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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Synchrotron radiation damage observations in normal incidence copper mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-cooled copper mirrors used at near-normal incidence on two beam lines at the NSLS are observed to undergo severe degradation upon exposure to the direct SR beam. These mirrors are used on beam lines designed to utilize radiation in the wavelength regions longer than 100 nm and are coated with a uv reflection-enhancing coating, consisting of one or more bilayers of aluminum with a MgF/sub 2/ overcoat. Beamline performance degrades very rapidly following installation of a new set of mirrors. Analysis of the mirror surfaces by various non-destructive techniques indicates severe degradation of the coating and surface along the central strip where most of the x-ray power is absorbed from the beam. In one case where the mirror had three bilayer coatings, the outer coating layer has disappeared along the central strip. Rutherford backscatter measurements indicate compositional changes between layers and confirm the existence of a carbon deposit on the surface. Thermal modeling suggests that most of the damage is caused by direct photon interaction, since the temperature rise in the energy deposition region is small.

Takacs, P.Z.; Melendez, J.; Colbert, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

Jain, Pranav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

RESEARCH ARTICLE Increase in crop damage caused by wild boar (Sus scrofa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Increase in crop damage caused by wild boar (Sus scrofa L.): the "refuge effect /Published online: 14 October 2011 Abstract The occurrence of crop damage by wild boars raised dramatically, including hunting, can play a relevant role in causing crop damage. We studied a Mediterranean area

Boyer, Edmond

4

Thermodynamic damage mechanism of transparent films caused by a low-power laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new model for analyzing the laser-induced damage process is provided. In many damage pits, the melted residue can been found. This is evidence of the phase change of materials. Therefore the phase change of materials is incorporated into the mechanical damage mechanism of films. Three sequential stages are discussed: no phase change, liquid phase change, and gas phase change. To study the damage mechanism and process, two kinds of stress have been considered: thermal stress and deformation stress. The former is caused by the temperature gradient and the latter is caused by high-pressure drive deformation. The theory described can determine the size of the damage pit.

Xia Zhilin; Shao Jianda; Fan Zhengxiu; Wu Shigang

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Specific grinding energy causing thermal damage in precision gear steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thermal damage for surface grinding of AISI 9310 gear steel using two different grinding wheels and two different coolants. The grinding wheels used for this research are plain alumina wheel-32A80-JVBE and Seeded Gel alumina abrasive-5SG80-JVS...

Hatathodi, Srinivas

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

It seems size does matter in the brain. Even the smallest stroke can cause widespread damage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health It seems size does matter in the brain. Even the smallest stroke can cause widespread damage by blocking blood vessels called arterioles, stopping blood from reaching capillaries deeper in the brain the blockage. Block several and you can knock out entire brain regions as the damage travels even in areas

Kleinfeld, David

7

38Name ________________________________ Solar Proton Events can cause satellite damage and produce harmful radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solar panels 10% larger to they produce 4900 watts at launch. By the end of 2004, the power will have38Name ________________________________ Solar Proton Events can cause satellite damage and produce the SPEs between 1997 and 2004 with intensities greater than 300 pico-Flux Units (pFU). Study this table

8

Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss...

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Using Violation and Vulnerability Analysis to Understand the Root-Causes of Complex Security Incidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incidents C.W. Johnson Dept. of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. http Department of Energy has also established the Information Security Resource Center to coordinate the `root is appropriate because it included failures in the underlying audit and control mechanisms. It also stemmed from

Johnson, Chris

12

DNA Damage Causes p27^(Kip1) Accumulation Through COP1 Signaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consequences of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Here, we report that p27 levels were elevated after DNA damage, with concurrent reduction of COP1 levels. Mechanistic studies showed that COP1 directly interacted with p27 through a VP motif on p27...

Choi, Hyun Ho

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Rapid Loss Modeling of Death and Downtime Caused By Earthquake Induced Damage to Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses produced by large, damaging earthquakes. This was when California Office of Emergency Services started thinking of some rational basis for state rescue and recovery operations for future. Kennedy et al. (1980) studied probabilistic seismic... (1999) developed a relationship between seismic demands on structures in terms of ground motion parameters which is part of the second step of the performance based design model. They worked on probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear...

Ghorawat, Sandeep

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environmental Stigma Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contami- nation causing environmental damage cannot be seen,Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases E.in cases of environmental damage, primar- ily because it is

Johnson, E. Jean

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cockroft, Nigel J. (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4314 8/2/2011 13:40 Agriculture Parking Lot Criminal Damage Spark plug cables cut on pick-up truck Report on file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:48 Boone Tavern Parking Lot Property Damage Mitsubishi Gallant Report on file 4318 8/10/2011 19:10 Anna Smith Parking Lot Theft by Unlawful Taking Car battery and Jumper Cables Report on file 4319 8 responded 4321 8/14/2011 17:14 Evans Sports Complex Theft by Unlawful Taking Solar Panel and Mounting

Baltisberger, Jay H.

18

Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

Driggers, S.A.

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Incidents of Security Concern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

Atencio, Julian J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Low-damage high-throughput grazing-angle sputter deposition on graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the prevalence of sputter deposition in the microelectronics industry, it has seen very limited applications for graphene electronics. In this letter, we report systematic investigation of the sputtering induced damages in graphene and identify the energetic sputtering gas neutrals as the primary cause of graphene disorder. We further demonstrate a grazing-incidence sputtering configuration that strongly suppresses fast neutral bombardment and retains graphene structure integrity, creating considerably lower damage than electron-beam evaporation. Such sputtering technique yields fully covered, smooth thin dielectric films, highlighting its potential for contact metals, gate oxides, and tunnel barriers fabrication in graphene device applications.

Chen, C.-T.; Gajek, M.; Raoux, S. [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Casu, E. A. [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Politecnico di Torino, Turin 10129 (Italy)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

Maheras, Anastasia Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Pathogenic Mechanisms in Ischemic Damage: A Computational Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathogenic Mechanisms in Ischemic Damage: A Computational Study Eytan Ruppin and Elad Ofer Depts of ischemic tissue damage during acute stroke. Two prime pathogenic mechanisms, cor- tical spreading the patterns of damage that arise if damage is caused by either mechanism are generated. These damaged tissue

Ruppin, Eytan

23

Incidents of Security Concern  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

BDS thin film damage competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for producing damage resistant optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a system that mitigates the growth of surface damage in an optic. Damage to the optic is minimally initiated. In an embodiment of the invention, damage sites in the optic are initiated, located, and then treated to stop the growth of the damage sites. The step of initiating damage sites in the optic includes a scan of the optic using a laser to initiate defects. The exact positions of the initiated sites are identified. A mitigation process is performed that locally or globally removes the cause of subsequent growth of the damaged sites.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Wegner, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Windsor, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Damage analysis in asphalt concrete mixtures based on parameter relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asphalt pavements experience damage due to traffic loading under various environmental conditions. Damage can be caused by viscopl microcracks, fracture due to fatigue cracking, or fracture due to thermal cracking. Asphalt pavements have...

Song, Injun

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

The biological and metabolic fates of endogenous DNA damage products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA and other biomolecules are subjected to damaging chemical reactions during normal physiological processes and in states of pathophysiology caused by endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. In DNA, this damage affects ...

Chan, Wan Simon

28

Grazing incidence beam expander  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reporting Incidents Of Security Concern  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To enhance the Department of Energy (DOE) Incidents of Security Concern Reporting Program through more consistent reporting, better information tracking, and interactive coordination. DOE N 251.54, dated 07/08/03, extends this directive until 07/08/04. Cancels Deputy Secretary Glauthier memorandum, subject: Reporting Security Incidents, dated 9-7-99.

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cyber Security Incident Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09.

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cyber Security Incident Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations.

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Remote sensing and forest damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

Reid, N.J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cyber Security Incident Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

Robert J. Turk

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Damage susceptibility tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions, 3) that x-ray induced damage rates for a common material (relatively pure PVC in this example 7,8 ) can be used to normalize different sets of XPS damage...

38

War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Laser damage testing of small optics for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A damage test procedure was established for optical components that have large incident beam footprints. The procedure was applied on coated samples for a high-powered 1053-nm, 3-ns pulse-length laser system.

Chow, Robert; Runkel, Mike; Taylor, John R

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name _________________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name's Title _________________________________________________________________ Date and Time of Accident accident occurred

Long, Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Specific grinding energy causing thermal damage in helicopter gear steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of dynamometer in between machine table and magnetic chuck . . . . . . I 3 . . . 18 . 22 24 Fig 3. 4 Tangential force graph as recorded in the PC using Labtech sol'tware. . . . . , . . . . . . . . 25 Fig . 3. 5. Normal I'orce graph as recorded in the PC.... The spindle speed was held constant throughout the test conditions. The force data was obtained during the grinding process by means of an AMTI force dynamometer. 3. 2 Specimen Preparation Three steel materials v ere investigated. They are AISI 9310, X53...

Purushothaman, Ganesh Kumaran

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Scientists Assess Damage Caused by Earthquake near Amchitka | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolvingPerformance | Department ofBowl |

43

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil parameters due to temperature changes from those caused by structural damage or other environmental e ects to environmental factors can be far larger than those caused by structural damage. During damp weather, for example

Stanford University

45

Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

Charles Solbrig

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 -May 20, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 - May 20, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building-000955 PARKING GARAGE - ARBORETUM LANE (PS2) Mech\\Electrical Security responded to a report that an automotive York Security responded to a report of an unknown male causing a disturbance in the food court

47

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Engineering survey building damage assessment training manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The training objectives are: differentiate between the various levels of damage caused to buildings and structures by an earthquake and classify them as to their safety of occupancy, extent of damage, and resources needed for recovery/repair.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cell damage seen from Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 30 kilometer radius forbidden zone around the Chernobyl atomic plant serves as a sobering reminder of the world's worst nuclear accident. But for former Soviet biologists, it's also a unique natural laboratory. And one scientist, Nadejda Gulaya of Kiev's Pallaguine Institute of Biochemistry, has been doing studies that she claims offer surprising evidence of Chernobyl's after-effects. Prolonged exposure to radioactive fallout from the 1986 accident, she says, has caused damage to cell membranes in both animals and humans. For the past year, Gulaya has been comparing tissues from animals such as mink, pigs, and rodents inhabiting the Chernobyl area with those from other parts of Ukraine. Her conclusion: Exposure to radiation has, in many cases, caused alterations to membrane phospholipids. These changes, are similar to those that disrupt cellular metabolism following exposure to oxidizing free radicals. Gulaya also has preliminary data from human studies. She claims to have found similar alterations in the neurons of people who have died since being exposed to Chernobyl radiation. That leads her to speculate that the frequent psychiatric disorders may not just be from mental stress or radiophobia, but might reflect actual damage to the central nervous system.

Not Available

1992-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Controlling Beaver Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beavers are important because their dams stabilize creek flow, slow runoff and create ponds. However, these same dams can negatively alter the flow of creeks. Damage prevention, control and various trapping methods are discussed in this publication....

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Controlling Opossum Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage; however, their pelts can be sold only during the furbearer season and with the proper licenses. Other furbearers include beaver, otter, mink, nutria, ringtailed cat, badger, skunk, weasel, raccoon, muskrat, fox and civet cat. Homeowners...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Composite heat damage assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Philpot, H.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Powell, G.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviates oxidative damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may cause erosion damage... into oxidation and exfoliation,mixed oxidant attack, molten salt accelerated corrosion, and the effect... of corrosion on the mechanical properties of...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviating oxidative damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may cause erosion damage... into oxidation and exfoliation,mixed oxidant attack, molten salt accelerated corrosion, and the effect... of corrosion on the mechanical properties of...

56

Author's personal copy Statistical pattern analysis of ultrasonic signals for fatigue damage detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-engineered complex electromechanical systems (e.g., aircraft, electric power generation units, and petrochemical plants). Accumulation of fatigue damage may cause catastrophic failures, leading to potential loss

Ray, Asok

57

Know Stroke Stroke is the third leading cause of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Know Stroke Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in adults. About 600,000 new strokes are reported in the U.S. each year. The good news is that treatments are available that can greatly reduce the damage caused by a stroke

Bandettini, Peter A.

58

BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

Stolz, C J

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

management to determine the severity or significance of any cyber security incident. For PII clarification for reporting, contact the Chief Privacy Officer. Reportable Cyber...

60

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A preliminary evaluation of a speed threshold incident detection algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic management centers can reduce emergency vehicle response time to incidents with immediate detection of incidents. Traffic management centers detect incidents by applying speed, occupancy, and/or volume loop detector data to an incident...

Kolb, Stephanie Lang

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Incident Report An incident report should be submitted for any event involving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident Report An incident report should be submitted for any event involving: injury or illness fire explosion or implosion chemical exposure Minor cuts and scrapes need not be reported be reported. If a "near miss" might have had severe consequences, submit an incident report. You may also

Crawford, T. Daniel

65

LETTER Earth Planets Space, 57, 191196, 2005 Simulation of strong ground motions caused by the 2004 off the Kii peninsula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003. Oil reserve tanks at Tomakomai suffered significant damage due to the motion of strong long that the damage to these oil tanks was caused by the violent motion of the floating roof due to resonance

Furumura, Takashi

66

Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hate Crimes and Incidents at UCSB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A hate crime is any criminal act, or attempted criminal act, motivated by hatred based on race, religion. · Acts which result in property damage. · Any criminal act or attempted criminal act, including property damage, directed against public or private agencies. What is the difference between a hate crime

California at Santa Barbara, University of

68

Regulation with anticipated learning about environmental damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abatement costs and environmental damages, and a generalemissions. 2.2 Environmental damages and learning Let S t begas stocks and environmental damages. In some respects these

Karp, L; Zhang, J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Novel applications of data mining methodologies to incident databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident databases provide an excellent opportunity to study the repeated situations of incidents in the process industry. The databases give an insight into the situation which led to an incident, and if studied properly can help monitor...

Anand, Sumit

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

Banerjee, Mayukh; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Pritha [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata (India); Das, Jayanta K. [Department of Dermatology, West Bank Hospital, Howrah (India); Basu, Santanu [Department of General Medicine, Sri Aurobindo Seva Kendra, Kolkata (India); Sarkar, Ajoy K. [Peerless Hospital and B.K Roy Research Centre, Kolkata (India); States, J. Christopher, E-mail: jcstates@louisville.ed [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Center for Environmental Genomics and Integrative Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Giri, Ashok K., E-mail: akgiri15@yahoo.co [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

Yin, Yuanqin [Cancer Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Yao, Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY (United States); Gao, Ning [Department of Pharmacognos, College of Pharmacy, 3rd Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States); Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs.

Buckalew, W.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Treatment of anisotropic damage development within a scalar damage formulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with describing a damage mechanics formulation which provides for non-isotropic effects using a scalar damage variable. An investigation has been in progress for establishing the constitutive behavior of rock salt at long times and low to moderate confining pressures in relation to the possible use of excavated rooms in rock salt formations as repositories for nuclear waste. An important consideration is the effect of damage manifested principally by the formation of shear induced wing cracks which have a stress dependent orientation. The analytical formulation utilizes a scalar damage parameter, but is capable of indicating the non- isotropic dependence of inelastic straining on the stress state and the confining pressure. Also, the equations indicate the possibility of volumetric expansions leading to the onset of tertiary creep and eventually rupture if the damage variable reaches a critical value.

Chan, K.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)][Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Existence and Regularity for Dynamic Viscoelastic Adhesive Contact with Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the dynamic process of frictionless adhesive contact between a viscoelastic body and a reactive foundation, which takes into account the damage of the material resulting from tension or compression, is presented. Contact is described by the normal compliance condition. Material damage is modelled by the damage field, which measures the pointwise fractional decrease in the load-carrying capacity of the material, and its evolution is described by a differential inclusion. The model allows for different damage rates caused by tension or compression. The adhesion is modelled by the bonding field, which measures the fraction of active bonds on the contact surface. The existence of the unique weak solution is established using the theory of set-valued pseudomonotone operators introduced by Kuttler and Shillor (1999). Additional regularity of the solution is obtained when the problem data is more regular and satisfies appropriate compatibility conditions.

Kuttler, Kenneth L. [Department of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)], E-mail: klkuttler@math.byu.edu; Shillor, Meir [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)], E-mail: shillor@oakland.edu; Fernandez, Jose R. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Facultade de Matematicas, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: jramon@usc.es

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF INJURY NONE EMPLOYER PHYSICIAN EMERGENCY FAMILY PHYSICIAN OTHER PHYSICIAN / SPECIALIST TO YOUR. _________________________________________ Room #___________________ STATE EXACTLY - THE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE INCIDENT, WHERE TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES 8 NOT GUARDED OR IMPROPERLY GUARDED 9 INADEQUATE ILLUMINATION 10

Hitchcock, Adam P.

78

Modelling of fatigue damage in aluminum cylinder heads. R. Salapeteb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1. INTRODUCTION Increase in the specific power of Diesel engines leads to severe operating fatigue damage that may cause Diesel engine to fail after a few thousand cycles on the test bench and under severe operating conditions. The alternative heating and cooling of the operative Diesel engine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

79

Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

On World Poverty: Its Causes and Effects Gott wrfelt nicht.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 On World Poverty: Its Causes and Effects Gott würfelt nicht. ­ Albert Einstein David A. Bessler a set of thirteen measures deemed relevant to the incidence of world poverty. Cross-section measures and agricultural income to be exogenous movers of poverty when measured as the percent of the population living

McCarl, Bruce A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FM032_r1_0_Incident Report.doc 03/04/09 CNS Incident Report Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FM032_r1_0_Incident Report.doc 03/04/09 CNS Incident Report Form Incident Information Date and Time Instructions on reverse #12;FM032_r1_0_Incident Report.doc 03/04/09 FM032 Instructions 1. This form. This form is not a substitute for other reporting obligations including University Injury reports. #12;

82

Mercury, to put it plainly, is bad stuff. In people, it causes exhaustion, headaches, memory loss, even brain damage; in birds it appears to have similar nervous system impacts and can harm their eggs; in the environment, there's almost no way to get rid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury, to put it plainly, is bad stuff. In people, it causes exhaustion, headaches, memory loss; in the environment, there's almost no way to get rid of it. Mercury in the San Francisco Bay is especially sinister with for cleaning up our bay and mitigating past errors, often make mercury levels worse. But why that is, where it

83

Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited, Irvine, CA USA 92697-2700 ABSTRACT Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate

Shinozuka, Masanobu

84

Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Environmental Change 12 (2002) 197­202 Increased crop damage in the US from excess Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA d Environmental Defense, 18 Tremont Street and worldwide have caused great damage to crop production. If the frequency of these weather extremes were

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Damage Cascade Formation in Ion Bombarded Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). In one subtask, we studied damage cascade interactions caused by two 2 keV Si atoms simultaneously bombarding a crystalline Si substrate. We found that the enhanced displacement creation appears primarily in the thermal spike...

Chen, Di

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

An adaptive control technology for flight safety in the presence of actuator anomalies and damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenge of achieving safe flight comes into sharp focus in the face of adverse conditions caused by faults, damage, or upsets. When these situations occur, the corresponding uncertainties directly affect the safe ...

Matsutani, Megumi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture damage, is defined...

Caro Spinel, Silvia

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

A common language for computer security incidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the computer security information regularly gathered and disseminated by individuals and organizations cannot currently be combined or compared because a common language has yet to emerge in the field of computer security. A common language consists of terms and taxonomies (principles of classification) which enable the gathering, exchange and comparison of information. This paper presents the results of a project to develop such a common language for computer security incidents. This project results from cooperation between the Security and Networking Research Group at the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, and the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. This Common Language Project was not an effort to develop a comprehensive dictionary of terms used in the field of computer security. Instead, the authors developed a minimum set of high-level terms, along with a structure indicating their relationship (a taxonomy), which can be used to classify and understand computer security incident information. They hope these high-level terms and their structure will gain wide acceptance, be useful, and most importantly, enable the exchange and comparison of computer security incident information. They anticipate, however, that individuals and organizations will continue to use their own terms, which may be more specific both in meaning and use. They designed the common language to enable these lower-level terms to be classified within the common language structure.

