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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past incidents. Analysis of data stored in existing databases can lead to useful conclusions and reduction of chemical incidents and consequences of incidents. An incident database is a knowledge based system that can give an insight to the situation which led to an incident. Effective analysis of data from a database can help in development of information that can help reduce future incidents: cause of an incident, critical equipment, the type of chemical released, and the type of injury and victim. In this research, Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss incidents. Petroleum related incidents are also excluded from the HSEES system. Studies show that HSEES covers only 37% of all incidents in the US. This scaling ratio was used to estimate the total universe size.

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a fire at an oilfield waste disposal facility (hereafter, disposal facility) near Rosharon, Texas, south of Houston. The fire occurred as two vacuum trucks were off-loading liquid wastes from oil and gas production wells. The trucks arrived at the disposal facility within a few minutes of each other and were parked approximately 16 feet apart. The two drivers got out of their trucks, left the engines running, and told the disposal facility employees that the trucks were to be drained and rinsed out. Both drivers then went to the drivers ’ shed to complete paperwork and to wait for the washout to be completed. (1) The fire was caused by the ignition of hydrocarbon vapor released during the off-loading of basic

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident  

SciTech Connect

Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

130 The Journal of Ocean Technology Spindrift Copyright Journal of Ocean Technology 2012 Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, GIS data, and personnel. It activated its Disaster Response Team to provide assistance to users and services through its disaster response web site. These included an online oil spill plume trajectory model Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident, an analysis

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

5

STEM-ing the Tide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide September 29, 2010 - 4:29pm Addthis Ali Zaidi Special Assistant to the Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the MacArthur Foundation rolled out its latest class of "geniuses" - 23 Americans who stand out because of their creativity and enterprise. Each recipient of the honor (and the $500,000 prize) has made an extraordinary contribution. One of those recipients is Amir Abo-Shaeer, an engineer in the aerospace and telecommunications industries who decided 10 years ago to go back to high school - this time as a teacher. At his alma mater, Dos Pueblos High School (in Santa Barbara, California), Amir created "a school within a school" built around a hands-on curriculum that helps students learn by connecting the ideas of physics, engineering and mathematics through

6

Personnel Change Notification ImagIng: GRSF/T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personnel Change Notification OGS Form 3 ImagIng: GRSF/T Admit Year/Term: GS Web Front Desk: Office., reviewers, coordinators and chairs) Update: View all AIM Graduate Studies pages and enter decisions on GS02: Search for and view applicants; edit emails Connect: Add, search for and communicate with prospects

Hart, Gus

7

"Dark Web: Exploring and Min-ing the Dark Side of the Web"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: "Dark Web: Exploring and Min- ing the Dark Side of the Web" Speaker: Director, Prof will review the emerging research in Terrorism Informatics based on a web mining perspective. Recent progress in the internationally re- nowned Dark Web project will be reviewed, including: deep/dark web spider- ing (web sites

Michelsen, Claus

8

13:00 Begrung und Symposiumserffnung Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerd Holbach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windenergie-Gewinnung Dipl.-Ing. Jörgen Thiele Stiftung Offshore-Windenergie, Varel 14:45 Evolution der Meyer Werft GmbH, Papenburg 14:00 Energiewende als Chance und Heraus- forderung am Beispiel der Offshore challenges for ships and offshore structures (Englisch) Dr.-Ing. Bas Buchner, Maritime Research Institute

Berlin,Technische Universität

9

"Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years Posted: December 5, 2013 - 4:48pm At a Nov. 14 visit to Y-12, National Nuclear Security Administration's Deputy Administrator for Defense Don Cook shared his outlook on the future and his thanks to employees for continuing their 70-year tradition of making America safer. "There are three things to remember," Cook told a meeting of NNSA Production Office and Y-12 employees. "We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America." Cook also shared his thanks for preparing for the potential furlough in October because of the government shutdown and lack of appropriations. During what was the longest government shutdown to date, Cook said Y-12

10

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build-ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build- ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and safe movement. How- ever, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance of transportation facilities, and through the travel behaviors they encourage

Wang, Yuhang

11

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

12

ing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2002 ... GAs are search algorithms based on the mechanics of natural selection and natural genetics. They combine the concept of survival of the.

13

Large-magnitude geomagnetic disturbances in the North Sea region: Statistics, causes, and forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-magnitude geomagnetic disturbances in the North Sea region: Statistics, causes require an undisturbed geomagnetic field. The Danish Meteorological Institute cur- rently offers real- ing project aiming at the development of geomagnetic forecast services, we have investigated

Gleisner, Hans

14

Incident Handling Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] Incident Handling Activities. Since 1989 the National Institute of Standards ...

15

Overview of Incidents Related to Live Working  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress in the research on injury and fatality information among workers who perform energized (live) and/or de-energized work. While every effort is made in the industry to avoid incidents during work on energized and de-energized lines, they do occur, and there are lessons embedded within every incident from which the utility industry can benefit, if the incidents are thoroughly analyzed, root causes are identified, and corrective actions are taken. The primary objective of...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable...

17

January 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of...

18

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information ...

19

Incidents of Security Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1210-2012 September 2012 DOE STANDARD Incidents of Security Concern U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1210-2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1210-2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................ IV INCIDENTS OF SECURITY CONCERN......................................................................................1 1. SCOPE ....................................................................................................................................1 2. PURPOSE...............................................................................................................................1

20

Incident Investigation and Reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a model procedure for incident investigations based on an examination of programs at fourteen utilities believed to have good and effective procedures. The model was compiled by an expert who also drew on materials from other industries. An outline presents the basic procedure while the main text discusses in more detail alternate methods that may be preferable for a specific utility.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #472: June 4, 2007 The Causes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Another 25% of congestion is caused by traffic incidents, such as crashes and disabled vehicles. Other causes for congestion include bad weather, work zones, poor signal...

22

Material development in the SI sub 3 N sub 4 system using glass encapsulated Hip'ing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP'ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 21:49 To: incidentcoordination@nist.gov Subject: Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

27

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

Robert J. Turk

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

31

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

32

Cyber Security Incidents, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reporting Computing Security Incidents Reporting Computing Security Incidents Incident Reporting Hotline: 631-344-8484 Security Incidents A computer security incident can range from a simple virus to the disclosure of sensitive information. Incidents can be minor, important, or significant. Incidents that must be reported include computer or network related activity, internal or external to the Laboratory, that may impact the Laboratory's mission. Examples of such activities include: the possibility of: loss of data; denial of services; compromise of computer security; unauthorized access to data that the Laboratory is required to control by law, regulation, or DOE orders; investigative activity by legal, law enforcement, bureaucratic, or political authorities; or a public relations embarrassment.

33

Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

Charles Solbrig

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Publications Dipl.-Ing. Ing. Hana Krsn (ne Spickov)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analýzu VLBI dat. Konferenz des CEDR ­ Center for Earth's Dynamic Research. Trest, Czech Republic, 14 ­ 16

Schuh, Harald

36

Cyber Incident Information | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Cyber Incident Information July 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information (PII). January 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of employee and contractor Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Tips to Monitor Your Identity Here is a suggested list of tips to monitor and protect yourself. Assistive Technology Forms Guidance Capital Planning Information Collection Management

37

Definition: Angle of incidence | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angle of incidence Angle of incidence Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Angle of incidence In reference to solar energy systems: the angle a ray of sun makes with a line perpendicular to a surface; for example, a surface directly facing the sun has an angle of incidence of zero, and a surface parallel to the sun (such as a sunrise striking a horizontal rooftop) has an angle of incidence of 90°. Sunlight with an incident angle of 90° tends to be absorbed, while lower angles tend to be reflected.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Angle of incidence is a measure of deviation of something from "straight on", for example: in the approach of a ray to a surface, or the angle at which the wing or horizontal tail of an airplane is installed on the fuselage, measured relative to the axis of the fuselage.

38

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management » JC3 Incident Reporting Management » JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting Procedures U.S. Department of Energy Facilities/Contractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all cyber security incidents involving information or information systems, including privacy breaches, under DOE or DOE contractor control must be identified, mitigated, categorized, and reported to the Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (JC3) in accordance with JC3 procedures and guidance." This document outlines the referenced JC3 reporting procedures and guidance to facilitate your reporting and CIRC's response activity. CIRC should be informed of all reportable cyber security incidents as specified below.

39

Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems are a challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal ... Keywords: Contrast, Dynamic detection of perturbations, Evolving system, Fast-neutron reactor, Neighbourhood, Noise

Laurent Hartert; Danielle Nuzillard; Jean-Philippe Jeannot

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Command System (ICS) Training Incident Command System (ICS) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports the emergency response community by promoting interagency cooperation and developing training that enhances response efforts. An example of such support involves the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Response and its compliance efforts toward the Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 (HSPD-5), which includes the implementation of National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Response Framework (NRF). The ICS, which has been recognized for its training curricula that has exceeded national standards, is an on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept that was originally designed for emergency management agencies, but

42

Chapter_11_Incidents_of_Security_Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Incidents of Security Concern This chapter covers the DOE HQ implementation of DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Attachment 5, Incidents of Security Concern. HS-91 manages the HQ Security Incidents Program. Incidents of Security Concern (henceforth referred to as Incidents) are actions, inactions, or events that are believed to: * Pose threats to national security interests and/or DOE assets * Create potentially serious or dangerous security situations * Significantly affect the safeguards and security program's capability to protect DOE safeguards and security interests * Indicate failure to adhere to security procedures * Reveal that the system is not functioning properly, by identifying and/or mitigating potential threats (e.g., detecting suspicious activity, hostile acts, etc.).

43

Definition: Cyber Security Incident | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Security Incident Security Incident Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cyber Security Incident Any malicious act or suspicious event that: Compromises, or was an attempt to compromise, the Electronic Security Perimeter or Physical Security Perimeter of a Critical Cyber Asset, or, Disrupts, or was an attempt to disrupt, the operation of a Critical Cyber Asset.[1] Related Terms Electronic Security Perimeter References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Cyber_Security_Incident&oldid=480296" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

44

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FacilitiesContractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all...

45

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

46

AMI Cyber Security Incident Response Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used by system and asset owners to assist in the preparation and response to AMI cyber security incidents. This document was developed by conducting interviews with EPRI members, AMI asset owners, and vendors, regarding practices involved in responding to AMI cyber security incidents and mapping the responses to requirements put forth by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Smart Grid (Open-SG) Working ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Causes of Pipeline Failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Types of defects that can cause pipeline failures...pipe body Mechanical damage Environmental causes Corrosion (external or internal) Hydrogen-stress cracking External stress corrosion cracking Internal sulfide-stress cracking Hydrogen blistering Fatigue Miscellaneous causes Secondary loads Weldments to pipe surface Wrinkle bends Internal combustion...

48

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

49

Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southeast Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a well-known consequence of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim of this study was to extract the HCC incidence rate in the province of Kerman, located in southern part of Iran, and compare the data with other parts of the country. Materials and Methods: All medical records related to HCC were collected through hospitals or outpatient services in public or private centers. The records of all oncology, radiotherapy, and pathology centers in Kerman province were actively searched between 1999 and 2006. The annual incidence of HCC around the country was calculated, using the

A Rticle; Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam; Ali-akbar Haghdoost; Seyed Hamed Hoseini; Rashid Ramazani; Mohammad Rezazadehkermani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Causes and Control of Wood Decay,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the processes lead to different time scal- ing and different types of solutions. In the case of a thin tight corresponds to 6 weeks, whereas for a tight seal the respective time scale is of the order of hun- dreds be larger inside a low-permeability seal than in per- meable aquifer sand, due to the presence

51

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COEIDTR01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COE­IDTR­01 1.0 Purpose To provide College faculty or disaster within a College-operated network closet. 2.0 Scope 2.1 Incident Response: Incident response for developing and implementing Disaster Tolerance/Recovery plans. 3.0 Policy 3.1 Incident Response: Any desktop

Demirel, Melik C.

52

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents  

SciTech Connect

There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

Comparative analysis of hydrogen fire and explosion incidents: quarterly report No. 2, December 1, 1977--February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional hydrogen incident reports compiled during this quarter have increased the size of the computerized data base to a current total of 280 incidents. Listings of 165 incidents that have occurred in industrial and transportation operations since 1968 are presented here. Sample case histories in six different cause categories are provided together with a discussion of common safety problems contributing to these incidents. Some of these problems are inadequate detection measures for hydrogen leaks and fires and ineffective purging with inert gas. A preliminary comparison of losses due to natural gas fires/explosions and hydrogen incidents indicates that hydrogen explosions have been, on the average, four-to-six times as damaging as natural gas explosions. Some tentative explanations for this result are presented but await confirmation from a more sophisticated statistical analysis.

Zalosh, R.G.; Short, T.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident Teams Responses. From NIST Tech Beat: June 28, 2013. ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Material development in the SI{sub 3}N{sub 4} system using glass encapsulated Hip`ing. Final report, Phase 2: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP`ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nervous breakdown causes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nervous breakdown causes Nervous breakdown causes Name: Renee Nuckols Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Physiologically, what causes a mental/nervous breakdown besides normal everyday stress? Is it a process that kills neurons? Also please include some internal and external symptoms that occur prior to, during, and after a nervous breakdown. Replies: "Nervous breakdown" may be a misnomer, though. What "breaks down" is not so much the nerves and neurons, but the adrenal glands. A more accurate term would be the "exhaustion phase of the general adaption syndrome," but obviously that is quite a mouthful. Excessive STRESS is what can cause "nervous breakdowns." Stress includes the obvious things like exam pressures, trouble with parents or teachers, peer pressure, but also includes things like a significant personal achievement, making a major purchase, changes in routines of life (sleeping, eating habits), moving to a different part of town - even the change in seasons and temperatures. It can come from almost anything which causes a disturbance in normal living. Stress triggers a number of physiological changes collectively termed "GENERAL ADAPTATION SYNDROME." There are three phases: 1) alarm, 2) resistance, and 3) exhaustion. These phases are controlled and regulated by the adrenal glands. Your adrenal glands lie just above your kidneys and are composed of inner and outer parts. The inner part is called the adrenal medulla, and it secretes the hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. These hormones help your body deal with stressful situations. If you were alone and met a gang in some back alley, your adrenal glands would flood your body with the hormones, your blood pressure, heart rate, sweat production would shoot way high! Your body is in a "FIGHT or FLIGHT" mode. (Just thinking about getting in such a situation may have caused some stress!) Well, whenever your body deals with smaller stresses, the same hormones are released. The outer part of the adrenal glands is the adrenal cortex. They also produce hormones, but slightly different ones: glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids. Glucocorticoids can increase blood sugar levels profoundly, while mineralcorticoids affect mineral excretion. These hormones are largely responsible for helping the body deal with prolonged stress. They help provide extra energy and blood supply. For instance, if you had a whole week of finals, your adrenal cortex would work overtime as you burn the midnight oil studying. These instances are the "resistance" phase of the general adaptation syndrome.

59

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reported four species of pollinators (Riley, 1892; Davis, 1967; Frack, 1982; Powell, 1984), including three

Goodman, Robert M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E(Race)ing gender: Stratified identities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the discussion that follows, I will examine, on the broadest level, Hurston's complex negotiation of identity, as manifested in Their Eyes Were Watching God. Central to this investigation is an understanding of the strategies that women, specifically African American women, have adopted, under the auspices of marriage and the patronage system, to seek an equal place within a hegemonic culture. Most importantly, I want to address the cultural and social price exacted for accepting (as seen in the appropriation of white standards, and rejecting (as seen in Janie's trial for her husband's death) those institutions as the basis of one's identity. The cultural and social price that Janie pays, furthermore, challenges her adaptive capacity to stratify her racial and gender identity. Finally, it exacts a toll on the community as a whole, a fact Hurston repeatedly suggests by illustrating the extent to which the community has absorbed hegemonic standards of value and beauty with little or no inspection of or reflection on the effects to itself or to its individual members.

Nguyen, Le Thuy Thi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

IMPROVED GROOVING TOOL FOR TU ING  

te hnology readiness level: 6 a market deliverable has been demonstrated in relevant environments and is in final development . author: alexandra ...

63

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

64

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments: Modeling of Incident Thermal Energy of Long Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc flash hazard assessment of their facilities operating at and above 1000 V. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the incident thermal energy of arc flash were developed for low and medium-voltage industri...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Root Cause Analysis Program Manual, Rev 0 Page 1 ofROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL Pub-5519 (2), Rev. 0Cause Analysis Program Manual, Rev 0 Page 2 of 15 REVISION

Gravois, Melanie C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

What Causes Violent Crime?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses panel data of intentional homicide and robbery rates for a sample of developed and developing countries for the period 1970-1994, based on information from the United Nations World Crime Surveys, to analyze the determinants of national crime rates both across countries and over time. A simple model of the incentives to commit crimes is proposed, which explicitly considers possible causes of the persistence of crime over time (criminal inertia). A panel-data based GMM methodology is used to estimate a dynamic model of national crime rates. This estimator controls for unobserved country-specific effects, the joint endogeneity of some of the explanatory variables, and the existence of some types of measurement errors afflicting the crime data. The results show that increases in income inequality raise crime rates, crime tends to be counter-cyclical, and criminal inertia is significant.

Pablo Fajnzylber; Daniel Lederman; Norman Loayza

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Recent Racial Incidents in Higher Education: A Contemporary Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Racial Incidents in Higher Education 1987b. "King Wants1988. "Hispanics Higher Education's Missing People." Change12-65. Chronicle of Higher Education. 1987. "Racial Brawl

Farrell, Walter C. Jr.; Jones, Cloyzelle K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In his after-action analysis, Haley has been surprised by the number of similarities in response planning, even when disaster scenarios differ dramatically. "Like this incident,...

71

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

72

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

PLUTONIUM RELEASE INCIDENT OF NOVEMBER 20, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A nonnuclear explosion involving an evaporator occurred in a shielded cell in the Radiochemical Processing Pilot Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on Nov. 20, 1959. Plutonium was released from the processing cell, probably as an aerosol of fine particles of plutonium oxide. It is probable that this evaporator system had accumulated -1100 g of nitric acid-insoluble plutonium in the steam stripper packing; the explosion released an estimated 150 g inside Cell 6, with about 135 g in the evaporator subcell, and about 15 g in the larger main cell. No radioactive material was released from the ventilation stacks; no contamination of grounds and facilities occurred outside of a relatively small area of OaK Ridge National Laboratory immediately adjacent to the explosion. No one was injured by the explosion, and no one received more than 2% of a lifetime body burden of plutonium or an overexposure to sources of ionizing radiation either at the time of the incident or daring subsequent cleanup operations. The explosion is considerdd to be the result of rapid reaction of nitrated organic compounds formed by the inadvertent nitration of about 14 liters of a proprietary decontaminating reagent. In cleanup the contamination was bonded to the nearby street and building surfaces with tar, paint, roofing compound, or masonry sealer, as appropriate to the surface. Decontamination of the interior of the pilot-plant building, except the processing cells, was 95% complete on Sept. 1, 1960. Decontamination of the processing cells was delayed 8 months until building modifications could be made to improve containment. Modifications to the pilot plant have been proposed which will preclude dischanges into the laboratory area and its environment of concentrations or amounts of radioactive materials that would be injurious to health or interfere with other laboratory programs. (auth)

King, L.J.; McCarley, W.T.

1961-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI published a Technical Update report, "Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching" (EPRI report 1016830), which introduced a report format and form designed to allow utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database. This new report summarizes work performed on the database in 2009.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness of the situation. Incident databases are excellent resources to learn from past mistakes; however, in order to be effective, incident databases need to be functional in disseminating the lessons learned to users. Therefore, this research is dedicated to improving user accessibility of incident databases. The objective of this research is twofold. The first objective is improving accessibility of the database system by allowing the option of word search as well as folder search for the users. This will satisfy research needs of users who are aware of the hazards at hand and need to access the relevant information. The second objective is to activate the database via integration of the database with an operational software. This will benefit research needs of users who are unaware of the existing hazards. Literature review and text mining of Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) database short reports are employed to develop an initial taxonomy, which is then refined and modified by expert review. The incident reports in MARS database is classified to the right folders in the taxonomy and implemented in a database system based on Microsoft Excel, where the users can retrieve information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords on hazardous substances and equipment is prepared. If the keywords exist in the MOC interface, they will be highlighted, and with the click of a button, will return up to ten relevant incident reports. Using an active and knowledge-based system, people can learn from incidents and near-misses and will be more active to reduce the frequency of recurring incidents.

Khan, Sara Shammni

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the criteria defined in DOE Order 231.1A. Root Cause: TheProgram Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 231.1A, Change 1,

Gravois, Melanie C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Climate Influences on Meningitis Incidence in Northwest Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of meningitis. In this study, the influence of climate on monthly meningitis incidence was examined. Monthly counts of clinically diagnosed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected from ...

Auwal F. Abdussalam; Andrew J. Monaghan; Vanja M. Dukic; Mary H. Hayden; Thomas M. Hopson; Gregor C. Leckebusch; John E. Thornes

79

The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cyber Security Incident Management Program, Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department of Energy operates numerous interconnected computer networks and systems to help accon~plishit s strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science, and the environment. These systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could potentially affect the Department's ability to carry out its mission. During Fiscal Year 2006, the Department experienced 132 incidents of sufficient severity to require reporting to law enforcement, an increase of 22 percent over the prior year. These statistics, troubling as they may be, are not unique to the Department; they are, in fact, reflective of a trend in cyber attacks throughout the government.

