business intelligence. Additional WAH applications may include scientific modeling, such as climate and combustion simulations, to minimize search time for analysis and subsequent data visualization.

  19. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  20. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  1. DOE Technical Targets for Fuel Cell System Humidifiers and Air Compression

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy System Humidifiers and Air Compression Systems DOE Technical Targets for Fuel Cell System Humidifiers and Air Compression Systems These tables list the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technical targets for transportation fuel cell system humidifiers and air compression systems. These targets have been developed with input from the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, which includes automotive and energy companies, and specifically the Fuel Cell Technical Team. The guideline

  2. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Compressed Natural Gas Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    estimate the cost to install fueling infrastructure for vehicles that run on propane. Curtis Donaldson from CleanFUEL USA discusses key components of a propane station, how a...

  4. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... This scenario provides a snapshot from which we can test the sensitivity of CNG project ... Test runs were then done with the calculator, and the results were plotted to establish a ...

  5. Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 1 24 19 15 3 0 8 23 22 2014 32 29 25 26 22 19 12 0 0 9 20 22 2015 27 17 20 21 28 23 23 5 0 4 20 27 2016 25 22 21 28 0 0

  6. Regulated Emissions from Diesel and Compressed Natural Gas Transit...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses

  7. Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10-11, 2009 in Washington, D.C. cngh2workshopagenda.pdf (45.89 KB) More Documents & Publications Overview of DOE - DOT December 2009 CNG and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Forum ...

  8. Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 33 27 30 29 9 26 20 19 22 27 28 32 2015 30 32 38 28 19 19 21 21 15 21...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the 2012 Honda Civic CNG is available in downloadable form.

  10. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... cost-effectiveness, more- consistent operational costs, increased energy security, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, reduced local air pollution, and reduced noise pollution. ...

  11. Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting Number: 016 284 994 Meeting Password: h2 Host Key: 604992 DAY 2 - Webinar Information Meeting Number: 016 499 453 Meeting Password: H2 Host Key: 142822 Thursday - December ...

  12. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  13. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  15. Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 115 217 214

  16. Compressed U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 303 291

  17. Advanced Management of Compressed Air Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how a compressed air system works and the benefits of optimal compressed air system performance. This training is designed to help end users as well as industry solution providers learn...

  18. Improving Compressed Air System Performance Third Edition | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Compressed Air System Performance Third Edition Improving Compressed Air System Performance Third Edition PDF icon Improving Compressed Air Sourcebook version 3.pdf More Documents ...

  19. Compressive strength of carbon fibers (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Compressive strength of carbon fibers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compressive strength of carbon fibers Direct transverse compressive test of pitch-based ...

  20. Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Effect of Compression Ratio and Piston Geometry on RCCI load limit Explores the effect of compression ratio and piston ...

  1. Compressed Air Best Practices Tools Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Air Best Practices Tools Compressed Air Challenge® DOE AIRMaster+ Software CAC LogTool Software Date: May 15, 2007 Instructor: Tom Taranto Agenda Training Webcast Introduction Introduction of Tools - 10 minutes Compressed Air Challenge ® Tools - 25 minutes AIRMaster+ Software Tool - 25 minutes LogTool v2 - 25 minutes ESA Process - 20 minutes Q&A / Summary - 15 minutes Training Web Cast Series Purpose: To provide information on Compressed Air BestPractices tools used during DOE's

  2. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) This presentation by Pinakin Patel and Ludwig Lipp of Fuel Cell Energy was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop on March 20, 2013. csd_workshop_4_patel.pdf (368.07 KB) More Documents & Publications Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Award Success Story: FuelCell Energy Inc. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report

  3. Gaseous Hydrogen Compression | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    » Gaseous Hydrogen Compression Gaseous Hydrogen Compression Hydrogen is typically produced at relatively low pressures (20-30 bar) and must be compressed prior to transport. Most compressors used today for gaseous hydrogen compression are either positive displacement compressors or centrifugal compressors. Positive displacement compressors can be reciprocating or rotary. Reciprocating compressors use a motor with a linear drive to move a piston or a diaphragm back and forth. This motion