John D. Howard; Thomas A Longstaff

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Focused ion beam damage to MOS integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial focused ion beam (FIB) systems are commonly used to image integrated circuits (ICS) after device processing, especially in failure analysis applications. FIB systems are also often employed to repair faults in metal lines for otherwise functioning ICS, and are being evaluated for applications in film deposition and nanofabrication. A problem that is often seen in FIB imaging and repair is that ICS can be damaged during the exposure process. This can result in degraded response or out-right circuit failure. Because FIB processes typically require the surface of an IC to be exposed to an intense beam of 30--50 keV Ga{sup +} ions, both charging and secondary radiation damage are potential concerns. In previous studies, both types of effects have been suggested as possible causes of device degradation, depending on the type of device examined and/or the bias conditions. Understanding the causes of this damage is important for ICS that are imaged or repaired by a FIB between manufacture and operation, since the performance and reliability of a given IC is otherwise at risk in subsequent system application. In this summary, the authors discuss the relative roles of radiation damage and charging effects during FIB imaging. Data from exposures of packaged parts under controlled bias indicate the possibility for secondary radiation damage during FIB exposure. On the other hand, FIB exposure of unbiased wafers (a more common application) typically results in damage caused by high-voltage stress or electrostatic discharge. Implications for FIB exposure and subsequent IC use are discussed.

FLEETWOOD,D.M.; CAMPBELL,ANN N.; HEMBREE,CHARLES E.; TANGYUNYONG,PAIBOON; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SODEN,JERRY M.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant of threats that result in damages leading to increased laser absorption, beam quality degradation and reduced

Tillack, Mark

95

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Theft Norco Mountain bike BPD notified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Four or more citations received Fine issued 4353 9/8/2011 16:00 Elizabeth Rogers Bicycle Theft Bluish Green bicycle BPD notified 4354 9/9/2011 13:49 Short St Hair Salon Criminal Damage Graffiti on the rear

Baltisberger, Jay H.

96

An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistory The Oak Ridge InstituteOakIncident

98

Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

Klaunig, James E., E-mail: jklauni@indiana.edu; Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Unexpected irreversible damage of an asymmetric bismuth silicate photorefractive spatial light modulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unexpected irreversible damage occurred repeatedly in the asymmetric bismuth silicate (BSO)photorefractive spatial light modulator under some operation modes, even though thepower of the write-light beam does not exceed the optical damage threshold. Accordingto the microscopic surface images and the Raman spectra of the BSO film, suddenrising of temperature in local areas caused by the drift of the photon-induced electronsis responsible for the damage; the damage exists not only on the surface but also insidethe BSO crystal. The damage is relative to the structure of the spatial lightmodulator, the operation mode, and the growth of the BSO crystal. The informationprovided by the damage is useful for optimizing the structure, the operation modes, and the performance of the photorefractive spatial light modulators.

Li Xiujian; Yang Jiankun; Yang Juncai; Chang Shengli; Liu Ju; Hu Wenhua

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VAPOR INCIDENTS IN THE 200 EAST & 200 WEST TANK FARMS FROM CY1995 TO CY2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Revised for a more comprehensive overview of vapor incidents reported at the Hanford Tank Farms. Investigation into the meteorological influences on vapor incidents in the tank farm to determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases. Weather phenomena, specifically barometric pressure, and wind velocity and direction can potentially cause or exacerbate a vapor release within the farm systems. The purpose of this document is to gather and evaluate the meteorological and weather information for the Tank Farms Shift Log Vapor Incident entries and determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases such as propane. A part of the evaluation will be determining which of the incidents are related to actual ''intrusive'' work, and which are ''transient.'' Transient vapor incidents are herein defined as those vapors encountered during walkdowns, surveys, or other activities that did not require working directly with the tanks, pits, transfer lines, etc. Another part of the investigation will involve determining if there are barometric pressures or other weather related phenomena that might cause or contribute vapors being released when there are no ''intrusive'' activities. A final purpose is to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the 242-A Evaporator operations and Vapor Incidents entered on the Shift Log.

HOCKING, M.J.

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Characterizing the Performance of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer An Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With interest growing in the deployment of solar energy system, the accuracy of irradiance measurements becomes for concentrating solar energy systems. The Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is used extensively for DNI and periods with clouds were excluded. The NIP is mounted on an automatic tracker that keeps the instrument

Oregon, University of

104

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

Howard, J.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A damage model for fracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Injections of large volumes of water into tight shale reservoirs allows the extraction of oil and gas not previously accessible. This large volume "super" fracking induces damage that allows the oil and/or gas to flow to an extraction well. The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for understanding super fracking. We assume that water is injected from a small spherical cavity into a homogeneous elastic medium. The high pressure of the injected water generates hoop stresses that reactivate natural fractures in the tight shales. These fractures migrate outward as water is added creating a spherical shell of damaged rock. The porosity associated with these fractures is equal to the water volume injected. We obtain an analytic expression for this volume. We apply our model to a typical tight shale reservoir and show that the predicted water volumes are in good agreement with the volumes used in super fracking.

Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiation Damage Monitoring in the ATLAS Pixel Detector1 Sally Seidel, on behalf of the ATLAS Collaborationa,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborationa, 2 a Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA3 is primarily due to displacement damage and other point defects caused by non-ionizing energy16 loss of charged to respond to these changes, the radiation damage sustained by detector22 elements must be monitored.23

Seidel, Sally

111

Updated fracture incidence rates for the US version of FRAX®  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presenting with non-vertebral fractures. Osteoporos Int 18:2006) Epidemiology of vertebral fractures: implications forORIGINAL ARTICLE Updated fracture incidence rates for the US

Ettinger, B.; Black, D. M.; Dawson-Hughes, B.; Pressman, A. R.; Melton, L. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An experimental investigation of damage-dependent material damping of laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found to alter several material properties [1-3]. Extensive modeling and testing have been performed to determine stiffness loss in laminated composites as a result of matrix cracking and interply delaminations. In addition, several investigators have... noted and measured a change in material damping in composites caused by damage [4-9]. However, no attempt has been made to quantify or model the effect of damage on material damping. It has been postualted that rubbing between matrix crack faces...

Smith, Scott Andrew

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

International Trade and the Internalization of Environmental Damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimates of environmental damages efficiently and quickly,an overview of environmental damages and internalizationdo little to decrease environmental damage, and may actually

Karp, Larry; Dumas, Christopher F.; Koo, Bonwoo; Sacheti, Sandeep

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Competition between mesoplasticity and damage under HCF Elasticity/damage shakedown concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during all the sample lifetime of the plasticity and damage effects. The plasticity mechanisms induce in the framework of the continuum damage mechanics, according to the identified physical mechanisms during, the damage growth arrest. Keywords High cycle fatigue; Multiaxial loading; Continuum damage mechanics

Boyer, Edmond

117

Linking Climate to Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (L. major) in Pre-Saharan North Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shifts in surface climate may have changed the dynamic of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the pre-Saharan zones of North Africa. Caused by Leishmania major, this form multiplies in the body of rodents serving as reservoirs of the disease. The parasite is then transmitted to human hosts by the bite of a Phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) that was previously fed by biting an infected reservoir. We examine the seasonal and interannual dynamics of the incidence of this ZCL as a function of surface climate indicators in two regions covering a large area of the semi-arid Pre-Saharan North Africa. Results suggest that in this area, changes in climate may have initiated a trophic cascade that resulted in an increase in ZCL incidence.

Bounoua, Lahouari; Kahime, Kholoud; Houti, Leila; Blakey, Tara; Ebi, Kristie L.; Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thome, Kurtis; Dudek, Claire; Sahabi, Salah A.; Messouli, Mohammed; Makhlouf, Baghdad; EI Laamrani, Abderahmane; Boumezzough, Ali

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

28-nm laser damage testing of LIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Incident involving UCSD student(s) takes place. UCSD STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident involving UCSD student(s) takes place. UCSD STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS for individual students (updated 9/20/11) The Office of Student Conduct receives an incident report (i.e. RA, RSO, UCSD Police, student/faculty/staff complaint, etc). If sufficient evidence is present to support a violation

Russell, Lynn

120

TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting Why?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting ­ Why? Obligation to report Health Care of the accident ­ if not, the organization (i.e. the department) can be fined Obligation under Section 51, 52 happened? When did it happen? (Date, Time and Place) When was the accident/incident reported? Any

Lennard, William N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

CAUSE & EFFECT What Is It?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of employee absenteeism? Urban Geography: How is urban sprawl a factor in global warming? Art History: WhatCAUSE & EFFECT What Is It? Cause and effect analysis answers the questions: "Why did this happen or an event occurred, you are looking at causes. When you are trying to predict or understand the consequences

Boonstra, Rudy

123

Thermal imaging investigation of modified fused silica at surface damage sites for understanding the underlying mechanisms of damage growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use an infrared thermal imaging system in combination with a fluorescence microscope to map the dynamics of the local surface temperature and fluorescence intensity under cw, UV excitation of laser-modified fused silica within a damage site. Based on a thermal diffusion model, we estimate the energy deposited via linear absorption mechanisms and derive the linear absorption coefficient of the modified material. The results indicate that the damage growth mechanism is not entirely based on linear absorption. Specifically, the absorption cross-section derived above would prove insufficient to cause a significant increase in the temperature of the modified material under nanosecond, pulsed excitation (via linear absorption at ICF laser fluences). In addition, irreversible changes in the absorption cross-section following extended cw, UV laser exposure were observed.

Negres, R A; Burke, M W; DeMange, P; Sutton, S B; Feit, M D; Demos, S G

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Electrodynamics of a planar photodiode discharge for an obliquely incident initiating laser pulse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approximate analytic solution of Maxwell's equations is obtained inside a photodiode. Analysis of this solution shows that the earlier discovered significant decrease in the radiation field characteristics over an anode is caused by a considerable increase in the amplitude of a wave generated inside the photodiode, which for angles of incidence {theta} {yields} {pi}/2 achieves a value comparable to the initial electric field strength applied to the photodiode. In this case, the electromagnetic energy flux density inside the photodiode exceeds tens times or more the electromagnetic energy flux density over the anode. The results of numerical calculations confirm the analytic results.

Lazarev, Y. N., E-mail: yulaz@snezhinsk.ru; Syrtsova, Yu. G. [All-Russia Research Institute of Technical Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel at U.S. DOE Facilities Experience and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a handling perspective, any spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that has lost its original technical and functional design capabilities with regard to handling and confinement can be considered as damaged. Some SNF was damaged as a result of experimental activities and destructive examinations; incidents during packaging, handling, and transportation; or degradation that has occurred during storage. Some SNF was mechanically destroyed to protect proprietary SNF designs. Examples of damage to the SNF include failed cladding, failed fuel meat, sectioned test specimens, partially reprocessed SNFs, over-heated elements, dismantled assemblies, and assemblies with lifting fixtures removed. In spite of the challenges involved with handling and storage of damaged SNF, the SNF has been safely handled and stored for many years at DOE storage facilities. This report summarizes a variety of challenges encountered at DOE facilities during interim storage and handling operations along with strategies and solutions that are planned or were implemented to ameliorate those challenges. A discussion of proposed paths forward for moving damaged and nondamaged SNF from interim storage to final disposition in the geologic repository is also presented.

Brett W. Carlsen; Eric Woolstenhulme; Roger McCormack

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Insulator damage endangers public, power reliability; ratepayers...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insulator-damage-endangers-public-power-reliability-ratepayers-foot-repair-bill Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us...

128

Image Processing Techniques applied for Corrosion Damage Analysis Mariana P. Bento, Fatima N. S. de Medeiros, Ialis C. de Paula Jr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gas tanks and pipelines is an important issue to avoid any untoward incidents. In this study we is highly recommended for inspection of storage tanks and pipelines in the oil industry, without disturbing will inevitably experience damage due to atmo- spheric corrosion. The early detection of corroded areas in oil

Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

129

Radiation-Damage Study of a Monocrystalline Tungsten Positron Converter X. Artru, R. Kirsch, IPN, Lyon, France; R. Chehab, LAL, Orsay, France;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation-Damage Study of a Monocrystalline Tungsten Positron Converter X. Artru, R. Kirsch, IPN tested on a 0.3 mm thick tungsten monocrystal exposed dur- ing 6 months to the 30 Gev incident electron and the corresponding enhancement in pair production [1, 3]. Their use in linear colliders (LC), where high beam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Bloggers as Citizen Journalists: The 2012 Pink Slime Incident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and added to ground beef to make lean affordable beef blends. News reports questioning the safety and quality of LFTB began in March 2012. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 44 blogs that mentioned the pink slime incident between...

Pannone, Anthony

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geometrical characteristics and damage morphology of nodules grown from artificial seeds in multilayer coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nodules have been planted in an HfO2/SiO2 multilayer system with absorptive gold nanoparticle seeds located on the surface of a substrate. The topography of nodules was scanned by an atomic force microscope and imaged by a scanning electron microscope. The underlying characteristics of nodules were revealed by a focused ion beam. The cross-sectional profiles reveal that nodules grown from small seeds have a continuous boundary and better mechanical stability. A laser-induced damage test shows that nodules decrease the laser-induced damage threshold by up to 3 times. The damage pits are exclusively caused by nodular ejection and triggered by the absorptive seeds. The distribution of electric field and average temperature rise in the nodules were analyzed. Theoretical results met experimental results very well. The strong absorptive seed and microlens effect of the nodule play important roles in laser-induced damage of a planted nodule.

Shan Yongguang; He Hongbo; Wei Chaoyang; Li Shuhong; Zhou Ming; Li Dawei; Zhao Yuan'an

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Experimental study on GaP surface damage threshold induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface damage threshold of undoped bulk <110> GaP induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond pulse at 1040 nm with a duration of 61 fs was studied. The threshold value was obtained by a linear fit of the incident single pulse fluence and was confirmed with a breakdown test around the threshold level. The result will be useful in high intensity, high repetition rate laser applications and ultrafast processes.

Li Yi; Liu Feng; Li Yanfeng; Chai Lu; Xing Qirong; Hu Minglie; Wang Chingyue

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

Teague, L.; Duff, M.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Formation Damage due to Iron Precipitation in Acidizing Operations and Evaluating GLDA as a Chelating Agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iron control during acidizing plays a key role in the success of matrix treatment. Ferric ion precipitates in the formation once the acid is spent and the pH exceeds 1-2. Precipitation of iron (III) within the formation can cause formation damage...

Mittal, Rohit

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

A METHOD FOR IMAGING CORROSION DAMAGE IN THIN PLATES FROM ELECTROSTATIC DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A METHOD FOR IMAGING CORROSION DAMAGE IN THIN PLATES FROM ELECTROSTATIC DATA Peter G. Kaup 1 nondestructive evaluation of corrosion in plates is considered. The inpection method uses boundary measurements of currents and voltages to determine the material loss caused by corrosion. The development of the method

Santosa, Fadil

136

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Assessment of damage to geomembrane liners by shredded scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a field and laboratory study performed to assess damage to the geomembrane liner caused by using shredded scrap tires as a leachate drainage layer material in landfills. The field testing was performed to assess the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liner during construction and included nine tests conducted with different combinations of tire chip size and thickness, both with a geotextile and without a geotextile overlying the geomembrane, and under different loading conditions. The laboratory testing was performed to characterize the shredded tires, particularly their size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and chemical resistance. The laboratory testing also included performing simulation testing to determine the extent of damage that occurs to the geomembrane liner by the shredded tires under long-term waste-loading conditions. the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liners in both field tests and simulated laboratory tests was determined by visual observations as well as by conducting multi-axial tension tests, wide strip tension tests, and water vapor transmission tests on the exhumed geomembrane samples. Based on these results, a 0.46-m thick layer of secondary shred tire chips, with an average size of 7.6 cm, placed over a 543-g/m{sup 2} geotextile installed over a geomembrane liner using low-ground-pressure (<58 kPa) equipment was determined to provide adequate protection in the geomembrane liner during construction. The degree of protection offered under long-term loading conditions depends on the normal stress and the random orientation of the shredded tire chips at the geomembrane interface.

Reddy, K.R.; Saichek, R.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - action real-time grazing-incidence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operation... ) 12;Grazing Incidence Pumping (GRIP) Target optimum gain region On-axis x-ray laser Preformed plasma1... ps Grazing Incidence Pumping ... Source: Wang, Wei Hua -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fluence Thresholds for Laser-Induced Damage of Optical Components in the Injector Laser of the SSRL Gun Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Damage threshold fluences for several optical components were measured at three wavelengths using the injector laser at SSRL's Gun Test Facility. Measurements were conducted using the fundamental ir wavelength at 1053 nanometers and harmonics at 526 nm and 263 nm with 3.4ps pulses (1/e{sup 2} full width intensity); ir measurements were also conducted with 850 ps pulses. Practical surfaces relevant to the laser system performance are emphasized. Damage onset was evidenced by an alteration of the specular reflection of a cw probe laser (650 nm) from the irradiated region of the target surface. For the case of stretched ir pulses, damage to a Nd:glass rod was observed to begin at a site within the bulk material and to progress back toward the incident surface.

Boton, P

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

evaluating x-ray damage. PCEMA has been shown to be more sensitive to degradation than PVC which has also been used as a damage sensitive material useful for comparison of damage...

144

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Micropatterned cell arrays for detecting DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerous agents are capable of interacting with DNA and damaging it. Permanent changes in the DNA structure can be both mutagenic and cytotoxic; therefore, methods to measure the susceptibility of cells to mutations are ...

Mittal, Sukant

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Structural damage detection using frequency response functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................90 5.1.2 Case 3: 1 st - 3 rd Story Braces Are Damaged .................................................92 5.1.2.1 All Four Modes Are Used for Damage Detection..........................95 5.1.2.2 The Last Two Modes... for Trial #2 with Hillclimbing #739 .......................................................................................................... 92 Figure 5.8 FRF for the 1 st Floor – 1 st - 3 rd Story Braces Are Broken SIMO – 12 DOF Symmetric...

Dincal, Selcuk

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quantitative damage evaluation of localized deep pitting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized deep pitting is considered difficult to precisely measure and evaluate using simple techniques and daily-use analysis approaches. A case study was made of carbon steel heat exchangers in a typical fresh cooling water environment that experienced severe pitting. To effectively and precisely evaluate the encountered pitting damage, a simple measurement and analyses approach was devised. In this article, the pitting measurement technique and the damage evaluation approach are presented and discussed in detail.

Al Beed, A.A.; Al Garni, M.A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Almost everyone knows that lead-based paint caused serious health problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as contaminat- ed food and drinking water. Imported foods in lead- soldered cans and foods served in lead. It accumulates in the body and can cause lead poisoning. Even at low concen- trations, when there are no outward poisoning may diminish if the source of exposure is removed, but some damage is permanent. Symptoms of lead

150

White-etching matter in bearing steel Part 2: Distinguishing cause and eect in bearing steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White-etching matter in bearing steel Part 2: Distinguishing cause and eect in bearing steel through a mechanism called "white-structure flaking", has triggered many studies of microstructural damage associated with "white-etching ar- eas" created during rolling contact fatigue, although whether

Cambridge, University of

151

Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Atomic-Scale Simulations of Cascade Overlap and Damage Evolution in Silicon Carbide. Abstract:...

152

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April...

153

Assessment of light water reactor fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of LWR fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident and comments on the adequacy of the present USNRC design requirements. Results from early SPERT tests are reviewed and compared with results from recent computer simulations and PBF tests. A progression of fuel rod and cladding damage events is presented. High strain rate deformation of relatively cool irradiated cladding early in the transient may result in fracture at a radial average peak fuel enthalpy of approximately 140 cal/g UO/sub 2/. Volume expansion of previously irradiated fuel upon melting may cause deformation and rupture of the cladding, and coolant channel blockage at higher peak enthalpies.