80

Public health: emergency management: capability analysis of critical incident response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9/11 terrorist incident, homeland security efforts and the readiness of local emergency management agencies have become focal points in the war on terrorism. A significant issue faced by front line responders has been the significant increase ...

Thomas F. Brady

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

82

Estimation of Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from GOES Visible Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important parameter for terrestrial ecosystem models. Because of its high temporal resolution, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations are very suited to ...

Tao Zheng; Shunlin Liang; Kaicun Wang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Efficiency of critical incident management systems: Instrument development and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is much literature in the area of emergency response management systems. Even so, there is in general a lacuna of literature that deals with the issue of measuring the effectiveness of such systems. The aim of this study is to develop and validate ... Keywords: Critical incident management system (CIMS), Decision support, Emergency response systems, Instrument, Measurement, Media richness theory, National incident management systems (NIMS), Validation

Jin Ki Kim; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

85

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

86

US DOE/NNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation NNSADataRepositoryGuide.pdf...

87

Managing Incidents in Smart Grids à la Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the Cloud Computing paradigm has emerged as a panacea for many problems in traditional IT infrastructures. Much has been said about the potential of Cloud Computing in the context of the Smart Grid, but unfortunately it is still ... Keywords: Smart Grid, SCADA systems, Incident Management, Cloud Computing, Cryptography, Searchable Encryption

Cristina Alcaraz; Isaac Agudo; David Nunez; Javier Lopez

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

SSM/I Brightness Temperature Corrections for Incidence Angle Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incidence angles of the SSM/I radiometers on the DMSP satellites vary from satellite to satellite and exhibit variations of up to 1.5° during one orbit. The effects of these variations on the measured brightness temperatures are investigated ...

Rolf Fuhrhop; Clemens Simmer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary results of a research task sponsored by EPRI's Power Switching Safety and Reliability (PSS&R) project to develop a report format and form that will allow multiple utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Causes of Paint Film Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Common causes of paint film defects...Dip, flow, roller, spray Improper applicator/metering roll speeds Roller Undesirable pattern Swelling of roll Roller Roll improperly ground Roller Foreign material on roll Roller Poor spray gun technique Spray Runs (curtains, sags) Too much solvent Dip, flow, spray Paint surface or drying atmosphere...

91

NIST SP 800-61 Revision 2, Computer Security Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... those caused by natural disasters, power failures ... are reflected in response operations. ... addition, following standardized responses should minimize ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies  

SciTech Connect

More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, D.L. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sumio (Hiroshima Perfectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

B U S I N E S SB U S I N E S S ROBERT H. SMITH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SPRING 2011 VOL. 12 NO. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cellphone products. Employees were asked daily over a period of 10 work- ing days to list any incidents

Milchberg, Howard

96

Feature: Washing Your Laundry in Public - An Analysis of Recent High-Publicity Security Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is, reportedly, a significant rise in the frequency of information security incidents. Quite obviously, there is a very significant rise in the public reporting of such incidents. Whereas all of us are more or less experienced in protecting our ...

Matthew Pemble

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

98

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956  

SciTech Connect

Pertinert details of the incidents are given. Some are illustrated with photographs or diagrams. (M.H.R.)

Hayes, D.F.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident  

SciTech Connect

If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

Sullivan,T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Go-ing for the prediction of protein folding mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kobe University, Kobe, 657-8501, Japan Protein folding has been a long-lived could be relatively simple. These three ingredients are linked together with an almost one-line free work (8, 9). The surprise of the three papers is that apparently one can have both simplicity and fair

Takada, Shoji

103

The physical function-ing of a city sometimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insurance. It is recommended that parents carefully review their homeowners, auto and health insurance. Parents should check their homeowners policy to see whether it will cover a student's possessions while

104

THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE INCIDENCE OF GALACTIC TIDAL FEATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a sample of 54 galaxy clusters (0.04 < z < 0.15) containing 3551 early-type galaxies suitable for study, we identify those with tidal features both interactively and automatically. We find that {approx}3% have tidal features that can be detected with data that reach a 3{sigma} sensitivity limit of 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Regardless of the method used to classify tidal features, or the fidelity imposed on such classifications, we find a deficit of tidally disturbed galaxies with decreasing clustercentric radius that is most pronounced inside of {approx}0.5 R{sub 200}. We cannot distinguish whether the trend arises from an increasing likelihood of recent mergers with increasing clustercentric radius or a decrease in the lifetime of tidal features with decreasing clustercentric radius. We find no evidence for a relationship between local density and the incidence of tidal features, but our local density measure has large uncertainties. We find interesting behavior in the rate of tidal features among cluster early-types as a function of clustercentric radius and expect such results to provide constraints on the effect of the cluster environment on the structure of galaxy halos, the build-up of the red sequence of galaxies, and the origin of the intracluster stellar population.

Adams, Scott M.; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

Knize, R.J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical incidents can be prevented or mitigated by improving safety performance and implementing the lessons learned from past incidents. Despite some limitations in the range of information they provide, chemical incident databases can be utilized as sources of lessons learned from incidents by evaluating patterns and relationships that exist between the data variables. Much of the previous research focused on studying the causal factors of incidents; hence, this research analyzes the chemical incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining and text mining methodologies. Both methodologies were performed with the aid of STATISTICA software. The analysis studied 12,737 chemical process related incidents and extracted descriptions of incidents in free-text data format from 3,316 incident reports. The structured data was analyzed using data mining tools such as classification and regression trees, association rules, and cluster analysis. The unstructured data (textual data) was transformed into structured data using text mining, and subsequently analyzed further using data mining tools such as, feature selections and cluster analysis. The data mining analysis demonstrated that this technique can be used in estimating the incident severity based on input variables of release quantity and distance between victims and source of release. Using the subset data of ammonia release, the classification and regression tree produced 23 final nodes. Each of the final nodes corresponded to a range of release quantity and, of distance between victims and source of release. For each node, the severity of injury was estimated from the observed severity scores' average. The association rule identified the conditional probability for incidents involving piping, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene in the value of 0.19, 0.04, 0.12, and 0.04 respectively. The text mining was utilized successfully to generate elements of incidents that can be used in developing incident scenarios. Also, the research has identified information gaps in the HSEES database that can be improved to enhance future data analysis. The findings from data mining and text mining should then be used to modify or revise design, operation, emergency response planning or other management strategies.

Mahdiyati, -

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NIST SP 800-83, Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Special Publication 800-83 Sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS REPORT OF PLUTONIUM SPILL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... research reactor, supported the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in ... root cause analysis of a major oil pipeline rupture and spill in a ...

110

Coccidioidomycosis Incidence in Arizona Predicted by Seasonal Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental mechanisms that determine the inter-annual and seasonal variability in incidence of coccidioidomycosis are unclear. In this study, we use Arizona coccidioidomycosis case data for 1995–2006 to generate a timeseries of monthly estimates of exposure rates in Maricopa County, AZ and Pima County, AZ. We reveal a seasonal autocorrelation structure for exposure rates in both Maricopa County and Pima County which indicates that exposure rates are strongly related from the fall to the spring. An abrupt end to this autocorrelation relationship occurs near the the onset of the summer precipitation season and increasing exposure rates related to the subsequent season. The identification of the autocorrelation structure enabled us to construct a ‘‘primary’ ’ exposure season that spans August-March and a ‘‘secondary’ ’ season that spans April– June which are then used in subsequent analyses. We show that October–December precipitation is positively associated with rates of exposure for the primary exposure season in both Maricopa County (R = 0.72, p = 0.012) and Pima County (R = 0.69, p = 0.019). In addition, exposure rates during the primary exposure seasons are negatively associated with concurrent precipitation in Maricopa (R = 20.79, p = 0.004) and Pima (R = 20.64, p = 0.019), possibly due to reduced spore dispersion. These associations enabled the generation of models to estimate exposure rates for the primary exposure season. The models explain 69 % (p = 0.009) and 54 % (p = 0.045) of the variance in the study period for Maricopa and Pima counties, respectively. We did not find any significant predictors for exposure rates during the secondary season. This study

James D. Tamerius; Andrew C. Comrie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

On the Incidence and Kinematics of Strong Mg II Absorbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of two investigations into the nature of strong (rest equivalent width > 1.0 Ang) Mg II absorption systems at high redshift. The first line of questioning examines the complete SDSS- DR3 set of quasar spectra to determine the evolution of the incidence of strong Mg II absorption. The redshift evolution of the comoving line-of-sight number density, l(x), is characterized by a roughly constant value at z > 0.8, indicating that the product of the number density and gas cross-section of halos hosting strong Mg II is unevolving at these redshifts. At z gas cross-section to strong Mg II absorption and therefore a decline in the physical processes relevant to such absorption. This evolution roughly tracks the global evolution of the SFR density. The decrease of l(x) is more pronounced for larger equivalent width systems. We also present the results of a search for strong Mg II absorption in 91 high resolution quasar spectra, which allow us to investigate the kinematics of such systems. These systems are characterized by the presence of numerous components spread over a ~200 km/s velocity width and the presence of more highly ionized species, which display kinematic profiles similar to the corresponding Mg II absorption. We consider these results in light of two competing theories to explain strong Mg II absorption: post-starburst, SN-driven galactic winds and accreting gas in the halos of massive galaxies. The later model is disfavored by the absence of evolution in l(x) at z > 1. We argue that the strong Mg II phenomenon primarily arises from feedback processes in relatively low mass galactic halos related to star formation.

Gabriel E. Prochter; Jason X. Prochaska; Scott Burles

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Components of an Incident Management Simulation and Gaming Framework and Related Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's emergency responders need to work in a coordinated, well-planned manner to best mitigate the impact of an emergency incident. They need to be trained and ready to act in view of the increased security threat. The training has been traditionally ... Keywords: architecture, component, emergency response, gaming, incident management, integration, modeling, simulation

Sanjay Jain; Charles R. Mclean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On the Surface Temperature Sensitivity of the Reflected Shortwave, Outgoing Longwave, and Net Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean top-of-atmosphere incident solar radiation (ISR) minus the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and the reflected shortwave radiation (RSW) is the net incident radiation (NET). This study analyzes the global-mean NET sensitivity to a ...

Hartmut H. Aumann; Alexander Ruzmaikin; Ali Behrangi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cause Marketing: Spillover Effects of Cause-Related Products in a Product Portfolio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of firms carrying a cause-related product has significantly increased in recent years. We consider a duopoly model of competition between firms in two products to determine which products a firm will link to a cause. We first test the behavioral ... Keywords: cause marketing, experimental economics, marketing and pricing strategy, product policy

Aradhna Krishna; Uday Rajan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Agency/Company /Organization Resources for the Future Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Topics Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.rff.org/RFF/Documen Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica[1] Abstract "Although fuel taxes are a practical means of curbing vehicular air pollution, congestion, and accidents in developing countries-all of which are typically major problems-they are often opposed on distributional

119

A Simple Physical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from GOES Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the suface from GOES satellite brightness measurements in clear and cloudy conditions. In this simple physical model, the effect of Rayleigh scattering is taken into account. ...

Catherine Gautier; Georges Diak; Serge Masse

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Use of DFDR Information in the Analysis of a Turbulence Incident over Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital flight data recorder (DFDR) tapes from commercial aircraft can provide useful information about the mesoscale environment of severe turbulence incidents. Air motion computations from these data and their errors are briefly described. An ...

Peter F. Lester; Orhan Sen; R. E. Bach Jr.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

124

Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Cloud on Incident Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fire, smoke cloud on incident broadband and spectral solar irradiance was studied using measurements made at the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, Golden, ...

Roland L. Hulstrom; Thomas L. Stoffel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

126

Left-over Windows Cause Window Clutter... But What Causes Left-over Windows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Left-over Windows Cause Window Clutter... But What Causes Left-over Windows? Julie Wagner1 that they can return to later. However, users also struggle with window clutter, facing an increasing number of `left-over windows' that get in the way. Our goal is to understand how users create and cope with left

127

Factors Causing Unexpected Variations in Ada Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benchmarks are often used to describe the performance of computer systems. This report considers factors that may cause Ada benchmarks to produce inaccurate results. Included are examples from the ongoing benchmarking efforts of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project using bare target computers with several Ada compilers. 1. Introduction One of the goals of the Ada Embedded Systems Testbed (AEST) Project is to assess the readiness of the Ada programming language and Ada tools for developing embedded systems. The benchmarking and instrumentation subgroup within the AEST Project is running various suites of Ada benchmarks to obtain data on the real-time performance of Ada on a number of different target systems. The purpose of this report is to categorize the factors which cause anomalous results to be produced by the benchmarks. Some of these factors have been observed, while others are more speculative in nature. All these factors should be understood if accurate, comparable,...

Neal Altman; Neal Altman

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Avoiding Flicker Caused by a Tire Shredder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing that nonlinear loads or loads with significant variations can cause sudden voltage fluctuations, or flicker, a utility decided to take preemptive action before adding a large tire shredder to its system. A flicker screening study was conducted, using a software that has been developed by EPRI that allowed the modeling of the load cycle. From the modeling results, several recommendations were made to keep flicker at an acceptable level.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Prevention of a wrong-location misadministration through the use of an intradepartmental incident learning system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A series of examples are presented in which potential errors in the delivery of radiation therapy were prevented through use of incident learning. These examples underscore the value of reporting near miss incidents. Methods: Using a departmental incident learning system, eight incidents were noted over a two-year period in which fields were treated 'out-of-sequence,' that is, fields from a boost phase were treated, while the patient was still in the initial phase of treatment. As a result, an error-prevention policy was instituted in which radiation treatment fields are 'hidden' within the oncology information system (OIS) when they are not in current use. In this way, fields are only available to be treated in the intended sequence and, importantly, old fields cannot be activated at the linear accelerator control console. Results: No out-of-sequence treatments have been reported in more than two years since the policy change. Furthermore, at least three near-miss incidents were detected and corrected as a result of the policy change. In the first two, the policy operated as intended to directly prevent an error in field scheduling. In the third near-miss, the policy operated 'off target' to prevent a type of error scenario that it was not directly intended to prevent. In this incident, an incorrect digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) was scheduled in the OIS for a patient receiving lung cancer treatment. The incorrect DRR had an isocenter which was misplaced by approximately two centimeters. The error was a result of a field from an old plan being scheduled instead of the intended new plan. As a result of the policy described above, the DRR field could not be activated for treatment however and the error was discovered and corrected. Other quality control barriers in place would have been unlikely to have detected this error. Conclusions: In these examples, a policy was adopted based on incident learning, which prevented several errors, at least one of which was potentially severe. These examples underscore the need for a rigorous, systematic incident learning process within each clinic. The experiences reported in this technical note demonstrate the value of near-miss incident reporting to improve patient safety.

Ford, Eric C.; Smith, Koren; Harris, Kendra; Terezakis, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program DOE/IG-0878 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 11, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy operates numerous networks and systems to help accomplish its strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science and the environment. The systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could impact the Department's

131

EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards  

SciTech Connect

The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

Stenner, Robert D.

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analysis of the incidence angle of the beam radiation on CPC. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Analytic expressions have been derived for the projected incidence angles {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub 2} from a two-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator solar collector. For a CPC the fraction of the incident rays on the aperture at angle {var theta}, which reaches the absorber, depends only on the {var theta}{sub 1} angle. In this paper, a mathematical expression for {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub t} has been calculated to determine the times at which acceptance of the sun's beam radiation begins and ceases for a CPC consisting of arbitrary orientation.

Pinazo, J.M.; Canada, J.; Arago, F. (Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mutations of the GREAT gene cause cryptorchidism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession no. AF453828 In humans, failure of testicular descent (cryptorchidism) is one of the most frequent congenital malformations, affecting 1–3 % of newborn boys. The clinical consequences of this abnormality are infertility in adulthood and a significantly increased risk of testicular malignancy. Recently, we described a mouse transgene insertional mutation, crsp, causing high intraabdominal cryptorchidism in homozygous males. A candidate gene Great (G-protein-coupled receptor affecting testis descent), was identified within the transgene integration site. Great encodes a seven-transmembrane receptor with a close similarity to the glycoprotein hormone receptors. The Great gene is highly expressed in the gubernaculum, the ligament that controls testicular movement during development, and therefore may be responsible for mediating hormonal signals that affect testicular descent. Here we show that genetic targeting of the Great gene in mice causes infertile bilateral intraabdominal cryptorchidism. The mutant gubernaculae fail to differentiate, indicating that the Great gene controls their development. Mutation screening of the human GREAT gene was performed using DHPLC analysis of the genomic DNA from 60 cryptorchid patients. Nucleotide variations in GREAT cDNA were found in both the patient and the control populations. A unique missense mutation (T222P) in the ectodomain of the GREAT receptor was identified in one of the patients. This mutant receptor fails to respond to ligand stimulation, implicating the GREAT gene in the etiology in some cases of cryptorchidism in humans.

Ivan P. Gorlov; Aparna Kamat; Natalia V. Bogatcheva; Eric Jones; Dolores J. Lamb; Anne Truong; Colin E. Bishop; Ken Mcelreavey; Er I. Agoulnik

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

17.423 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examines the causes of war, with a focus on practical measures to prevent and control war. Topics covered include: causes and consequences of national misperception; military strategy and policy as cause of war; US foreign ...

Van Evera, Stephen

136

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992 Category STATEMENT 5.1 The University shall establish a comprehensive and integrated Disaster Response Plan and appropriate measures are in place to prevent predictable or potential disasters and possible critical

138

nicter: a large-scale network incident analysis system: case studies for understanding threat landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have been developing the Network Incident analysis Center for Tactical Emergency Response (nicter), whose objective is to detect and identify propagating malwares. The nicter mainly monitors darknet, a set of unused IP addresses, to observe global ... Keywords: correlation analysis, malware analysis, network monitoring

Masashi Eto; Daisuke Inoue; Jungsuk Song; Junji Nakazato; Kazuhiro Ohtaka; Koji Nakao

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oscillating two stream instability at the resonance of obliquely incident radiation in inhomogeneous plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The growth rate and the threshold value were calculated for the oscillating two-stream instability for an electromagnetic wave obliquely incident on an inhomogeneous plasma. The localization of the instability is found to be in the overdense region near the threshold and to shift toward the local plasma resonance when the pump intensity increases. (auth)

Kuo, Y.Y.; Oberman, C.; Liu, C.S.; Troyon, F.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

Ostmeyer, R.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Leverage Causes Fat Tails and Clustered Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We build a very simple model of leveraged asset purchases with margin calls. Investment funds use what is perhaps the most basic financial strategy, called 'value investing', i.e. systematically attempting to buy underpriced assets. When funds do not borrow, the price fluctuations of the asset are normally distributed and uncorrelated across time. All this changes when the funds are allowed to leverage, i.e. borrow from a bank, to purchase more assets than their wealth would otherwise permit. When funds use leverage, price fluctuations become heavy tailed and display clustered volatility, similar to what is observed in real markets. Previous explanations of fat tails and clustered volatility depended on 'irrational behavior', such as trend following. We show that the immediate cause of the increase in extreme risks in our model is the risk control policy of the banks: A prudent bank makes itself locally safer by putting a limit to leverage, so when a fund exceeds its leverage limit, it must partially repay it...

Thurner, Stefan; Geanakoplos, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra for the clinical linac agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using the unfolded electron energies) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 3.7%. The corresponding measured and EGSnrc-calculated transmission data agree within 1.5%, where the typical transmission measurement uncertainty on the clinical linac is 0.4% (not including the uncertainties on the incident electron parameters). Conclusions: The approach proposed in an earlier study for unfolding photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data is accurate and practical for clinical use.

Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council, M-35 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Case Study: Preparing for the Smart Grids - Identifying Current Practice for Information Security Incident Management in the Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry faces the implementation of smart grids, which will introduce new information security threats to the power automation systems. The ability to appropriately prepare for, and respond to, information security incidents, is of utmost ... Keywords: Information security, incident respons, smart grids

Maria B. Line

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of the integrated application of intelligent transportation system technologies using stochastic incident generation and resolution modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of the microscopic vehicle traffic simulation software PARAMICS to evaluate different incident management implementation alternatives in South Carolina. This study customized the simulation model for random spatial and temporal ... Keywords: freeway service patrol, intelligent transportation systems, traffic incident management, traffic simulation

Yongchang Ma; Ryan Fries; Mashrur Chowdhury; Imran Inamdar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R. [HASYLAB, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Significant factors in rail freight accidents: A statistical analysis of predictive and severity indices in the FRA accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Association maintains a file of carrier-reported accidents and incidents that meet threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. Using a five year period from this data base, an investigation was conducted into the relationship between quantifiable risk factors and accident frequency and severity. Specific objectives were to identify key variables in accidents, formulate a model to predict future accidents, and assess the relative importance of these variables from the perspective of routing and shipping decision making. The temporal factors YEAR and MONTH were found to be significant predictors of risk; accident severity was greatest for accidents caused by track and roadbed defects. Train speed was an indicator of accident severity; track class and training tonnage were inversely proportional to accident severity. Investigation of the data base is continuing, with a final report expected by late summer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Lee, Tze-San; Saricks, C.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Incident-energy and system-size dependence of directed flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present STAR's measurements of directed flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200$ GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity, transverse momentum and centrality. We find that directed flow depends on the incident energy, but not on the system size. We extend the validity of limiting fragmentation hypothesis to different collision systems.