  4. Compressed Air Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance » Compressed Air Systems Compressed Air Systems Applying best energy management practices and purchasing energy-efficient equipment can lead to significant savings in compressed air systems. Use the software tools, training, and publications listed below to improve performance and save energy. Compressed Air Tools Tools to Assess Your Energy System AIRMaster+ Tool AIRMaster+ LogTool Qualified Specialists Qualified Specialists have passed a rigorous competency examination on

  5. Calais, ME Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    452 1,028 6,952 13,425 2,694 14,030 2007-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.53 4.46 4.30 8.45 6.22 3.23 2007-2015 Compressed Natural Gas Volumes 0 115 217 212 2012-2015 Compressed Natural Gas Prices -- 6.20 12.40 5.69 2012

  6. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  7. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  8. Forecourt Storage and Compression Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecourt Storage and Compression Options DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE Headquarters 25 January 2006 Mark E. Richards Gas Technology Institute 2 Overview > Project objectives > Gaseous delivery configurations > Analysis tool: CASCADE H2 Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results - Compressor-storage relationships - Vehicle fueling times - Temperature effects > Cost profiles >

  9. Fuel cell separator with compressible sealing flanges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mientek, A.P.

    1984-03-30

    A separator for separating adjacent fuel cells in a stack of such cells includes a flat, rectangular, gas-impermeable plate disposed between adjacent cells and having two opposite side margins thereof folded back over one side of the plate to form two first seal flanges and having the other side margins thereof folded back over the opposite side of the plate to form two second seal flanges, each of the seal flanges cooperating with the plate to define a channel in which is disposed a resiliently compressible stack of thin metal sheets. The two first seal flanges cooperate with the electrolyte matrix of one of the cells to form a gas-impermeable seal between an electrode of the one cell and one of two reactant gas manifolds. The second seal flanges cooperate with the electrolyte matrix of the other cell for forming a gas-impermeable seal between an electrode of the other cell and the other of the two reactant gas manifolds. The seal flanges cooperate with the associated compressible stacks of sheets for maintaining a spacing between the plate and the electrolyte matrices while accommodating variation of that spacing.

  10. Fuel cell separator with compressible sealing flanges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mientek, Anthony P.

    1985-04-30

    A separator for separating adjacent fuel cells in a stack of such cells includes a flat, rectangular, gas-impermeable plate disposed between adjacent cells and having two opposite side margins thereof folded back over one side of the plate to form two first seal flanges and having the other side margins thereof folded back over the opposite side of the plate to form two second seal flanges, each of the seal flanges cooperating with the plate to define a channel in which is disposed a resiliently compressible stack of thin metal sheets. The two first seal flanges cooperate with the electrolyte matrix of one of the cells to form a gas-impermeable seal between an electrode of the one cell and one of two reactant gas manifolds. The second seal flanges cooperate with the electrolyte matrix of the other cell for forming a gas-impermeable seal between an electrode of the other cell and the other of the two reactant gas manifolds. The seal flanges cooperate with the associated compressible stacks of sheets for maintaining a spacing between the plate and the electrolyte matrices while accommodating variation of that spacing.

  11. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  12. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  16. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Onyshczak, R.J.; Hopper, T.

    1996-10-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  17. Analyzing Your Compressed Air System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analyzing Your Compressed Air System Analyzing Your Compressed Air System This tip sheet outlines the process to analyze industrial compressed air systems and ensure proper system configuration. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET #4 Analyzing Your Compressed Air System (August 2004) (243.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Compressed Air System Control Strategies Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant

  18. Proceedings: Geotechnology workshop on compressed-air energy storage in porous media sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The extensive experience of the natural gas industry with gas storage in underground porous media is directly applicable to the storage of air for compressed-air energy storage plants. In this workshop, natural gas industry representatives provided utility personnel with a basic understanding of the geology of porous media and strategies for developing air storage reservoirs.