MacDonald, P.E.; Seiffert, S.L.; Martinson, Z.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Owen, D.E.; Fukuda, S.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Multiscale analysis of the laser-induced damage threshold in optical coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the influence of laser beam size on laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the case of single- and multiple-shot irradiation. The study was performed on hafnia thin films deposited with various technologies (evaporation, sputtering, with or without ion assistance). LIDT measurements were carried out at 1064 nm and 12 ns with a spot size ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of micrometers, in 1-on-1 and R-on-1 modes. These measurements were compared with simulations obtained with the statistical theory of laser-induced damage caused by initiating inclusions.

Capoulade, Jeremie; Gallais, Laurent; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

Leikind, Bernard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal, nitrogen and energy in different natural systems. Since photosynthesis is the core process for energy as an input for modeling photosynthesis from single plant leaves to complex plant communities. For example

Liang, Shunlin

157

A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

Kuchangi, Shamanth

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Violation of Laws, Losses, and Incidents of Security Concerns  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To set forth Department of Energy (DOE) procedures to assure timely and effective action relating to violations of criminal, laws, loses, and incidents of security concern to DOE. Cancels DOE O 5631.5. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 of 9-28-1995.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A program led by EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE for response to potential national radiological incidents recently received recognition for the best-in-track poster at a waste management conference earlier this year.

160

Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chemical Sputtering and Surface Damage of Graphite by Low Energy Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen and Deuterium Projectiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental methane production yields for H+, H2+, and H3+ ions incident on ATJ graphite in the energy range 10-250 eV/H. Below about 60 eV/H, the molecular H species give higher methane yields/H when compared with isovelocity H+. The results are interpreted by considering the differences of the maximum binary collision energy transfer in the ejection of chemical sputtering products associated with undissociated molecules and incident atomic ions, using the same analysis as developed by Yao et al. (PRL 81, 550(1998)) in comparing sputtering of Au by isovelocity N+ and N2+ ions. For both D and H atomic and molecular projectiles, the yields/atom coalesce onto a single curve below projectile energies of approximately 60 eV/atom, when plotted as function of maximum energy transfer, under the assumption that the incident molecular species are undissociated when ejecting the hydrocarbon chemical sputtering product. Raman spectroscopy of a graphite sample exposed to high fluences of D+ and D3+ beams at high and low energies, confirmed the expectation that, according to this argument, there should also be more surface damage by incident molecular species than by isovelocity atomic ions. The two high-energy beam-exposed spots showed similar damage, while the low-energy molecular-beam- exposed spot showed slightly more damage than the corresponding D+ beam exposed spot.

Meyer, Fred W [ORNL; Zhang, Hengda [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Krause, Herbert F [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS PROGRAM MANUAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) identifies the cause of an adverse condition that, if corrected, will preclude recurrence or greatly reduce the probability of recurrence of the same or similar adverse conditions and thereby protect the health and safety of the public, the workers, and the environment. This procedure sets forth the requirements for management determination and the selection of RCA methods and implementation of RCAs that are a result of significant findings from Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) violations, occurrences/events, Significant Adverse Conditions, and external oversight Corrective Action Requests (CARs) generated by the Office of Enforcement (PAAA headquarters), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and other oversight entities against Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Performance of an RCA may result in the identification of issues that should be reported in accordance with the Issues Management Program Manual.

Gravois, Melanie C.

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of Common Angling-Induced Sources of Epithelial Damage for Popular Freshwater Sport Fish using Fluorescein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angling is a popular recreational activity across the globe and a large proportion of fish captured by anglers are released due to voluntary or mandatory catch-and-release practices. The handling associated with hook removal and return of the fish to their environment can cause physical damage to the epidermal layer of the fish which may affect the condition and survival of released fish. This study investigated possible sources of epithelial damage associated with several different handling methods (i.e. landing net types, interactions with different boat floor surfaces, tournament procedures) commonly used in recreational angling for two popular freshwater sport fish species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius). Epithelial damage was examined using fluorescein, a non-toxic dye, which has been shown to detect latent epithelial damage. Northern pike exhibited extensive epithelial damage after exposure to several of the induced treatments (i.e., interaction with a carpeted surface, knotted nylon net, and line rolling) but relatively little epithelial damage when exposed to others (i.e., knotless rubber nets, smooth boat surfaces, or lip gripping devices). Largemouth bass did not show significant epithelial damage for any of the treatments, with the exception of fish caught in a semi-professional live release tournament. The detection of latent injuries using fluorescein can be an important management tool as it provides visual examples of potential damage that can be caused by different handling methods. Such visualizations can be used to encourage fish friendly angler behaviour and enhance the survival and welfare of released fish. It can also be used to test new products that are intended to or claim to reduce injury to fish that are to be released. Future research should evaluate the relationship between different levels of epithelial damage and mortality across a range of environmental conditions.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mississippi Canyon 252 Incident NRDA Tier 1 for Deepwater Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and are visible on Google Earth. With 3D seismic data obtained by the oil and gas industry for geophysical Resource Damage Assessment. Each Party reserves its right to produce its own independent interpretation ofcommunities considered sensitive to human impacts, including chemosynthetic, deep-water (aka cold-water) coral

166

Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Building, University Park 16802 PA USA 4 Chair Professor Center for Research Excellence in Corrosion hip prosthesis. Fretting corrosion tests were conducted with stainless steel and poly (methyl

Boyer, Edmond

167

Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. We have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.

Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage localization for a general class of gradient damage models Kim Pham solutions for the traction problem of an elastic damaging bar. This bar has a softening behavior which obeys

Boyer, Edmond

170

Metabolites of arsenic and increased DNA damage of p53 gene in arsenic plant workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that monomethylarsonous acid is more cytotoxic and genotoxic than arsenate and arsenite, which may attribute to the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we used hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry to determine three arsenic species in urine of workers who had been working in arsenic plants,and calculated primary and secondary methylation indexes. The damages of exon 5, 6, 8 of p53 gene were determined by the method developed by Sikorsky, et al. Results show that the concentrations of each urinary arsenic species,and damage indexes of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene in the exposed population were significantly higher, but SMI was significantly lower than in the control group. The closely positive correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and PMI,MMA, DMA were found, but there was closely negative correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and SMI. Those findings suggested that DNA damage of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene existed in the population occupationally exposed to arsenic. For exon 5, the important factors may include the model of arsenic metabolic transformation, the concentrations of MMA and DMA, and the MMA may be of great importance. - Research Highlights: > In our study, the mean SMI for workers came from arsenic plants is 4.06, so they may be in danger. > There are more MMA, there are more damage of exon 5 of p53 gene. > MMA and damage of exon 5 of p53 gene may be useful biomarkers to assess adverse health effects caused by arsenic.

Wen Weihua, E-mail: Dongsijiehua@sina.com [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Public Health College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan City, Hubei, 430030 (China); Wen Jinghua [Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, No. 276, Chongguan Road, Guiyang, Guizhou, 550004 (China); Lu Lin [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Liu Hua [The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College, No. 295 Xichang Road, Kunming, Yunnan, 650032 (China); Yang Jun; Cheng Huirong [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Che Wangjun [The First Division of Public Health, Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 4, Ziyun Road, Xishan District, Kunming, Yunnan 650228 (China); Li Liang [Honghe Zhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 1, Guannan Road, Mengzi City, Yunnan, 661100 (China); Zhang Guanbei [Yunnan Institute for Drug Abuse, Kunming, 650028 (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Induced Optical Losses in Optoelectronic Devices due to Focused Ion Beam Damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of damages caused by gallium focused ion beam (FIB) into III-V compounds is presented. Potential damages caused by local heating, ion implantation, and selective sputtering are presented. Preliminary analysis shows that local heating is negligible. Gallium implantation is shown to occur over areas tens of nanometers thick. Gallium accumulation as well as selective sputtering during III-V compounds milling is expected. Particularly, for GaAs, this effect leads to gallium segregation and formation of metallic clusters. Microdisk resonators were fabricated using FIB milling with different emission currents to analyze these effects on a device. It is shown that for higher emission current, thus higher implantation doses, the cavity quality factor rapidly decreases due to optical scattering losses induced by implanted gallium atoms.

Vallini, Felipe; Reis, Elohim Fonseca dos; von Zuben, Antônio Augusto; Frateschi, Newton Cesário

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Heat removal aspects of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor safety in light of the Three Mile Island incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safety aspects of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) loop design are compared with those of the Light Water Reactor (LWR), in light of the Three Mile Island (TMI) incident. The events at TMI are briefly described, the fundamental differences between the LWR water coolant and the LMFBR sodium coolant are presented, and the design of analogous LMFBR safety systems under similar events as those at TMI is discussed. A preliminary qualitative evaluation of a TMI-equivalent accident for an LMFBR indicates that there is likely to be: (1) negligible pressure transients in the primary loop, (2) no core damage, (3) isolation of the incident at the steam generator, and (4) no radiation release to the environment, except a negligible amount of tritium from the secondary sodium. Furthermore, with the absence of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System), pressurizer, and other pressure-related components in the LMFBR design, operator action for a LMFBR should be much simpler in dealing with the coolant upset condition and the decay heat removal problems.

Victor, H.R.; Graf, D.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage S.L. Dudarev EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, DFT Abstract Density functional theory models developed over the past decade provide unique phenomena. Density functional theory models have effectively created a new paradigm for the scientific

174

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas...

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide NDE methodologies that simultaneously identify the location, the extent, and the severity of damage in general beams. By general beams, we mean beyond Euler-Bernoulli beams (i.e. slender beams) to deep beams and stubby beams whose response may...

Dincal, Selcuk

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

Quantitative Evaluation of Radiation Damage to Polyethylene Terephthalate by Soft X-rays and High-energy Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Evaluation of Radiation Damage to Polyethylene Terephthalate by Soft X-rays and High to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) caused by soft X-rays and energetic electrons have been measured using to polyethylene terephalate (PET) by TEM-EELS versus nonspatially resolved NEXAFS.5 That study also reported

Hitchcock, Adam P.

178

Predicting scorpion sting incidence in an endemic region using climatological variables*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting scorpion sting incidence in an endemic region using climatological variables* G. CHOWELL in Mexico. We analysed the significance of climatological variables to predict the incidence of scorpion seasonal pattern that correlates to climatological variables. An increase in scorpion activity

Chowell, Gerardo

179

Continuum-based Multiscale Computational Damage Modeling of Cementitous Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ? , and its comparison with experimental results by Kupfer et al. (1969) ...... 32 5.1 Evolution of the damage due to the change of the compressive hardening modulus Q ? for: (a) Exponential damage evolution law in Eq. (2.48) and (b) power damage... evolution law in Eq. (2.52) ............... 71 5.2 Evolution of the damage due to the change of the compressive hardening rate constant b? for: (a) Exponential damage evolution law in Eq. (2.48) and (b) power damage evolution law in Eq. (2...

Kim, Sun-Myung

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

topics saved for quick access. The database search system developed in this research is similar to that of CCPS-PSID in the way that it offers folder search and word search. However, the PSID has a single level of folders (keyword list... maximum of four levels. Moreover, word search within a folder has also been included for the search system, which further improves searching capabilities. 5 Some of the existing incident databases that are open to public or accessible by Mary Kay O...

Khan, Sara Shammni

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Studies on transmission and incidence of Trypanosoma theileri, Laveran 1902  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vector. c) Ingestion of the insect vector. Sane evidence of intrauterirm transmission has been provided by several researchers. Dirc)anan, Manthei and Frank (1957) found T. theileri in the stanach of an ~ bovine fetus. Iundholm, Stors and Mc... were infected with T. theileri; the 2 calves were free fran infectian. Kohl-Yakimoff, Yakimoff and 13e)censky (1913) in Saint Peters- bourg, Russia, examined 14 cattle for T. theileri and faund a 35. 6rr incidence of infecticnr in another survey...

Betancourt Echeverry, Antonio

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistoryMedical Management of Radiation Incidents

183

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistoryMedical Management ofIncident

184

Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

Hodges, J. P.

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

Evaluation of radiation damage using nonlinear ultrasound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear ultrasound was used to monitor radiation damage in two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The microstructural changes associated with radiation damage include changes in dislocation density and the formation of precipitates, and nonlinear ultrasonic waves are known to be sensitive to such changes. Six samples each of two different RPV steels were previously irradiated in the Rheinsberg power reactor to two fluence levels, up to 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Longitudinal waves were used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity in these samples, and the results show a clear increase in the measured acoustic nonlinearity from the unirradiated state to the medium dose, and then a decrease from medium dose to high dose.

Matlack, K. H. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wall, J. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina 28262 (United States); Kim, J.-Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Qu, J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Jacobs, L. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Viehrig, H.-W. [Department of Structural Materials, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion-Beam Physics and Materials Research, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Single cell trapping and DNA damage analysis using microwell arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With a direct link to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases as well as a critical role in cancer treatment, the importance of DNA damage is well-established. The intense interest in DNA damage in applications ranging from ...

Wood, David

189

Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of Pump-Turbine S Instability and Reverse Waterhammer Incidents in Hydropower Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic systems continually experience dynamic transients or oscillations which threaten the hydroelectric plant from extreme water hammer pressures or resonance. In particular, the minimum pressure variations downstream of the turbine runner during the load rejection or other events may cause dangerous water column separation and subsequent rejoinder. Water column separation can be easily observed from the measurements of site transient tests, and has indeed caused serious historical damages to the machine and water conveyance system. Several technical issues regarding water column separation in draft tubes, including S instability of turbine characteristic curves, numerical instability and uncertainty of computer programs, are discussed here through case studies and available model and site test data. Catastrophic accidents experienced at a Kaplan turbine and in a long tailrace tunnel project, as well as other troubles detected in a more timely fashion, are revisited in order to demonstrate the severity of reverse water hammer. However, as there is no simple design solutions for such complex systems, this paper emphasizes that the design of hydraulic systems is always difficult, difficulties that are compounded when the phenomena in question are non-linear (water hammer), dynamic (involving wave interaction and complex devices of turbines, controls, and electrical systems), and non-monotonic (severity of response is seldom simply connected to severity of load as with vibrations and resonance, and the complexity of transient loads), and thus may lead to high economic and safety challenges and consequences.

Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav [University of Toronto] [University of Toronto; Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL] [ORNL; Karney, Professor Byran W. [University of Toronto] [University of Toronto; Gajic, Prof. Aleksandar [University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia] [University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Battelle determines cause of Ashland tank failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existing flaw, combined with embrittled steel and residual stresses, led to the catastrophic failure of the fuel oil tank at Ashland Petroleum Co., Floreffe, Pa., last January. Here is a look at the tank's background, events surrounding its rupture, and Battelle's methods for investigating the incident.

Mesloh, R.E.; Marschall, C.W.; Buchheit, R.D.; Kiefner, J.F. (Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (US))

1988-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

A BAYESIAN PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO DAMAGE DETECTION FOR CIVIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage or other environmental e ects. Results based on the eld vibration test of a bridge indicate on the vibration parameters can be di erentiated from other environmental e ects or potential structural damage. vA BAYESIAN PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO DAMAGE DETECTION FOR CIVIL STRUCTURES a dissertation submitted

Stanford University

193

Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation and glycosaminoglycan loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caused progressive damage to the molecular structure of type I collagen as assessed by Fourier transform aortic valve cusps were 65.2 ± 8.66 g uronic acid/10 mg of dry weight for control and 7.91 ± 1.1 g uronic acid/10 mg of dry weight for 10­300 million cycled cusps. Together, these molecular changes contribute

Zand, Robert

194

SMITH NORMAL FORMS OF INCIDENCE MATRICES Abstract. A brief introduction is given to the topic of Smith normal forms of incidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH NORMAL FORMS OF INCIDENCE MATRICES PETER SIN Abstract. A brief introduction is given to the topic of Smith normal forms of incidence matrices. A general discussion of techniques is illustrated, the fundamental invariant is the Smith normal form of A, whose definition we now recall. A square integer matrix

Sin, Peter

195

HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or near miss. 2. Fill out the online accident report (OARS) form://www.ehs.washington.edu/ohsoars/index.shtm. The supervisor, lab manager, or person who had the accident can fill out the form. 3. For any serious accidents

Borenstein, Elhanan

196

Mechanical Damage from Cavitation in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Accelerated Thrombolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Mechanical Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3.3 Connection to Mechanical Damage . . . . . . 3.41.2.5 Assessing mechanical damage . . 1.3 Bubble

Weiss, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Morphologies of laser-induced damage in hafnia-silica multilayer mirror and polarizer coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hafnium-silica multilayer mirrors and polarizers were deposited by e-beam evaporation onto BK7 glass substrates. The mirrors and polarizers were coated for operation at 1053 nm at 45{degree} and at Brewster`s angle (56{degree}), respectively. They were tested with a single 3-ns laser pulse. Morphology of the laser-induced damage was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Four distinct damage morphologies were found: pits, flatbottom pits, scalds, and delaminates. The pits and flat bottom pits (<30{mu}m dia) were detected at lower fluences (as low as 5 J/cm{sup 2}). The pits seemed to result from ejection of nodular defects by causing local enhancement of the electric field. Scalds and delaminates could be observed at higher fluences (above 13 J/cm{sup 2}) and seemed to result from the formation of plasmas on the surface. These damage types often originated at pits and were less than 300 {mu}m diameter; their size increased almost linearly with fluence. Finally, effects of the damage on the beam (reflectivity degradation and phase modulations) were measured.

Genin, F.Y.; Stolz, C.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ice damage in loblolly pine: Understanding the factors that influence susceptibility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Winter ice storms frequently occur in the southeastern United States and can severely damage softwood plantations. In January 2004, a severe storm deposited approximately 2 cm of ice on an intensively managed 4-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation in South Carolina. Existing irrigation and fertilization treatments presented an opportunity to examine the effects of resource amendments on initial ice damage and subsequent recovery. Fertilized treatments showed more individual stem breakage, whereas non fertilized treatments showed more stem bending; however, the proportion of undamaged trees did not differ between treatments. Irrigation did not influence the type of damage. Trees that experienced breakage during the storm were taller with larger diameter and taper and leaf, branch, and crown biomass compared with unbroken trees. One growing season after ice damage, relative height increases were significantly greater for trees experiencing stem breakage compared with unbroken trees; however, relative diameter increases were significantly lower for these trees. Relative diameter increases for broken trees were smaller for fertilized treatments compared with nonfertilized treatments. A reduction in wood strength was ruled out as the cause of greater breakage in fertilized trees; rather, fertilized trees had reached an intermediate diameter range known to be susceptible to breakage under ice loading.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coleman, Mark, D.; Coyle, David, R.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Task order #24 update: exploration of damage mechanisms in cylindrical geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A typical method of failure for ductile materials is spallation damage, which is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids due to the presence of high tensile stress in the material. Spallation damage models, such as TEPLA, are currently implemented in hydrodynamic computer codes used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parameters for such constitutive models are derived from data sets obtained primarily from gas gun and shock-driven experiments, which are designed to allow one-dimensional analysis of the evolution of the failure characteristics. However, in a non-planar geometry, advanced failure models predict failure to be a multi-dimensional process. Additionally, a limited amount of data exists for the process of void nucleation, growth and coalescence. Another lightly researched area is the state of the material in the event that the spallation layer is recollected and voids are closed. The experiments described here are being conducted as part of a Campaign-l effort to provide data addressing these issues. The Russian Damage Experimental Series is designed to provide fundamental non-planar (cylindrical) spallation damage data, including early time processes (void nucleation, growth and coalescence) and late time processes (recollection of the spallation layer). Previous experiments produced data addressing some of the early time processes. This presentation will be provided to LANL and VNIIEF colleagues as a means of assessing the status of Task Order No.24 at the current time.

Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

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201

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations with alternated loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anisotropic visco-damage, by introducing a material strain rate effect in the cases of positive hydro- static: anisotropic damage, concrete, non-local, visco-damage, micro-cracks closure Email address: desmorat such as concrete are mainly governed by the nucleation and the propagation of micro-cracks. Present within

203

Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Survey of four damage models for concrete.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material properties. The RHT model appears to similarly support optional uncertainty and automated settings for scale-dependent material parameters. The K&C, RHT, and CSCM models support rate dependence by allowing the strength to be a function of strain rate, whereas the BF1 model uses Duvaut-Lion viscoplasticity theory to give a smoother prediction of transient effects. During softening, all four models require a certain amount of strain to develop before allowing significant damage accumulation. For the K&C, RHT, and CSCM models, the strain-to-failure is tied to fracture energy release, whereas a similar effect is achieved indirectly in the BF1 model by a time-based criterion that is tied to crack propagation speed.

Leelavanichkul, Seubpong (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 RS-PO-0001-001.docW.Radiation damage

208

Modelling electron distributions within ESA's Gaia satellite CCD pixels to mitigate radiation damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented positional accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. At L2, protons cause displacement damage in the silicon of CCDs. The resulting traps capture and emit electrons from passing charge packets in the CCD pixel, distorting the image PSF and biasing its centroid. Microscopic models of Gaia's CCDs are being developed to simulate this effect. The key to calculating the probability of an electron being captured by a trap is the 3D electron density within each CCD pixel. However, this has not been physically modelled for the Gaia CCD pixels. In Seabroke, Holland & Cropper (2008), the first paper of this series, we motivated the need for such specialised 3D device modelling and outlined how its future resu...

Seabroke, G M; Burt, D; Robbins, M S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

Sullivan,T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ion-beam-induced damage formation in CdTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Damage formation in <111>- and <112>-oriented CdTe single crystals irradiated at room temperature and 15 K with 270 keV Ar or 730 keV Sb ions was investigated in situ using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) in channeling configuration. Defect profiles were calculated from the RBS spectra using the computer code DICADA and additional energy-dependent RBS measurements were performed to identify the type of defects. At both temperatures no formation of a buried amorphous layer was detected even after prolonged irradiation with several 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The fact that CdTe is not rendered amorphous even at 15 K suggests that the high resistance to amorphization is caused by the high ionicity of CdTe rather than thermal effects. The calculated defect profiles show the formation of a broad defect distribution that extends much deeper into the crystal than the projected range of the implanted ions at both temperatures. The post-range defects in CdTe thus do not seem to be of thermal origin either, but are instead believed to result from migration driven by the electronic energy loss.

Rischau, C. W.; Schnohr, C. S.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Inuence of foreign-object damage on crack initiation and early crack growth during high-cycle fatigue of Ti6Al4V  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incidence of late of HCF- related engine failures, particularly involving titanium alloy fan and compressor.g., stones, primarily on the fan blades, can cause (de- pending on the impact severity) immediate blade of small surface fatigue cracks in a Ti±6Al±4V alloy, processed for typical turbine blade applications

Ritchie, Robert

213

The effect of the displacement damage on the Charge Collection Efficiency in Silicon Drift Detectors for the LOFT satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The technology of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) has been selected for the two instruments aboard the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) space mission. LOFT underwent a three year long assessment phase as candidate for the M3 launch opportunity within the "Cosmic Vision 2015 -- 2025" long-term science plan of the European Space Agency. During the LOFT assessment phase, we studied the displacement damage produced in the SDDs by the protons trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere. In a previous paper we discussed the effects of the Non Ionising Energy Losses from protons on the SDD leakage current. In this paper we report the measurement of the variation of Charge Collection Efficiency produced by displacement damage caused by protons and the comparison with the expected damage in orbit.

Del Monte, E; Bozzo, E; Cadoux, F; Rachevski, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Feroci, M; Pohl, M; Vacchi, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Changes in vigorous physical activity and incident diabetes inmale runners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the dose-response relationship between changes in reported vigorous exercise (running distance, {Delta}km/wk) and self-reported physician diagnosed diabetes in 25,988 men followed prospectively for (mean {+-} SD) 7.8 {+-} 1.8 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that the log odds for diabetes declined significantly in relation to men's {Delta}km/wk (coefficient {+-} SE: -0.012 {+-} 0.004, P < 0.01), which remained significant when adjusted for BMI (-0.018 {+-} 0.003, P < 0.0001). The decline in the log odds for diabetes was related to the distance run at the end of follow-up when adjusted for baseline distance, with (-0.024 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) or without (-0.027 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) adjustment for BMI. Baseline distance was unrelated to diabetes incidence when adjusted for the distance at the end of follow-up. Compared to men who ran <8 km/wk at the end of follow-up, incidence rates in those who ran {ge} 8 km/wk were 95% lower between 35-44 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 92% lower between 45-54 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 87% lower between 55 and 64 years old (P < 0.0001), and 46% lower between 65-75 yrs old (P = 0.30). For the subset of 6,208 men who maintained the same running distance during follow-up ({+-}5 km/wk), the log odds for diabetes declined with weekly distance run (-0.024 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.02) but not when adjusted for BMI (-0.005 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.65). Conclusion: Vigorous exercise significantly reduces diabetes incidence, due in part to the prevention of age-related weight gain and in part to other exercise effects. Physical activity decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes [1-10]. Moderate and vigorous exercise are purported to produce comparable reductions in diabetes risk if the energy expenditure is the same [3,10]. The optimal physical activity dose remains unclear, however, with some [4-7] but not all studies [1,8,9] showing continued reduction in diabetes for high versus intermediate energy expenditures. The National Runners Health Study [11-19] is unique among population cohorts in its focus on the health impact of higher doses of vigorously intense physical activity (i.e., {ge} 6-fold metabolic rate). The study was specifically designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship between vigorous physical activity and health for intensities and durations that exceed current physical activity recommendations [20-22]. One specific hypothesis is whether changes in vigorous physical activity affect the risk for becoming diabetic. Although women were surveyed and followed-up, only 23 developed diabetes so there is limited statistical power to establish their significance. Our analyses of diabetes and vigorous exercise are therefore restricted to men. This paper relates running distance at baseline and at the end of follow-up to self-reported, physician diagnosed diabetes in vigorously active men who were generally lean and ostensibly at low diabetic risk The benefits of greater doses of more vigorous exercise are relevant to the 27% of U.S. women and 34% of U.S. men meet or exceed the more general exercise recommendations for health benefits [23]. Specific issues to be addressed are: (1) whether maintenance of the same level of vigorous exercise over time reduces the risk of incident diabetes in relation to the exercise dose; (2) whether men who decrease their activity increase their risk for becoming diabetic; and (3) whether end of follow-up running distances are more predictive of diabetes than baseline distances, suggesting a causal, acute effect. Elsewhere we have shown that greater body weight is related to a lack of vigorous exercise [12-14] and increases the risk for diabetes even among generally lean vigorously active men [11]. In runners, leanness may be due to the exercise or due to initially lean men choosing to run further [17]. Therefore we also test whether body weight mediates the effects of vigorous exercise on diabetes, and whether this may be due to self-selection.

Williams, Paul T.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

THE EXTENT AND CAUSES OF ILLEGAL LOGGING: AN ANALYSIS OF A MAJOR CAUSE OF TROPICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EXTENT AND CAUSES OF ILLEGAL LOGGING: AN ANALYSIS OF A MAJOR CAUSE OF TROPICAL DEFORESTATION;2 THE EXTENT AND CAUSES OF ILLEGAL LOGGING: AN ANALYSIS OF A MAJOR CAUSE OF TROPICAL DEFORESTATION IN INDONESIA high rates of deforestation in Indonesia. Its extent during 1997-98 is analysed using a materials

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing healthcare incident Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, many of the telemedicine incidents reported to MAUDE demonstrate that ... Source: Johnson, Chris - Department of Computing Science, University of Glasgow Collection: Computer...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual cancer incidence Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annual cancer incidence Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr...

219

Damage from the impacts of small asteroids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fragmentation of a small asteroid in the atmosphere greatly increases its aerodynamic drag and rate of energy dissipation. The differential atmospheric pressure across it disperses its fragments at a velocity that increases with atmospheric density and impact velocity and decreases with asteroid density. Extending our previous work, we use a spherical atmosphere and a fitted curve to its density profile to find the damage done by an asteroid entering the atmosphere at various zenith angles. In previous work we estimated the blast damage by scaling from data on nuclear explosions in the atmosphere during the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. This underestimated the blast from asteroid impacts because nuclear fireballs radiate away a larger fraction of their energy than do meteors, so less of their energy goes into the blast wave. We have redone the calculations to allow for this effect. We have found the area of destruction around the impact point in which the over pressure in the blast wave exceeds 4 pounds/inch{sup 2} = 2.8 X 10{sup 5} dynes/cm{sup 3}, which is enough to knock over trees and destroy buildings. About every 100 years an impactor should blast an area of 300 km{sup 2} or more somewhere on the land area of Earth. The optical flux from asteroids 60 meters or more in diameter is enough to ignite pine forests. However, the blast from an impacting asteroid goes beyond the radius within which the fire starts. It tends to blow out the fire, so it is likely that the impact will char the forest (as at Tunguska), but it will not produce a sustained fire. Because of the atmosphere, asteroids less than about 200 m in diameter are not effective in producing craters and earthquakes. They are also not effective in producing water waves and tsunami in ocean impacts. Tsunami is probably the most devastating type of damage for asteroids that are between 200 meters and 1 km in diameter.

Hills, J.G.; Goda, M.P.

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

Bornn, Luke [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the n umber of organic species generated and their concentrations.

J Abrefah GS Klinger

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effects of intercropping systems on incidence and damage to cotton by Diaparopsis Castenea Hampson(lepidoptera:Arctiidae)in Magoye,Mazabuka district of Zambia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Red bollworm, Diaparopsis Castenea Hampson, is an insect that has become a major pest of cotton in Zambia. This study was conducted in Magoye,… (more)

Chijikwa, Mutibo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Damage Detection and Characterization in Smart Material Structures \\Lambda y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­maps'' as done in the thermal based tomography techniques of [BK1, BK2, BKW] wherein the damaged physical domain

228

attack damage due: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell damage extent due to irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses under cell culturing medium and dry environment Engineering Websites Summary: Autnoma de Mxico; Av....

229

A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the evolutionary relationship with respect to either time or the number of loa, d cycles. The damage histories f' or cross-ply laminates subjected to constant maximum stress fatigue were generated by the dart. age evolutionary relationship. These predictions... with respect to the measured damage state. . 5 Structure of FORTRAN code for the integration of the damage evolution- ary rela. tionship. 6 Matrix ' rack damage variable in the 90' plies for a. [Os/90s], AS4/3501 ? 6 laminate loaded at a maximum fatigue...

Lo, David Chi Shing

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stiffener Impact Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–FTE Values of Carbon/Epoxy Composite Tape Laminate Plates [Sarh B, Kismarton MU. Composite Structures: The First 100

Le, Jacqueline Linh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

assessing dna damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

232

affects dna damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

233

assessing tubal damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University, Deborah French, Applied Sciences Associates, Bruce Wright 5 Natural Resource Damage Assessment for the Deepwater BP Oil Spill Environmental Sciences and...

234

Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Unlimited Damage Accumulation in Metallic Materials Under Cascade-Damage Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most experiments on neutron or heavy-ion cascade-produced irradiation of pure metals and metallic alloys demonstrate unlimited void growth as well as development of the dislocation structure. In contrast, the theory of radiation damage predicts saturation of void swelling at sufficiently high irradiation doses and, accordingly, termination of accumulation of interstitial-type defects. It is shown in the present paper that, under conditions of steady production of one-dimensionally (1-D) mobile clusters of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in displacement cascades, any one of the following three conditions can result in indefinite damage accumulation. First, if the fraction of SIAs generated in the clustered form is smaller than some finite value of the order of the dislocation bias factor. Second, if solute, impurity or transmuted atoms form atmospheres around voids and repel the SIA clusters. Third, if spatial correlations between voids and other defects, such as second-phase precipitates and dislocations, exist that provide shadowing of voids from the SIA clusters. The driving force for the development of such correlations is the same as for void lattice formation and is argued to be always present under cascade-damage conditions. It is emphasised that the mean-free path of 1-D migrating SIA clusters is typically at least an order of magnitude longer than the average distance between microstructural defects; hence spatial correlations on the same scale should be taken into consideration. A way of developing a predictive theory is discussed. An interpretation

Barashev, Aleksandr [University of Liverpool; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

forthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes Hayley Chouinarda, Berkeley, and member of the Giannini Foundation. Abstract The federal specific gasoline tax falls equally incidence of state taxes is greater in states that use relatively little gasoline. Author Keywords: Taxes

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

237

Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

Rosenberg, Michael S.

238

Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

239

Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants D Laurier 1 living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present herein results about the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety Biohazardous laboratory incident or accident involves the following: 1. Any potential or known exposure-related accidents or illnesses involving work described under the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research (NIH

Arnold, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Monthly Theme OARS January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monthly Theme ­ OARS ­ January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss Online Accident Reporting System (OARS) debuts January 2009 EH&S has a NEW online system to report any accident or incident that happens at the University. The web- based reporting system is called OARS -- Online Accident Reporting

Calgary, University of

242

Analysis of ammonium sulfate circulation tank failure -- Possible causes and their remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acme steel manufactures a liquid solution of ammonium sulphate by scrubbing the coke oven gas with a dilute solution of sulphuric acid. When the bath reaches a predetermined specific gravity, it is isolated from the system, neutralized with aqua ammonia, pumped to the shipping tanks, re-charged with water and acid, then placed back in service. To improve the ammonia removal efficiency, three circulation tanks are used in this system. In June 1996, the volume of two of the sulfate solution tanks in the ammonia removal plant were increased by two different pressure events. The first tank was damaged by pressure that was not relieved due to a plugged vent line. The second tank was damaged by a pressure event generated during the process of making ammonium sulfate. This paper will discuss the cause of the second tank`s failure, and the design solution to restart the operation of the plant.

O`Hearn, R.J. [Acme Steel, Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

anthracnose causing fungus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease of papaya Babak Madani a,*, Mahmud Tengku Muda Mohamed a,**, Alan R. Biggs c , Jugah Kadir October 2013 Keywords: Papaya Anthracnose Calcium Disease incidence...

244

anthracnose disease caused: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease of papaya Babak Madani a,*, Mahmud Tengku Muda Mohamed a,**, Alan R. Biggs c , Jugah Kadir October 2013 Keywords: Papaya Anthracnose Calcium Disease incidence...

245

An enhanced Lemaitre model formulation for materials processing damage computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are presented and discussed to deal with complex multiaxial configurations ­ such as multi-stages bulk forming loading, involving crack closure effects. - Simple parameters identification: whatever the damage model used, the identification of damage parameters is an important issue. Most of the time

Boyer, Edmond

246

Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pavements are a major part of the infrastructure in the United States. Moisture damage of these pavements is a significant problem. To predict and prevent this kind of moisture damage a great deal of research has been performed on this issue in past...

Shah, Brij D.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Atomic processes during damage production and defect Nasr M. Ghoniem *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sitivity to the deleterious eects of neutron irradiation. Electro-optical properties of semi uncertainties exposed. Damage production under neutron and ion irradiation proceeds through the elementary step-cascade interaction events. Under fusion neutron irradiation, single cascade damage production occurs within 10 ps

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

248

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE Chao Zhang1 , Jinhao Qiu1* , Hongli Ji1 1 State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures ultrasonic scanning technique has great potential for damage evaluation in various applications. In order

Boyer, Edmond

249

Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

Worden, K.; Allen, D. W. (David W.); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering.

BODNER,SOL R.; CHAN,KWAI S.; MUNSON,DARRELL E.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ris-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter Estimation April 2002 #12;Risø-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter condition monitoring of wind turbine blades (Phase I)". The goal of Phase I is to make a pre

252

Application of Damage Detection Techniques Using Wind Turbine Modal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As any structure ages, its structural characteristics will also change. The goal of this work was to determine if modal response data fkom a wind turbine could be used in the detection of damage. The input stimuli to the wind turbine were from traditional modal hammer input and natural wind excitation. The structural response data was acquired using accelerometers mounted on the rotor of a parked and undamaged horizontal-axis wind turbine. The bolts at the root of one of the three blades were then loosened to simulate a damaged blade. The structural response data of the rotor was again recorded. The undamaged and damage-simulated datasets were compared using existing darnage detection algorithms. Also, a novel algorithm for combining the results of different damage detection algorithms was utilized in the assessment of the data. This paper summarizes the code development and discusses some preliminary damage detection results.

Gross, E.; Rumsey, M.; Simmermacher, T.; Zadoks, R.I.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

How Damage Diversification Can Reduce Systemic Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of risk diversification in complex networks. Nodes represent e.g. financial actors, whereas weighted links represent e.g. financial obligations (credits/debts). Each node has a risk to fail because of losses resulting from defaulting neighbors, which may lead to large failure cascades. Classical risk diversification strategies usually neglect network effects and therefore suggest that risk can be reduced if possible losses (i.e., exposures) are split among many neighbors (exposure diversification, ED). But from a complex networks perspective diversification implies higher connectivity of the system as a whole which can also lead to increasing failure risk of a node. To cope with this, we propose a different strategy (damage diversification, DD), i.e. the diversification of losses that are imposed on neighboring nodes as opposed to losses incurred by the node itself. Here, we quantify the potential of DD to reduce systemic risk in comparison to ED. For this, we develop a branching proce...

Burkholz, Rebekka; Schweitzer, Frank

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effect of Catalase/Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic EUK-134 on Damage, Inflammation, and Force Generation of the Diaphragm Muscle in mdx Mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most devastating form of muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Defects in the dystrophin gene in DMD, are homologous to that found in mdx mice, and result in profound muscle damage...

Kim, Jong Hee

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chytridiomycosis as a cause of species extinction? Yimin Du Penny Langhammer Yijun Lou John population declines, species extinctions ­ Biodiversity loss · Theoretical ­ Host extinction generally to amphibian species Stuart et al. 2004. Science 306: 17831786 #12;Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd

Linder, Tamás

256

Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

257

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Cause of East-West Earth Asymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The different slope of the Wadati-Benioff zones oriented towards east and west is considered a main asymmetry of the Earth's globe. Under the Americas they have angles of about 30o, while under the Pacific east coasts (Asia, Japan) the angles are steeper. In the framework of plate tectonics geodynamics the cause of this difference can be identified in the tidal drag that would cause a global shift of the lithosphere towards west. But this solution has been many times criticized on the basis of the irrelevance of the tidal forces with respect to viscous friction. Instead, it is possible to show that in a different framework, in which sudden extrusions of mantle materials occur by local phase change toward a more unpacked lattice, the value of the Coriolis fictitious force can rise of several magnitude orders, becoming the main cause of the east-west asymmetry of the Wadati-Benioff zones, which might be ascribed entirely to internal causes of the planet (its rotation and geodynamics) and not to external causes ...

Scalera, Giancarlo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplementation during cold storage rescue chronic renalprotects against cold storage injury of renal tubular cellsstress and minimize cold storage-induced organ damage.

Nafar, Mohsen; Sahraei, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Samavat, Shiva; Vaziri, Nosartolah D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Towards a Learning Traffic Incident Detection System Tomas Singliar and Milos Hauskrecht  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manual tuning. Our hypoth- esis is that these time-consuming solutions can be sucessfuly eliminated of sensor networks on US roadways. Incident detection systems (IDS) are complex arrange- ments

Hauskrecht, Milos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence of Huanglongbing and Improve Growth of New Citrus Plantings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7.14 P Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence ofNorth, Immokalee, FL, USA Polyethylene mulch was evaluatedUV reflective low density polyethylene mulch metalized with

Croxton, S.; Stansly, P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium exposure incident Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: americium exposure incident Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 4th Quarter 20091st Quarter 20104th...