Gang Wang

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Establishing Tower-Top Equipotential Zones--Case-Study of Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide protection and training for workers who perform work on de-energized and energized lines. This Technical Update report contains the draft script of a new training video on DVD under development on establishing tower-top equipotential zones. The script contains case studies and analysis of specific selected incidents that have occurred in the field. It also includes recommendations for minimizing risks and avoiding elec...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

17.42 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. ...

Van Evera, Stephen

153

SunShot Initiative: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why is PV different? to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why is PV...

154

Weather and other events can cause disruptions to gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Weather and other events can cause disruptions to gasoline infrastructure and supply. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration.

155

Proficiency Testing Follow Up Actions and Root Cause ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proficiency Testing Follow Up Actions and Root Cause Analysis. Purpose: Participants will be able to: Identify the 17025 ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Weather and other events can cause disruptions to gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Weather and other events can cause disruptions to gasoline infrastructure and ...

157

74 Scientific American, April 2011 Illustration by Tom Whalen Earthquake early-warning networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but it is enough to send shutdown warn- ings to power plants and rail networks, automatically open ele- vator doors comes in two parts: a fast- moving, sudden jolt and a slower-mov- ing wave that causes the great

Allen, Richard M.

158

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to U.S. Nuclear Weapon Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a)), this Instruction: a. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for the DoD response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents in accordance with DoDD 3150.08 (Reference (b)). b. Authorizes DoD support for the Nuclear Weapons Accident Incident Response Subcommittee (NWAIRS) to the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) Committee of Principals (CoP) to address the Federal Government response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water Characterization and Isolation of Constituents Causing Red Coloration in Desert Arroyo Seepage Water More Documents & Publications Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico

162

ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect

Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Surface instability of binary compounds caused by sputter yield amplification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that the flat surface of a binary material that is subjected to normal-incidence ion bombardment can be unstable even if the curvature dependence of the sputter yields is negligibly small. This unforeseen instability is brought about by sputter yield amplification, and it results in the formation of a disordered array of nanodots with the lighter of the two atomic species concentrated at the peaks of the dots.

Mark Bradley, R. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

Wei, Lei

166

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. =}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gamma-Rays from Grazing Incidence Cosmic Rays in the Earth’s Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high energy cosmic rays with the earth’s atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond time scales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earth’s surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 1020 eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than earth based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the earth’s atmosphere. Subject headings: atmospheric effects- cosmic rays- Earth- gamma-rays: bursts

Andrew Ulmer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Causes for the Ferromagnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Perovskite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Causes for the Ferromagnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+d and the Ultrafast Redox ...

172

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 January 2005 HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF PIPELINE STEELS: CAUSES AND REMEDIATION P. Sofronis, I. Robertson, D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline...

173

Trends and causes of historical wetland loss in coastal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Trends and causes of historical wetland loss in coastal Louisiana. [Julie Christine Bernier; Geological Survey (U.S.),

174

Primary causes of wetland loss at Madison Bay, Terrebonne ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Primary causes of wetland loss at Madison Bay, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. [Robert A Morton; Ginger Tiling; Nicholas F ...

175

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Communicated by Steve Nowlan Competition and Multiple Cause Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

somewhat independently of each other. An added advantage of such multiple cause models is that a few causes parts of the input. In this paper, we use the probabilistic theory that underlies Keeler #12 for training. The input values for the dots are 0 and those for the white boxes are 1. et d ' s (1991

Dayan, Peter

177

Measuring Solar Spectral and Angle-ofIncidence Effects on Photovoltaic Modules and Solar Irradiance Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation. INTRODUCTION It is common knowledge to people familiar with photovoltaic technology that the electrical current generated by photovoltaic devices is influenced by the spectral distribution (spectrum) of sunlight. It is also commonly understood that the spectral distribution of sunlight vari...

David L. King; Jay A. Kratochvil; William E. Boyson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electromagnetic energy within a magnetic infinite cylinder and scattering properties for oblique incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we analytically calculate the time-averaged electromagnetic energy stored inside a nondispersive magnetic isotropic cylinder which is obliquely irradiated by an electromagnetic plane wave. An expression for the optical-absorption efficiency in terms of the magnetic internal coefficients is also obtained. In the low absorption limit, we derive a relation between the normalized internal energy and the optical-absorption efficiency which is not affected by the magnetism and the incidence angle. This mentioned relation, indeed, seems to be independent on the shape of the scatterer. This universal aspect of the internal energy is connected to the transport velocity and consequently to the diffusion coefficient in the multiple scattering regime. Magnetism favors high internal energy for low size parameter cylinders, which leads to a low diffusion coefficient for electromagnetic propagation in 2D random media.

Tiago Jose Arruda; Alexandre Souto Martinez

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Self-Organized Criticality in Daily Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous periodogram power spectral analysis of daily incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reported at a leading hospital for cardiology in Pune, India for the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994 show that the power spectra follow the universal and unique inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and have been identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. The unique quantification for self-organized criticality presented in this paper is shown to be intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing fractal space-time fluctuation patterns in dynamical systems. The results are consistent with El Naschie's concept of cantorian fractal spacetime characteristics for quantum systems.

A. M. Selvam; D. Sen; S. M. S. Mody

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Twisted-light-induced intersubband transitions in quantum wells at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the intersubband transitions induced by laser beams of light with orbital angular momentum (twisted light) in semiconductor quantum wells at normal incidence. These transitions become possible in the absence of gratings thanks to the fact that collimated laser beams present a component of the light's electric field in the propagation direction. We derive the matrix elements of the light-matter interaction for a Bessel-type twisted-light beam represented by its vector potential in the paraxial approximation. Then, we consider the dynamics of photo-excited electrons making intersubband transitions between the first and second subbands of a standard semiconductor quantum well. Finally, we analyze the light-matter matrix elements in order to evaluate which transitions are more favorable for given orbital angular momentum of the light beam in the case of small semiconductor structures.

Sbierski, B; Tamborenea, P I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric-Field Enhancement by Nodular Defects in Multilayer Coatings Irradiated at Normal and 45 (degree) Incidence  

SciTech Connect

The standing-wave electric-field profile within multilayer coatings is significantly perturbated by a nodular defect. The intensity, which is proportional to the electric field squared, is increased in the high index material by {>=}3x at normal incidence and {>=}12x at 45 degrees incidence angle. Therefore it is not surprising that nodular defects are initiation sites of laser-induced damage. In this study, the impact of reflectance-band centering and incident angle are explored for a 1 {micro}m diameter nodular defect seed overcoated with a 24 layer high-reflector constructed of quarter-wave thick alternating layers of hafnia and silica. The modeling was performed using a three-dimensional finite-element analysis code.

Stolz, C J; Genin, F Y; Pistor,T V

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Los Alamos researchers demonstrated improved technical methods capable of directly counting small RNA molecules in pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria. June 17, 2013 Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. The new technique reduced the number of false positives, which improved the accuracy of the count statistics, and it significantly reduced the image processing time. Small molecules of RNA (tens to hundreds of nucleotides in length) play a key regulatory role in bacteria. Due to their small size, directly

183

Stochastic and deterministic causes of streamer branching in liquid dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streamer branching in liquid dielectrics is driven by stochastic and deterministic factors. The presence of stochastic causes of streamer branching such as inhomogeneities inherited from noisy initial states, impurities, ...

Jadidian, Jouya

184

Some Causes for Lightning Data Inaccuracies: The Case of Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on records currently available, no complete knowledge exists of the number of casualties caused by lightning in the United States. The compilation of lightning casualty statistics is not a simple problem, and there are many unresolved ...

Kathleen M. Shearman; Carl F. Ojala

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Environmental Management Root Cause Analysis Corrective Action Plan Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the Department’s effort to build a strong project and contract management foundation, a Root Cause Analysis (RCA) was developed through extensive collaboration between DOE's Headquarters...

186

Common cause analysis : a review and extension of existing methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantitative common cause analysis code, MOBB, is extended to include uncertainties arising from modelling uncertainties and data uncertainties. Two methods, Monte Carlo simulation and the Method-of-Moments are used ...

Heising, Carolyn D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Topic Extraction from Text Documents Using Multiple-Cause Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to the topic extraction from text documents using probabilistic graphical models. Multiple-cause networks with latent variables are used and the Helmholtz machines are utilized to ease the learning and inference. The learning ...

Jeong-Ho Chang; Jae Won Lee; Yuseop Kim; Byoung-Tak Zhang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Numerical simulation to determine the effects of incident wind shear and turbulence level on the flow around a building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of incident shear and turbulence on flow around a cubical building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence and shear results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow fields with the available wind-tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977). Comparing the authors' results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Huber, A.H.; Arya, S.P.S.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors  

SciTech Connect

Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

Palmer, R.C. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ansari, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Freibert, E.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hydrogen Film Cooling With Incident and Swept-Shock Interactions in a Mach 6.4 Nitrogen Free Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium ...

Olsen G. C.; Nowak R. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

197

Can reduced processing decision support interfaces improve the decision-making of less-experienced incident commanders?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-based decision support systems have been proposed as a tool to improve the decision-making of less-experienced personnel by reducing the information processing demands necessary for decision-making. This study investigated the utility of three ... Keywords: Cognitive load, Decision-making, Experience, Expertise, Fire-fighting, Incident command

Nathan C. Perry; Mark W. Wiggins; Merilyn Childs; Gerard Fogarty

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Social Conditions and Infant Mortality in China: A Test of the Fundamental Cause  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology and the Fundamental Cause Concept: On theSocial Conditions as Fundamental Causes of Disease." Journaland Creating Disparities: A Fundamental Cause Perspective."

Song, Shige; Burgard, Sarah A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects Professor Gerta Keller Princeton University Presentation: WC13FEB2014_GKeller.pptx The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether one, or several large bolide impacts, the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) or a combination of the two were the primary mechanisms driving the environmental changes that are universally regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Recent years have seen a revolution in our understanding of interplanetary

200

Steam Turbine Blade Failure Root Cause Analysis Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam Turbine Blade Failure Root Cause Analysis Guide is a concise reference written for operators to plan and conduct an investigation into the most probable causes of a steam turbine blade (bucket) failure. The report provides both an overview and step-by-step approach to identifying the damage mechanisms most common to turbine blade failures. It proceeds to show how damage mechanisms are related to the operating history prior to the blades failure and how they are evaluated to establish their role as ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

Jones, L.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Incidence angle modifiers in cylindrical solar collector design. Final report, June 1996--May 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis presents an analysis of the thermal performance of cylindrical solar collectors. A major contributor to performance is optics, the principle focus of this work. A tool used to compute the incidence angle modifiers (IAM`s) for cylindrical solar collectors is presented. The Monte Carlo Method is employed in a Fortran 90 computer code to compute the hemispheric IAM`s of cylindrical solar collectors. Using concentric cylinders, the tubes are modeled with and without back plane reflectors of varying size. The computed IAM`s are verified both analytically and experimentally. Outdoor experiments on an array of cylindrical tubes with various back planes and two different tube spacings are described. Agreement with TRNSYS runs in daily energy gain is excellent. Over the 38 data sets, taken on different days, a maximum error of 11.2% is observed, with an average error of 3%. Heat loss tests, used to calculate an overall heat loss coefficient for the collector, are also described. A parametric variation study is used to illustrate the effect of varying many of the collector parameters. This study provides insight into the significant design parameters for cylindrical solar collectors. This insight is used to analyze the effect of these design parameters on the annual energy delivered by the collector. In addition, a simple cost analysis illustrates the benefits of varying the design parameters. The use of this new program and a detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis are the tools needed for optimizing the design of a cylindrical solar collector. 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Ryan, J.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

ing the distribution of those galaxies, the way they clump and spread out, scientists  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illuminated realms as small as a single molecule and as large as a gamma ray burst. of the Year Agony ex- plosions in the universe: titanic blasts of en- ergy called gamma ray bursts (GRBs). Most notably of black holes and other phenomena in the gamma ray region of the spectrum. And the Wilkinson Microwave

Yildiz, Ahmet

205

SUSTAINABILITY EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg130  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Journal of "Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells". Proceedings of IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conferences. Proceedings of European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conferences. #12;Module 2/Photovoltaics, Wiley, 1995. R.H.Bube, Photovoltaic Materials, Imperial College Press, 1998. Journal of "Solar Energy

206

CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MCKEESPORT MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE WALBORN RESERVOIR YOUN GSVILLE RPD-LORAIN -1 INGOMAR-GRUBBS BIG MEADOWS GARD EN ISLE TURT LE CREEK LEWIST ON E BR USH CR EEK FOOT VILLE BU LL CREEK BESSEMER EAGLEVILLE LIVER POOL E RIDGEVILLE E EVANS CIT Y GUIT ONVILLE WOLF S COR NERS WIN DFALL ABBEYVILLE ROC K CAMP LEATH ER WOOD AR COLA CR EEK MEC HANICST OWN NINE MILE RU N WALKCHALK RENFR EW-MCCALMONT BU FFALO N VALENCIA WELLIN GT ON

207

Spring'ing' Forward Into the Finals . . . Of A Competition Like...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

& Testimony Recovery Act Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 03.11.13...

208

'March'ing Into The Finals . . . Of A Competition Like No Other  

Office of Science (SC) Website

& Testimony Recovery Act Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 03.04.13...

209

SUSTAINABILITY EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg102  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when carbon dioxide is introduced into thermal conversion processes such as the gasification of coal to syngas, leaving behind only a carbonless char. Castaldi estimates that if the biomass were used

210

Kurzlebenslauf (CV) Stand September 2011 Dr.-Ing. Diplom-Physiker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:30 Panel: Erneuerbare Energien: Rentable Investitionen oder teure Experimente? Christof Stein (KfW Bank) Dr für Klima, Umwelt und Energie) Matthias Willenbacher (JuWi Holding) Moderation: Monika Seynsche

211

Power Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim Bcker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, e.g. Interior permanent magnet synchronous motors (IPMSM)Interior permanent magnet synchronous rings Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor integrated into the rotor outlines Active magnetic bearing motors (IPMSM) Switched reluctance drives FPGA based control Self optimizing systems (Collaborative

Noé, Reinhold

212

Programme Coordination Professor Dr.-Ing. habil. Dr. h. c. Karl J. Thom-Kozmiensky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management · Recycling · Waste-to-Energy Recovery of Biowastes · Mechanical-Biological Treatment of the European Suppliers of Waste to Energy Technology (ESWET), Brussels, Belgium 10.30 Hrs. Waste Framework.V., Gent, Belgium 12.30 Hrs. Waste incineration in the 21st century ­ Energy-efficient and climate

Hone, James

213

Wolfram Hoefer, Dr.-Ing. Assistant Professor Department of Landscape Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landentwicklung. Gärtner im Garten- und Landschaftsbau. (State exam for professional degree as gardener, landscape Ltd. London 1984-86 Apprenticeship as landscape gardener with Hermann Kretz, Garten und Landschaftsbau

Goodman, Robert M.

214

SUSTAINABILITY EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg 141  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- onry is also crucial to their safe storage. Plutonium, an active ingredient in nuclear weap- ons, has to determine how the electrons within these materials will behave. "The plutonium in the weapons ages, and we have to be able to predict the proper- ties of plutonium under a variety of conditions," Chris

215

Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

Phelps, Richard D. (Greeley, CO); Upham, Gerald A. (Valley Center, CA); Anderson, Paul M. (San Diego, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Pico-ing into the future of mobile projection and contexts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years ago, we were on the verge of having cameras built into our mobile phones, but knew very little about what to expect or how they would be used. Now we are faced with the same unknowns with mobile projector phones. This research seeks to explore ... Keywords: Diary study, Experience sampling, Mobile, Pico-projectors

Max L. Wilson; Dan Craggs; Simon Robinson; Matt Jones; Kristian Brimble

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Koordination: Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. Seume Institut fr Turbomaschinen und Fluid-Dynamik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of installation of offshore wind farms (from Wiese 2008: Auswirkungen der Offshore-Windenergie auf den Betrieb von and offshore applications require appropriate planning and design. For most of them, statistics of extreme wind coastDat have been used in a large variety of coastal, offshore and terrestrial applications

218

Sandra Koch Dipl.-Ing. (FH) Telefon: 04921-807-1489  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

die Voraussetzung geschaffen, um die Stromerzeugung aus Windenergie Offshore langfristig erfolgreich geschaffen, um die Stromerzeugung aus Offshore Windenergie langfristig erfolgreich und effizient entwickeln-02 Bestimmung von Wärme- und Impulsfluss in der marinen atmosphärischen Grenzschicht für die Offshore

Damm, Werner

219

CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

RURAL RID GE ROWSBUR G SH ERRETT MON AC A QUEEN JUN CTION YELLOW CR EEK SMELTZ ER CAT FISH R UN POLK E JEROMESVILLE N FLORENCE-FIVE POINTS ATEN CLARINGTON MILLERSBURG...

220

Following weeks of purging and organiz-ing, phase one of the School's reloca-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in August. The depart- ments of Consumer Science and Human Development and Family Studies, as well as UW from top: Gloria McCord, Human Ecology financial specialist, casts a spell at the punch-bowl cauldron

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INFORMATION EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg238  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that bends and twists. "Computers, geometry, and physics are my ingredients. I mix them up in a bowl and what science as well. B.A.Sc., University of Toronto (Canada), 1997; M.S., California Institute of TechnologySPUn Associate Professor of Computer Science #12;

Hone, James

222

METHOD FOR REDU ING A KGROUND LUTTER IN A AMERA IMAGE  

... bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration, and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. The ...

223

SOLAR TRA ING SENSORS FOR MAXIMUM SOLAR ON ENTRATOR EFFI IEN Y  

POTENTIAL APPLI ATIONS Parabolic dish & trough solar concentrating collectors Solar energy and renewable energy Electric utility

224

whITe PaPer The ChaNgINg DYNaMICS OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the smart grid, which integrates AMI with distribution automation and other tech- nologies to connect consumers Network Automation And Analytics Smart Meters Distributed Generation Today: Centralized and One smart grid and advanced metering deployments. Bob Brnilovich, IBM www.UtilitiesProject.com/10803

225

Isotope Biogeochemistry of Diagenesis caused by a Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope Biogeochemistry of Diagenesis caused by a Black Shale-fueled Deep Marine Biosphere (ODP Leg Forschungsgemeinschaft and Max Planck Society #12;Black shales and Diagenesis: Processes and Proxies - Authigenic sulfur the coasts of Surinam and French Guyana #12;µ Black shales in Leg 207 sediments and pore water response depth

226

Causes of Death among Aka Pygmies of the Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. No specific term111 !. Njala bene 1 B. Malnutrition 1. Tokonbondo and sopo 1 2. Sopo I C. During or after term of acute abdomen; and (5) tokombondo and sopo each describes a form of malnu- #12;3. CAUSES OF DEATH AMONG AKA PYGMIES 53 trition-fokombondo is probably kwashiorkor while sopo, which literally means

227

Erroneous coal maturity assessment caused by low temperature oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erroneous coal maturity assessment caused by low temperature oxidation Y. Copard J. R. Disnar, J. F on different outcrop coals from the French Massif Central revealed abnormally high Tmax values, which initially observed for medium to low volatile bituminous coals (Rr1.5%), was accompanied by a very clear exponential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Power Transformer Failure Investigation and Root Cause Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides practical, step-by-step guidance to help utility personnel gather evidence and perform investigations on failed or retired high-voltage substation power transformers to assist in determining the cause of the transformer failure or the service condition of retired units.

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Automated root cause isolation of performance regressions during software development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance is crucial for the success of an application. To build responsive and cost efficient applications, software engineers must be able to detect and fix performance problems early in the development process. Existing approaches are either relying ... Keywords: performance regression, root cause analysis

Christoph Heger; Jens Happe; Roozbeh Farahbod

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A root cause localization model for large scale systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Root cause localization, the process of identifying the source of problems in a system using purely external observations, is a significant challenge in many large-scale systems. In this paper, we propose an abstract model that captures the common issues ...

Emre Kiciman; Lakshminarayanan Subramanian

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Stirring by Small-Scale Vortices Caused by Patchy Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that lateral dispersion on scales of 1–10 km in the stratified waters of the continental shelf may be significantly enhanced by stirring by small-scale geostrophic motions caused by patches of mixed fluid adjusting in the ...