  19. A compute-Efficient Bitmap Compression Index for Database Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    FastBit: A Compute-Efficient Bitmap Compression Index for Database Applications The Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) bitmap compression method and data structure is highly efficient for performing search and retrieval operations on large datasets. The WAH technique is optimized for computational efficiency. The WAH-based bitmap indexing software, called FastBit, is particularly appropriate to infrequently varying databases, including those found in the on-line analytical processing (OLAP) industry. Some commercial database products already include some Version of a bitmap index,more » which could possibly be replaced by the WAR bitmap compression techniques for potentially large operational speedup. Experimental results show performance improvements by an average factor of 10 over bitmap technology used by industry, as well as increased efficiencies in constructing compressed bitmaps. FastBit can be use as a stand-alone index, or integrated into a database system. ien integrated into a database system, this technique may be particularly useful for real-time business analysis applications. Additional FastRit applications may include efficient real-time exploration of scientific models, such as climate and combustion simulations, to minimize search time for analysis and subsequent data visualization. FastBit was proven theoretically to be time-optimal because it provides a search time proportional to the number of elements selected by the index.« less

  20. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  1. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, A.R. II [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering and Process Dept.

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  2. Tuning and synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures by mechanical compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Li, Binsong

    2015-11-17

    A mechanical compression method can be used to tune semiconductor nanoparticle lattice structure and synthesize new semiconductor nanostructures including nanorods, nanowires, nanosheets, and other three-dimensional interconnected structures. II-VI or IV-VI compound semiconductor nanoparticle assemblies can be used as starting materials, including CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, ZnS, PbSe, and PbS.

  3. Non-Vapor Compression HVAC Technologies Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While vapor-compression technologies have served heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) needs very effectively, and have been the dominant HVAC technology for close to 100 years, the conventional refrigerants used in vapor-compression equipment contribute to global climate change when released to the atmosphere. The Building Technologies Office is evaluating low-global warming potential (GWP) alternatives to vapor-compression technologies.

  4. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  5. Compressed Air Storage Strategies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies (August 2004) (258.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Compressed Air System Control Strategies Stabilizing System Pressure Effect of Intake on Compressor Performance

  6. Compressed Air Storage Strategies; Industrial Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review the plant's compressed air demand patterns to determine whether storage would be benefcial. * Examine the ...

  7. Preventive Maintenance Strategies for Compressed Air Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suggested Actions * Establish a regular, well-organized maintenance program in accordance ... that all compressed air system maintenance needs are performed properly, on ...

  8. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional feedback on the worksop received via a request for information issued in ...

  9. Optimization of Storage vs. Compression Capacity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation by Amgad Elgowainy of Argonne National Laboratory was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

  10. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  11. Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System - Compressed Air Tip Sheet #5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing how to determine the right air quality for compressed air systems.

  12. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  13. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  14. A New Approach for Fingerprint Image Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazieres, Bertrand

    1997-12-01

    The FBI has been collecting fingerprint cards since 1924 and now has over 200 million of them. Digitized with 8 bits of grayscale resolution at 500 dots per inch, it means 2000 terabytes of information. Also, without any compression, transmitting a 10 Mb card over a 9600 baud connection will need 3 hours. Hence we need a compression and a compression as close to lossless as possible: all fingerprint details must be kept. A lossless compression usually do not give a better compression ratio than 2:1, which is not sufficient. Compressing these images with the JPEG standard leads to artefacts which appear even at low compression rates. Therefore the FBI has chosen in 1993 a scheme of compression based on a wavelet transform, followed by a scalar quantization and an entropy coding : the so-called WSQ. This scheme allows to achieve compression ratios of 20:1 without any perceptible loss of quality. The publication of the FBI specifies a decoder, which means that many parameters can be changed in the encoding process: the type of analysis/reconstruction filters, the way the bit allocation is made, the number of Huffman tables used for the entropy coding. The first encoder used 9/7 filters for the wavelet transform and did the bit allocation using a high-rate bit assumption. Since the transform is made into 64 subbands, quite a lot of bands receive only a few bits even at an archival quality compression rate of 0.75 bit/pixel. Thus, after a brief overview of the standard, we will discuss a new approach for the bit-allocation that seems to make more sense where theory is concerned. Then we will talk about some implementation aspects, particularly for the new entropy coder and the features that allow other applications than fingerprint image compression. Finally, we will compare the performances of the new encoder to those of the first encoder.