263

Assessing the Potential of Using Traffic Simulation Model Results for Evaluating Automatic Incident Detection Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the Potential of Using Traffic Simulation Model Results for Evaluating Automatic Incident of such a test-bed would be the ability to incorporate synthetic data produced by a simulation model since

Hellinga, Bruce

264

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

265

Health risk from earthquake caused releases of UF{sub 6} at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health risk to the public and workers from potential exposure to the toxic materials from earthquake caused releases of uranium hexafluoride from the Paducah gaseous Diffusion Plant are evaluated. The results of the study show that the health risk from earthquake caused releases is small, and probably less than risks associated with the transportation of hydrogen fluoride and other similar chemicals used by industry. The probability of more than 30 people experiencing health consequences (injuries) from earthquake damage is less than 4xlO{sup 4}/yr.

Brown, N.W; Lu, S.; Chen, J.C.; Roehnelt, R.; Lombardi, D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection, Offshore wind turbines, Numerical response simulation. INTRODUCTION Offshore wind turbines are exposed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests and theoretical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests subject to progressive damage. The chain of springs models the strain localization, and the second series qualitative agreement with the experiments. Keywords: polyurethane foams; strain localization; cyclic damage

Boyer, Edmond

268

ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE AS NEGATIVE EXTERNALITY: UNCERTAINTY, MORAL COMPLEXITY AND THE LIMITS OF THE MARKET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE AS NEGATIVE EXTERNALITY: UNCERTAINTY, MORAL COMPLEXITY AND THE LIMITS environmental damage with a sociological approach, I show how the process of externalities definition inclusive and democratic public deliberation on environmental damage and its reparation. Key Words

Boyer, Edmond

269

A study of the incidence and histology of accessory corpora lutea in swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1969 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (M...

Schultz, Lewis Russell

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD iNORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TECHIE INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTFR OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD NORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TIME INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted...

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mechanism for atmosphere dependence of laser damage morphology in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflective films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show in this paper single-shot and multi-shot laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflective films (the reflectance = 99.9%) are affected by the presence of a water layer absorbed on the surface of the porous films. When the water layer was removed with the process of pumping, the single-shot LIDT measured in vacuum dropped to {approx}48% of that measured in air, while the multi-shot LIDT in vacuum dropped to {approx}47% of its atmospheric value for the high reflective films. Typical damage micrographs of the films in air and in vacuum were obtained, showing distinct damage morphologies. Such atmosphere dependence of the laser damage morphology was found to originate from that formation of a water layer on the surface of porous films could cause an increase of horizontal thermal conductivity and a reduction of vertical thermal conductivity. Moreover, laser-induced periodic ripple damages in air were found in the SiO{sub 2} layer from the micrographs. A model of deformation kinematics was used to illustrate the occurrence of the periodic ripple damage, showing that it could be attributed to a contraction of the HfO{sub 2} layer under irradiation by the 5-ns laser pulses in air.

Pu Yunti [Fine Optical Engineering Research Center, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Ma Ping; Chen Songlin; Wang Gang; Pan Feng [Fine Optical Engineering Research Center, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhu Jiliang; Sun Ping; Zhu Xiaohong; Zhu Jianguo; Xiao Dingquan [Department of Materials Science, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Pump-beam-induced optical damage depended on repetition frequency and pulse width in 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the dependence of optical damage to an organic nonlinear optical crystal of 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) on the repetition frequency and pulse width of the pump beam used to cause the thermal damage. For a pump beam with a pulse width of 15 ns at a wavelength of 1064 nm, the highest damage threshold of 8.0 J/cm{sup 2} was measured for repetition frequencies in the range from 10 to 40 Hz. On the other hand, DAST crystals were easily damaged under the repetition rates from 50 to 100 Hz. For 600-ps pulses, a higher damage threshold that was a factor of 11 to 28 times higher in terms of peak intensity was obtained compared with that of 15-ns pulses. In both the cases of 15-ns pulse duration and 600-ps duration, we demonstrated that the thermal effects in DAST crystals dominated the optical damage, which depended on thermal accumulation and dissipation.

Matsukawa, Takeshi; Nawata, Kouji; Notake, Takashi; Qi Feng; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Minamide, Hiroaki [Tera-photonics Laboratory, RIKEN, 519-1399, Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan)

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO: 519-661-2079 (82079)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO ­ Accident/Incident Reporting Form PART A Name of Employee: ______________________________________ Employee: Report Only Accident Incident No Injury/Hazard First Aid Lost Time Non-Lost Time (If Report Only

Lennard, William N.

274

Automated structural damage detection using one class machine learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and analysing the vibration of structures using sensors can help identify and detect damage, potentially prolonging the life of structures and preventing disasters. Wireless sensor systems promise to make this ...

Long, James, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. and Gupta, R. , “Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIARADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that

Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Review of Dynamic Recovery Effects on Ion Irradiation Damage...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6H–SiC, ionization processes are less dominant. Citation: Weber WJ, Y Zhang, and LM Wang.2012."Review of Dynamic Recovery Effects on Ion Irradiation Damage in...

278

Obstacles to Determining Punitive Damages in Class Actions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts and commentators have often embraced the class action device as an ideal means of assessing punitive damages fairly in mass tort cases. In this Article, Professor Hines sounds a cautionary note by identifying a number of procedural...

Hines, Laura J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Assessing blackbird damage to ripening rice in Matagorda County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pyrotechnic and auditory scare devices, but with only limited success. However, in order to develop new control techniques, as well as to test the efficacy of current techniques, damage must be accurately assessed. Large scale estimates (over entire fields...

Wright, Robert Glen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–21. Ice Drop.How to make clear ice. 28 February 2011. Victoria, BC,2011/02/how-to- make-clear-ice-that-actually-works/ Graham,

Le, Jacqueline Linh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Visual Indication of Mechanical Damage Using Core-Shell Microcapsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-7 Changes in pH have been used to detect compression in polymer brushes,8 and microcapsules containing a p have been incorporated into filled hollow fibers to enhance damage visibility in the structure

Sottos, Nancy R.

282

Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage Dennis H. Oh* , Brett A- neously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimen- sions. This approach for targeting

Boxer, Steven G.

284

Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage induced by sea level rise in the United States. InImpacts on Water Sea Level Rise Temperature-Related Extremewater supply and sea level rise and the costs of adjustment

Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Graded Materials for Resistance to Contact Deformation and Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graded Materials for Resistance to Contact Deformation and Damage S. Suresh The mechanical response as diverse as tribology, geology, optoelectronics, biomechanics, fracture mechanics, and nanotechnology changes in the elastic properties of sands, soils, and rocks beneath Earth's surface in- fluence

Suresh, Subra

286

Effects of ballistic damage on the dynamics of composite driveshafts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research program is to study the dynamics of a composite driveshaft before and after ballistic damage is incurred. Driveshafts are tested under static and dynamic loads to obtain material, mechanical, and vibrational...

Ayers, Thomas Ray

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Linking Cell Cycle Reentry and DNA Damage in Neurodegeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aberrant cell cycle activity and DNA damage have been observed in neurons in association with various neurodegenerative conditions. While there is strong evidence for a causative role for these events in neurotoxicity, it ...

Kim, Dohoon

288

Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO{sub 2} over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energetic ion bombardment during plasma etching of microelectronics devices is necessary to activate chemical process and define features through the ions' anisotropic trajectories. These energetic fluxes can also cause damage and mixing of the constituents of crystalline lattices. These properties are likely best modeled using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The computational expense of these techniques makes feature scale simulations difficult, and so motivates development of approximate methods that can be used to model full features. In this regard, an implantation and mixing model has been developed and implemented into a Monte Carlo feature profile model to simulate the mixing and damage to the underlying Si during high aspect ratio (HAR) etching of SiO{sub 2} trenches. Fluxes to the surface were provided by a reactor scale model. The feature scale model was validated by comparison to the mixing produced by Ar{sup +} bombardment of Si with and without F and CF fluxes as predicted by MD simulations. Scaling of mixing damage of underlying Si during HAR of SiO{sub 2} etching in Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2} plasmas for rf bias powers of 1-4 kW was investigated. The authors found that mixing damage at the bottom of HAR features, though increasing in magnitude with increasing ion energy, does not scale as dramatically as on flat surfaces. This is due to the reflection of ions off of sidewalls which moderate the ion energies.

Wang Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50010 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Down Syndrome What causes Down syndrome?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

04/13 Down Syndrome What causes Down syndrome? Individuals with Down syndrome usually have an extra chromosome 21. Down syndrome occurs in about 1 in every 700 to 1,000 births. The chance of giving birth to a baby with Down syndrome increases if the mother is over 35 years old. Down syndrome affects both males

Palmeri, Thomas

290

Pink Eye Conjunctivitis Definition, Symptoms and Causes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pink Eye ­ Conjunctivitis Definition, Symptoms and Causes Pink eye is the common name given to inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye. It is otherwise called conjunctivitis. The conjunctiva is the transparent membrane that lines the eyelids and covers the whites of the eyes. Very small, superficial blood

Suzuki, Masatsugu

291

Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique to quantify fuel damage in an LMR through analysis of delayed neutron data is presented, which is suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the SLSF and Mol 7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bauer, T.H.; Braid, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a technique is presented to quantify fuel damage in a liquid-metal reactor through fast-running computer analysis of delayed neutron data, suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the Sodium Loop Safety Facility and Mol-7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage.

Bauer, T.H.; Braiel, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The application of ultrasonics to assess damage in composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1985 Major Subjectr Aerospace Engineering THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Approved as to style and content by: (V. . Kinra, Chairman) (D. H. Allen, Member) (R. A...

Eden, John Gregory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.1 Yield surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.2.2 Viscoplastic potential energy function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.2.3 Hardening function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3 Numerical... viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1.1 Moisture-induced damage in pavements results in raveling and potholing 4 1.2 Adhesive and cohesive failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3 Damaged and e ective undamaged con gurations...

Graham, Michael A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Grey Squirrel bark stripping damage A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height & DBH each tree Stems per ha Basal area Thinned Nov 1998 43% removed Growth Rate 1998 & 2003 with no damage 223 81.1 51 39 7 13/04/2010 #12;Case study DBH Tree size (DBH) v year of damage for `new.4 9.4 11.4 10 9 12 11 Basal area Post thinning 25.4 18.0 20.0 18 20 18 19 Total Basal area 27.2 28

296

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Laser-induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains papers presented at the 35th Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers, held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, 22-24 September 2003. The symposium was attended by 125 participants from China, India, Russia, France, Germany, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. A meeting summary and some 75 reviewed papers appear. The book is divided into sections devoted to the following topics: thin films, surfaces and mirrors, fundamental mechanisms, materials and measurements, and finally, understanding optical damage with ultrashort laser pulses. Topics of interest to the high-peak-power and high-average-power laser communities in addition to damage issues related to various research efforts and commercial laser applications are discussed. Also discussed are improved scaling relations as a function of pulse duration in the femtosecond range, beam footprint size, and irradiation of optical materials with wavelengths down to the x-ray region. New sources at shorter wavelengths continue to be developed, and a corresponding shift in emphasis to short-wavelength and repetitively pulsed damage problems can be seen in some of these papers. Fabrication and test procedures are discussed particularly in the area of thin films. New materials and the implication of defects on the damage process are emphasized in addition to new reports of conditioning effects and damage repair or damage mitigation.

Exarhos, Gregory J.; Guenther, Arthur H.; Kaiser, Norbert; Lewis, Keith L.; Soileau, M. J.; Stolz, Christopher J.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Femtosecond pulse damage thresholds of dielectric coatings in vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At 10-7 Torr, the multiple femtosecond pulse damage threshold, F(?), is about 10% of the single pulse damage fluence F(1) for hafnia and silica films compared to about 65% and 50%, respectively, at 630 Torr. In contrast, the single-pulse damage threshold is pressure independent. The decrease of F(?) with decreasing air pressure correlates with the water vapor and oxygen content of the ambient gas with the former having the greater effect. The decrease in F(?) is likely associated with an accumulation of defects derived from oxygen deficiency, for example vacancies. From atmospheric air pressure to pressures of {approx}3 x 10{sup -6} Torr, the damage 'crater' starts deterministically at the center of the beam and grows in diameter as the fluence increases. At pressure below 3x10-6 Torr, damage is initiated at random 'sites' within the exposed area in hafnia films, while the damage morphology remains deterministic in silica films. A possible explanation is that absorbing centers are created at predisposed sample sites in hafnia, for example at boundaries between crystallites, or crystalline and amorphous phases.

Michelle D. Shinn, Duy N. Nguyen, Luke A. Emmert ,Paul Schwoebel, Dinesh Patel, Carmen S. Menoni, Wolfgang Rudolph

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

acetaminophen-induced oxidative damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and damage detection...21 3.5 Damage identification using a 3DOFs reduced order system Yang, Jann 105 Numerical aperture...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - adapted damage control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlo simulation Summary: : Monte Carlo simulation; Masked irradiation damage; Josephson junction 1. Introduction Controlled... controlled damaged barrier layers, due to the long...

302

Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

situ damage detection of composite materials for structuralmaterials, Journal of Composite Materials , 10, 342-354,effects in damaged composite aerospace structures ,

Gobbato, Maurizio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES #12;A-1 APPENDIX A MEASURING IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND TURBINES 1.0 INTRODUCTION Differential composition of wind turbines at wind energy used is the number of fatalities per wind turbine per year (Anderson et al. 1999). This metric has

304

Comparisons between laser damage and optical electric field behaviors for hafnia/silica antireflection coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare designs and laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) of hafnia/silica antireflection (AR) coatings for 1054 nm or dual 527 nm/1054 nm wavelengths and 0 deg. to 45 deg. angles of incidence (AOIs). For a 527 nm/1054 nm, 0 deg. AOI AR coating, LIDTs from three runs arbitrarily selected over three years are {approx}20 J/cm{sup 2} or higher at 1054 nm and <10 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm. Calculated optical electric field intensities within the coating show two intensity peaks for 527 nm but not for 1054 nm, correlating with the lower (higher) LIDTs at 527 nm (1054 nm). For 1054 nm AR coatings at 45 deg. and 32 deg. AOIs and S and P polarizations (Spol and Ppol), LIDTs are high for Spol (>35 J/cm{sup 2}) but not as high for Ppol (>30 J/cm{sup 2} at 32 deg. AOI; {approx}15 J/cm{sup 2} at 45 deg. AOI). Field intensities show that Ppol discontinuities at media interfaces correlate with the lower Ppol LIDTs at these AOIs. For Side 1 and Side 2 dual 527 nm/1054 nm AR coatings of a diagnostic beam splitter at 22.5 deg. AOI, Spol and Ppol LIDTs (>10 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm; >35 J/cm{sup 2} at 1054 nm) are consistent with Spol and Ppol intensity behaviors.

Bellum, John; Kletecka, Damon; Rambo, Patrick; Smith, Ian; Schwarz, Jens; Atherton, Briggs

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Oil Price Shocks: Causes and Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on oil markets conducted during the last decade has challenged long-held beliefs about the causes and consequences of oil price shocks. As the empirical and theoretical models used by economists have evolved, so has our understanding of the determinants of oil price shocks and of the interaction between oil markets and the global economy. Some of the key insights are that the real price of oil is endogenous with respect to economic fundamentals, and that oil price shocks do not occur ceteris paribus. This makes it necessary to explicitly account for the demand and supply shocks underlying oil price shocks when studying their transmission to the domestic economy. Disentangling cause and effect in the relationship between oil prices and the economy requires structural models of the global economy including oil and other commodity markets.

Lutz Kilian; Key Words

306

Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the context of structural stiffness reductions and impact damage. A method by which the sensitivity to damage could be increased for simple structures was presented, and the challenges of applying that technique to a more complex structure were identi fi ed. The structural dynamic changes in a weak adhesive bond were investigated, and the results showed promise for identifying weak bonds that show little or no static reduction in stiffness. To address these challenges in identifying highly localized impact damage, the possi- bility of detecting damage through nonlinear dynamic characteristics was also identi fi ed, with a proposed technique which would leverage impact location estimates to enable the detection of impact damage. This nonlinear damage identi fi cation concept was evaluated on a composite panel with a substructure disbond, and the results showed that the nonlinear dynamics at the damage site could be observed without a baseline healthy reference. By further developing impact load identi fi cation technology and combining load and damage estimation techniques into an integrated solution, the challenges associated with impact detection in composite struc- tures can be effectively solved, thereby reducing costs, improving safety, and enhancing the operational readiness and availability of high value assets.

Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

Matlack, K. H. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kim, J.-Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Wall, J. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 and Nuclear Sector, The Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Qu, J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jacobs, L. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Experimental test results presented for field-damaged orifice meter plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests demonstrate that, unlike other types of meters, there is minimal loss of accuracy with orifice meters even when operational excursions are such that severe damage occurs. Both flange taps and pipe taps effectively have the same general pattern in that the actual coefficient increases with increasing permanent deformation. Of the two types of orifice tap, these data indicate that flange-tapped orifices may be less susceptible to severe deformation. This is probably caused by changes in the local pressure gradients in the vicinity of the plate. Since pipe taps are at such a large distance from the plate, these changes are probably not noticeable due to the turbulent mixing that takes place. With orifice meters, visual inspection of the plates after severe operation is recommended, to tell the user if the plate is beyond specifications. With other types of meters (i.e., other than differential meters) recalibration is the only method of determining if the meter has been affected. Where damage is apparent, the plate (or the meter if it is not of the differential type) should be immediately replaced.

Teyssandier, R.G.; Chisman, W.E.

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Interface modeling to predict well casing damage for big hill strategic petroleum reserve.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil leaks were found in well casings of Caverns 105 and 109 at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. According to the field observations, two instances of casing damage occurred at the depth of the interface between the caprock and top of salt. This damage could be caused by interface movement induced by cavern volume closure due to salt creep. A three dimensional finite element model, which allows each cavern to be configured individually, was constructed to investigate shear and vertical displacements across each interface. The model contains interfaces between each lithology and a shear zone to examine the interface behavior in a realistic manner. This analysis results indicate that the casings of Caverns 105 and 109 failed by shear stress that exceeded shear strength due to the horizontal movement of the top of salt relative to the caprock, and tensile stress due to the downward movement of the top of salt from the caprock, respectively. The casings of Caverns 101, 110, 111 and 114, located at the far ends of the field, are predicted to be failed by shear stress in the near future. The casings of inmost Caverns 107 and 108 are predicted to be failed by tensile stress in the near future.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

b) Economic i) Total damage estimates: From Pimentel et al. (2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4) Impacts b) Economic i) Total damage estimates: From Pimentel et al. (2000) · United States #12;4) Impacts b) Economic i) Total damage estimates: From Pimentel et al. (2000) · United States Economic impacts from losses/damage #12;4) Impacts b) Economic i) Total damage estimates: From Pimentel et al

Nowak, Robert S.

311

The dynamic interplay between DNA damage and metabolism : the metabolic fate and transport of DNA lesions and novel DNA damage derived from intermediary metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work presented in this thesis explores two novel and complementary facets of endogenous DNA damage: the development of biomarkers of inflammation based on metabolites of DNA damage products and the formation of DNA ...

Jumpathong, Watthanachai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

17.423 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examines the causes of war, with a focus on practical measures to prevent and control war. Topics covered include: causes and consequences of national misperception; military strategy and policy as cause of war; US foreign ...