Miles A. Sundermeyer; James R. Ledwell; Neil S. Oakey; Blair J. W. Greenan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

What is the probability that radiation caused a particular cancer  

SciTech Connect

Courts, lawyers, health physicists, physicians, and others are searching for a credible answer to the question posed in the title of this paper. The cases in which the question arises frequently stem from an individual that has cancer and they, or their next-of-kin, are convinced that a past radiation exposure - usually small - is responsible for causing it. An arithmetic expression of this problem is simple: the probability of causation by the radiation dose in question is equal to the risk of cancer from the radiation dose divided by the risk of cancer from all causes. The application of risk factors to this equation is not so simple. It must involve careful evaluation of the reliability of and variations in risk coefficients for development of cancer due to radiation exposure, other carcinogenic agents, and natural causes for the particular individual. Examination of our knowledge of these various factors indicates that a large range in the answers can result due to the variability and imprecision of the data. Nevertheless, the attempts to calculate and the probability that radiation caused the cancer is extremely useful to provide a gross perspective on the probability of causation. It will likely rule in or out a significant number of cases despite the limitations in our understandings of the etiology of cancer and the risks from various factors. For the remaining cases, a thoughtful and educated judgment based on selected data and circumstances of the case will also be needed before the expert can develop and support his opinion.

Voelz, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Power Transformer Failure Investigation and Root Cause Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides practical, step-by-step guidance to help utility personnel gather evidence and perform investigations on failed or retired high-voltage substation power transformers to assist in determining the cause of the transformer failure or the service condition of retired units.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack Growth Rates of Irradiated Commercial Stainless Steels in BWR and PWR ... Detailed Root Cause Analysis of SG Tube ODSCC Indications within the Tube Sheets of NPP Biblis Unit A .... Radiation Damage in Fe-C-Met Model Alloys ... Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior near the Fusion Boundary of Dissimilar Weld

235

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water

236

Learning Causes: Psychological Explanations of Causal Explanation^1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I argue that psychologists interested in human causal judgment should understand and adopt a representation of causal mechanisms by directed graphs that encode conditional independence (screening off) relations. I illustrate the benefits of that ... Keywords: causation, cause, directed graphs, explanation, judgment, under certainty

Clark Glymour

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell c.mitchell@rhul.ac.uk Information Security Group Royal security, namely: (a) what do current technological trends mean for future information security, and (b) what effect do conflicts between security/privacy requirements and economic and technological pressures

Sheldon, Nathan D.

238

Analysis of Pump-Turbine S Instability and Reverse Waterhammer Incidents in Hydropower Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic systems continually experience dynamic transients or oscillations which threaten the hydroelectric plant from extreme water hammer pressures or resonance. In particular, the minimum pressure variations downstream of the turbine runner during the load rejection or other events may cause dangerous water column separation and subsequent rejoinder. Water column separation can be easily observed from the measurements of site transient tests, and has indeed caused serious historical damages to the machine and water conveyance system. Several technical issues regarding water column separation in draft tubes, including S instability of turbine characteristic curves, numerical instability and uncertainty of computer programs, are discussed here through case studies and available model and site test data. Catastrophic accidents experienced at a Kaplan turbine and in a long tailrace tunnel project, as well as other troubles detected in a more timely fashion, are revisited in order to demonstrate the severity of reverse water hammer. However, as there is no simple design solutions for such complex systems, this paper emphasizes that the design of hydraulic systems is always difficult, difficulties that are compounded when the phenomena in question are non-linear (water hammer), dynamic (involving wave interaction and complex devices of turbines, controls, and electrical systems), and non-monotonic (severity of response is seldom simply connected to severity of load as with vibrations and resonance, and the complexity of transient loads), and thus may lead to high economic and safety challenges and consequences.

Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav [University of Toronto; Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL; Karney, Professor Byran W. [University of Toronto; Gajic, Prof. Aleksandar [University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.

Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O.; Tyler, R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program  

SciTech Connect

This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV--0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MegaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of {approx}80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 {mu}m over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 {mu}m resolution over an 800-{mu}m-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 {mu}m over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

Rosch, R.; Boutin, J. Y.; Le Breton, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Soullie, G.; Lidove, G.; Maroni, R. [CEA/DIF, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

Greenaway, Alan

242

Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media  

SciTech Connect

During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 Japan (Japan); Takahashi, Migaku [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Center for Nanobioengineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, 220, Gung-Dong, Yuseong-Gu., Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

Anders E. Carlsson

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Investigation of Inter-System Common-Cause Failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal characteristic of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) approach compared to a deterministic safety approach is to systematically account for common-cause failures (CCFs) in the study of severe accident scenarios. There has been extensive analysis of intra-system CCFs (within a given system) in the existing fleet of PSA models, but the information and studies that incorporate the potential for inter-system CCFs among systems are limited.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

Braidwood Leaking Fuel Root Cause Hot Cell Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the beginning of 2003, an increase in the number of leakers in 17x17 optimized fuel assembly (OFA) plants have been observed, resulting in an increased fuel reliability rate. A comprehensive evaluation of plant data and an assessment of the most likely causes of the leakers suggested that leakage mechanisms for the current leakers could be different from those seen historically. Westinghouse identified this trend as a significant fuel performance issue and initiated an extensive investigation to ad...

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Power Transformer Failure Investigation and Root Cause Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides practical, step-by-step guidance to help utility personnel gather evidence and perform investigations on failed or retired high-voltage substation power transformers to assist in determining the cause of the transformer’s failure or the service condition of retired units.BackgroundHigh-voltage transformers are essential to the reliability of the power system, but many are aging and nearing the end of their design lives. Transformer ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cause not found for Texas LPG site blast  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that National Transportation Safety Board investigators completed the first phase of tests at Seminole Pipeline Co.'s liquid petroleum gas storage dome near Brenham, Tex., without finding the cause of an explosion there Apr. 7. But in a week of investigation, NTSB determined that a release of brine and product occurred at the 350,000 bbl LPG storage dome, about 45 miles northwest of Houston, just before the blast. The explosion sent shock waves felt as far as 130 miles away. Three persons have died from injuries suffered in the accident. Another 18 were injured.

1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On April 20, 2010, a catastrophic eruption of methane caused the Deepwater Horizon exploratory drill rig drilling the Macondo Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 252 (MC252) to explode. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was unprecendeted for several reasons: the volume of oil released; the spill duration; the well depth; the distance from the shore-line (77 km or about 50 miles); the type of oil (light crude); and the injection of dispersant directly at the wellhead. This study clearly demonstrated that there was a profound and significant response by certain members of the in situ microbial community in the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. In particular putative hydrocarbon degrading Bacteria appeared to bloom in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, even though the temperature at these depths is never >5 C. As the plume aged the shifts in the microbial community on a temporal scale suggested that different, yet metabolically important members of the community were able to respond to a myriad of plume constituents, e.g. shifting from propane/ethane to alkanes and finally to methane. Thus, the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the plume by Bacteria was a highly significant process in the natural attenuation of many compounds released during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Mason, O.U.; Hazen, T.C.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Attitudes and Perceptions of Texas Public Safety Training Officers Regarding the Effectiveness of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis sought to understand reasons for noncompliant respondents and ineffective leadership in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) by Texas public safety training officers. Research has been conducted on the policies and their implications for NIMS, organizational culture and its impact on NIMS, and the hierarchy network of the Incident Command System (ICS). However, research evaluating the attitudes and perceptions regarding the effectiveness of NIMS is scarce. Training officers from rural fire departments, emergency medical services, and law enforcement agencies were the population for this study (n=33). The results of this study have implications for combined fire department, emergency medical services, and law enforcement training (interoperability), simplification of the management structure, and a mentoring program. This study should be explored further in an urban setting, based on this model. This study showed that respondents agreed that rural emergency responders tend to be noncompliant with NIMS. Respondents mentioned that rural emergency responders disagree with the effectiveness of NIMS. This study showed that a correlation occurred between the effectiveness of NIMS and the number of times a respondent was involved in a formal NIMS incident command. The following recommendations were made based on the findings and conclusions of this study. Researchers should continue to look at what public safety training officers believe affects the adaptability of NIMS. Training officers should consider contributing to the future NIMS curriculum. Training officers should focus on interoperability issues through increased field exercises. Research should be conducted to determine what improvements to curriculum effect future NIMS compliance. Further research should be conducted on the effectiveness of individual compliance, and achievement.

Wilson, Jason

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters  

SciTech Connect

The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

Denise Baclawski

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

FIA-12-0050 - In the Matter of Cause of Action | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 - In the Matter of Cause of Action FIA-12-0050 - In the Matter of Cause of Action On October 4, 2012, The Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) granted an Appeal filed by Cause...

252

A Geographic Information Science (GISc) Approach to Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns of Terrorist Incidents in Iraq, 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect

As terrorism on all scales continues, it is necessary to improve understanding of terrorist and insurgent activities. This article takes a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to advance the understanding of spatial, social, political, and cultural triggers that influence terrorism incidents. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal patterns of terrorist attacks are examined to improve knowledge about terrorist systems of training, planning, and actions. The results of this study aim to provide a foundation for understanding attack patterns and tactics in emerging havens as well as inform the creation and implementation of various counterterrorism measures.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Siebeneck, Laura K. [University of Utah; Hepner, George F. [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Embrittlement Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA, August 30, 2005 Funding and Duration * Timeline - Project start date: 7/20/05 - Project end date: 7/19/09 - Percent complete: 0.1% * Budget: Total project funding: 300k/yr * DOE share: 75% * Contractor share: 25% * Barriers - Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) - Assessment of hydrogen compatibility of the existing natural gas pipeline system for transporting hydrogen - Suitable steels, and/or coatings, or other materials to provide safe and reliable hydrogen transport and reduced capital cost 2 Team and Collaborators 3 * Industrial Partners: SECAT

255

Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Diversity Strategies to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ventilation/Perfusion Mismatch Caused by Positive Pressure Ventilatory Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a patient with lobar atelectasis who was on positive pressure ventilatorysupport, ventilationand perfusion images showed absent ventilationand normal perfusion (reverse mismatch) in the region of the atelectasis and normal ventilation and decreased perfusion (true mismatch) not caused by pulmonaryembolism in another lung zone. We report this case to emphasize that the lung scan findingsin patients on positive pressure ventilatorySUppOrt be carefullyinterpreted for the diagnosis of pulmonaryemboli. J NuciMed30:1268—1270, 1989 ulmonary embolism (PE) is often difficult to diag nose because the symptoms and signs can be nonspe cific or subtle. Lung ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scm tigraphy is the principal noninvasive imaging modality for its diagnosis. We report a case demonstrating both classical V/P mismatch (false positive for PE in this case) and reverse V/P mismatch (absent ventilation and normal perfusion, therefore negative for PE) in a patient

Chun K. Kim; Sydney Heyman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Natural completions - overcoming the damage caused by drilling and perforations  

SciTech Connect

Natural completions are suggested as a way to avoid or overcome damage to the formation caused by drilling and perforating. Formation damage may take the form of plugged passageways which remain closed because formation pressure does not exceed that of the plug material. Natural completions refer to using maximum differential pressure toward the wellbore, so that such obstructions in passageways can less easily exist. The method allows the formation pressure to backsurge perforation tunnels immediately following detonation of the guns, with the objectives of obtaining deep, clean perforations with the crushed zone and debris completely removed from the perforations. Procedures for natural completions are described and illustrated. A case history is given where the natural completion method restores productivity of a well.

Perry, G.; Smith, G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Computation of Domain-Averaged Shortwave Irradiance by a One-Dimensional Algorithm Incorporating Correlations between Optical Thickness and Direct Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiative transfer algorithm that accounts for correlations between the optical thickness and the incident direct solar radiation is developed to compute the domain-averaged shortwave irradiance profile. It divides the direct ...

Seiji Kato

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Relationship between Incident and Double-Way Transmittances: An Application for the Estimate of Surface Albedo from Satellites over the African Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inference of surface reflectance from satellite observations requires the knowledge of the double-way transmittance through the atmosphere. Since the existing pyranometer networks routinely provide measurements of the incident transmittance ...

B. Pinty; D. Tanre

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

Morris, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 Y in parts of Sweden with high {sup 137}Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation form {sup 137}Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from {sup 137}Cs was apparent. A some-what decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Tondel, M.; Flodin, U.; Skoeldestig, A.; Axelson, O. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by palaeontologists. We discuss the likely rate of such events in the light of the recent identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 pc away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away, and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of $\\gamma$ radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth's ozone layer discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away could be expected every few hundred million years, and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs.

John Ellis; David N. Schramm

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Low productivity in American coal mining: causes and cures  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies the factors responsible for depressed productivity in the US coal mining industry. GAO analysis revealed that the fall in underground mining productivity since 1969 is closely tied to poor labor-management relations, 1974 union contract requirements, and federal mine safety and health regulation. State reclamation laws and the opening of new surface mines lowered productivity in surface mining. Coal mining technology has not advanced sufficiently to offset the loss due to these causes. Federal and state regulations have been successful in reducing both fatalities and the environmental costs of coal mining. Thus far, lower productivity is a price the nation has paid for imposed health, safety, and environmental regulations. Industry and public officials must find ways to offset the effects of regulation on productivity without compromising safety or environmental quality. GAO recommends increased federal efforts to promote the development and greater use of safe, productivity technologies, and improved labor management relations. Because of the importance of higher productivity, GAO plans to send the report to knowledgeable individuals to solicit their views on the report's conclusions, and to request suggestions on how they might be implemented. If appropriate, GAO will submit further recommendations in a subsequent report.

Staats, E.B.

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

Subsidence in coastal Louisiana: causes, rates, and effects on wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal wetlands are being lost at a rapid and accelerating rate in Louisiana. Much of this loss is attributable to a relative lowering of the wetland surface below the level adequate to support vegetation. Such rapid subsidence is a natural phenomenon, related to the progradation and abandonment of distributary lobes of the Mississippi river Deltaic Plain. For a considerable period after abandonment of new sediment sources, wetlands are able to keep pace with subsidence by accreting sediments reworked by marine processes. But inundation of interior wetlands removed from such an active sediment supply, wave exposure, and saltwater intrusion eventually result in deterioration of the wetlands. Human activities may accelerate this process by disrupting sediment supplies for wetland accretion, raising global sea level, causing saltwater intrusion, and withdrawals of subsurface materials. Present subsidence rates from tide gauge records exceed 40 mm/yr at the modern Mississippi River delta and approximate 10 mm/yr in wetlands near the gulf coast. Subsidence rates over the last 1000 years appear to have been half the rates presently observed. This either results from natural variability, inaccuracy of tide gauge records, or human influences. The effect of the high rate of increase in locally apparent sea level on wetlands is difficult to quantitatively predict because of local variations in subsidence and accretion, uncertainty regarding future global sea level, and lack of knowledge of the accretionary limits of wetlands. 66 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

Boesch, D.F.; Levin, D.; Nummedal, D.; Bowles, K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dynamic investigation of gold nanocrystal assembly using in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering.  

SciTech Connect

Here we investigate the dynamic self-assembly pathway of ordered gold nanocrystal arrays during the self-assembly of gold nanocrystal micelles, with and without the presence of colloidal silica precursors, using grazing-incidence X-ray scattering performed at a synchrotron source. With silica precursors present, a lattice with rhombohedral symmetry is formed from the partial collapse of a face-centered cubic structure. In the absence of silica, a transient body-centered orthorhombic phase appears, which rapidly collapses into a glassy nanocrystal film. The appearance of face-centered and body-centered structures is consistent with a phase diagram for charged colloidal particles with assembly modulated via Coulomb screening.

Dunphy, D.; Fan, H.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Brinker, C. J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of New Mexico; SNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.-Ing. Biljana Milivojevic Dipl.-Ing. Vitali Mirvoda Stip. Dipl.-Ing. Timo Pfau Dr.-Ing. David Sandel Dr

270

Virtual Globe visualization of ash-aviation encounters, with the special case of the 1989 Redoubt-KLM incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of natural hazards on the local environment causes major issues for those agencies responsible for warning and understanding of the risks. Analysis of past events can assist and improve future warning capabilities. Here, volcanic ash-aviation ... Keywords: Dispersion modeling and Virtual Globes, Puff, Volcanic ash

P. W. Webley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

[FIXED] perl 5.16.0 File::Glob() causes crashes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

perl 5.16.0 File::Glob() causes crashes FIXED perl 5.16.0 File::Glob() causes crashes August 15, 2013 by Doug Jacobsen (1 Comments) There is an issue with the default modules...

272

Causes and explanations in the structural-model approach: Tractable cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper continues the research on the computational aspects of Halpern and Pearl's causes and explanations in the structural-model approach. To this end, we first explore how an instance of deciding weak cause can be reduced to an equivalent instance ... Keywords: ?-partial explanation, Actual cause, Blame, Computational complexity, Explanation, Explanatory power, Partial explanation, Probabilistic structural causal model, Responsibility, Structural causal model, Tractability, Weak cause

Thomas Eiter; Thomas Lukasiewicz

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DHS National Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Transforming Federal Cyber Security Management June 12, 2013 1 Page 2. Outline 1. Securing .gov 2. Why CDM1? ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Incident Handling at BMDO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Adverse events such as natural disasters and power ... for damage by ensuring response actions are ... We must prioritize our responses to have the ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident conditions and frequencies. Just under 6000 records, each representing a single event involving rail freight shipments moving on mainline track, were subjected to statistical frequency analysis, then included in the construction of classification and regression trees as described by Breimann et al. (1984). Variables related to damage cost defined the initial splits,'' or branchings of the tree. An interesting implication of the results of this analysis with respect to transportation of hazardous wastes by rail is that movements should be avoided when ambient temperatures are extreme (significantly 80{degrees}F), but that there should be no a priori bias against shipping wastes in longer train consists. 2 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Saricks, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Janssen, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dissolution dynamics of the calcite-water interface observed in situ by glancing-incidence X-ray scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Glancing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source were used to investigate dissolution dynamics in situ at the calcite-water interface. The relation between calcite saturation state and roughness of the calcite (1014) cleavage surface as a function of time was examined during pH titrations of an initially calcite-saturated solution. Systematic variations in roughness were observed as a function of saturation state as pH was titrated to values below that of calcite saturation. Different steady-state values of roughness were evident at fixed values of {Delta}G{sub r}, and these were correlated with the extent of undersaturation. A significant increase in roughness begins to occur with increasing undersaturation at a {Delta}G{sub r} value of approximately {minus}2.0 kcal/mol. The dissolution rate corresponding to this increase is about 1.5 x 10{sup 7} mmol/cm {center_dot} sec. This increase in roughness is attributed to a transition in the principal rate-determining dissolution mechanism, and is consistent with both powder-reaction studies of dissolution kinetics and single-crystal dissolution studies by atomic force microscopy. These data indicate some important potential applications of GIXS in the study of mineral-water interface geochemistry.

Sturchio, N.C.; Chiarello, R.P.

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant's wave scattering theory to evaluate degradation of the beam performance. For a damaged surface

Tillack, Mark

280

Modified Hitschfeld–Bordan Equations for Attenuation-Corrected Radar Rain Reflectivity: Application to Nonuniform Beamfilling at Off-Nadir Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by Takahashi et al., multiple path attenuation estimates over the field of view of an airborne or spaceborne weather radar are feasible for off-nadir incidence angles. This follows from the fact that the surface reference technique, which ...

Robert Meneghini; Liang Liao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

282

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

283

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

284

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

285

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

286

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

287

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

288

Institutsleitung: Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Prof. E.h. Dr.-Ing. E.h. Dr. h.c. mult. Engelbert Westkmper Kontakt: Birgit Spaeth Presse-und ffentlichkeitsarbeit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universitätsprofessor ernannt wird. Thomas Bauernhansl, 1969 im fränkischen Miltenberg geboren, hat Maschinenbau an der

Möbius, Bernd

289

V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate abnormally July 27, 2013 - 4:35am Addthis PROBLEM: A specially crafted query that includes malformed rdata can cause named to terminate with an assertion failure while rejecting the malformed query. PLATFORM: BIND 9.7 ABSTRACT: A specially crafted query sent to a BIND nameserver can cause it to crash (terminate abnormally). REFERENCE LINKS: ISC Knowledge Base CVE-2013-4854 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: BIND is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. Authoritative and recursive servers are equally vulnerable. Intentional exploitation of this condition can cause a denial of service in all nameservers running affected versions of BIND 9. Access Control Lists do

290

Root Causes of Circumferential Cracking in Waterwalls of Supercritical Units: State-of-Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumferential cracking on the waterwalls has again become a significant problem for many supercritical units, especially with the implementation of low-NOx systems. Damage typically consists of multiple, parallel cracks perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tube and to the direction of maximum tensile stress. There can be numerous potential causes, and the choice of the appropriate control strategy will depend on identifying the underlying cause(s) for a particular outbreak of damage. This repo...

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

291

Causes and Explanations in the Structural-Model Approach: Tractable Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue our research on the algorithmic aspects of Halpern and Pearl's causes and explanations in the structural-model approach. To this end, we present new characterizations of weak causes for certain classes of causal models, which show that under suitable restrictions deciding causes and explanations is tractable. To our knowledge, these are the first explicit tractability results for the structuralmodel approach.