  15. Bunch length compression method for free electron lasers to avoid parasitic compressions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, David R.; Benson, Stephen; Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Tennant, Christopher; Wilson, Guy

    2015-05-26

    A method of bunch length compression method for a free electron laser (FEL) that avoids parasitic compressions by 1) applying acceleration on the falling portion of the RF waveform, 2) compressing using a positive momentum compaction (R.sub.56>0), and 3) compensating for aberration by using nonlinear magnets in the compressor beam line.

  16. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Applications | Department of Energy Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the

  17. MHK technology developments include current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology developments include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, for example, hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering, design, and analysis of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high- performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  18. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-11

    Here we report compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  19. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  20. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  1. Combustion engine variable compression ratio apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence; Keith E.; Strawbridge, Bryan E.; Dutart, Charles H.

    2006-06-06

    An apparatus and method for varying a compression ratio of an engine having a block and a head mounted thereto. The apparatus and method includes a cylinder having a block portion and a head portion, a piston linearly movable in the block portion of the cylinder, a cylinder plug linearly movable in the head portion of the cylinder, and a valve located in the cylinder plug and operable to provide controlled fluid communication with the block portion of the cylinder.

  2. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Peter J; Rousculp, Christopher L; Reinovsky, Robert E; Reass, William A; Griego, Jeffrey R; Oro, David M; Merrill, Frank E

    2010-06-28

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  3. General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle General Compression Looks at Energy Storage from a Different Angle February 3, 2011 - 3:36pm Addthis Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. Image of the General Compression CAES system | courtesy of General Compression, Inc. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week, we told you about a new company

  4. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_8_ahluwalia.pdf (1.1 MB) More Documents & Publications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic

  5. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda Agenda for the first day of the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_day1_agenda.pdf (10.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    data to EIA. The number of companies reporting increased by 3 from 2008, to include Alon USA, Chalmette Refining LLC, and Western Refining, Inc. Natural Gas Transportation Update...

  7. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requested by Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham in an effort to enhance natural gas market information and efficiency. Survey respondents would include all operators of...

  9. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  10. Logarithmic compression methods for spectral data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunham, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided for logarithmic compression, transmission, and expansion of spectral data. A log Gabor transformation is made of incoming time series data to output spectral phase and logarithmic magnitude values. The output phase and logarithmic magnitude values are compressed by selecting only magnitude values above a selected threshold and corresponding phase values to transmit compressed phase and logarithmic magnitude values. A reverse log Gabor transformation is then performed on the transmitted phase and logarithmic magnitude values to output transmitted time series data to a user.