Van Evera, Stephen

313

High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

Zarkadoula, Evangelia [Queen Mary, University of London] [Queen Mary, University of London; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Weber, William J [ORNL] [ORNL; Seaton, M [Daresbury Laboratory, UK] [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Todorov, I T [Daresbury Laboratory, UK] [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Dove, Martin T [Queen Mary, University of London] [Queen Mary, University of London; Trachenko, Kostya [Queen Mary, University of London] [Queen Mary, University of London

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Application Of Shakedown Analysis To Cyclic Creep Damage Limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shakedown analysis may be used to provide a conservative estimate of local rupture and hence cyclic creep damage for use in a creep-fatigue assessment. The shakedown analysis is based on an elastic-perfectly plastic material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined to guarantee that a shakedown solution exists which does not exceed rupture stress and temperature for a defined life. The ratio of design life to the estimated maximum cyclic life is the shakedown creep damage. The methodology does not require stress classification and is also applicable to cycles over the full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Full cyclic creep and damage analysis is the alternative when shakedown analysis appears to be excessively conservative.

Carter, Peter [Stress Engineering Services Inc.] [Stress Engineering Services Inc.; Jetter, Robert I [Consultant] [Consultant; Sham, Sam [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Analysis of tank damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The damage sustained by cylindrical liquid storage tanks during the 1994 Northridge earthquake is summarized. It included elephant foot buckling, anchor failure and roof-shell connection separation. A few of the important lessons learned, in particular, as related to the accuracy of code computations in predicting the actual behavior of these structures are outlined. A detailed case study is presented to illustrate the application of current seismic design standards to a damaged unanchored tank and to demonstrate the use of a state-of-the-art finite element analysis in assessing the seismic safety of the same tank.

Haroun, M.A.; Bhatia, H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While silicon has several properties making it an attractive material for structure-based laser-driven acceleration, its optical damage threshold, a key parameter for high-gradient acceleration, has been unknown. Here we present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon for ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm extending longer toward the two-photon absorption threshold at around 2200 nm. We discuss the prevailing theories of ultrafast optical breakdown, describe the experimental setup and preliminary results, and propose a relevant performance parameter for candidate accelerator structures.

Cowan, B.; /SLAC

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities. The apparatus comprises a focused and pulsed laser, a photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, W.

1985-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Improving the Department of Energy's project and contract...

322

Stroke is the nation's third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. Strokes claim some 144,000 lives a year, accounting for one in every 17 deaths. Oregon with its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stroke is the nation's third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. Strokes claim-aging population and high incidence of obesity and tobacco use ­ has one of the nation's highest stroke mortality rates. The total 2009 estimated direct and indirect cost of stroke in the nation is a staggering $68

Chapman, Michael S.

323

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

Schrijver, Karel

326

Incidence of ischemic stroke according to income level among older people: the 3C study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Incidence of ischemic stroke according to income level among older people: the 3C study Olivier 26 25. Email: olivier.grimaud@ehesp.fr Abstract Background Stroke has been shown to follow a social between socioeconomic status and ischemic stroke risk amongst older people. Setting The Cities of Bordeaux

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

327

Systme de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Système de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le réseau A.S.T.R.I.D Mémoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Aper¸cu d'ITIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Objectifs de ce m´emoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 ITIL 4 2.1 Introduction

Libre de Bruxelles, Université

328

Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Forecasting Spatiotemporal Impact of Traffic Incidents on Road Networks Bei Pan, Ugur Demiryurek, Cyrus Shahabi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fidelity spatiotemporal data on trans- portation networks of major cities. In this paper, using two real- world incidents, for example it can be used by city transportation agencies for providing evacuation plan to eliminate potential congested grid locks, for effective dispatching of emergency vehicles, or even for long

Shahabi, Cyrus

330

Modeling Disease Incidence Data with Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Dirichlet Process Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Disease Incidence Data with Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Dirichlet Process Mixtures approaches to analyze such data. We develop a hierarchical specification using spatial random effects modeled. Key words: Areal unit spatial data; Dirichlet process mixture models; Disease mapping; Dy- namic

Wolpert, Robert L

331

A two-stage model for incidence and prevalence in point-level spatial count data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-stage model for incidence and prevalence in point-level spatial count data Virginia Recta about the underlying data generating process. We utilize a two-stage spatial generalized linear mixed and real data from an ecological field survey. 1 Introduction Spatial count data arise frequently

Haran, Murali

332

Dynamically Predicting Corridor Travel Time Under Incident Conditions Using a Neural Network Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the ANN model development, despite that incident might be a major source of prediction degradations. Additionally, directly deriving corridor travel times in a one-step manner raises some intractable problems, such as pairing input-target data, which have...

Zeng, Xiaosi

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

333

Using IEC 61508 to Guide the Investigation of Computer-Related Incidents and Accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. This has had `knock-on' effects in terms of the complexity of any incident investigation by fractional distillation into intermediate products, including light and heavy diesel, naptha, kerosese a fire in part of the crude distillation unit within the plant. This led to a number of knock-on effects

Johnson, Chris

334

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

335

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

Sommaruga, Ruben

336

Incidence of the source of fibre on the caecal fermentation pattern of the growing rabbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incidence of the source of fibre on the caecal fermentation pattern of the growing rabbit R Bellier the caecal fermentation and the fibre degradation in the growing rabbit. Three experimental diets were given;ADL&dquo; = 9 %), but they differed mainly by the fibre origin : Lucerne (diet L), sunflower meal (diet SM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

The Smith Normal Form of the Incidence Matrix of Skew Lines in PG(3, q)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Smith Normal Form of the Incidence Matrix of Skew Lines in PG(3, q) Peter Sin, University. In our case D = q4I. #12;Smith normal forms A, L define endomorphisms of the free Z-module on lines. Cokernel of A is called the Smith group and the torsion subgroup of the cokernel of L is known

Sin, Peter

338

Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Resonant normal-incidence separate-absorption-charge-multiplication Ge/Si avalanche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-speed InP /InGaAsP /InGaAs avalanche photodiodes grown by chemical beam epitaxy," IEEE J. Quantum ElectronResonant normal-incidence separate-absorption- charge-multiplication Ge/Si avalanche photodiodes the impedance of separate-absorption-charge- multiplication Ge/Si avalanche photodiodes (APD) is characterized

Bowers, John

340

USING ARCHIVED ITS DATA FOR ANALYSIS OF INCIDENTS ON THE PORTLAND, OREGON FREEWAY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this project and during my graduate program at Portland State University. My sincere gratitude goes Potter and Mike Rose for their assistance with the project. In addition, I would also like to thank that relate to traffic volumes and weather. In a more detailed analysis, the cost of incidents, in terms

Bertini, Robert L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

incident_investigation_form.docx Revision Date: 2/5/2013 Page 1 of 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layout is hazardous Unsafe lighting Unsafe ventilation Lack of personal protective equipment (PPE of Report: Reported by: Supervisor EH&S Team Other__________ DESCRIBE THE INCIDENT Exact Location) Inadequate guard Unguarded hazard Safety device is defective Tool or equipment defective Workstation

342

Topeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with and approved by the necessary resource agencies. The long-term environmental and cultural consequences of planTopeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood risk management and restores the reliability of the Topeka, Kansas, Levee System located

US Army Corps of Engineers

343

NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGES IN LAMINATED COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are performed on a carbon fiber/epoxy laminated composite plate with barely visible impact damage and requires an ever increasing accuracy of detection. A good example is the inspection of composite materials been applied to a variety of materials including rocks [4], metals [5-10] and composites [11

Boyer, Edmond

344

Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree A. Elizabeth Arnold* , Luis Carlos Meji species examined to date harbors endophytic fungi within its asymptomatic aerial tissues, such that endophytes rep- resent a ubiquitous, yet cryptic, component of terrestrial plant communities. Fungal

Bermingham, Eldredge

345

Temporary patching of damaged UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patching techniques based on application of epoxy resins have been developed for temporarily repairing UF{sub 6} cylinders which have sustained relatively minor damage and must be safely emptied. The method is considerably faster and simpler than metallurgical weld repairs. Laboratory tests, detailed operational procedures, and case histories of experience at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described.

Cardenas, A.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Automated Damage Diagnosis and Recovery for Remote Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; damage may require rapid compensation (eg., power drain due to coverage of solar panels); and repeated that are qualitatively different from the original controller. A number of algorithms based on repeated testing have been only handles pre­ specified error types. The algorithm proposed here is demon­ strated to automatically

Bongard, Josh

347

Automated Damage Diagnosis and Recovery for Remote Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; damage may require rapid compensation (eg., power drain due to coverage of solar panels); and repeated that are qualitatively different from the original controller. A number of algorithms based on repeated testing have been only handles pre- specified error types. The algorithm proposed here is demon- strated to automatically

Bongard, Josh

348

Electric heating units in pollination bags avoid damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric heating units in pollination bags avoid damage to flowers by spring frost J. CH. FERRAND n'Orlgans Ardon, F 45160 Olivet Summary An effective, cheap and simple heating device was designed by INRA heating, Larix. Controlled crosses are essential for forest tree breeding, but spring frost can destroy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

A micromechanics based ductile damage model for anisotropic titanium alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of internal cavitation. The model is developed from a rigorous micromechanical basis, following well-known previous works in the field. The model incorporates the porosity and void aspect ratio as internal damage variables, and seeks to provide a more accurate...

Keralavarma, Shyam Mohan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling of fracture length and distributed damage Vladimir Lyakhovsky The Institute of Earth space scaling except linear relations between fracture length and displacements and thus the determination theoretically of the strength of a body or structure directly. Self-similarity of a fracture

Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

351

Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 3 RiS0-Rr512 Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors during Steady Operation Peter OF WIND TURBINE ROTORS DURING STEADY OPERATION Peter Hauge Madsen, Sten Frandsen, William E. Holley-carrying capacity of a wind turbine rotor with respect to short-term strength and material fatigue are presented

352

Non-Destructive Damage Evaluation Based on Element Strain Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should apply to 1-D as well as 2-D and 3-D structures with single or multiple damage locations. To achieve the objectives listed above, the following four tasks are addressed: (1) the development of the theoretical foundations of the nondestructive...

Li, Ran

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites: 2-D & 3-D Weaved Structures carbon-carbon composite ATJ Graphite 3D CC composite AGS Beam-on-Target tests show clearly that carbon composites are better absorbers of thermo- mechanical shock. This is attributed to the very low coeff

McDonald, Kirk

354

IDENTIFICATION OF MATERIAL DAMAGE IN TWO DIMENSIONAL DOMAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF MATERIAL DAMAGE IN TWO DIMENSIONAL DOMAINS USING SQUID BASED NDE SYSTEM H on such problems entails quantitative nondestructive evaluation methods in SQUID-based NDE system [1]. It is well, SQUID based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems using injection current methods have been recently

355

IDENTIFICATION OF MATERIAL DAMAGE IN TWO DIMENSIONAL DOMAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF MATERIAL DAMAGE IN TWO DIMENSIONAL DOMAINS USING SQUID BASED NDE SYSTEM H#ort on such problems entails quantitative nondestructive evaluation methods in SQUID­based NDE system [1]. It is well nondestructive evaluation (NDE) systems using injection current methods have been recently developed [3, 4

356

Collaborative Post-Disaster Damage Mapping via Geo Web Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with geospatial services that can interact in a loosely coupled envir- onment and be used to create more suitable architecture for a collaborative post-disaster damage mapping system. We focus particularly on satellite image-based post-disaster support situations, and present our ideas for a prototype based on this architecture

Köbben, Barend

357

Monitoring Forest Damage Methods and Development in Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fieldwork in the target-tailored inventory of resin top disease, damage by Spruce bark beetle. (photo: S is the most important information that can be obtained from these kinds of inventories. Short variability. Large-scale monitoring, such as that performed in national forest inventories, has good potential

358

TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

DAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITES BY NONCONTACT LASER Byeongjin Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Composite structures, Wind blade. INTRODUCTION Composite materials are widely used for various industries. The feasibility of the proposed technique is examined by localizing a delamination in a real 10 kW wind turbine blade. KEYWORDS : Laser ultrasonics, Damage detection and localization, Time-of-flight triangulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

Cao, M. S. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)] [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Ostachowicz, W. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland) [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Faculty of Automotive and Construction Machinery, Warsaw University of Technology, Narbutta 84, 02-524 Warsaw (Poland); Bai, R. B., E-mail: bairunbo@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271000 (China); Radzie?ski, M. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)] [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NATO Simulation Pressures Students to Forge a Response to Threatening International Incidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an attempt by Kurdish militants to damage an oil pipeline that runs from Baku on the Caspian Sea infrastructure. Other reports follow just minutes apart. Turkish offi- cials announce that they have thwarted Russia may be intent on disrupting the flow of oil through the Baku-Tblisi-Ceyhan pipe- line. Turkey

363

29.01.03.M1.09 Information Resources Incident Management Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

likelihood that security incidents could be propagated to other systems beyond departmental control, system, process, store, retrieve, display, and transmit information or data. SIRS ­ Security Incident Reporting follow System Regulation 10.02.01, Control of Fraud, Waste and Abuse. 2.6 If there is a substantial

364

-Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

McCune, Bruce

365

Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

Rocca, Jorge J.

366

Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process An incident report is submitted and directed to the Coordinator of the specific residence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process · An incident report is submitted and directed of Residential Life. · Upon review, the Coordinator determines whether or not the incident requires a one. For additional information, you may contact the Residential Life office at 257-4917. #12;

Selmic, Sandra

367

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which facilitates analysis of the incidence of an economywide capandtrade system for carbon dioxide (CO2) at the state level. An understanding of the geographic incidence of climate change mitigation are geographically localized. The upshot is a classic collective action problem. The issue of distribution has long

Wing, Ian Sue

368

EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains accurate, up-to-date incident files  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANNING EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains, EOC Action Plan, and other documents, as required · Ensure an EOC sign-in sheet is available for each and Initial Action Incidents (3 hours) · IS-700 National Incident Management System (3 hours) · IS-800

Walker, Matthew P.

369

Alpha decay self-damage in cubic and monoclinic zirconolite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of primarily-monoclinic /sup 238/Pu-doped zirconolite were stored at ambient temperature to allow accumulation of alpha decay self-damage to a dose of 1 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ (equivalent to a SYNROC age of approx. 10/sup 3/y). Bulk swelling reached 2.3 vol% with no tendency toward saturation, a damage response similar to that observed for cubic Pu-doped zirconolite. X-ray volumetric swelling at 4 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ was 1 vol%, considerably less than that for the cubic material. Changes in cell dimensions differed significantly from those reported by others for a monoclinic natural mineral. Extensive microcracking was observed, and is attributed at least partially to swelling differences between the matrix and minor phases.

Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Land, C.C.; Peterson, D.E.; Rohr, D.L.; Roof, R.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Damage and rupture mechanisms in an austenoferritic duplex steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of ageing on damage and rupture mechanisms in an austenoferritic duplex stainless steel is studied using conventional straining and impact toughness testing at 20 C and 320 C, and in situ SEM straining at 20 C. While the as-received alloy fails in a ductile mode, damage in the aged material starts with cleavage nucleation in ferrite. The authors show that, owing to the bipercolated topology of the alloy, these cleavage cracks can propagate while passing round austenite ligaments whose plastic stretching controls the crack extension. The variations with strain of both the crack size and the average crack separation are computed analytically and their comparison gives a good prediction of ductility.

Verhaeghe, B.; Louchet, F.; Brechet, Y. [LTPCM-CNRS, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Groupe Physique du Metal] [LTPCM-CNRS, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Groupe Physique du Metal; Massoud, J.P. [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France)] [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Constitutive representation of damage development and healing in WIPP salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been considerable interest in characterizing and modeling the constitutive behavior of rock salt with particular reference to long-term creep and creep failure. The interest is motivated by the projected use of excavated rooms in salt rock formations as repositories for nuclear waste. It is presumed that closure of those rooms by creep ultimately would encapsulate the waste material, resulting in its effective isolation. A continuum mechanics approach for treating damage healing is formulated as part of a constitutive model for describing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt. Formulation of the healing term is, described and the constitutive model is evaluated against experimental data of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. The results indicate that healing anistropy in WIPP salt can be modeled with an appropriate power-conjugate equivalent stress, kinetic equation, and evolution equation for damage healing.

Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Fossum, A.F [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Building Damage, Death and Downtime Risk Attenuation in Earthquakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

value over a specified amount of time, can be obtained. This was a great development in the field of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Kennedy et al. (1980) conducted research to study the safety of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant... 2D structural model developed in SAP 2000; and (c) plan of ?Redbook Building? ....... 16 Figure 4 ?Scenario-based? 3d loss model: (a) seismic hazard intensity-attenuation model; (b) structural analysis; (c) damage analysis; and (d) loss...

Huang, Yinghui

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microstructural Characterization of Material Properties and Damage in Asphalt Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND DAMAGE IN ASPHALT COMPOSITES A Thesis by SARA MOHAMMAD KHORASANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Engineering Copyright 2013 Sara Mohammad Khorasani ii ABSTRACT Asphalt composites are used to construct 90% of roads in the United States. These composites consist of asphalt binder, which is a product of the refinery process of oil, aggregates...

Mohammad Khorasani, Sara

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Damage Assessment and Control of Wireworms in Grain Sorghum.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- plete block design with three replications. Plc': were four rows, 50 feet long. Five days following planting on May 9, 19": 1 wireworm damaged seed and wireworm number- were determined in one linear row foot in err ! plot. After plant emergence...) / insecticides / Texas. color, religion, sex, age or national origin. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, J. E. Miller, Director, College Station, Texas 2M - 9-76 ...

Teetes, George L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NMSLO Water Lease Damage Bond | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Information Exploration/Development Water EasementLeaseofDamage

376

Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Predictive storm damage modeling and optimizing crew response to improve storm response operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility infrastructures are constantly damaged by naturally occurring weather. Such damage results in customer service interruption and repairs are necessary to return the system to normal operation. In most cases these ...

Whipple, Sean David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Review: Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China Mun S. Ho andEconomic Damages of Air Pollution in China. Cambridge, MA:the assessment of air pollution and its health and economic

Lee, Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1 Donglin Li Tongwen Chen2 hierarchical LEC structure and apply it to a typ- ical boiler system. There are two damage models

Marquez, Horacio J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - area damage detection Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

loss due to loss of stems Safety issues Canopy damage Ring Barking Any thin... -barked tree species 10-40 yrs old Grey Squirrel Bark Stripping Damage Deformed stems 12 Source:...

382

Applicability of linear analysis in probabilistic estimation of seismic building damage to reinforced-concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As design has moved from strength based to performance based, there has been an effort to relate building response to damage. Because decision-makers typically consider human lives, property damage and cost, setting ...

James, Timothy P. (Timothy Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Use of CFRP Overlays to Repair Fatigue Damage in Steel Bridge Girders and Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fatigue damage in steel girder bridges built prior to the mid-1980s is common due to distortion-induced fatigue. Different repair techniques have been developed and implemented to retrofit bridges of this era with existing fatigue damage...

Gangel, Regan Elisabeth

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

A study of inter-individual differences in the DNA damage response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agents that damage our DNA are omnipresent in our environment and inside our cells themselves. Left unrepaired, DNA damage can lead to premature aging, neurodegeneration and cancer. Humans have thus evolved intricate and ...

Sefta, Meriem

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - acari eriophyidae damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acari eriophyidae damage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 216 Florida Entomologist 85(1) March...

386

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER turbine blade. We compare the data collected from the wireless sensors against wired sensors for nonstationary blade excitations. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Damage Detection, Wind Turbine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Abstract: This note describes an approach for...

388

Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

Mulligan, Anthony C.; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Popovich, Dragan; Halloran, Joseph P.; Fulcher, Michael L.; Cook, Randy C.

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

Mulligan, Anthony C. (Tucson, AZ); Rigali, Mark J. (Tucson, AZ); Sutaria, Manish P. (Malden, MA); Popovich, Dragan (Redmond, WA); Halloran, Joseph P. (Tucson, AZ); Fulcher, Michael L. (Tucson, AZ); Cook, Randy C. (Tucson, AZ)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress on each of the following topics is outlined: (1) rotating target neutron source, (2) fusion materials irradiation test facility, (3) environmental characterization, (4) damage production, and (5) damage microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior. (MOW)

None

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K and 373 K. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray...

392

Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron...

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution damage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution damage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications...

394

Regulation of DNA damage tolerance : studies of the translesion synthesis DNA ploymerase eta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All organisms must control the effects of DNA damage to protect the integrity of their genomes. In addition to DNA repair, this requires DNA damage tolerance pathways, which allow the continuation of essential processes ...

Woodruff, Rachel Van Etten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the ...

Modell, Joshua W.

396

SALT DAMAGE CRITERION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to conduct a field-scale application demonstrating the use of continuum damage mechanics to determine the minimum allowable operating pressure of compressed natural gas storage caverns in salt formations. A geomechanical study was performed of two natural gas storage caverns (one existing and one planned) utilizing state-of-the-art salt mechanics to assess the potential for cavern instability and collapse. The geomechanical study consisted primarily of laboratory testing, theoretical development, and analytical/numerical tasks. A total of 50 laboratory tests was performed on salt specimens to aid in the development and definition of the material model used to predict the behavior of rock salt. Material model refinement was performed that improved the predictive capability of modeling salt during damage healing, recovery of work-hardened salt, and the behavior of salt at stress states other than triaxial compression. Results of this study showed that the working gas capacity of the existing cavern could be increased by 18 percent and the planned cavern could be increased by 8 percent using the proposed method compared to a conventional stress-based method. Further refinement of the continuum damage model is recommended to account for known behavior of salt at stress conditions other than triaxial compression that is not characterized accurately by the existing model.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

Friebele, John Duncan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-PA-13-11-02 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Improved Methodology to Measure Normal... Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array Juan-Carlos Baltazar*, Yifu Sun, Jeff Haberl Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, The Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77845, U.S.A. Abstract...

Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

399

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

USING ARCHIVED DATA SOURCES TO EVALUATE AN INCIDENT RESPONSE PROGRAM IN PORTLAND, OREGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 10 15 20 25 NumberofWetDays Crashes on Wet Days Crashes on Dry Days Wet Days 1152 Crashes on Wet Days 1712 Crashes on Dry Days 113 Wet days 210 989 1050 1105 960 1072 313 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 by Day of Week on I-5 for 2001 Crashes and Precipitation by Month for 2001 Average Ongoing Incidents

Bertini, Robert L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities for reporting cyber security incidents involving classified and unclassified systems and responding to cyber security alerts and advisories; and to implement requirements of DOE N 205.1, Unclassified Cyber Security Program, and DOE M 471.2-2, Classified Information Systems Security Manual. DOE N 205.13, dated 7-6-04, extends this notice until 7-6-05. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter III, section 8.

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was established to meet the federal hazardous material transportation regulation. All modes of transportation except for pipeline and bulk marine transportation are covered by the HMIRS database. The process industry should take advantage of these chemical... al., 1999). HSEES HMIRSOSHA RMP Fixed facility Transportation Railroad, Highway, Pipeline, Waterways Residence areas Agricultural areas Public areas Industry 4 Based on the availability of chemical incident database and their evident...

Mahdiyati, -

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear incident monitor criticality alarm instrument for the Savannah River Site: Technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy facility. The facility stores, processes, and works with fissionable material at a number of locations. Technical standards and US Department of Energy orders, require these locations to be monitored by criticality alarm systems under certain circumstances. The Savannah River Site calls such instruments Nuclear Incident Monitors or NIMs. The Sole purpose of the Nuclear Incident Monitor is to provide an immediate evacuation signal in the case of an accidental criticality in order to minimize personnel exposure to radiation. The new unit is the third generation Nuclear Incident Monitor at the Savannah River Site. The second generation unit was developed in 1979. It was designed to eliminate vacuum-tube circuits, and was the first solid state NIM at SRS. The major design objectives of the second generation NIM were to improve reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Ten prototype units have been built and tested. This report describes the design of the new NIM and the testing that took place to verify its acceptability.

Jenkins, J.B.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

English, Shawn Allen

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

17.42 Causes and Prevention of War, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. ...

Van Evera, Stephen

407

Structural Dynamics of Various Causes of Migration in Jaipur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Various social causes for migration in Jaipur are studied and statistical hypotheses are made in this paper.

Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

2008-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES burdens of wind turbines. To detect damage of rotor blades, several research projects focus on an acoustic, rotor blade, wind turbine INTRODUCTION There are several publications of non destructive damage

Boyer, Edmond

409

PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

694 PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA of shear band localization conditions for finite elastic-plastic rate independent deformations of damaged for elastic-plastic solids when iso- tropic and kinematic hardening effects and micro-damage process are taken

Boyer, Edmond

410

Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuum Damage Mechanics at the Representative Element Volume scale is a relevant tool to deal with largeAnisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures Ragueneau F with damage induced anisotropy modelling for concrete-like materials. A thermodynamics based constitutive

Boyer, Edmond

411

Damage Threats and Response of Final Optics for Laser-Fusion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Damage Threats and Response of Final Optics for Laser-Fusion Power Plants M. S. Tillack1 , S. A the various damage threats and also provides nominal goals for a power plant. These goals are driven-1597 The final optics for laser-IFE (inertial fusion energy) power plants will be exposed to a variety of damage

Tillack, Mark

412

N d'ordre : 2011-ISAL-0147 Annee 2011 Ductile damage characterization in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N d'ordre : 2011-ISAL-0147 Ann´ee 2011 Th`ese Ductile damage characterization in Dual-Phase steels-5Oct2012 #12;Ductile damage characterization in Dual-Phase steels using X-ray tomography Abstract to stress and to damage, the Dual-Phase steels (DP) present an acceptable strength/ductility compromise

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

413

Thin film cracking and ratcheting caused by temperature cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film cracking and ratcheting caused by temperature cycling M. Huang and Z. Suo Mechanical caused by ratcheting in an adjacent ductile layer. For example, on a silicon die directly attached corners. Aided by cycling temperature, the shear stresses cause ratcheting in the aluminum pads

Suo, Zhigang

414

Cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolites on HL-60 cells in vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used oxygenate in unleaded gasoline; however, few studies have been conducted on the toxicity of this compound. This study evaluates the cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of MTBE and its metabolites in a human haemopoietic cell line, HL-60. The metabolites of MTBE studied include tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA), and formaldehyde. Comet assay is used to assess DNA damage, and the cytotoxicity is investigated by lactate dehydrogenease (LDH) release. The results show no significant cytotoxic effects of MTBE, TBA, and HIBA over a concentration ranging from 1 to 30 mM. Formaldehyde, in contrast, causes a substantial LDH release at a concentration of 5 {mu}M. Hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative agent, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, produces a significant dose-related increase in DNA damage, whereas a much higher concentration of MTBE (1 to 30 mM) is required to produce a similar observation. The genotoxic effects of TBA and HIBA appear to be identical to that of MTBE. Conversely, DNA damage is observed for formaldehyde at a relatively low concentration range (5 to 100 {mu}M). These findings suggest that MTBE and its metabolites, except formaldehyde, have relatively low cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. 16 refs., 4 figs.

Tang, G.H. [Xian Medical Univ. (China); Shen, Y.; Shen, H.M. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Laser damage resistant pits in dielectric coatings created by femtosecond laser machining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replacing growing damage sites with benign, laser damage resistant features in multilayer dielectric films may enable large mirrors to be operated at significantly higher fluences. Laser damage resistant features have been created in high reflecting coatings on glass substrates using femtosecond laser machining. These prototype features have been damage tested to over 40 J/cm{sup 2} (1064nm, 3ns pulselength) and have been shown not to damage upon repeated irradiation at 40J/cm{sup 2}. Further work to optimize feature shape and laser machining parameters is ongoing.

Wolfe, J; Roger Qiu, ,; Stolz, C; Thomas, M; Martinez, C; Ozkan, A

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

Second harmonic generation by propagation of a p-polarized obliquely incident laser beam in underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical study of second harmonic generation due to interaction an intense, p-polarized laser beam propagating obliquely in homogeneous underdense plasma, in the mildly relativistic regime, has been presented. The efficiency of the second harmonic radiation as well as its detuning length has been obtained and their variation with the angle of incidence is analyzed. It is shown that, for a given plasma electron density, the second harmonic efficiency increases with the angle of incidence while the detuning length decreases. The second harmonic amplitude vanishes at normal incidence of the laser beam.

Jha, Pallavi; Agrawal, Ekta [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cadmium-induced oxidative stress and histological damage in the myocardium. Effects of a soy-based diet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cd exposure has been associated to an augmented risk for cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of 15 and 100 ppm of Cd on redox status as well as histological changes in the rat heart and the putative protective effect of a soy-based diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups and treated during 60 days as follows: groups (1), (2) and (3) were fed a casein-based diet; groups (4), (5) and (6), a soy-based diet; (1) and (4) were given tap water; (2) and (5) tap water containing 15 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}; and (3) and (6) tap water containing 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}. Serum lipid peroxides increased and PON-1 activity decreased in group (3). Lipoperoxidation also increased in the heart of all intoxicated groups; however protein oxidation only augmented in (3) and reduced glutathione levels diminished in (2) and (3). Catalase activity increased in groups (3) and (6) while superoxide dismutase activity increased only in (6). Glutathione peroxidase activity decreased in groups (3) and (6). Nrf2 expression was higher in groups (3) and (6), and MTI expression augmented in (3). Histological examination of the heart tissue showed the development of hypertrophic and fusion of cardiomyocytes along with foci of myocardial fiber necrosis. The transmission electron microscopy analysis showed profound ultra-structural damages. No protection against tissue degeneration was observed in animals fed the soy-based diet. Our findings indicate that even though the intake of a soy-based diet is capable of ameliorating Cd induced oxidative stress, it failed in preventing cardiac damage. -- Highlights: ? Cd intoxication produces extracellular and ultrastructural damage in the myocardium. ? The intake of a soy-based diet ameliorated Cd-induced oxidative stress. ? Cd-induced myocardial damage wasn't prevented by the intake of a soy-based diet. ? Cd-induced myocardial degeneration may not be caused by oxidative stress generation. ? Histology evaluation is needed to establish the extent of Cd-induced cardiac damage.

Ferramola, Mariana L.; Pérez Díaz, Matías F.F. [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Honoré, Stella M.; Sánchez, Sara S. [Department of Development Biology, INSIBIO, National University of Tucumán, CONICET-UNT, Tucumán (Argentina)] [Department of Development Biology, INSIBIO, National University of Tucumán, CONICET-UNT, Tucumán (Argentina); Antón, Rosa I. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, INQUISAL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)] [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, INQUISAL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Anzulovich, Ana C. [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)] [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina); Giménez, María S., E-mail: mgimenez@unsl.edu.ar [Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, National University of San Luis, IMIBIO-SL, CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Insulin signaling, dietary restriction and DNA damage : multiple roles for smk-1 in the mediation of C. elegans life span  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role of oxidative damage and environmental stresses. Natureand environmental insults drive the accumulation of DNA damageenvironmental state. While age- related decay still occurs (due to oxidative damage and

Wolff, Suzanne Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Infection-induced colitis in mice causes dynamic and tissue-specific changes in stress response and DNA damage leading to colon cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helicobacter hepaticus-infected Rag2-/- mice emulate many aspects of human inflammatory bowel disease, including the development of colitis and colon cancer. To elucidate mechanisms of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis, ...

Mangerich, Aswin

420

Guidelines for Setting up a Reflux Condenser Water leaks from a reflux condenser can destroy years of research data and cause thousands of dollars of damage to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidelines for Setting up a Reflux Condenser Water leaks from a reflux condenser can destroy years. To help prevent this common accident, wire or clamp all hose connections, secure the condenser outlet tubes into the inlet and outlet of the condenser. After fitting the tubes into the condenser (a

Brody, James P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Case Study of the Failure of two 13.8kV Control & Metering Transformers that caused significant Equipment Damage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The degradation and failure of cast-coil epoxy windings within 13.8kV control power transformers and metering potential transformers has been shown to be dangerous to both equipment and personnel, even though best industrial design practices were followed. Accident scenes will be examined for two events at a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory. Failure modes will be explained and current design practices discussed with changes suggested to prevent a recurrence and to minimize future risk. New maintenance philosophies utilizing partial discharge testing of the transformers as a prediction of end-of-life will be examined.

Dreifuerst, G R; Chew, D B; Mangonon, H L; Swyers, P W

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Summary of Recent Damage-Initiation Experiments on KDP Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We summarize recent investigations of the density and morphology of bulk damage in KDP crystals as a function of pulse duration, temporal profile, wavelength, and energy fluence. As previously reported by Runkel et al., we also find that the size of bulk damage sites varies roughly linearly with pulse duration for pulses between 1 ns and 9 ns. However this trend no longer applies at pulse durations below 1 ns. Experiments measuring the damage density and size distribution as a function of wavelength confirm many previous works which indicated a strong dependence of damage density with wavelength. However, we also find that the size of damage sites is relatively insensitive to wavelength. Further we see damage due to Flat-In-Time (FIT) pulses has different pulse length and fluence dependence than Gaussian pulses. We demonstrate that a simple thermal diffusion model can account for observed differences in damage densities due to square and Gaussian temporally shaped pulses of equal fluence. Moreover, we show that the key laser parameter governing size of the bulk damage sites is the length of time the pulse remains above a specific intensity. The different dependences of damage density and damage site size on laser parameters suggest different absorption mechanisms early and late in the damaging pulse.

Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Trenholme, J B; Spaeth, M L

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Identification and Elimination of Mechanisms Leading to UV Damage of DKDP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This LDRD project addressed both bulk and surface damage induced by UV-laser exposure. The primary objectives were (1) to complete our understanding of the factors leading to bulk damage, including growth conditions and orientational direction, and (2) to identify mechanisms of surface damage initiation and growth leading to mitigation methods. Due to the more advanced state of knowledge in bulk damage, a greater portion of that work was completed during the one-year term of this project. Three papers were presented at the 32nd Boulder Damage Symposium on Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials, and the three resulting manuscripts submitted to the Proceeding are attached: An important result from this work is that it established a dependence of obscuration from bulk damage on fluence and pulse length, which is shown.

Burnham, A; Runkel, M; Chase, L; Demos, S; Staggs, M; Siekhaus, W

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon in air for ultrafast pulses in the near infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm, extending to 2260 nm. We discuss the motivation for the measurements and give theoretical context. We then describe the experimental setup, diagnostics, and procedure. The results show a breakdown threshold of 0.2J/cm{sup 2} at 1550 nm and 1.06 ps FWHM pulse duration, and a weak dependence on wavelength.

Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1415 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ?6, ?12, ?24, and ?36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (?65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ?6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

Ebi, Junko, E-mail: junkoe@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Schmitt et al. Damage of monolithic refractory linings in steel ladles during drying Damage of monolithic refractory linings in steel ladles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schmitt et al. Damage of monolithic refractory linings in steel ladles during drying Damage of monolithic refractory linings in steel ladles during drying N. Schmitt(1)& , Y. Berthaud(1) , J.F. Hernandez) & Corresponding author : Email: schmitt@lmt.ens-cachan.fr Abstract: Safety linings of steel ladles are made

432

Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Prediction of blast damage from vapor cloud explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process industries handle a wide range of different materials and use them in different types of chemical reaction. Of particular concern is the prospect of damage and injury affecting the general public outside the boundary wall of the chemical plant. It is not wise to permit the construction of homes, schools or hospitals so close to chemical plants that they, and the people within, might be damaged or injured should there be an accidental explosion in the plant. The major hazard outside the plant is over-pressure, a consequence of an accidental explosion in a cloud of flammable gas or vapor (Vapor Cloud Explosion or VCE). It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that any such accidental explosion is not so large as to endanger the public, and of the local planning authorities to ensure that homes, schools or hospitals are not sited so close to chemical plants that they may be endangered by accidental explosion. A vital tool for such authorities is a simple method of assessing the possible consequences of an accidental VCE. In this paper those methods of assessing the consequences are examined.

Phillips, H. [Phillips (H.), Buxton (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation and remediation of a fire damaged geosynthetic liner system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fire in a hazardous waste landfill damaged the liner system consisting of compacted clay, geomembranes, geonets, geotextiles, and granular soils. Following waste excavation, the visibly damaged liner system materials were removed and samples of each component were obtained from the perimeter of the visibly undamaged area. Geomembrane samples were tested for tensile characteristics and index properties; geonet samples were tested for grab tensile properties and thickness. Test results were compared to the original specifications, manufacturers` quality control data, quality assurance conformance test results, and baseline sample data from an unaffected part of the landfill. Geomembrane baseline results exceeded the original specifications, and the specifications were used as the basis of acceptance of the perimeter samples. Geonet baseline results were inconclusive, with grab elongation consistently below the original specifications. A statistical approach was used to delineate the limit of affected geonet using the baseline sample data. The liner system was reconstructed to the limits defined by this testing program and returned to service following acceptance by the regulatory agencies.

Adams, F.T.; Overmann, L.K.; Cotton, R.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Laser damage of dichroic coatings in a high average power laser vacuum resonator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our application, dichroics in a high average power, near-infrared, laser system have short operating lifetimes. These dichroics were used as the resonator fold mirrors and permitted the transmission of the pumping argon (Ar) ion laser light. Representative samples of two different dichroic optics were taken off-line and the transmission performance monitored in various scenarios. Irradiating these optics under resonator vacuum conditions, ({le}1 mT, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) resulted in a degradation of transmission with time. Irradiating these optics in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere (1 to 10 T of oxygen, 11.7 kW/cm{sup 2}, Ar laser running all wavelengths) the transmission remained steady over a period of days. The transmission loss observed in the optic tested in vacuum was somewhat reversible if the optic was subsequently irradiated in a rarefied oxygen atmosphere. This reversibility was only possible if the transmission degradation was not too severe. Further tests demonstrated that an atmosphere of 10 T of air also prevented the transmission degradation. In addition, tests were performed to demonstrate that the optic damage was not caused by the ultra-violet component in the Ar ion laser. Mechanisms that may account for this behavior are proposed.

Arnold, P A; Berzins, L V; Chow, R; Erbert, G V

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

A slow comeback (clean up at the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on the progress that has been made in cleaning up the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor, with radioactive debris present not only in the reactor core, but throughout the primary cooling system. Delays in the cleanup operation have been caused by extraordinary technical challenges, regulatory procedures, and funding shortages. The initial stabilization and decontamination of the containment building, which included the removal and processing of the radioactive water, are essentially complete. Reactor disassembly and defueling have yet to begin. The NRC has reported that radiation doses at Unit 2 since the accident have been lower than those experienced at operating reactors, but the estimates for the collective radiation exposure for the work force have recently increased. The NRC has proposed that if robotic devices are used in the defueling and decontamination processes, work-force exposure could be cut by more than half. The projected completion rates for defueling Unit 2 and decontaminating the containment building now range from 1990 to past the year 2000. A five-part inspection program was conducted that included the use of video and sonar probes inside the reactor vessel, and the gathering of debris samples from the core.

Adam, J.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

avascular necrosis caused: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

released to the atmosphere by human activities are the main cause of contemporary global warming. Recent decades have seen record-high average global surface temperatures....

439

anastomotic strictures caused: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

released to the atmosphere by human activities are the main cause of contemporary global warming. Recent decades have seen record-high average global surface temperatures....

440

Estimation of /sup 244/Cm intake by bioassay measurements following a contamination incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An employee was contaminated with radioactive material consisting primarily of /sup 244/Cm and /sup 246/Cm as a consequence of handling a curium nitrate solution at a reprocessing facility. In vivo gamma analysis and in vitro (urine and fecal) analysis were initiated soon after the incident. Further in vivo measurements were performed regularly through hour 528, and in vitro bioassay measurements were obtained through day 74. A sample of the curium solution from the workplace was obtained to confirm that the nitrate was the chemical form and to identify the curium isotopes present. The mass ratio of /sup 244/Cm:/sup 246/Cm was determined to be 91:7. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) was administered on hours 33 and 71. Observed excretion rates were consistent with available information for curium in the literature. In this paper, the results of the in vivo and in vitro measurements are presented and intake estimates for the incident are developed using various excretion rate functions. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Thein, M.; Bogard, J.S.; Eckerman, K.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Page 1 of 2 Welcome to Just CAUSES!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. MORE CAUSES Installs Ward 8 Urban Aquaponics Project CAUSES celebrated the launch of a neighborhood-sized aquaponics facil- ity located in the southeastern quad- rant of Washington, D.C. The project is the result was attended by representa- tives from USDA, the D.C. Govern- ment, UDC and the community. The new aquaponics

District of Columbia, University of the

444

Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letters Assessing species invasions as a cause of extinction Anthony Ricciardi Redpath Museum, Mc the generalization that biological invasions are a leading cause of species extinctions. The authors note zebra mussel colonization has accelerated the local extinction of unionid species by a factor of 10

Ricciardi, Anthony

445

OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL OF THE PARASITES THAT CAUSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL OF THE PARASITES THAT CAUSE SWIMMER'S ITCH IN MICHIGAN;#12;OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL OF THE PARASITES THAT CAUSE SWIMMER'S ITCH IN MICHIGAN 1 Acknowledgments University). Graphic Design Margaret Weaver (ANR Communications, Michigan State University). Snail Species

446

Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Warming caused by cumulative carbon emissions towards the trillionth tonne Myles R. Allen1 emission pathways. We find that the peak warming caused by a given cumulative carbon dioxide emission of emissions or peak emission rate). Hence policy targets based on limiting cumulative emissions of carbon

Fischlin, Andreas

447

Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Karim, Julia Abdul [Reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Power Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Clean Assembly Practices to Prevent Contamination and Damage to Optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key lesson learned from the earliest optics installed in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was that the traditional approach for maintaining cleanliness, such as the use of cleanrooms and associated garments and protocols, is inadequate. Assembly activities often negate the benefits provided by cleanrooms, and in fact generate contamination with high damage potential. As a result, NIF introduced ''clean assembly protocols'' and related practices to supplement the traditional clean room protocols. These new protocols included ''clean-as-you-go'' activities and regular bright light inspections. Introduction of these new protocols has greatly reduced the particle contamination found on more recently installed optics. In this paper we will describe the contamination mechanisms we have observed and the details of the clean assembly protocols we have successfully introduced to mitigate them.

Pryatel, J; Gourdin, W H

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effect of pore pressure on damage accumulation in salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory data acquired from two multistage, triaxial compression creep experiments are presented for bedded salt. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of pore pressure changes on the accumulation of damage (dilatant volumetric strain). The first experiment comprised five constant total stress tests in which the internal pore pressure was incremented during successive stages, while the externally applied axial and radial stresses were maintained constant. The second experiment comprised three constant effective stress tests in which the pore pressure and the externally applied axial and radial stresses were increased in equal increments in successive stages. Volumetric strain rates were determined both before and after the pore pressure changes were made in all tests. The data suggest pore pressure changes made during the constant total stress tests have a greater effect on salt dilation than do changes made during the constant effective stress tests.

PFEIFLE,T.W.; HURTADO,L. DIANE

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

450

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

452

The effect of lattice temperature on surface damage in fused silica optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the effect of lattice temperature on the probability of surface damage initiation for 355nm, 7ns laser pulses for surface temperatures below the melting point to temperatures well above the melting point of fused silica. At sufficiently high surface temperatures, damage thresholds are dramatically reduced. Our results indicate a temperature activated absorption and support the idea of a lattice temperature threshold of surface damage. From these measurements, we estimate the temperature dependent absorption coefficient for intrinsic silica.

Bude, J; Guss, G; Matthews, M; Spaeth, M L

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorate ischemic damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the nuclear enzyme poly... . (1996) Role of oxidants in ischemic brain damage. Stroke 27, ... Source: Cossart, Rosa - Institut de Neurobiologie de la Mditerrane, Inserm...

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - acquired brain damage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brain Injury, Seizures & Epilepsy Concussion A mild... The blood vessels in the brain may stretch and cranial nerves may be damaged - No bleeding, closed head... : two to...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviate salinity damage Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA Summary: , anti-acrolein therapy significantly alleviated myelin damage, delayed the Fig. 6 CAP reduction...

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute axonal damage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sections were viewed with a light microscope. Those axons labeled with HRP... that acrolein, a lipid peroxida- tion byproduct, can inflict significant damage in isolated spinal...

457

atr-mediated dna damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

458

aluminium-induced dna damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

459

atr-dependent dna damage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

460

Mechanical Damage from Cavitation in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Accelerated Thrombolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.3 Cavitation Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Field Characterization / Passive Cavitation Detection 2.3Method for Estimation of Cavitation Damage for an Embedded

Weiss, Hope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

Nguyen, Ba NGHIEP; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laser-Induced Damage in DKDP Crystals under Simultaneous Exposure to Laser Harmonics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While KDP and DKDP crystals remain the only viable solution for frequency conversion in large aperture laser systems in the foreseeable future, our understanding of damage behavior in the presence of multiple colors is very limited. Such conditions exist during normal operation where, for third harmonic generation, 1{omega}, 2{omega} and 3{omega} components are present with different energy ratios as they propagate inside the crystal. The objective of this work is to shed light into the damage behavior of frequency conversion crystals during operational conditions as well as probe the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation. We have performed a series of experiments to quantify the damage performance of pristine (unconditioned) DKDP material under simultaneous exposure to 2{omega} and 3{omega} laser pulses from a 3-ns Nd:YAG laser system as a function of the laser influences at each frequency. Results show that simultaneous dual wavelength exposure leads to a much larger damage density as compared to the total damage resulting from separate exposure at each wavelength. Furthermore, under such excitation conditions, the damage performance is directly related to and can be predicted from the damage behavior of the crystal at each wavelength separately while the mechanism and type of defects responsible for damage initiation are shown to be the same at both 2{omega} and 3{omega} excitation.

Negres, R A; DeMange, P; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Laser induced damage of fused silica polished optics due to a droplet forming organic contaminant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the effect of organic molecular contamination on single shot laser induced damage density at the wavelength of 351 nm, with a 3 ns pulse length. Specific contamination experiments were made with dioctylphthalate (DOP) in liquid or gaseous phase, on the surface of fused silica polished samples, bare or solgel coated. Systematic laser induced damage was observed only in the case of liquid phase contamination. Different chemical and morphological characterization methods were used to identify and understand the damage process. We demonstrate that the contaminant morphology, rather than its physicochemical nature, can be responsible for the decrease of laser induced damage threshold of optics.

Bien-Aime, Karell; Neauport, Jerome; Tovena-Pecault, Isabelle; Fargin, Evelyne; Labrugere, Christine; Belin, Colette; Couzi, Michel

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

The effective beta sensitivity to the incident neutron energy dependence of the absolute delayed neutron yields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uncertainty of the [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, and [sup 238]U absolute delayed neutron yields v[sub d] is one of the principal sources of uncertainty in predicting the fission reactor reactivity scale [beta][sub eff]. The current uncertainties in the dependence of v[sub d] on incident neutron energy is investigated for significance in the evaluation of [beta][sub eff]. The uncertainty effects on the GODIVA, JEZEBEL, Zero Power Reactor, SNEAK, and Masurca benchmark facility calculations are analyzed using ENDF/B and JEF basic data. Different assumptions about the energy dependence result in variations of up to 5% in the reactor spectrum averaged values of v[sub d], and these would result in variations of up to [approximately] 2% in the value of [beta][sub eff] for a typical liquid-metal fast breeder reactor.

D'Angelo, A. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)); Filip, A. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064?nm illumination of 10 mW/cm{sup 2?}??1?kW/cm{sup 2}, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Risk Insights Associated with Incident-Free Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel To Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Final Environmental Impact Statement (YM EIS)[1] included an analysis of the environmental impacts associated with the transport of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from multiple locations across the US to Yucca Mountain for incident-free and accident conditions. While the radiological risks contained in the YM EIS were calculated to be small, it is important to recognize the many conservatisms that were utilized to calculate these risks. This paper identifies conservative assumptions associated with the YM EIS calculation of incident free transportation risk, and provides an estimate of incident free transportation risk using more realistic assumptions. While it is important to use conservative assumptions in the evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with the proposed repository, it is equally important that the public and decision makers understand the conservative nature of the results presented. This paper will provide that perspective regarding the incident free transportation impacts and summarizes the results of a more detailed EPRI report on this subject, 'Assessment of Incident Free Transport Risk for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5'. [2] (authors)

Supko, E.M. [Energy Resources International, Inc., 101518 St., NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Kessler, J.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Blvd., Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Radioactive material (RAM) transportation accident and incident experience in the U.S.A. (1971--1997)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the National Transportation Program (EM-70) of the US Department of Energy. Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident incident events in the US for the period 1971--1997. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred.

McClure, J.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Fagan, H.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Analysis Dept.; Thomas, T. [Dept. of Energy National Transportation Program (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Incidence of primary liver cancer and aetiological aspects: a study of a defined population from a low-endemicity area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary The prevalence of primary liver cancer (PLC) varies throughout the world. It has been attributed to variations in incidence of the predominant histological type, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of PLC types other than HCC such as cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is far less known, especially in low-incidence areas. The aetiology of HCC and other PLC types is obscure, with the exception of the association between HCC and cirrhosis as well as chronic viral hepatitis. The present retrospective incidence and aetiology study concerns a well-defined population from a period with a high autopsy frequency. Preserved biopsy specimens were re-evaluated histopathologically and patient records were studied. Among 590 histologically verified cases of PLC, HCC constituted 90%, CCC 8 % and a mixed form of these types 1%. At the end of the study period the annual age-standardised incidence rate of HCC was 3.6 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. Other PLC types were hepatoblastoma (n = 3), fibrolamellar carcinoma (n = 2), angiosarcoma (n = 1) and infantile haemangioendothelioma (n = 1), each constituting less than I % of the PLC cases. Comparing HCC with CCC we found that cirrhosis (70%) and alcoholism (21%) was significantly more frequent in HCC, and cholelithiasis was significantly more common (60%) in patients with CCC. In the majority of the PLC cases with liver cirrhosis this disorder was unknown before diagnosis of the tumour.

J Kaczynski; G Hansson; S Wallerstedt

472

Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a “calibration” shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

,

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

473

Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Center for Nuclear Security, established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The initial project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The results will help advance the seismic monitoring capability of the United States by improving the predictive capability of physics-based modeling of explosive phenomena. The first SPE N (SPE-N-1) test was conducted in May 2011, using 100 kg of explosives at the depth of 54.9 m in the U 15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m in the same source hole. The SPE-N-3 test was conducted in the same source hole in July 2012, using the same amount and type of explosive as for SPE-N-2, and at the same depth as SPE-N-2, within the damage zone created by the SPE-N-2 explosion to investigate damage effects on seismic wave propagation. Following the SPE-N-2 shot and prior to the SPE-N-3 shot, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The objective was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast, where the core hole penetrated it, and obtain information on the properties of the damaged medium. Geologic characterization of the post-SPE-N-2 core hole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for measurement of physical and mechanical properties. A video was also run in the source hole after it was cleaned out. A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the angle core hole between 5.7 and 7.5 m from the shot point. However, several of the fractures observed in the core hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. The fractures are characterized by a “fresh,” mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets; they are common starting at about 5.4 m from the shot point. Within about 3.3 m of the shot point to the end of the recovered core at 1.6 m from the shot point, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

Townsend, M. J.; Huckins-Gang, H. E.; Prothro, L. B.; Reed, D. N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A Computational Model Incorporating Neural Stem Cell Dynamics Reproduces Glioma Incidence across the Lifespan in the Human Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert...

Bauer, Roman; Stoll, Elizabeth

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Effect of anisotropy in ground movements caused by tunnelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents closed-form analytical solutions for estimating far-field ground deformations caused by shallow tunnelling in a linear elastic soil mass with cross-anisotropic stiffness properties. The solutions describe ...

Zymnis, Despina Maria

476

Common cause analysis : a review and extension of existing methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantitative common cause analysis code, MOBB, is extended to include uncertainties arising from modelling uncertainties and data uncertainties. Two methods, Monte Carlo simulation and the Method-of-Moments are used ...

Heising, Carolyn D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Mutual Optimism as a Rationalist Cause of War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geoffrey. 1988. The Causes of War. 3rd ed. New York: FreeExplanations for War. ” In- ternational Organization 49(2007. “Mutual Optimism and War. ” American Journal of

Slantchev, Branislav L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, ...

Holder, Jason W.

479

Phenomenon of electrization caused by gravitation of massive body  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The value of excess charge in the kernel of massive body (and the opposite in sign excess charge at the surface) caused by the influence of gravitational forces is determined.

D. A. Kirzhnits; A. A. Shatskiy

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

480

Analysis and detection of driver fatigue caused by sleep deprivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human errors in attention and vigilance are among the most common causes of transportation accidents. Thus, effective countermeasures are crucial for enhancing road safety. By pursuing a practical and reliable design of ...

Yang, Ji Hyun, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incident causing damage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

alleles causing variable: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

age of a neutral allele as a function of its Slatkin, Montgomery 13 Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather Physics (arXiv) Summary:...

482

adherens junctions caused: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of an order of magnitude and the corresponding lifetime of about seven decades. R. Yamapi; G. Filatrella 2014-06-24 497 Deaths: Leading causes for 2001 CiteSeer Summary:...

483

The influence of iodinated casein and high fat diets on the performance and incidence of fatty livers in laying hens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INl'LUENCE OF IODINATED CASEIN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE PEBFORMANC' AND INCIDENCE OF FATTY LIVERS IN LAYING H"NS A Thesis Loui" Lee Young Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&II Univer -ity in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject oultry Science THE INPLUENCE OP IODINA'I "D CAS IN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE P, HFOHMAI'JCE AND INCIDENCE OP PATTY LIVENS IN LAYING HENS A Thesis Louis Lee Young Approved...

Young, Louis Lee

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Structural damage to the corticospinal tract correlates with bilateral sensorimotor cortex reorganization in stroke patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reorganization in stroke patients Judith D. Schaechter, Katherine L. Perdue, and Ruopeng Wang MGH 2007 Available online 16 October 2007 Damage to the corticospinal tract (CST) in stroke patients has of structural damage to the CST and functional reorganization in stroke patients. The purpose of the current

Schaechter, Judith D.

485

6 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1)Columns The changing face of wildlife damage management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management methods has risen dramatically. Public scrutiny of these methods has also increased substantially, wildlife damage management professionals are also involved in activities to protect public health damage management. New problems and conflicts with wildlife require increasingly new and unique research

486

Windstorm damage and forest recovery: accelerated succession, stand structure, and spatial pattern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Patterns of wind-induced damage and mortality may vary according to tree species, tree size, tree density). Given the potential variability of wind- related damage, differential tree mortality from a windstorm Ã? Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012 Abstract We evaluated 25 years of change in wind

Palmer, Michael W.

487

NUMERICAL MODELING OF SHOCK-INDUCED DAMAGE FOR GRANITE UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUMERICAL MODELING OF SHOCK-INDUCED DAMAGE FOR GRANITE UNDER DYNAMIC LOADING H. A. Ai1 , T. J beneath impact crater in granite. Model constants are determined either directly from static uniaxial from Century Dynamics to simulate the shock-induced damage in granite targets impacted by projectiles

Stewart, Sarah T.

488

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):315320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):315­320, Fall 2011 Canada goose crop damage abatement in South% in 2006 and 80% in 2007, but the timing was important. Fields where abatement practices were applied early in the growing season had less damage than fields where they were applied later. Abatement practices that were

489

DAMAGE MECHANISMS OF ULTRAHIGH STRENGTH STEELS IN BENDING APPLICATION TO A TRIP STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DAMAGE MECHANISMS OF ULTRAHIGH STRENGTH STEELS IN BENDING APPLICATION TO A TRIP STEEL D. Rèche 1, the present study aims at understanding damage mechanisms involved in bending of Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSSs). It focuses on a TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel. This work is based

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

490

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation for the free vibration analysis of slender Kirchoff plates with both mixed and damaged boundaries an important role in applications of mechanical, aerospace and civil engineering. Studying the free vibration

Butcher, Eric A.

491

NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME-vessel steels. We irradiated samples ofASTM A508 nuclear reactor pressure-vessel steel to fast neutron 17 2 (PALS) to study the effects of neutron damage in the steels on positron lifetimes. Non

Motta, Arthur T.

492

Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition Protects the Kidney from Hypertension-Induced Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibition Protects the Kidney from Hypertension-Induced Damage XUEYING hypertension in- duced renal damage. Chronic administration of the specific SEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecylurea (CDU, 3 mg/d) for 10 d lowered BP in angiotensin hypertensive rats. The contri- bution of renal

Hammock, Bruce D.

493

Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry and the Oyster Reefs Across the Galveston Bay System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry and the Oyster Reefs Across the Galveston Bay Economics and Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Texas AgriLife Extension Service Sea Grant College Program., Russell J. Miget, and Lawrence L. Falconer. "Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry

494

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Debris and Radiation-Induced Damage Effects on EUV Nanolithography Source Collector Mirror Optics, Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT Exposure of collector mirrors facing the hot, dense pinch plasma in plasma region of the lamp are known to induce serious damage to nearby collector mirrors. Candidate collector

Harilal, S. S.

495

Prevention of tissue damage by water jet during cavitation Daniel Palanker,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prevention of tissue damage by water jet during cavitation Daniel Palanker,a) Alexander Vankov Cavitation bubbles accompany explosive vaporization of water following pulsed energy deposition in liquid can produce tissue damage at a distance exceeding the radius of the cavitation bubble by a factor of 4

Palanker, Daniel

496

FREQUENCY DOMAIN INSTANTANEOUS WAVENUMBER ESTIMATION FOR DAMAGE QUANTIFICATION IN LAYERED PLATE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FREQUENCY DOMAIN INSTANTANEOUS WAVENUMBER ESTIMATION FOR DAMAGE QUANTIFICATION IN LAYERED PLATE, US 3 G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA of promising techniques for the identification and the characterization of damage in plate structures. Among

Boyer, Edmond

497

TEMPORAL INFORMATION OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LAMB WAVES FOR FATIGUE DAMAGE LOCALIZATION: ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPORAL INFORMATION OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR LAMB WAVES FOR FATIGUE DAMAGE LOCALIZATION: ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS Ming Hong1,2 , Zhongqing Su*1,3 , Ye Lu2 , Li Cheng1,3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering widely applied to locate gross damage in plate structures, which may greatly facilitate the localization

Boyer, Edmond

498

DAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES FROM FIBRE OPTIC DISTRIBUTED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of backscattered radiation), placing the plain optical fibre at the region where damage is expected. Because of itsDAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURES FROM FIBRE OPTIC DISTRIBUTED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS Alfredo the backscattered radiation ocurring at every point of the optical fibre by its natural disturbances, and three

Boyer, Edmond

499

A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A continuum damage modelling of quasi-static fatigue strength of plain concrete S. H. Maia,b , F of concrete. The approach is based on the framework of continuum damage mechanics where the fatigue model fatigue tests have been performed on a concrete the formulation of which is close to the one used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

500

Management Options for Late-Season Hail Damaged Stripper Harvested Cotton Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management Options for Late-Season Hail Damaged Stripper Harvested Cotton Fields Extension Agronomy Cooperative Extension Agronomist ­ Cotton Lubbock, TX Dr. Robert Lemon Texas Cooperative Extension Agronomist ­ Cotton College Station, TX Late-season severe weather can result in significant hail damage to immature

Mukhtar, Saqib