Thomas Eiter; Thomas Lukasiewicz

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mitigation of Animal-Caused Outages For Distribution Lines and Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant number of electric outages throughout North America are caused by animals -- mammals, birds, snakes, etc. These animal-caused outages are increasingly common in both urban and residential areas. By taking a pro-active approach to mitigating outages, utilities will spare the lives of wildlife and address the increasing pressures from environmental groups and concerned utility customers. This document describes a study designed to mitigate animal-caused outages for distribution lines and subs...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Phytoplankton in the Upper San Francisco Estuary: Recent Biomass Trends, Their Causes and Their Trophic Significance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow on the succession and biomass of phytoplankton in acontrol phy- toplankton biomass in south San Francisco Bay?Francisco Estuary: Recent Biomass Trends, Their Causes and

Jassby, Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS OF GREEN CAUSE-RELATED MARKETING (CRM) PRICE FAIRNESS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many firms employ Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) strategies that link product sales to the support of a charity to generate positive brand images. The global objective… (more)

Kim, Eun Kyoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Root Cause Analysis Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Improving the Department of Energy's project and contract management continues to be one of the Department's management priorities. Excellence in this area helps ensure that DOE's programs and projects meet DOE's strategic objectives, provide value to the American taxpayer, and foster public confidence in DOE's ability to manage its responsibilities. As part of our effort to build a strong project and contract management foundation, a root cause analysis (RCA) was developed through extensive collaboration between DOE's Headquarters and field project, contract, and financial management professionals, and in coordination with the Office of

296

Tactical urbanism, public policy reform, and 'innovation spotting' by government : from Park(ing) Day to San Francisco's parklet program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the prospects and impacts of tactical urbanism (TU). While tactical urbanism remains primarily a subcultural movement, it is beginning to gain traction in popular culture in traditionally politically ...

Davidson, Mariko Mura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Burning Man festival is a unique happen-ing. For one week in September every year,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spaces, the city as it alters over the seven days and from year to year, exhibiting emergent properties- ance of oversized gas-guzzling camper vans, fossil-fuel-powered generators and gratuitous combustion, it is no Utopia. But the City's Alternative Energy Zone, with its huge bank of solar panels, multiple experiments

Bourne, Philip E.

298

Cultivat(ing) modernities : the Society for National Heritage, political propaganda and public architecture in twentieth-century Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning in 1922, under the auspices of the Pahlavi dynasty of Iran, the tombs of selected historical figures were systematically destroyed to make way for modern mausoleums erected as metaphors for an "Aryan" nation in ...

Grigor, Talinn, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

58 UTS ANNUAL REPORT 2008 sUppoRtING oUR objEctIvEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvingenvironmentalsustainabilityin ourcampusoperations.Itisoverseenby asteeringcommitteeandsevenworking groups:waste,transport,energy into the atmosphere. The proposal from students Antony Henry and Kavit Pandya was to put this wasted energy through Energy-efficientlightinginmorethan> 60percentoftheUniversity Savingtheequivalentof45Olympic

University of Technology, Sydney

300

HOW ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FROM LEACH ING OF HEAVY METALS IN ASH RESIDUES FROM COMBUSTION OF MUNIC IPAL SOLID WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratories which led to the use of acid tests such as the EP and TCLP tests. [25] 13 #12;CONCLUSIONS and soluble metals in the ash from Waste-to Energy (WTE) facilities has led to a public concern about why has led to the requirement for continuous monitoring of oxygen , carbon monoxide (CO) , and acid gases

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

What Caused the Onset of the 1997–98 El Niño?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense debate about the causes of the 1997–98 El Niño. One side sees the obvious intense westerly wind events as the main cause for the exceptional heating in summer 1997, the other emphasizes slower oceanic processes. A ...

Geert Jan van Oldenborgh

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients for H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} incident upon spacecraft surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients were made for gas-surface interactions between the Space Shuttle reaction control jet plume gases and the solar panel array materials to be used on the International Space Station. Actual conditions were simulated using a supersonic nozzle source to produce beams of the gases with approximately the same average velocities as the gases have in the Shuttle plumes. Samples of the actual solar panel materials were mounted on a torsion balance that was used to measure the force exerted on the surfaces by the molecular beams. Measurements were made with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} incident upon the solar array material, Kapton, SiO{sub 2}-coated Kapton, and Z93-coated Al. The measurements showed that molecules scatter from the surfaces more specularly as the angle of incidence increases and that scattering behavior has a strong dependence upon both the incident gas and velocity. These results show that for some technical surfaces the simple assumption of diffuse scattering with complete thermal accommodation is entirely inadequate. It is clear that additional measurements are required to produce models that more accurately describe the gas-surface interactions encountered in rarefied flow regimes.

Cook, S.R.; Hoffbauer, M.A.

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ocean Heat Transport as a Cause for Model Uncertainty in Projected Arctic Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic climate is governed by complex interactions and feedback mechanisms between the atmosphere, ocean, and solar radiation. One of its characteristic features, the Arctic sea ice, is very vulnerable to anthropogenically caused warming. ...

Irina Mahlstein; Reto Knutti

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Issues in Establishing Causes of the 1988 Drought over North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress toward understanding the causes of and physical mechanisms involved in the 1988 North American drought is reported. An earlier study demonstrated that major sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the tropical Pacific Ocean, in ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Grant W. Branstator

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Will Amazonia Dry Out? Magnitude and Causes of Change from IPCC Climate Model Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest may undergo significant change in response to future climate change. To determine the likelihood and causes of such changes, the authors analyzed the output of 24 models from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (...

Brian Cook; Ning Zeng; Jin-Ho Yoon

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A GCM Study of Volcanic Eruptions as a Cause of Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments have shown that idealized climatic perturbations that increase the temperature of the tropical tropopause region can cause larger than expected surface temperature increases. This is because the ...

Manoj M. Joshi; Keith P. Shine

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Atmospheric Turbidity at Tucson, Arizona, 1956–83: Variations and Their Causes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation data collected over the last 27 years at the University of Arizona have been analyzed to determine the major causes of time variations in the local turbidity of the atmosphere. The most extreme perturbations have been associated ...

R. J. Szymber; W. D. Sellers

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The Role of Multiple Vortex Tornado Structure in Causing Storm Researcher Fatalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large and violent tornado/multiple vortex mesocyclone (MVMC) / tornado tracked east and northeastward near El Reno, Oklahoma on 31-May-2013, causing eight fatalities, including storm-chasers/researchers attempting to deploy in-situ instrumentation. Sub-...

Joshua Wurman; Karen Kosiba; Paul Robinson; Tim Marshall

311

Large Waves In The Gulf Of Mexico Caused By Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large waves generated by Hurricane Ivan caused extensive damage to the offshore oil industry and to the coastal areas on the Gulf of Mexico. This damage and the wave conditions have received considerable media coverage. There has been ...

Vijay G. Panchang; Dongcheng Li

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Impact of a 2 × CO2 Climate on Lightning-Caused Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate change could have significant repercussions for lightning-caused wildfires. Two empirical fire models are presented relating the frequency of lightning fires and the area burned by these fires to the elective precipitation and the ...

Colin Price; David Rind

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A human-caused climate change signal emerges from the noise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-05 For immediate release: 11292012 | NR-12-11-05 A human-caused climate change signal emerges from the noise Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov...

314

FIA-13-0015- In the Matter of Cause of Action  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On April 24, 2013, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) granted in part a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by the Cause of Action (Appellant) of a...

315

Dynamical causes of the 2010/11 Texas-northern-Mexico drought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The causes of the Texas-northern Mexico drought during 2010-11 are shown, using observations, reanalyses and model simulations, to arise from a combination of ocean forcing and internal atmospheric variability. The drought began in fall 2010 and ...

Richard Seager; Lisa Goddard; Jennifer Nakamura; Naomi Henderson; Dong Eun Lee

316

Root-Cause Failure Analysis: Fossil-Fired Power Plant Draft Fans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the collection and analysis of fan-related outage data for 61 large fossil fuel steam power plants. The outage causes are ranked in terms of their impact on production, and a systematic search for generic root causes is described. Recommendations are made for short-term corrective measures and for longer-term research efforts to significantly improve fan system reliability.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 What Causes High-temperature Superconductivity? A phase change at absolute zero temperature may provide key insights into the decades-old mystery of high-temperature superconductivity. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Ames Laboratory

319

Establishing Public Policy as a Primary Cause of Engineering Failures in National Infrastructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the 14th August 2003, a complex combination of immediate events and longer term vulnerabilities led to a domino-effect in which 50 million people had their power supplies interrupted. Consequent losses were between $5-10 billion. It is, therefore, one of the most serious disruptions to a national power distribution network. The causes of this infrastructure failure included technical issues to do with network capacity and the algorithms used to predict potential distribution problems. It also had managerial and human factors causes; these arguably included an over-reliance on automated monitoring systems. The infrastructure failure also stemmed from governmental and regulatory intervention, which led to problems in the operation of the energy market. The following paper applies accident investigation techniques to represent and reason about the complex interactions between these causes. In particular, we use Violation and Vulnerability (V2) diagrams to map out arguments for and against market deregulation as a causal factor in engineering failures.

Christopher W. Johnson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Theory is Watertight Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks An X-ray Rainbow An Insulating Breakthrough Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness FEBRUARY 12, 2007 Bookmark and Share Gerard Wong, a professor of materials science and engineering, of physics, and of bioengineering at Illinois, and colleagues have found an underlying molecular cause for one form of deafness, while exploring the physics of hearing. (Photo by L. Brian Stauffer) Scientists exploring the physics of hearing have found an underlying molecular cause for one form of deafness, and a conceptual connection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ORP-3 Rescues ER Membrane Expansions Caused by the VAPB-P56S Mutation in Familial ALS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A mutation in ER membrane protein VAPB is responsible for causing a familial form of ALS (ALS8). The VAPB-P56S mutation causes protein aggregation and a… (more)

Darbyson, Angie L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Univ. of British Columbia (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)  

SciTech Connect

This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for CAUs on the NNSS for Calendar Year 2011

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-B Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies 241-B Tank Farm (B Farm) leak cause and locations for the 100 series leaking tank (241-B-107) identified in RPP-RPT-49089, Hanford B-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the B Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Harlow, Donald G. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Causes and Consequences of the Oil Shock of 2007-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores similarities and differences between the run-up of oil prices in 2007-08 and earlier oil price shocks, looking at what caused the price increase and what effects it had on the economy. Whereas historical oil price shocks were primarily caused by physical disruptions of supply, the price run-up of 2007-08 was caused by strong demand confronting stagnating world production. Although the causes were different, the consequences for the economy appear to have been very similar to those observed in earlier episodes, with significant effects on overall consumption spending and purchases of domestic automobiles in particular. In the absence of those declines, it is unlikely that we would have characterized the period 2007:Q4 to 2008:Q3 as one of economic recession for the U.S. The experience of 2007-08 should thus be added to the list of recessions to which oil prices appear to have made a material contribution.

James D. Hamilton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

CAUSES AND PREVENTION OF SYMPTOM COMPLAINTS IN OFFICE BUILDINGS: DISTILLING THE EXPERIENCE OF INDOOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAUSES AND PREVENTION OF SYMPTOM COMPLAINTS IN OFFICE BUILDINGS: DISTILLING THE EXPERIENCE Environmental Engineering; 6 Environmental Building Sciences, Inc.; 7 National Institute for Occupational Safety building-related symptoms in office buildings, for owners and managers. Ideas from six experienced building

Diamond, Richard

327

Fever Caused By Occult Infections In The 3-To-36-Month-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fever Caused By Occult Infections In The 3-To-36-Month- Old Child It's 3 am and the ED is winding medical literature. 2. Understand the changing epidemiology of occult infection in young children due to widespread immunization and the implications in testing for and treating occult infection. 3. Review

328

Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Plastic Deformation in High-Capacity Lithium-Ion Batteries Caused by Charge and Discharge, Massachusetts 02138 Evidence has accumulated recently that a high-capacity elec- trode of a lithium-ion battery in the particle is high, possibly leading to fracture and cavitation. I. Introduction LITHIUM-ION batteries

Suo, Zhigang

329

B&W Y-12 responds to NNSA's show cause letter | Y-12 National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B&W Y-12 responds to ... B&W Y-12 responds to NNSA's show cause letter Posted: September 12, 2012 - 3:29pm On September 10, B&W Y-12 provided its response to the National Nuclear...

330

Location dependent common cause analysis with an application to fires. [Nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the work described is to develop a methodology by which the public risk arising from localized common cause events (e.g., fires) in nuclear plants can be assessed. Attention was paid to maximizing both the completeness and efficiency of the analysis. This methodology was then applied to the analysis of fire events in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP).

Leaver, D.; vonHerrmann, J.; Olmos, J.; Boardman, R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

DETECTION OF EVENTS CAUSING PLUGGAGE OF A COAL-FIRED BOILER: A DATA MINING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETECTION OF EVENTS CAUSING PLUGGAGE OF A COAL-FIRED BOILER: A DATA MINING APPROACH ANDREW KUSIAK to analyze events leading to plug- gage of a boiler. The proposed approach involves statistics, data. The proposed approach has been tested on a 750 MW commercial coal-fired boiler affected with an ash fouling

Kusiak, Andrew

333

Latitudinal Distribution of Mixing Rate Caused by the M2 Internal Tide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon tidal data and an energy balance relation are used to estimate the mixing rate caused by M2 internal tides in the upper ocean. The results indicate that latitudinal distribution of the ...

Jiwei Tian; Lei Zhou; Xiaoqian Zhang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Inrush related problems caused by lamps with electronic drivers and their mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New types of appliances sometimes bring unexpected power quality problems. On several locations it was reported that energy-saving lamps cause random false tripping of circuit breakers. In all of these cases these lamps had electronic drivers. An investigation ... Keywords: energy-saving lamp, false tripping, inrush, mitigation, power quality

Vladimir ?uk; Joseph F. G. Cobben; Wil L. Kling

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

On the Causes and Dynamics of the Early Twentieth-Century North American Pluvial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early twentieth-century North American pluvial (1905–17) was one of the most extreme wet periods of the last 500 yr and directly led to overly generous water allotments in the water-limited American west. Here, the causes and dynamics of the ...

Benjamin I. Cook; Richard Seager; Ron L. Miller

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Causes of Long-Term Drought in the U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Great Plains experienced a number of multiyear droughts during the last century, most notably the droughts of the 1930s and 1950s. This study examines the causes of such droughts using ensembles of long-term (1930–2000) simulations ...

Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Philip J. Pegion; Randal D. Koster; Julio T. Bacmeister

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Protecting Against Digital Common-Cause Failure: Combining Defensive Measures and Diversity Attributes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software common-cause failure (CCF) remains an unsettled technical and regulatory issue, both for new plants and digital upgrades at operating plants. The concern is the potential for CCFs to disable multiple equipment trains or systems that use identical software-based components. This report will help utilities ensure that plants have adequate protection against digital CCF.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy and Environment: Progress and Existence Energy Provides Existence and Is Cause for Change (hopefully Progress)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Environment: Progress and Existence Energy Provides Existence and Is Cause for Change (hopefully Progress) Energy is possessed (thus equilibrium property) by material systems and redistributed-displacement interactions (process) towards the equilibrium (equi- partition of energy over mass and space); thus energy

Kostic, Milivoje M.

339

A Model of Sea Level Rise Caused by Ocean Thermal Expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming of the atmosphere as a result of an increased concentration of greenhouse gases is expected to lead to a significant rise is global sea level. We present estimates of the component of this sea level rise caused by thermal expansion of the ...

John A. Church; J. Stuart Godfrey; David R. Jackett; Trevor J. McDougall

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77 CHAPTER 4 IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION Bird mortality studies reporting on wind energy facilities elsewhere regularly report that bird mortality in the APWRA is unusually high there and is, therefore, an anomaly among wind energy facilities in the United States. We

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Techniques to evaluate the importance of common cause degradation on reliability and safety of nuclear weapons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear weapon stockpile ages, there is increased concern about common degradation ultimately leading to common cause failure of multiple weapons that could significantly impact reliability or safety. Current acceptable limits for the reliability and safety of a weapon are based on upper limits on the probability of failure of an individual item, assuming that failures among items are independent. We expanded the current acceptable limits to apply to situations with common cause failure. Then, we developed a simple screening process to quickly assess the importance of observed common degradation for both reliability and safety to determine if further action is necessary. The screening process conservatively assumes that common degradation is common cause failure. For a population with between 100 and 5000 items we applied the screening process and conclude the following. In general, for a reliability requirement specified in the Military Characteristics (MCs) for a specific weapon system, common degradation is of concern if more than 100(1-x)% of the weapons are susceptible to common degradation, where x is the required reliability expressed as a fraction. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon subsystem if more than 0.1% of the population is susceptible to common degradation. Common degradation is of concern for the safety of a weapon component or overall weapon system if two or more components/weapons in the population are susceptible to degradation. Finally, we developed a technique for detailed evaluation of common degradation leading to common cause failure for situations that are determined to be of concern using the screening process. The detailed evaluation requires that best estimates of common cause and independent failure probabilities be produced. Using these techniques, observed common degradation can be evaluated for effects on reliability and safety.

Darby, John L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

Griffin, O. M.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

DOE-NE-STD-1004-92; Root Cause Analysis Guidance Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NE-STD-1004-92 NE-STD-1004-92 DOE GUIDELINE ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS GUIDANCE DOCUMENT February 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards Washington, D.C. 20585 ii ABSTRACT DOE Order 5000.3A, "Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information," investigation and reporting of occurrences (including the performance of root cause analysis) requires the and the selection, implementation, and follow-up of corrective actions. The level of effort expended should be based on the significance attached to the occurrence. Most off-normal occurrences need only a scaled- down effort while most emergency occurrences should be investigated using one or more of the formal analytical models. A discussion of methodologies, instructions, and worksheets in this document guides

344

Production of tectonically caused overpressures in carbonates by using resistivity and bulk density of associated shales  

SciTech Connect

In tectonically caused overpressured carbonate reservoirs associated with thick shale beds (e.g., 50 m and more), several shale properties can be used as predictive techniques: low porosities, high acoustic (sonic) velocities, high resistivities, and high bulk densities. The reason these properties are used is because the greater the degree of overcompaction (due to tectonic forces), the greater the amount of water squeezed from the shales, which, in turn, overpressures the associated reservoirs. Two case studies from the Soviet Union and Iran illustrate this occurrence. For comparison purposes, the prediction of overpressures caused by undercompaction (e.g., due to rapid sedimentation) using conventional overpressure indicators, such as resistivity, acoustic and density logs, and bulk density of shale cuttings, are reviewed and illustrated via a typical Tertiary sand/shale sequence.

Chilingarian, G.V. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA)); Fertl, W.H. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-A Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies 241-A Tank Farm (A Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-A-104 and 241-A-105) identified in RPP-ENV-37956, Hanford A and AX Farm Leak Assessment Report. This document satisfies the A Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Experimental Verification of the Root Cause Mechanism for Axial Offset Anomaly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology built a test facility designed to experimentally verify the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Tests consisted of depositing materials from the simulated PWR coolant on zircaloy-4 test elements, followed by rapid isolation from the boron-rich coolant to trap within the deposit layer any boron compounds having retrograde solubility. Although significant amounts of boron (up to 8 weight percent) were i...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low productivity in American coal mining: causes and cures. Report to the Congress  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies the factors responsible for depressed productivity in the U.S. coal mining industry. GAO analysis revealed that the fall in underground mining productivity since 1969 is closely tied to poor labor-management relations, 1974 union contract requirements, and Federal mine safety and health regulations. State reclamation laws and the opening of new surface mines lowered productivity in surface mining. Coal mining technology has not advanced sufficiently to offset the loss due to these causes.

Not Available

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

Root Cause Analysis of Failed ATRIUM-10B Fuel Rod from Forsmark-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) is co-sponsoring numerous research projects to investigate fuel failures associated with power or sequence changes in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and thereby identify the root cause of these failures and provide guidance to avoid future failures. This subject report is complementary to Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1015453, Fuel Reliability Guideline: Pellet-Cladding Interaction, as well as other EPRI technical reports (1011100, 1014876, 1018037, 10...