  11. An efficient compression scheme for bitmap indices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2004-04-13

    When using an out-of-core indexing method to answer a query, it is generally assumed that the I/O cost dominates the overall query response time. Because of this, most research on indexing methods concentrate on reducing the sizes of indices. For bitmap indices, compression has been used for this purpose. However, in most cases, operations on these compressed bitmaps, mostly bitwise logical operations such as AND, OR, and NOT, spend more time in CPU than in I/O. To speedup these operations, a number of specialized bitmap compression schemes have been developed; the best known of which is the byte-aligned bitmap code (BBC). They are usually faster in performing logical operations than the general purpose compression schemes, but, the time spent in CPU still dominates the total query response time. To reduce the query response time, we designed a CPU-friendly scheme named the word-aligned hybrid (WAH) code. In this paper, we prove that the sizes of WAH compressed bitmap indices are about two words per row for large range of attributes. This size is smaller than typical sizes of commonly used indices, such as a B-tree. Therefore, WAH compressed indices are not only appropriate for low cardinality attributes but also for high cardinality attributes.In the worst case, the time to operate on compressed bitmaps is proportional to the total size of the bitmaps involved. The total size of the bitmaps required to answer a query on one attribute is proportional to the number of hits. These indicate that WAH compressed bitmap indices are optimal. To verify their effectiveness, we generated bitmap indices for four different datasets and measured the response time of many range queries. Tests confirm that sizes of compressed bitmap indices are indeed smaller than B-tree indices, and query processing with WAH compressed indices is much faster than with BBC compressed indices, projection indices and B-tree indices. In addition, we also verified that the average query response time

  12. Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry, Third Edition Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Third Edition AMO's "Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for ...

  13. Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This tip sheet discusses a method for determining the cost of compressed air at industrial ... More Documents & Publications Compressed Air System Control Strategies Select an ...

  14. Robust ferromagnetism in the compressed permanent magnet Sm 2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Robust ferromagnetism in the compressed permanent magnet Sm 2 Co 17 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Robust ferromagnetism in the compressed permanent ...

  15. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection ...

  16. High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines High Fidelity Modeling of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Engines Most accurate and detailed chemical kinetic ...

  17. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression ...

  18. Evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenge(R) Training Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This Evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenge Training Program was prepared with the ... Evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenge Training Program i ii Table of Contents ...

  19. Compressive Shear Test to Accurately Measure Adhesion of PV Encapsulan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressive Shear Test to Accurately Measure Adhesion of PV Encapsulants Compressive Shear Test to Accurately Measure Adhesion of PV Encapsulants Presented at the PV Module ...

  20. Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression This presentation by Matther Weaver of Pdc ...

  1. Compression set in Gas Blown Condensation Cured Polysiloxane...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Compression set in Gas Blown Condensation Cured Polysiloxane Elastomers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compression set in Gas Blown Condensation Cured Polysiloxane ...

  2. H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) Presentation by Matthew Hooks of TIAX at the...

  3. Rotary Vapor Compression Cycle Technology: A Pathway to Ultra...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rotary Vapor Compression Cycle Technology: A Pathway to Ultra-Efficient Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Rotary Vapor Compression Cycle Technology: A Pathway to...

  4. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Shock compression of precompressed deuterium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Shock compression of precompressed deuterium Here we report quasi-isentropic ...

  5. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications High-Pressure Tube ...

  6. Evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenge Training Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... aware of compressed air system efficien- cy measures prior to attending the CAC training. ... Compressed air system efficien- cy and consulting services represented a very small ...

  7. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report ...

  8. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen ...

  9. Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Title: Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Authors: Naumov, Ivan I. ; ...

  10. Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen Storage at SAE-International Open Issues in the Development of Safety Standards for Compressed Hydrogen...

  11. Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse You ...

  12. A Multicomponent Blend as a Diesel Fuel Surrogate for Compression...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Multicomponent Blend as a Diesel Fuel Surrogate for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Title A Multicomponent Blend as a Diesel Fuel Surrogate for Compression Ignition...

  13. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Access the recording and download ...

  14. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  15. 2014- LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by...

  16. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  17. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between ~200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to ~900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  18. Simultaneous dual mode combustion engine operating on spark ignition and homogenous charge compression ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fiveland, Scott B.; Wiggers, Timothy E.

    2004-06-22

    An engine particularly suited to single speed operation environments, such as stationary power generators. The engine includes a plurality of combustion cylinders operable under homogenous charge compression ignition, and at least one combustion cylinder operable on spark ignition concepts. The cylinder operable on spark ignition concepts can be convertible to operate under homogenous charge compression ignition. The engine is started using the cylinders operable under spark ignition concepts.

  19. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  20. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).