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-C Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies 241-C Tank Farm (C Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-C-101 and 241-C-105) identified in RPP-RPT-33418, Rev. 2, Hanford C-Farm Leak Inventory Assessments Report. This document satisfies the C Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-U Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies 241-U Tank Farm (U Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-U-104, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112) identified in RPP-RPT-50097, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-U Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the U-Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fragilities Caused by Dosage Imbalance in Regulation of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells can maintain their functions despite fluctuations in intracellular parameters, such as protein activities and gene expression levels. This commonly observed biological property of cells is called robustness. On the other hand, these parameters have different limitations, each reflecting the property of the subsystem containing the parameter. The budding yeast cell cycle is quite fragile upon overexpression of CDC14, but is robust upon overexpression of ESP1. The gene products of both CDC14 and ESP1 are regulated by 1:1 binding with their inhibitors (Net1 and Pds1), and a mathematical model predicts the extreme fragility of the cell cycle upon overexpression of CDC14 and ESP1 caused by dosage imbalance between these genes. However, it has not been experimentally shown that dosage imbalance causes fragility of the cell cycle. In this study, we measured the quantitative genetic interactions of these genes by performing combinatorial ‘‘genetic tug-of-war’ ’ experiments. We first showed experimental evidence that dosage imbalance between CDC14 and NET1 causes fragility. We also showed that fragility arising from dosage imbalance between ESP1 and PDS1 is masked by CDH1 and CLB2. The masking function of CLB2 was stabilization of Pds1 by its phosphorylation. We finally modified Chen’s model according

Kazunari Kaizu; Hisao Moriya; Hiroaki Kitano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

U.S. military action in Panama: justifying OPERATION JUST CAUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project of this thesis is a moral evaluation of OPERATION JUST CAUSE, the United States' use of military force in Panama in 1989. I begin by arguing that just war theory, both in its classic and contemporary forms, needs to be revised. Present just war positions do not adequately take into account the complex, nontraditional missions that military forces are increasingly called to perform in today's ever-changing international arena. From humanitarian relief efforts in Somalia to peacekeeping missions in Kosovo, militaries today and those of the United States in particular, are serving in roles that are a sharp tactical departure from those they prepared for in the Cold War era. OPERATION JUST CAUSE is one such example of these types of nonstandard missions. I survey classic and contemporary just war theories, select and modify appropriate criteria, and restate a modified composite theory that I argue for as optimal for evaluating these new types of military actions. I then put my composite theory to the test by examining in detail U.S. motives and actions in Panama in 1989, and subsequently evaluating them against my revised criteria. Finally, given the judgment methodology that I state, I conclude that OPERATION JUST CAUSE was a justified use of military force by the United States.

Reich, Theodore Herman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5308 7/1/2013 0:41 Indian Fort Medical Emergency Hiker bit by snake on trail Report Filed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to unknown cause BFD Responded 5311 7/2/2013 13:15 Old Broom Craft Building Theft By Unlawful Taking Copper piping stolen from new construction BPD responded 5312 7/4/2013 13:45 James Hall Fire Alarm/6/2013 12:45 Visitor Center Theft By Unlawful Taking Older Huffy bicycle stolen from parking lot Report

Baltisberger, Jay H.

354

Investigation of Bottle Related Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure · Analysis of Glass Breakage · Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

355

Free form incident light fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents methods for photo-realistic rendering using strongly spatially variant illumination captured from real scenes. The illumination is captured along arbitrary paths in space using a high dynamic range, HDR, video camera system with position ...

Jonas Unger; Stefan Gustavson; Per Larsson; Anders Ynnerman

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Reporting of Nuclear Incidents (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each operator of a nuclear power generating facility shall notify the Commissioner of Environmental Protection or his designee, which may be another State Agency, as soon as possible but in all...

357

Radiation Incident on Tilted Collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solar energy system design purposes, observations of solar radiation on a horizontal surface must be converted to values on a tilted energy collector. An empirical conversion relationship, introduced by Liu and Jordan (1960) and based on ...

P. J. Robinson

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Incident Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virus Pages Sophos Virus Info Page Symantec Trend Micro Virus Encyclopedia Virus Bulletin Home Page Cyber Security Sites AUSCERT FIRST NSA (National Security Agency) NVD (National...

359

The incident at Stagg Field  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the events leading up to the first controlled release of atomic energy under the abandoned West Stands of Scagg Field at the University of Chicago on December 2, 1942. This experiment was a milestone in a multifaceted project geared toward producing an atomic bomb in time to affect the outcome of World War II. This article traces the origins of the Manhattan Project from the first letter written by Einstein to the first successful graphite modulated chain reacting pile and including a brief afterward on the use of the bombs produced by this project on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Other articles in this magazine also discuss various aspects of the project and serve, along with this article, as a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

Moore, M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-BY and 241-TY Farm  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies 241-BY Tank Farm (BY Farm) and 241-TY Tank Farm (TY Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-BY-103, 241-TY-103, 241-TY-104, 241-TY-105, and 241-TY-106) identified in RPP-RPT-43704, Hanford BY Farm Leak Assessments Report, and in RPP-RPT-42296, Hanford TY Farm Leak Assessments Report. This document satisfies the BY and TY Farm portion of the target (T04) in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

Girardot, Crystal L.; Harlow, Donald G.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of the Reference Energy System and EEMIS to analyze some cause-effect relationships  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Emergency Management Information System (EEMIS) and the Reference Energy System (RES) form an ideal framework for analyzing cause-effect relationships in the petroleum and natural gas energy systems. This report presents four case studies that demonstrate the applications of EEMIS and the RES for analyzing (1) the relationships between weather and the demand for energy in regions of the US, (2) the effect of a refinery outage on oil product distribution, (3) the impact of transportation outages on the flow and supply of petroleum, and (4) the relationship between income and energy usage.

D& #x27; Acierno, J; Hermelee, A

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Investigating Servant Leadership in the Context of Cause-Related Sporting Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents three separate studies designed to provide systematic and evidence-based insight into how servant leadership could be a crucial success factor in helping non-profit organizations (NPOs) hosting cause-related sporting events achieve their missions. Thus, the purpose of my dissertation was to advance the literature and the practice of servant leadership. In Study one, I conducted a systematic literature review of studies that explored an application of servant leadership. A disciplined screening process resulted in a sample population of 39 studies. The synthesis of these applied studies revealed: a) there is no consensus on the definition of servant leadership; b) servant leadership is being applied across a variety of contexts, cultures, and themes; c) researchers are using multiple measures to explore servant leadership; and d) these studies provide strong evidence that servant leadership helps organizations and improves the well-being of followers. In Study two, I explored the leadership style of the founder of a cause-related sporting event to understand how this leadership style motivated volunteers. This was achieved through semi-structured personal interviews, document analysis, and personal observations of the 25th National Kidney Foundation (NKF) Surf Festival. Results indicated that the founder was a servant leader who influenced volunteer motivation by generating a shared vision dedicated to helping others, building a caring and loving community, and creating the freedom and resources for followers to become servants themselves. In Study three, using a longitudinal case study, I qualitatively explored if a cause-related sporting event could inspire participants to become servant leaders, and if so, how does the event achieve this? Data collection methods included focus groups, open-ended qualitative questionnaires, direct observations, document analysis, and semi-structured personal interviews with participants of the U.S. NKF Transplant Games, specifically Team Florida. Analyses revealed the event inspired participants to serve others and helped to build a community of servant leaders. It was found that three specific mechanisms of the Games generated community-level outcomes, which led to impacts on participants and helped them develop servant leadership. I then developed a model to describe a cause-related sporting event's ability to inspire participants to become servant leaders.

Parris, Denise

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fuel Reliability Program: Browns Ferry Fuel Corrosion Failures Root Cause Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixty-three GE13 fuel bundles failed in Browns Ferry Unit 2 (BF2) during Cycle 12; three GE13 assemblies failed in BF Unit 3 (BF3) during Cycle 11. The affected fuel in BF2 was in its second cycle of operation and the fuel in BF3 in its third at the time of failure. Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF), General Electric-Hitachi (GEH), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) investigated the cause of the failures. The investigation included evaluations of materials and manu...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Root Cause Analysis of Failed Westinghouse 17OFA Fuel Rod in Callaway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel rod F8 of fuel assembly V36 was identified as leaking during the Callaway Unit 1 EOC-17 core offload in April 2010. V36 was a once-burned assembly that resided in interior core location F-6. According to inspection results of the rod, the root cause analysis (RCA) team initially determined, in mid-2010, that debris fretting or internal primary hydriding was the most probable leaking mechanism. However, the team also recommended additional inspections to assist in the final determination of the leaki...

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

365

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume 3 contains five appendices providing methodological details and data listings.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Non-Kinetic Losses Caused by Electrochemical Carbon Corrosion in PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

This paper presented non-kinetic losses in PEM fuel cells under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support. The cathode with carbon-supported Pt catalyst was prepared and characterized with potential hold at 1.2 V vs. SHE in PEM fuel cells. Irreversible losses caused by carbon corrosion were evaluated using a variety of electrochemical characterizations including cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and polarization technique. Ohmic losses at the cathode with potential hold were determined using its capacitive responses. Concentration losses in PEM fuel cells were analyzed in terms of Tafel behavior and thin film/flooded-agglomerate dynamics.

Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Method of normalizing the measured scattered light from a surface defect located arbitrarily in a Gaussian intensity distribution incident on the surface  

SciTech Connect

The intensity distribution of the beam from a laser operated in the TEM/sub infinity/ mode is Gaussian in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the beam. In some applications it is desirable to have a uniform intensity over a certain region in space. For example, when a Gaussian beam is incident on a smooth surface containing small isolated defects the light scattered by a defect will depend on the position of the defect relative to the center of the beam. In the past, several techniques have been devised to convert a Gaussian intensity profile into a uniform intensity over a specified region in space. In the present work a different approach is taken. A method of normalization is described which makes direct use of the Gaussian intensity distribution of the TEM/sub infinity/ mode. By this method, the amount of light scattered by a defect can be normalized to the value which would be observed if the defect were located at the center of the beam, for a defect small in size compared with the l/e/sup 2/ diameter of the Gaussian profile. The normalization requires that three measurements be made of the scattering by the defect for an arbitrary location of the defect relative to the center of the beam. Experimental data was obtained which verifies the theory.

Klingsporn, P.E.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

Kovalchuk, I.; Kovalchuk, O. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy (Ukraine)]|[Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research (Ukraine); Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Enhanced superbanana transport caused by chaotic scattering across an asymmetric separatrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a novel 'chaotic' form of superbanana transport and compares the theory to experiments on non-neutral plasmas. Superbanana transport is caused by particles that cross local trapping separatrices (magnetic or electric ripples) in the presence of field 'errors' such as toroidal magnetic curvature. Traditionally, collisions (at rate {nu}) cause separatrix crossings, with resulting transport that scales as {nu}{sup 1/2}B{sup -1/2}. The 'chaotic' transport of interest here occurs when the separatrix is 'ruffled' in the direction of plasma drift; then, collisionless particle orbits give random trapping and detrapping. Prior theory assumed a 'stellarator symmetry' and suggested that these orbits give reduced transport scaling as {nu}{sup p} with p{approx}1. Here, we fully characterize chaotic transport and show that the transport is enhanced rather than reduced, scaling as {nu}{sup 0}B{sup -1}. Experiments on pure electron plasmas provide quantitative transport measurements, with precise control of the overall field error, and of the trapping separatrix with and without ruffles. The experiments show close agreement with theory over a decade in B, for both collisional neoclassical transport, and for the distinctive chaotic transport. At low magnetic fields, transport scaling as B{sup -p} with p>rsim2 becomes dominant, showing preliminary agreement with bounce-resonant theory.

Dubin, Daniel H. E.; Kabantsev, A. A.; Driscoll, C. F. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Can the Increase in the Eddy Length Scale under Global Warming Cause the Poleward Shift of the Jet Streams?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The question of whether an increase in the atmospheric eddy length scale may cause a poleward shift of the midlatitude jet streams is addressed. An increase in the length scale of the eddy reduces its zonal phase speed and so causes eddies to ...

Joseph Kidston; G. K. Vallis; S. M. Dean; J. A. Renwick

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM |  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil Spill by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM | Investigations into the gulf oil disaster are multiplying. The National Academy of Engineering (NAE and industry engineers to take a technical look into the causes of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and oil

Southern California, University of

373

Biofuels, causes of land-use change, and the role of fire in greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

IN THEIR REPORTS IN THE 29 FEBRUARY ISSUE ('LAND CLEARING AND THE BIOFUEL CARBON debt,' J. Fargione et al., p. 1235, and 'Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change,' T. Searchinger et al., p. 1238), the authors do not provide adequate support for their claim that biofuels cause high emissions due to land-use change. The conclusions of both papers depend on the misleading premise that biofuel production causes forests and grasslands to be converted to agriculture. However, field research, including a meta-analysis of 152 case studies, consistently finds that land-use change and associated carbon emissions are driven by interactions among cultural, technological, biophysical, political, economic, and demographic forces within a spatial and temporal context rather than by a single crop market. Searchinger et al. assert that soybean prices accelerate clearing of rainforest based on a single citation for a study not designed to identify the causal factors of land clearing. The study analyzed satellite imagery from a single state in Brazil over a 4-year period and focused on land classification after deforestation. Satellite imagery can measure what changed but does little to tell us why. Similarly, Fargione et al. do not rely on primary empirical studies of causes of land-use change. Furthermore, neither fire nor soil carbon sequestration was properly considered in the Reports. Fire's escalating contribution to global climate change is largely a result of burning in tropical savannas and forests. Searchinger et al. postulate that 10.8 million hectares could be needed for future biofuel, a fraction of the 250 to 400 million hectares burned each year between 2000 and 2005. By offering enhanced employment and incomes, biofuels can help establish economic stability and thus reduce the recurring use of fire on previously cleared land as well as pressures to clear more land. Neither Searchinger et al. nor Fargione et al. consider fire as an ongoing land-management tool. In addition, deep-rooted perennial biofuel feedstocks in the tropics could enhance soil carbon storage by 0.5 to 1 metric ton per hectare per year. An improved understanding of the forces behind land-use change leads to more favorable conclusions regarding the potential for biofuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

Mesa, Matthew

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

European Economic Review46 (2002) 1323}1357 What causes violent crime?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses panel data of intentional homicide and robbery rates for a sample of developed and developing countries for the period 1970}1994, based on information from the United Nations World Crime Surveys, to analyze the determinants of national crime rates both across countries and over time. A simple model of the incentives to commit crimes is proposed, which explicitly considers possible causes of the persistence of crime over time (criminal inertia). A panel-data based GMM methodology is used to estimate a dynamic model of national crime rates. This estimator controls for unobserved country-speci"c e!ects, the joint endogeneity of some of the explanatory variables, and the existence of some types of measurement errors a%icting the crime data. The results showthat increases in income inequality raise crime rates, crime tends to be countercyclical, and criminal inertia is signi"cant. ? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, Volume 1: executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. The final report, prepared in three volumes, describes the extent of the contribution of OCS development to coastal land loss. Volume I is the Executive Summary. The report provides a detailed description of both direct and indirect impacts.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Stratgies for Diversity Usage to Mitigate Postulated Common Cause Failure Vulnerabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach to establish effective mitigating strategies that can resolve potential common-cause failure (CCF) vulnerabilities in instrumentation and control systems at nuclear power plants. A particular objective in the development of these strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria, is to address the unique characteristics of digital technology that can contribute to CCF concerns. The research approach employed to establish diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on diversity usage and experience from nuclear power and non-nuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of common practices, and assessment of the nature of CCFs and compensating diversity attributes. The resulting diversity strategies address considerations such as the effect of technology choices, the nature of CCF vulnerabilities, and the prospective impact of each diversity type. In particular, the impact of each attribute and criterion on the purpose, process, product, and performance aspects of diverse systems are considered.

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Waterman, Michael E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

U. S. federal haste in setting up strategic petroleum reserves has caused a stir  

SciTech Connect

U.S. federal haste in setting up strategic petroleum reserves has caused a stir among Gulf Coast chemical companies who use salt domes to store chemicals or to obtain brine. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is expropriating pipeline rights-of-way and buying salt domes for storage of crude oil to meet the strategic-reserves timetable ordered by President Carter. A plan to convert a dome in Napoleonville, La., affects 12 companies that use 20-30 caverns there. To take over a salt dome, the DOE's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program needs only to write a writ of condemnation, get court approval, and then pay the owners twice the estimated value. The DOE is making an economic impact study of the entire program and expects to issue a report in Apr. 1978.

1978-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

Design of Experiments to Determine Causes of Flex Cable Solder Wicking, Discoloration and Hole Location Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of Experiments (DoE) were developed and performed in an effort to discover and resolve the causes of three different manufacturing issues; large panel voids after Hot Air Solder Leveling (HASL), cable hole locations out of tolerance after lamination and delamination/solder wicking around flat flex cable circuit lands after HASL. Results from a first DoE indicated large panel voids could be eliminated by removing the pre-HASL cleaning. It also revealed eliminating the pre-HASL bake would not be detrimental when using a hard press pad lamination stackup. A second DoE indicated a reduction in hard press pad stackup lamination pressure reduced panel stretch in the y axis approximately 70%. A third DoE illustrated increasing the pre-HASL bake temperature could reduce delamination/solder wicking when using a soft press pad lamination stackup.

Wolfe, Larry

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575oC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifier’s refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifier’s on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.A.; Thomas, H.; Krabbe, R.A.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An analysis of the causes of failure in high chrome oxide refractory materials from slagging gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

High Cr2O3 refractory materials are used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers. Gasifiers are reaction chambers that convert water, oxygen, and a carbon feedstock into CO, H2, and methane at temperatures as high as 1575DGC and pressures up to 1000 psi. Ash in the carbon feedstock liquefies, erodes and corrodes the gasifier's refractory liner, contributing to liner failure within a few months to two years. The failure of a refractory liner decreases a gasifier's on-line availability and causes costly system downtime and repairs. Many factors contribute to refractory lining failure, including slag penetration and corrosion, thermal cycling, gasifier environment, and mechanical loads. The results of refractory post-mortem failure analysis and how observations relate to gasifier service life will be discussed.

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Causes and Consequences of Employee Turnover in a Financial Institution in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employee turnover is expensive and disruptive to organizations. However not many employers appreciate the value lost in quality of human capital, and dollar value of lost productivity and time due to turnover. This study identified the causes and consequences of voluntary employee turnover in a financial institution in Kenya. The researcher established from the bank records that 80 employees resigned from the institution in the five-year period. The causes of turnover were identified and recorded as given in the separated employees' resignation letters held at the bank, and categorized as either avoidable or unavoidable. The quality of the separated employees was measured by academic qualifications, banking training, job performance ratings and years of work experience as recorded in the separated person's file. Turnover cost was computed based on the earnings of the separated employee and the associated administration costs, plus the cost of training and lost productivity due to the resignations. The turnover policies were reviewed. The data collected were coded and analyzed using the SPSS program version16. The quantitative data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics. Non-parametric Chi-Square Goodness-of-Fit Test was used to test the research hypotheses. A thematic analysis of the narration by the HR director was done. The reasons for the resignations were as follows: 65 percent better salaries offered elsewhere, 17.7 percent were due to family reasons, 13.8 percent went on further studies, 2.5 percent had problems with bank administration and 1.2 percent changed careers. It was further established that 71 percent of the separated workers had university degrees, 92 percent were either good or excellent job performers, 35 percent had more than ten years work experience and 80 percent had received bank training. The turnover cost per separated employee was 100 percent of the worker's annual salary. The total turnover cost comprised of 43.5 percent in lost productively due to the resignations; 30.9 percent on training and 25.6 percent on recruiting and hiring replacements. The researcher concluded that personnel turnovers had negative consequences for the bank in terms of loss of quality human capital and cost, and that management should act to resolve the problem since 67.5 percent of the turnovers were avoidable.

Obiero, Dan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: • Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte.

M.S. Sohal; J.E. O'Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

An Investigation with a General Circulation Model of the Climatic Effects of Cloud Albedo Changes Caused by Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hemispheric general circulation model, with fixed zonally averaged cloud cover, was used to investigate the climatic impact of increased albedo of low-level clouds caused by atmospheric pollution. The albedo of these clouds was increased from ...

B. G. Hunt

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Drought in the Southeastern United States: Causes, Variability over the Last Millennium, and the Potential for Future Hydroclimate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of the nature and causes of drought in the southeastern United States is conducted as well as an assessment of model projections of anthropogenically forced hydroclimate change in this region. The study uses observations of ...

Richard Seager; Alexandrina Tzanova; Jennifer Nakamura

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Blackout 2003: Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Task Force has completed a thorough investigation of the causes of the August 14, 2003 blackout and has recommended actions to minimize the likelihood and scope of similar events in the future.

387

A method for estimating common cause failure probability and model parameters : the inverse stress-strength interference (ISSI) technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, an alternative for the analysis of common cause failures (CCFs) is investigated. The method studied consists of using the Licensee Event Report (LER) data to get single component failure probability and using ...

Guey, Ching Ning

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tropical Oceanic Causes of Interannual to Multidecadal Precipitation Variability in Southeast South America over the Past Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations, atmosphere models forced by historical SSTs, and idealized simulations are used to determine the causes and mechanisms of interannual to multidecadal precipitation anomalies over southeast South America (SESA) since 1901. About 40% ...

Richard Seager; Naomi Naik; Walter Baethgen; Andrew Robertson; Yochanan Kushnir; Jennifer Nakamura; Stephanie Jurburg

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

User's manual for MOCUS-BACKFIRE [i.e. MOCUS-BACFIRE] : a computer program for common cause failure analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is the user's manual for MOCUS-BACFIRE, a computer programme for qualitative common cause analysis. The MOCUSBACFIRE package code was developed by coupling the MOCUS code and BACFIRE code. The MOCUS code is a ...

Heising, Carolyn D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Quasi-biennial oscillations in the solar tachocline caused by magnetic Rossby wave instabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO) are frequently observed in the solar activity indices. However, no clear physical mechanism for the observed variations has been suggested so far. Here we study the stability of magnetic Rossby waves in the solar tachocline using the shallow water magnetohydrodynamic approximation. Our analysis shows that the combination of typical differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field with a strength > 10^5 G triggers the instability of the m=1 magnetic Rossby wave harmonic with a period of 2 years. This harmonic is antisymmetric with respect to the equator and its period (and growth rate) depends on the differential rotation parameters and the magnetic field strength. The oscillations may cause a periodic magnetic flux emergence at the solar surface and consequently may lead to the observed QBO in the solar activity features. The period of QBO may change throughout the cycle, and from cycle to cycle, due to variations of the mean magnetic field and differential rotation in the...

Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Ballester, J L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Prevention of Prespawning Mortality: Cause of Salmon Headburns and Cranial Lesions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was to undertaken to provide information about a condition known as ''headburn''. Information from the project will enable U.S. Corps of Engineers managers to make adjustments in operational procedures or facilities on the Columbia and Snake rivers to prevent loss of pre-spawning adult salmonids that migrate through the facilities. Headburn is a descriptive clinical term used by fishery biologists to describe scalping or exfoliation of skin and ulceration of underlying connective tissue and muscle, primarily of the jaw and cranial region of salmonids observed at fish passage facilities. Headburn lesions are primarily caused when fish collide with concrete or other structures at dams and fish passage facilities, and may be exacerbated in some fish that ''fallback'' or pass over spillways or through turbine assemblies after having passed the dam through a fish ladder. Prespawning mortality of headburned salmonids can be prevented or greatly reduced by therapeutic treatment of both hatchery and wild fish. Treatments would consist of topical application of an anti-fungal agent, injection of replacement plasma electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity, and injection of a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent at fish passage and trapping facilities or hatcheries.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Elston, R A.; Abernethy, Cary S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Compressor and Hot Section Fouling in Gas Turbines- Causes and Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fouling of axial flow compressors and turbines is a serious operating problem in gas turbine engines. These prime movers are being increasingly used in cogeneration applications and with the large air mass flow rate (e.g. 633 Lbs/Sec for a 80 MWe gas turbine) foulants even in the ppm range can cause deposits on the blading resulting in severe performance decrements. This is a common operating problem experienced by almost all operators of gas turbines. The effect of compressor fouling is a drop in airflow and a drop in compressor isentropic efficiency. Fouling of the axial compressor results in a drop in output and thermal efficiency of the system. In some cases, fouling can also result in surge problems as its effect is to move the compressor surge line to the right i.e. towards the operating line. This paper discusses the mechanism of fouling and the aerodynamic and thermodynamic effects. This paper also discusses types of foulants commonly experienced, detection methods and filtration techniques. A brief discussion of turbine fouling, which is particularly relevant when heavy fuels are utilized, is also discussed.

Meher-Homji, C. B.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Measurements of television interference caused by a vertical-axis wind machine. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electromagnetic interference to television reception caused by the 17 m Darreius at Albuquerque, NM, has been studied by carrying out measurements at a number of sites in the vicinity of the VAWT. The rf sources used were the commercial vhf and uhf TV signals available in the area. Ambient field-strength measurements showed that the signals on all TV channels except one were strong, and provided good reception at all test sites. With the antenna (properly) oriented for maximum direct signal, unacceptable interference was observed on some channels at sites out to 33 m from the WT in the forward and backward regions. With the antenna beam directed at the WT, interference varying from slight to violent were observed at all sites on some or all TV channels. A simple theoretical model has been developed for analyzing the TVI produced by a VAWT like the Darrieus. Using the model in conjunction with measured data, an approximate expression for the equivalent scattering area A of the Darrieus has been developed. It is found that A is wavelength (lambda) dependent and varies as lambda/sup 1/2/.

Sengupta, D L; Senior, T B.A.; Ferris, J E

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Instability, collapse, and oscillation of sheaths caused by secondary electron emission  

SciTech Connect

The Debye sheath is shown to be unstable under general conditions. For surface materials with sufficient secondary electron emission (SEE) yields, the surface's current-voltage characteristic has an unstable branch when the bulk plasma temperature (T{sub e}) exceeds a critical value, or when there are fast electron populations present. The plasma-surface interaction becomes dynamic where the sheath may undergo spontaneous transitions or oscillations. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we analyze sheath instabilities occurring in a high T{sub e} plasma slab bounded by walls with SEE. As the plasma evolves, whenever the sheath enters an unstable state, its amplitude rapidly collapses, allowing a large flux of previously trapped electrons to hit the wall. These hot electrons induce more than one secondary on average, causing a net loss of electrons from the wall. The sheath collapse quenches when the surface charge becomes positive because the attractive field inhibits further electrons from escaping. Sheath instabilities influence the current balance, energy loss, cross-B-field transport and even the bulk plasma properties. Implications for discharges including Hall thrusters are discussed. More generally, the results show that common theories that treat emission as a fixed (time-independent) 'coefficient' do not capture the full extent of SEE effects.

Campanell, M. D.; Khrabrov, A. V.; Kaganovich, I. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Proceedings of the conference on coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana: causes, consequences, and options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen papers and panel discussions from a conference held in Baton Rouge, LA, 5 to 6 October 1981 are presented. The presentations consider the causes and consequences of coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana and the mitigative options available to slow or reverse the rapid rate of coastal land loss. Detailed habitat mapping studies have allowed accurate estimates of coastal habitat change and land loss through 1978. Projections from these rates of change indicate an annual rate of land loss in coastal Louisiana in the early 1980's of approximately 130 km/sup 2//y (50 m/sup 2//y). The projected effects of wetland modification on the bountiful living resources of coastal Louisiana (fisheries, fur and hide bearers and waterfowl) are major because of the close dependence of these resources on estuarine wetlands. These changes and others related to flood protection, transportation and ownership of mineral resources are projected to have extensive social and economic consequences. Options proposed to slow coastal land loss include major and minor diversions of the Mississippi River, barrier island and shoreline restoration and protection, hydrological management of wetlands and more restrictive permitting of dredging activities.

Boesch, D.F. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Evaluation of strain caused by coherent precipitates in an Al alloy using TEM techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastic strains, caused by GP zones in an aged Al alloy, were determined quantitatively using two techniques: Dark Field In-line Holography (DFH) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy-Geometric Phase Analysis (HRTEM-GPA). The results obtained by both techniques showed that the elastic strain was not uniform along the precipitate-matrix interface. In some areas, it was found that strain had negligible value and this was attributed to the loss of coherence between the lattices. It is suggested that a possible explanation for this fact could be a variation in the 'vacancies pump mechanism' kinetics. To obtain a better interpretation of the experimental deformation maps, a reference GP precipitate-matrix structure was built using QSTEM software. The main advantages of DFH over HRTEM-GPA were a bigger field of view and low electron dose requirements without spatial resolution loss. Another difference found was that crystalline defects such as dislocations were evidenced by HRTEM-GPA in contrast to the result obtained by DFH. However, strain measurements were affected by mask size effect in the former. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain around GP precipitates was not uniform and was in a more relaxed state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain values determined by HRTEM had more artifacts compared with holography ones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain distribution was attributed to differences in the release of vacancies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holography showed important advantages over HRTEM regarding field of view mainly.

Hernandez-Rivera, J.L., E-mail: jose.hernandez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Z.C. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico); Universidad del Valle de Mexico, Robles 600, Fraccionamiento Jacarandas, Z. C. 78220, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Rivera, J.J. Cruz; Garay-Reyes, C.G.; Azpeitia, M. Ramos; Zuniga-Alonso, I. [Facultad de Ingenieria-Instituto de Metalurgia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Sierra Leona 550, Lomas 2a seccion, Z.C. 78210, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)] [Facultad de Ingenieria-Instituto de Metalurgia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Sierra Leona 550, Lomas 2a seccion, Z.C. 78210, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Martinez-Sanchez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Z.C. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico)] [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes 120, Z.C. 31109, Chihuahua (Mexico)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to leak detection. In-tank parameters can include temperature of the supernatant and sludge, types of waste, and chemical determination by either transfer or sample analysis. Ex-tank information can be assembled from many sources including design media, construction conditions, technical specifications, and other sources. Five conditions may have contributed to SX Farm tank liner failure including: tank design, thermal shock, chemistry-corrosion, liner behavior (bulging), and construction temperature. Tank design did not apparently change from tank to tank for the SX Farm tanks; however, there could be many unknown variables present in the quality of materials and quality of construction. Several significant SX Farm tank design changes occurred from previous successful tank farm designs. Tank construction occurred in winter under cold conditions which could have affected the ductile to brittle transition temperature of the tanks. The SX Farm tanks received high temperature boiling waste from REDOX which challenged the tank design with rapid heat up and high temperatures. All eight of the leaking SX Farm tanks had relatively high rate of temperature rise. Supernatant removal with subsequent nitrate leaching was conducted in all but three of the eight leaking tanks prior to leaks being detected. It is possible that no one characteristic of the SX Farm tanks could in isolation from the others have resulted in failure. However, the application of so many stressors - heat up rate, high temperature, loss of corrosion protection, and tank design - working jointly or serially resulted in their failure. Thermal shock coupled with the tank design, construction conditions, and nitrate leaching seem to be the overriding factors that can lead to tank liner failure. The distinction between leaking and sound SX Farm tanks seems to center on the waste types, thermal conditions, and nitrate leaching.

VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

A COMPANION AS THE CAUSE OF LATITUDE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN THE WIND OF ETA CARINAE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae binary system obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/STIS. Eta Car is enshrouded by the dusty Homunculus nebula, which scatters light emitted by the central binary and provides a unique opportunity to study a massive binary system from different vantage points. We investigate the latitudinal and azimuthal dependence of H{alpha} line profiles caused by the presence of a wind-wind collision (WWC) cavity created by the companion star. Using two-dimensional radiative transfer models, we find that the wind cavity can qualitatively explain the observed line profiles around apastron. Regions of the Homunculus which scatter light that propagated through the WWC cavity show weaker or no H{alpha} absorption. Regions scattering light that propagated through a significant portion of the primary wind show stronger P Cygni absorption. Our models overestimate the H{alpha} absorption formed in the primary wind, which we attribute to photoionization by the companion, not presently included in the models. We can qualitatively explain the latitudinal changes that occur during periastron, shedding light on the nature of Eta Car's spectroscopic events. Our models support the idea that during the brief period of time around periastron when the primary wind flows unimpeded toward the observer, H{alpha} absorption occurs in directions toward the central object and Homunculus SE pole, but not toward equatorial regions close to the Weigelt blobs. We suggest that observed latitudinal and azimuthal variations are dominated by the companion star via the WWC cavity, rather than by rapid rotation of the primary star.

Groh, J. H. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, Chemin des Maillettes 51, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Madura, T. I.; Weigelt, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kruip, C. J. H., E-mail: jose.groh@unige.ch [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David; (MSKCC); (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Clemson University Preservation master Plan Part III: ExIstIng CondItIons ChaPtEr Four FEbruary 2009 JMa, InC. 70  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,337 CFDA # 15.922 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act Direct Federal Awards 16,227 525,830 - 4,830 Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab RF HANFORD SEDM THOMP-6875736 48,614 2,965 45,649 Savannah River Nuclear Solutns RF RIVERBASIN GRUND-AC716760 132,105 9,248 122,857 Savannah River Nuclear Solutns RF SUP

Stuart, Steven J.

404

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Smoldering Biomass Combustion. Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 10,aerosols emitted during biomass combustion [Robinson et al.burning samples. Combustion of biomass produces EC a and

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tar Balls from Smoldering Biomass Combustion. Atmos. Chem.gases and particles from biomass burning in Brazil, J. Ge-for smoke from African biomass burning, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Early and sustained interventions which strongly feature mentoring are essential in help-ing Native American and Latino students navigate an unfamiliar academic system that is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Navajo) is the largest, with 170,000 members. Others include the Oglala Sioux, Cherokee Nation, Blackfeet

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

407
408

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

409

MICRO-MACHINED THIN FILM HYDROGEN GAS SENSORS Frank DiMeo, Jr., Ing-Shin Chen, Philip Chen, Jeffrey Neuner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Introduction The reputation of hydrogen as the next generation energy delivery agent, supplementing electricity of Electric Power Research Institute, in a recent The Industrial Physicist column, observed the multifaceted as a national security priority. While fuel cell cars often feature prominently in news media and are touted

410

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001. Kerminen, V. -M. , Makela, T. E. , Ojanen, C. H. ,Saarikoski, S. , Frey, A. , Mäkelä, T. , and Hillamo, R. :Acker, K. , Hillamo, R. , Mäkelä, T. : Intercomparison of

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CS-03-02 A PIvotIng PRocEDuRE FoR A ClAss oF SEconD-oRDER ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linear function over an intersection of an affine set and second-order cones. SOCP is a .... Note that the e q uality constraints of ¡ƒ¢¥¤ does not contain„!7# .

412

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crutzen, P. : Atmospheric Aerosols: Biogeochemical sourcesof optically active aerosol particles over the Amazonproperties of Amazonian aerosol particles: Rev. Geophys. ,

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, ings”. Journal of Solaroperations. With continu- ing Smart Grid development, there

Addy, Nathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Report of Flood, Oil Sheen, and fish Kill Incidents on East Fork Poplar Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water quality and plant opemtion irriiormation provided by the Y-12 Plant strongly suggest that a dechlorinating agent, applied to the raw water released below the North-South Pipes was responsible for the toxicity resulting in the fish kill of July 24. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in upper EFPC indicai e that low oxygen levels (3-5 ppm) occurred for a period of up to 30 min. This slug of low DO water traveling down EFPC to the lake could easily explain the massive fish kill and the resulting observations. Dissolved oxygen levels of 5.2 ppm or lower are documented as causing problems for warmwater fish species (Heath 1995). The presence of other stressors, including a range of petrochemicals, tends to lower resistance to low oxygen conditions. Given the sequence of events in upper EFPC in the few days prior to July 24, where extremely high flows were followed by inputs of a wide range of low concentrations of oils, the sensitivity to low DO conditions might be heightened. The possible toxic impact of ::he oils and other contaminants reaching EFPC as a result of the heavy rainfidl on July 22 doesn't appear significant enough to be the sole cause of the kill on July 24. Even during the height of the kill, a large school of fish remained immediately downstream of the North-South Pipes. If the toxicity of waters flowing through this outlet were the primary cause of the kill, then it would be expected that this school of fish would not have been present immediately below the pipes. Any impact of waters entering from other sources, such as pumping of basements WOUIC1 have produced a staggered pattern of mortality, with fishing dying in different localities at different times and rates. Further, it would be expected that the morta.lhy observed would have continued over several days at least, as more resistant individuals succumbed slowly to the toxic exposure. This would have provided freshly dead or dying fish for the surveys of July 25 and 28. In previous fish kills in this stream section, the impact on the fish community has been judged to be short-term only, with no significant long-term ecological effects. In fact, the numerous fish kills over the past 7 years do not appear to have dampened the growth of the stream fish populations. The magnit~de of these kills was far less than that of the July 24 kill; maximum mortality of 10-20o/0 of th{~ total population above Lake Reality. Because the current kill has tiected a much larger proportion of the resident population, the impacts are expected to extend for a longer period in this situation, perhaps up to a year. Decreased population levels should be evident through the fhll 1997 and spring 1998 samples. Depending on the success rate of reproduction during the summer cf 1998, the recovery of fish populations should be observed in the fdl 1998 population sample. However, complete recovery may take several reproductive seasons to reach the densities seen in 1997. The cyprinid species occurring in upper EFPC have tremendous reproductive capacities and should be able to repopulate this area with little or no long-term ecological impact. Even the redbreast sunfish should, at the worst, only endure a narrowing of its available gene pool, with little if any long-term impacts.

Skaggs, B.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analytic fit of deviation caused by atmospheric refraction of starlight as a function of space-based sensor position  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple prescription describes how space-borne sensors with fields of view less than one degree can be properly aimed at starlight that passes near the Earth`s surface and is therefore refracted by the Earth`s atmosphere. Atmospheric refraction effects cause deviations up to about one degree that distort the light path and can cause the target to be missed. Deviations are contrasted with those experienced for a target on the Earth. Such refractive corrections have long been available for Earth-based sensors looking through the atmosphere. The corrections have not been available for sensors in space. The prescription is illustrated by example.

Vittitoe, C.N.; Schmidt, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Optics and Exploratory Technologies Dept.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D{sub 2}O electrochemistry incident at SRI International  

SciTech Connect

The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell.

Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Table E1. Major Fuel Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

419

Table E6. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

420

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Table E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

422

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

423

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

424

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

425

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

426

Table E5A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

427

Table E6A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other

428

Classifiers for the Causes of Data Loss Using Packet-Loss Signatures* Phillip M. Dickens1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission window. We are exploring the application of complexity theory to the problem of learning be mapped to the underlying causes of packet loss, and provide experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of our approach. 1 Introduction Computational Grids create large-scale distributed systems

Dickens, Phillip M.

429

Abstract--Cascading outages can cause large blackouts, and a variety of methods are emerging to study this challenging topic.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract-- Cascading outages can cause large blackouts, and a variety of methods are emerging Analysis, Risk Analysis, Preventing Cascades. I. INTRODUCTION A cascading outage is a sequence of events component outages (based on [1] and [2]). In some cases cascading outages halt before the sequence results

Hines, Paul

430

Do Power Plant Impingement and Entrainment Cause Changes in Fish Populations? — A Review of the Scientific Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report directly examines the peer-reviewed scientific evidence for the occurrence of changes, adverse or otherwise, as determined by researchers to fish and shellfish populations and to communities as a result of impingement and entrainment (I&E) mortality caused by power plant cooling water intake structures (CWISs).

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Factorization of the Cross Section for the {sup 12}C(p,p{alpha}){sup 8}Be(g.s.) Reaction at an Incident Energy of 100 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross sections and analyzing powers for the reaction {sup 12}C(p,p{alpha}){sup 8}Be at an incident energy of 100 MeV, measured over a range of quasifree scattering angle pairs, are compared with elastic scattering of protons from {sup 4}He. Remarkable agreement between angular distributions of the two sets of data, presented as a function of the scattering angle in the two-body centre-of mass, is found. Thus the {alpha}-cluster reacts to the projectile just like a free particle.

Cowley, A. A.; Mabiala, J. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Buthelezi, E. Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Number of lightning discharges causing damage to lightning arrester cables for aerial transmission lines in power systems  

SciTech Connect

Damage by lightning discharges to lightning arrester cables for 110-175 kV aerial transmission lines is analyzed using data from power systems on incidents with aerial transmission lines over a ten year operating period (1997-2006). It is found that failures of lightning arrester cables occur when a tensile force acts on a cable heated to the melting point by a lightning current. The lightning currents required to heat a cable to this extent are greater for larger cable cross sections. The probability that a lightning discharge will develop decreases as the amplitude of the lightning current increases, which greatly reduces the number of lightning discharges which damage TK-70 cables compared to TK-50 cables. In order to increase the reliability of lightning arrester cables for 110 kV aerial transmission lines, TK-70 cables should be used in place of TK-50 cables. The number of lightning discharges per year which damage lightning arrester cables is lowered when the density of aerial transmission lines is reduced within the territory of electrical power systems. An approximate relationship between these two parameters is obtained.

Nikiforov, E. P. [Electric Power Scientific Research Institute (VNIIE), branch of OAO 'NTTs Elektroenergetika' (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Obliquity factors for {sup 60}Co and 4, 10, and 18 MV x rays for concrete, steel, and lead and angles of incidence between 0{degrees} and 70{degrees}  

SciTech Connect

The attenuation of {sup 60}Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 10, and 18 MV x-ray beams by concrete, steel, and lead has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique for angles of incidence 0{degrees}, 30{degrees}, 45{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 70{degrees}. Transmission factors have been determined down to < 2 x 10{sup {minus}5} in all cases. The results show that deviation from the obliquity factor increases with angle but is not significant for angles {le} 45{degrees}. AT 70{degrees} angle of incidence and a transmission factor of 10{sup {minus}5}, the obliquity factor varies between 1.2 and 1.9 for concrete, between 1.4 and 1.7 for steel, and between 1.4 and 1.5 for lead for the range of energies investigated. This amounts to an additional 86 and 50 cm of concrete, 25 and 23 cm of steel, and 8 and 14 cm of lead for {sup 60}Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. The results for {sup 60}Co is concrete and lead are in good agreement with previously published experimental work. Fits to the data using mathematical models allow reconstruction of all data curves to better than 1% on average and 7% in the worst single case. 9 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Biggs, P.J. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Do Foreclosures Cause Crime?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mortgage foreclosure crisis has generated increasing concerns about the effects of foreclosed properties on their surrounding neighborhoods, and on criminal activity in particular. There are a number of potential ways in which a foreclosed property might increase the payoffs to committing crime and decrease the likelihood of being caught, including reduced maintenance, residential turnover, and vacancy. Using point-specific, longitudinal crime, foreclosure, and other property data from New York City, this paper determines whether foreclosed properties affect criminal activity on the surrounding blockface – an individual street segment including properties on both sides of the street. We find that additional foreclosures on a blockface lead to additional total crimes, violent crimes and public order crimes. These effects appear to be largest when foreclosure activity is measured by the number of foreclosed properties that are on their way to an auction or have reverted to bank ownership. We find that effects are largest in neighborhoods with moderate or high levels of crime, and on blockfaces with concentrated foreclosure activity. Key words: crime; mortgage foreclosure *Corresponding author.

Ingrid Gould Ellen; Johanna Lacoe; Claudia Ayanna Sharygin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of the Synthesis and Growth of CdS Quantum Dots from Constituent Atoms in SiO2 Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering was applied to study the synthesis and growth of CdS quantum dots (QDs) from Cd and S atoms implanted in SiO{sub 2}. For a dose of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}, the partial synthesis of CdS QDs occurred already during implantation, with only moderate size increase upon subsequent annealing up to T{sub a} = 1073 K. The dynamics of QD synthesis and growth were considerably different for just two times lower dose, where synthesis started only if the implanted samples were annealed at T{sub a} = 773 K or higher, with a strong increase of the size of QDs upon annealing at higher T{sub a}. The results suggest that high-dose implantation followed by low-temperature annealing could lead to better defined sizes and narrower size distributions of QDs.

Desnica, U. V. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Dubcek, P. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Desnica-Frankovic, I. D. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Buljan, M. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy; White, Clark W [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

2768 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 55, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2008 Taser Blunt Probe Dart-To-Heart Distance Causing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dart-To-Heart Distance Causing Ventricular Fibrillation in Pigs Jiun-Yan Wu, Student Member, IEEE. Webster*, Life Fellow, IEEE Abstract--The maximum distance between the heart and a model Taser stimulation dart, called the dart-to-heart distance, at which the Taser can directly cause ventricular fibrillation

Sheridan, Jennifer

437

Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

Cohen, Oren (Boulder, CO); Kapteyn, Henry C. (Boulder, CO); Mumane, Margaret M. (Boulder, CO)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

{beta}-carboline derivatives: Novel photosensitizers that intercalate into DNA to cause direct DNA damage in photodynamic therapy  

SciTech Connect

Novel 1,3,9-trisubstituted {beta}-carboline derivatives were found to exhibit DNA photocleavage properties under visible light irradiation in a cell-free system, which could be reduced by antioxidant vitamin E. Their photo-cytotoxicity to human tumor cell line HeLa was confirmed, in which apoptosis only contributed a small part to the cell death, and necrosis was the dominating outcome of HeLa cells in photodynamic therapy (PDT) using {beta}-carboline derivatives. Different from other clinical PDT drugs, {beta}-carboline derivatives were demonstrated to be able to distribute in the nucleus and intercalate into DNA, and consequently cause direct DNA damage by photochemical reaction products in PDT, which was proved by the distinct DNA tails in the comet assay and the considerable amount of DNA damaged cells quantified by flow cytometry. This mechanism could be the explanation for the delay of cell proliferation at DNA synthesis and mitosis.

Guan Huaji [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Liu Xiaodong [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Peng Wenlie [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Cao Rihui [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Ma Yan [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chen Hongsheng [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xu Anlong [State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Therapeutic Functional Genes, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, 135 Xin Gang Xi Road, Guangzhou 510275 (China)]. E-mail: ls36@zsu.edu.cn

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 2. Technical narrative. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume II provides an introduction to the study, direct impacts of OCS activities, saltwater intrusion, subsidence and sedimentation, and landscape patterns and aerial imagery.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purposes of this response, we categorise the cyber security maturity of organisations into these three categories with these attributes: ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

442

On the Incidence of Tornadoes in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological analyses of tornado occurrence in the state of California for the period 1950–1992 are presented. In constructing these analyses, the official historical record of California tornadoes was supplemented and corrected with tornado ...

Warren Blier; Karen A. Batten

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Using Incident Reporting to Combat Human Error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnson,C.W. Booktitle: 'People and Computers XIV. In Proceedings of HCI 2000. (McDonald, S., Waern, Y., and Cockton, G., Eds.) pp 311-326 Springer

Johnson, C.W.

444

ORISE: The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dose estimation (US and SI units) treatment of whole body and acute local irradiation issues assessment and treatment of internal contamination with radioactive...

445

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

446

TASK 2: Identification of Building Collapse Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shopping Elveden Forest, Suffolk, UK Unknown 2 April ... Country Club Lewisburg, VA Unknown 2 December 19 ... practice in fire resistance testing is to ...

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

448

Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRAINING 4 UNSAFE EQUIPMENT / POOR DESIGN 5 INSUFFICIENT CARE 6 IMPROPER POSITION OR POSTURE 7 FAILURE ORDER JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS DONE 4 IMPROVED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 5 EQUIPMENT REPAIR TO BE USED FOR COMPLETION OF WSIB CLAIM FORM #7 WHITE COPY - Department Chair, Manager or Director YELLOW

Hitchcock, Adam P.

449

Investigation of the Cause of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Blister–threshold testing of fuel plates is a standard method through which the safety margin for operation of plate-type in research and test reactors is assessed. The blister-threshold temperature is indicative of the ability of fuel to operate at high temperatures for short periods of time (transient conditions) without failure. This method of testing was applied to the newly developed U-Mo monolithic fuel system. Blister annealing studies on the U-Mo monolithic fuel plates began in 2007, with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-6 experiment, and they have continued as the U-Mo fuel system has evolved through the research and development process. Blister anneal threshold temperatures from early irradiation experiments (RERTR-6 through RERTR-10) ranged from 400 to 500°C. These temperatures were projected to be acceptable for NRC-licensed research reactors and the high-power Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) based on current safety-analysis reports (SARs). Initial blister testing results from the RERTR-12 experiment capsules X1 and X2 showed a decrease in the blister-threshold temperatures. Blister threshold temperatures from this experiment ranged from 300 to 400°C. Selected plates from the AFIP-4 experiment, which was fabricated using a process similar to that used to fabricate the RERTR-12 experiment, also underwent blister testing to determine whether results would be similar. The measured blister-threshold temperatures from the AFIP-4 plates fell within the same blister-threshold temperature range measured in the RERTR-12 plates. Investigation of the cause of this decrease in bister threshold temperature is being conducted under the guidance of Idaho National Laboratory PLN-4155, “Analysis of Low Blister Threshold Temperatures in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-4 Experiments,” and is driven by hypotheses. The main focus of the investigation is in the following areas: 1. Fabrication variables 2. Pre-irradiation characterization 3. Irradiation conditions 4. Post-irradiation examination 5. Additional blister testing 6. Mechanical modeling This report documents the preliminary results of this investigation. Several hypotheses can be dismissed as a result of this investigation. Two primary categories of causes remain. The most prominent theory, supported by the data, is that low blister-threshold temperature is the result of mechanical energy imparted on the samples during the fabrication process (hot and cold rolling) without adequate post processing (annealing). The mechanisms are not clearly understood and require further investigation, but can be divided into two categories: • Residual Stress • Undesirable interaction boundary and/or U-Mo microstructure change A secondary theory that cannot be dismissed with the information that is currently available is that a change in the test conditions has resulted in a statistically significant downward shift of measured blister temperature. This report outlines the results of the forensic investigations conducted to date. The data and conclusions presented in this report are preliminary. Definitive cause and effect relationships will be established by future experimental programs.

Mitchell K Meyer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Secondary radiation damage as the main cause for unexpected volume effects: A histopathologic study of the parotid gland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To elucidate with a histopathological study the mechanism of region-dependent volume effects in the partly irradiated parotid gland of the rat. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were locally X-irradiated with collimators with conformal radiation portals for 100% volume and 50% cranial/caudal partial volumes. Single doses up to 40 Gy were applied. Parotid saliva samples were collected, and the three lobes of the parotid gland were examined individually on the macro- and micromorphologic level up to 1 year after irradiation. Results: Dose-dependent loss of gland weight was observed 1 year after total or partial X-irradiation. Weight loss of the glands correlated very well with loss of secretory function. Irradiating the cranial 50% volume (implicating a shielded lateral lobe) resulted in substantially more damage in terms of weight loss and loss of secretory function than 50% caudal irradiation (shielding the ventral and dorsal lobe). Histologic examinations of the glands 1 year after irradiation revealed that the shielded lateral lobe was severely affected, in contrast to the shielded ventral and dorsal lobes. Time studies showed that irradiation of the cranial 50% volume caused late development of secondary damage in the shielded lateral lobe, becoming manifest between 240 and 360 days after irradiation. The possible clinical significance of this finding is discussed. Conclusion: It is concluded that the observed region-dependent volume effect for late function loss in the rat parotid gland after partial irradiation is mainly caused by secondary events in the shielded lateral lobe. The most probable first step (primary radiation event) in the development of this secondary damage is radiation exposure to the hilus region (located between the ventral and dorsal lobe). By injuring major excretory ducts and supply routes for blood and nerves in this area, the facility system necessary for proper functioning of the nonexposed lateral lobe is seriously affected. The unexpected volume effect in the rat might have consequences for treatment strategies in radiotherapy, implicating not only salivary glands but also other organs with a seemingly homogeneous distribution of radiosensitive elements, a situation wherein volume effects have not been anticipated up to now.

Konings, Antonius W.T. [Department of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.umcg.nl; Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Cotteleer, Femmy [Department of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vissink, Arjan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Rob P. [Department of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electron-impact rotationally elastic total cross sections for H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of incident energy (0.01-2000 eV)  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports computational results of the total cross sections for electron impact on H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of electron impact energies from 0.01 eV to 2 keV. The total cross section is presented as sum of the elastic and electronic excitation cross sections for incident energies. The calculation uses two different methodologies, below the ionization threshold of the target the cross section is calculated using the UK molecular R-matrix code through the Quantemol-N software package while cross sections at higher energies are evaluated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The two methods are found to be consistent at the transition energy ({approx}15 eV). The present results are, in general, found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results (wherever available) and, thus, the present results can serve as a benchmark for the cross section over a wide range of energy.

Vinodkumar, Minaxi [V P and R P T P Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Bhutadia, Harshad [Government Engineering College, Patan 384265, Gujarat (India); Antony, Bobby [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad JH-826004 (India); Mason, Nigel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Power Quality Hotline Call-of-the-Month for November 2009: Failure of a Lighting-Control System Caused by Electrical Fast Transients (EFTs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses the basics of lighting-control systems, a recent failure of a lighting-control system caused by a common electrical disturbance, and some solutions to resolving compatibility problems with lighting-control systems.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effects Caused by Varying the Strength of the Capping Inversion Based on a Large Eddy Simulation Model of the Shear-Free Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects caused by variation of the potential temperature lapse rate ? in the free atmosphere are examined based on a “large eddy simulation” model of the shear-free convective atmospheric boundary layer. The obtained results show that only near ...

Zbigniew Sorbjan

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

PQ Hotline Call-of-the-Month for December 2009: Lockup of a Power-Line Carrier System Caused by Conducted Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Call of the Month discusses the basics of X-10 communication control systems, a recent malfunction of an X-10 control system caused by electrical noise, and some solutions to resolving compatibility problems with X-10 control systems.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant Disease 69:1007, 1985. Accepted

Biggs, Alan R.

456

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The effects of the band bending caused by interface states in CdTe and CIS solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, the effects of interface states in the Z-nO/CdS/CuinSe{sub 2}, and CdS/CdTe solar cells are presented. The effects are investigated through numerical modeling using ADEPT (A Device Emulation Program and Tool). The results show that donor-like interface states have very little effect but acceptor-like interface states at the resistive ZnO/CdS can cause pinning of the bands at the interface, thus leading to non-exponential illuminated I-V curves when the interface state densities are high enough. High density of acceptor-like states between the CdS and In-rich CIS does not result in the two-diode like IV curves. Instead they can significantly lower the fill factor. In the CdS/CdTe solar cells. either donor- or acceptor-like interface states have little effect since almost all the depletion region lies in the CdTe. Thus, the metallurgical junction where the interface states are located is away from the electrical junction where the conductivity type changes.

Lee, Youn-Jung; Gray, J.L. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Electrical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mapping Alteration Caused by Hydrocarbon Microseepages in Patrick Draw area Southwest Wyoming Using Image Spectroscopy and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing  

SciTech Connect

Detection of underlying reservoir accumulations using remote sensing techniques had its inception with the identification of macroseeps. However, today we find ourselves relying on the detection of more subtle characteristics associated with petroleum reservoirs, such as microseeps. Microseepages are the result of vertical movement of light hydrocarbons from the reservoir to the surface through networks of fractures, faults, and bedding planes that provide permeable routes within the overlying rock. Microseepages express themselves at the surface in an array of alterations and anomalies, such as chemical or mineralogical changes in overlying soils and sediments. Using NASA's Hyperion hyperspectral imaging sensors, this project has developed spectral and geochemical ground truthing techniques to identify and map alterations caused by hydrocarbon microseepages and to determine their relationships to the underlying geology in the Patrick Draw area of Southwest Wyoming. Training the classification of satellite imagery with spectral inputs of samples collected over previously defined areas of hydrocarbon microseepage resulted in the successful identification of an anomalous zone. Geochemical characteristics of samples that defined this anomalous zone were then compared to the remaining non-anomalous samples using XRD, ICP, spectroscopy and carbon isotope techniques.

Shuhab D. Khan

2008-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

ON THE VARIATION OF ZONAL GRAVITY COEFFICIENTS OF A GIANT PLANET CAUSED BY ITS DEEP ZONAL FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly rotating giant planets are usually marked by the existence of strong zonal flows at the cloud level. If the zonal flow is sufficiently deep and strong, it can produce hydrostatic-related gravitational anomalies through distortion of the planet's shape. This paper determines the zonal gravity coefficients, J{sub 2n}, n = 1, 2, 3, ..., via an analytical method taking into account rotation-induced shape changes by assuming that a planet has an effective uniform density and that the zonal flows arise from deep convection and extend along cylinders parallel to the rotation axis. Two different but related hydrostatic models are considered. When a giant planet is in rigid-body rotation, the exact solution of the problem using oblate spheroidal coordinates is derived, allowing us to compute the value of its zonal gravity coefficients J-bar{sub 2n}, n=1,2,3,..., without making any approximation. When the deep zonal flow is sufficiently strong, we develop a general perturbation theory for estimating the variation of the zonal gravity coefficients, {Delta}J{sub 2n}=J{sub 2n}-J-bar{sub 2n}, n=1,2,3,..., caused by the effect of the deep zonal flows for an arbitrarily rapidly rotating planet. Applying the general theory to Jupiter, we find that the deep zonal flow could contribute up to 0.3% of the J{sub 2} coefficient and 0.7% of J{sub 4}. It is also found that the shape-driven harmonics at the 10th zonal gravity coefficient become dominant, i.e., {Delta}J{sub 2n}>=J-bar{sub 2n} for n {>=} 5.

Kong Dali; Zhang Keke [Center for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics and Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QF (United Kingdom); Schubert, Gerald, E-mail: dk254@ex.ac.uk, E-mail: kzhang@ex.ac.uk, E-mail: schubert@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Automatic annotation of organellar genomes with DOGMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 98 chloroplast protein cod- ing genes (with two entriessimilarly to the protein cod- ing genes, except that

Wyman, Stacia; Jansen, Robert K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidents caus ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

fr Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitarbeiter und Stipendiaten Dr. Olaf Adamczyk Dr.-Ing. Suhas Bhandare Stip. M. Sc. Mohamed Ebrahim Fahmy Taha El-Darawy Stip. M. Sc. Vijitha Herath M. Sc. Ariya Hidayat Dipl.-Ing. Sebastian Hoffmann Dr Stip. Dipl.-Ing. Timo Pfau Dr.-Ing. David Sandel Dr.-Ing. Sunil Survaiya Dr.-Ing. Hongbin Zhang

Noé, Reinhold

462

Experimental observation of enhanced interaction of magnetic solitons with potential barriers and wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wells Vladislav E. Demidov,* Ulf-Hendrik Hansen, and Sergej O. Demokritov Institute for Applied Physics magnetic potential barriers and wells. We have found that the nonlinearity in the system causes of potential barriers the solitons demonstrate an enhanced tunnel- ing, whereas for potential wells they show

Demokritov, S.O.

463

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 38:873890 DOI 10.1007/s10295-011-0970-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dedicated to break- ing down the crystalline structure of cellulose to release the fermentable­substrate synergistic eVects. As a result, recombinant strains can simultaneously break down and ferment PASC to ethanol in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates is one of the major causes of elevated bioethanol produc- tion cost, making

Zhao, Huimin

464

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of the Republic of South Africa The Republic of South by extensive foreign fish- ing, have caused severe economic prob- lems in the industry. The tuna fishery plays expansion. Catch South Africa's 1979 total tuna catch of 7,500 metric tons (t) represents only slightly more

465

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

466

GEOSPATIOTEMPORAL DATA MINING IN AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR FOREST THREATS IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and limited resources of agencies such as the USDA Forest Service to conduct aerial surveys and ground it to identify areas in Colorado, USA, where an ongo- ing mountain pine beetle outbreak has caused significant of the second tier, consisting of higher reso- lution monitoring through airborne overflights--called Aerial

Mills, Richard

467

Appl Phys A DOI 10.1007/s00339-010-5735-8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and engineering, but many of these systems are complex with little or no symmetry and are difficult to fabri- cate]. Complex 3D microstructures, devices, and optics have been fabricated by 2PP, such as a microgear-wheel [8-expansion model is presented to explain the distortion caused by axial load- ings of the walls. 1 Introduction Two

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

468

Isotope-selective laser molecular alignment Sharly Fleischer, I. Sh. Averbukh, and Yehiam Prior*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and centrifuge-based separation methods rely on generic mechanical effects caused by small mass differences a wide range of topics to be studied. In the gas phase, molecular alignment follow- ing excitation that of an isotropic gas was monitored as evidence for alignment 14,15 . More recently, these observations have been

Prior, Yehiam

469

CHAPTER 5 MANDATORY & DISCRETIONARY FuNDS COAStAl ZONE MANAGEMENt FUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and result- ing economic loss caused by obstructions related to oil and gas exploration, development the impacts from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas production. Congress appropriated $150 are derived from fees collected by the Secretary of the Interior from the holders of leases, exploration

470

Fracture of electrodes in lithium-ion batteries caused by fast charging Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr, Joost J. Vlassak, and Zhigang Suoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture of electrodes in lithium-ion batteries caused by fast charging Kejie Zhao, Matt Pharr; published online 8 October 2010 During charging or discharging of a lithium-ion battery, lithium batteries.3 A lithium-ion battery contains an electrolyte and two electrodes. Each electrode is an atomic

Suo, Zhigang

471

China and the Barbarians: Part 1 I was in China when U.S. midterm elections caused some people to become more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China and the Barbarians: Part 1 I was in China when U.S. midterm elections caused some people, for two reasons, both related to China. Here I explain the first reason for optimism. In an op-ed, "Chinese Leadership Needed to Save Humanity", published in the South China Morning Post on 3 November, I

Hansen, James E.

472

Characterizing the Performance of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer An Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, the NIP was seated on a piece of closed-cell insulating foam without any clamping. For outdoor to the cold side of the thermopile and the disc that is directly connected to the "hot" side of the thermopile determined by the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions inside the instrument. Without

Oregon, University of

473

Analysis of the causes of the decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency of AlGaInN light-emitting-diode heterostructures at high pumping density  

SciTech Connect

The study is devoted to theoretical explanation of a decrease in the electroluminescence efficiency as the pump current increases, which is characteristic of light-emitting-diode (LED) heterostructures based on AlInGaN. Numerical simulation shows that the increase in the external quantum efficiency at low current densities J {approx} 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by the competition between radiative and nonradiative recombination. The decrease in the quantum efficiency at current densities J > 1 A/cm{sup 2} is caused by a decrease in the efficiency of hole injection into the active region. It is shown that the depth of the acceptor energy level in the AlGaN emitter, as well as low electron and hole mobilities in the p-type region, plays an important role in this effect. A modified LED heterostructure is suggested in which the efficiency decrease with the pump current should not occur.

Rozhansky, I. V., E-mail: igor@quantum.ioffe.ru; Zakheim, D. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Failure Root Cause of PCI Suspect Fuel Rods from Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) Reactor: Part 2: PIE of Failed and Sibling Sound Rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers can best determine in-reactor fuel behavior by performing detailed post irradiation examinations (PIE) of carefully selected fuel rods. By applying PIE techniques to failed and sibling sound rods, they can often determine the failure mechanism or root cause. Similarly, they can obtain critical performance-limiting data by PIE of sound high burn-up fuel rods. The investigations and results detailed in this report achieve both of these goals.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Sequencing and fan-out mechanism for causing a set of at least two sequential instructions to be performed in a dataflow processing computer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sequencing and data fanout mechanism is provided for a dataflow processor is activated by an input token which causes a sequence of operations to occur by initiating a first instruction to act on data contained within the token and then executing a sequential thread of instructions identified by either a repeat count and an offset within the token, or by an offset within each preceding instruction.

Grafe, Victor G. (Corrales, NM); Hoch, James E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Root-cause analysis of the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancellation of errors) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems were set up with three different fuel lattices: CANDU, HWR and PWR. These benchmark problems were then used to analyze the root cause of the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors. The analyses confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation. Based on the analyses, it is recommended to use 2 x 2 coarse-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core analysis. (authors)

Shen, W. [Candu Energy Inc., 2285 Speakman Dr., Mississauga, ON L5B 1K (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary