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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

Hodges, Gary

2

Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases by Means of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. Part I: Retrieval Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A retrieval algorithm for processing multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) data from clear and partially cloudy days is described and validated. This method, while complementary to the Langley approach, uses consistency between the ...

Mikhail D. Alexandrov; Andrew A. Lacis; Barbara E. Carlson; Brian Cairns

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incidence Multifilter Radiometer External Instruments USDARAD : US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Radiation Monitoring Data Field Campaign Instruments AOD : Aerosol Optical...

5

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incidence Multifilter Radiometer External Instruments USDARAD : US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Radiation Monitoring Data Field Campaign Instruments AOD : Aerosol Optical...

6

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

59 59 Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook With subsections for the following derivative instruments: Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) GB Hodges JJ Michalsky January 2011 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research GB Hodges and JJ Michalsky, January 2011, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-059 iii Acronyms and Abbreviations AMF ARM Mobile Facility ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement EMF electromagnetic field ESRL Earth System Research Laboratory FOV field-of-view GMD Global Monitoring Division IMMS Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary MFR multifilter radiometer MFRSR multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer

7

Radiometer Calibration Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiometer Calibration Trends S. M. Wilcox, T. L. Stoffel, and D. R. Myers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado Abstract Calibrations of Atmospheric Radiation...

8

DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook Evaluation of a New Multi-Frequency Microwave Radiometer for Measuring the Vertical Distribution of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Cloud...

9

Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases by Means of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. Part II: Climatological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from ground-based sun photometer networks can be used both to provide ground-truth validation of satellite aerosol retrievals and to produce a land-based aerosol climatology that is complementary to satellite retrievals that are ...

Mikhail D. Alexandrov; Andrew A. Lacis; Barbara E. Carlson; Brian Cairns

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

Morris, VR

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Loss-compensated radiometer  

SciTech Connect

A new radiometer concept is described and evaluated. Automatic dynamic electrical compensation is achieved by a high-gain feedback amplifier and low thermal inertia solar and compensating electrical sensors. With sufficiently high gain, compensation can increase accuracy to limits determined by amplifier drift. Equations governing instrument response are derived and analyzed. Initial measurements on a preliminary prototype confirm the validity of the concept which should yield a very accurate instrument with ''self calibrating'' features.

Lobo, P.C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ARM - Instrument - nimfr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsnimfr govInstrumentsnimfr Documentation NIMFR : Handbook NIMFR : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports NIMFR : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Radiometric Picture of the Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR) Picture of the Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR) General Overview The Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR) is a ground-based instrument that provides a time series of the shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance. Additionally, there is a broadband silicon detector that can crudely measure the direct normal broadband irradiance. These

13

Using digital cameras as quasi-spectral radiometers to study complex fenestration systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work discusses the use of digital cameras fitted with absorption filters as quasi-spectral radiometers. By filtering incident light into selected wavelength intervals, accurate estimates of radiances can be made for ...

Gayeski, Nicholas

14

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Spectro-Radiometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectro-Radiometer Spectro-Radiometer Spectro-Radiometer spectro-radiometer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer The spectro-radiometer is used to measure the light output of a light source at each wavelength. The part that looks like a video camera (to the far right in the picture) can look at each wavelength separately. The spectro-radiometer can also be used as a standard light meter and measure all visible wavelengths at once to obtain the total light output of a source. The console portion of the spectro-radiometer is used to display the meter readings and also to adjust measurement settings like the sensitivity. The computer is interfaced with the spectro-radiometer and is used to send commands to the machine and receive, store, and analyze the data.

15

Calibration Service for Low-level Pulsed-Laser Radiometers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... be noted that not all pulse energies or peak ... both the peak-power and pulse-energy radiometers ... a single radiometer has not been reserved for NIST ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Field Comparison among a Domeless Net Radiometer, Two Four-Component Net Radiometers, and a Domed Net Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kipp & Zonen NR-Lite is a newly designed domeless net radiometer. In preparation for the Oklahoma Atmospheric Surface-layer Instrumentation System (OASIS) Project, the NR-Lite was rigorously field tested for over eight months during 1998. ...

J. A. Brotzge; C. E. Duchon

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The 90/150-GHz Vapor Radiometer provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

Caddedu, MP

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Radiosonde Comparisons During the WVIOP2000 Field Experiment D. Cimini University of L'Aquila L'Aquil, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Y. Han Science System Applications National Aeronautics Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland S. Keihm Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California Introduction During September to October 2000, a water vapor intensive operational period (WVIOP) was conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and

19

Solid-State Radiometer Measurements of Sea Surface Skin Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite sea surface skin temperature (SSST) maps are readily available from precisely calibrated radiometer systems such as the ERS along-track scanning radiometer and, in the near future, from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer. ...

C. J. Donlon; S. J. Keogh; D. J. Baldwin; I. S. Robinson; I. Ridley; T. Sheasby; I. J. Barton; E. F. Bradley; T. J. Nightingale; W. Emery

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ARM's Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARM's BRS data contains measurements of broadband shortwave and longwave, downwelling, upwelling, and normal radiation. The Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) has collected data since 2001. Data Plots can be viewed for the BRS datastream through ARM's Thumbnail Browser. The primary site for BRS data collection is the Southern Great Plains (SGP).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SSM/I Brightness Temperature Corrections for Incidence Angle Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incidence angles of the SSM/I radiometers on the DMSP satellites vary from satellite to satellite and exhibit variations of up to 1.5° during one orbit. The effects of these variations on the measured brightness temperatures are investigated ...

Rolf Fuhrhop; Clemens Simmer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

Tom Stoffel; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Mary Anderberg; Mark Kutchenreiter

23

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

24

Accurate Airborne Surface Temperature Measurements with Chopper-stabilized Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of chopper-stabilized radiometers for the meteorological measurement of surface temperatures was investigated during a series of airborne trails, including tests at high altitude using a pressurized aircraft. The significant finding ...

Dieter Lorenz

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Field Performance of a Spinning-Reflector Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the winter of 1986, two microwave radiometers were operated side by side at a high-altitude weather observation site in the central Sierra Nevada for the purpose of comparing measurements in a variety of ambient weather conditions. The ...

Belay B. Demoz; Arlen W. Huggins; Joseph A. Warburton; Richard L. Smith

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Comparison of Scatterometer and Radiometer Wind Vector Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coincident measurements with a 37-GHz polarimetric radiometer and a 10-GHz scatterometer during the Coastal Ocean Probing Experiment (COPE) in September and October of 1995 offered a unique opportunity to compare their relative sensitivity and ...

David E. Weissman; William J. Plant; William C. Keller; Vladimir G. Irisov

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Temperature Profiling with Neural Network Inversion of Microwave Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neural network is used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature from microwave radiometer data. The overall rms error in the retrieved profiles of a test dataset was only about 8% worse than the overall error using an optimized statistical ...

James H. Churnside; Thomas A. Stermitz; Judith A. Schroeder

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparison of Plotting Methods for Solar Radiometer Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative formulation of the Langley plot relating observed solar irradiance, extraterrestrial solar irradiance, and air mass has been suggested to potentially improve radiometer calibration accuracy. In this study, results from the ...

S. M. Adler-Golden; J. R. Slusser

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Retrievals Obtained with Near-IR Solar Radiometer and Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple two-channel solar radiometer and analysis technique have been developed for setting atmospheric water vapor via differential solar transmission measurements in and adjacent to the 940-nm water vapor absorption band. A prototype solar ...

J. Reagan; K. Thome; B. Herman; R. Stone; J. DeLuisi; J. Snider

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Infrared Sea Surface Temperature Autonomous Radiometer (ISAR) for Deployment aboard Volunteer Observing Ships (VOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrared SST autonomous radiometer (ISAR) is a self-calibrating instrument capable of measuring in situ sea surface skin temperature (SSTskin) to an accuracy of 0.1 K. Extensive field deployments alongside two independent research radiometers ...

C. Donlon; I. S. Robinson; W. Wimmer; G. Fisher; M. Reynolds; R. Edwards; T. J. Nightingale

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Improved Retrieval of Integrated Water Vapor from Water Vapor Radiometer Measurements Using Numerical Weather Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor radiometer (WVR) retrieval algorithms require a priori information on atmospheric conditions along the line of sight of the radiometer in order to derive opacities from observed brightness temperatures. This paper's focus is the mean ...

Steven R. Chiswell; Steven Businger; Michael Bevis; Fredrick Solheim; Christian Rocken; Randolph Ware

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quantitative Measurements of Path-Integrated Rain Rate by an Airborne Microwave Radiometer over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on the airborne microwave radiometer, which is one of the sensors of the airborne microwave rain-scatterometer/radiometer (AMRS) system, are analyzed to infer path-integrated rain rate measured from topside. The equation of radiative ...

Masaharu Fujita; Ken'ichi Okamoto; Harunobu Masuko; Takeyuki Ojima; Nobuyoshi Fugono

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Miami2001 Infrared Radiometer Calibration and Intercomparison. Part II: Shipboard Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second calibration and intercomparison of infrared radiometers (Miami2001) was held at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) during a workshop held from May to June 2001. The radiometers ...

I. J. Barton; P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; C. J. Donlon; S. J. Hook; A. T. Jessup; T. J. Nightingale

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A High Speed Spectrally Scanning Radiometer (SPERAD) for Airborne Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall design of a radiometer and data acquisition system for use on an aircraft platform is described. The instrument is a fast response spectrally scanning radiometer providing measurements at 48 spectral intervals between 400 and 1200 nm. ...

Graeme L. Stephens; John C. Scott

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Design and Performance Analysis of an Automated 10-Channel Solar Radiometer Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated multichannel solar radiometer has been designed and fabricated by the Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory at The University of Arizona. The automated radiometer has 10 separate silicon-photodiode-based channels that allow near-...

A. R. Ehsani; J. A. Reagan; W. H. Erxleben

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NREL: MIDC/ARM Radiometer Characterization System (36.606 N,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center collects Irradiance and Meterological data from the ARM Radiometer Characterization System....

37

Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

Cadeddu, MP

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Scanning multichannel microwave radiometer snow water equivalent assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatic driver through the surface albedo's role in energy and water budgets [e.g., Yeh et al., 1983Scanning multichannel microwave radiometer snow water equivalent assimilation Jiarui Dong,1 due to complicating effects, including distance to open water, presence of wet snow, and presence

Houser, Paul R.

39

ARM - Datastreams - nimfr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsnimfr Datastreamsnimfr Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025258 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example nimfr Archive Data Plot Example nimfr Archive Data Plot Datastream : NIMFR Normal Incidence Multi-Filter Radiometer (NIMFR): direct normal irradiances Active Dates 1997.10.16 - 2014.01.09 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Airmass unitless airmass ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt Azimuth angle degrees azimuth_angle ( time )

40

Microwave Radiometer Calibration on Decadal Time Scales Using On-Earth Brightness Temperature References: Application to the TOPEX Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described to calibrate a satellite microwave radiometer operating near 18–37 GHz on decadal time scales for the purposes of climate studies. The method uses stable on-earth brightness temperature references over the full dynamic range ...

Shannon Brown; Shailen Desai; Stephen Keihm; Wenwen Lu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Differential Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

42

Method and apparatus for precision control of radiometer  

SciTech Connect

A radiometer controller of a solar radiation detector is described. The system includes a calibration method and apparatus comprised of mounting all temperature sensitive elements of the controller in thermostatically controlled ovens during calibration and measurements, using a selected temperature that is above any which might be reached in the field. The instrument is calibrated in situ by adjusting heater power to the receptor cavity in the radiometer detector to a predetermined full scale level as displayed by a meter. Then with the heater de-energized and the receptor cavity covered, the voltage output, is set to zero as displayed by the meter. Next the preset power is applied to the heater and the output of the radiant measurement channel is applied to the panel meter. With this preset heater power producing the proper heat, the gain of the measurement channel is adjusted to bring the meter display to full scale.

Estey, R.S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Incident Handling Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] Incident Handling Activities. Since 1989 the National Institute of Standards ...

46

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

47

NREL: MIDC/SMUD Anatolia Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (38.55...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center collects Irradiance and Meterological data from the SMUD Anatolia Irradiance Inc. Rotating Shadowband Radiometer v2....

48

ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

OAK A271 ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) heterodyne radiometer diagnostic on DIII-D has been upgraded with the addition of eight channels for a total of 40. The new, higher frequency channels allow measurements of electron temperature into the magnetic axis in discharges at maximum field, 2.15 T. The complete set now extends over the full usable range of second harmonic emission frequencies at 2.0 T covering radii from the outer edge inward to the location of third harmonic overlap on the high field side. Full coverage permits the measurement of heat pulses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations on both sides of the magnetic axis. In addition, the symmetric measurements are used to fix the location of the magnetic axis in tokamak magnetic equilibrium reconstructions. Also, the new higher frequency channels have been used to determine central T{sub e} with good time resolution in low field, high density discharges using third harmonic ECE in the optically gray and optically thick regimes.

AUSTIN, ME; LOHR, J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A New Look at Calibration and Use of Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometers. Part II: Calibration and Use of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Improved Meteorology Precision Infrared Radiometer*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For some years, investigators have made measurements of downwelling longwave irradiance with the Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometer (PIR), recording the values of thermopile voltage and body and dome thermistor resistances and combining them in ...

Richard E. Payne; Steven P. Anderson

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A High-Accuracy Multiwavelength Radiometer for In Situ Measurements in the Thermal Infrared. Part I: Characterization of the Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new infrared radiometer (conveyable low-noise infrared radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground surface targets, or CLIMAT) is a highly sensitive field instrument designed to measure brightness temperatures or radiances in the ...

Michel Legrand; Christophe Pietras; Gérard Brogniez; Martial Haeffelin; Nader Khalil Abuhassan; Michaël Sicard

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Calibration of Geostationary-Satellite Infrared Radiometers Using the TIROS-N Vertical Sounder: Application to METEOSAT-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for the calibration of infrared radiometers on geostationary satellites using calibrated infrared radiometers on an orbiting satellite. This method relies on similarities between the weighting functions corresponding to the ...

N. Beriot; N. A. Scott; A. Chedin; P. Sitbon

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ARM - Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifilter Radiometer 1997.10.26 1998.09.30 grams Ground Radiometer Autonomous Measurement System 1997.10.15 2000.10.03 precnet Precipitation Network 1997.10.01 2003.10.31...

53

Dual transmission grating based imaging radiometer for tokamak edge and divertor plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designs of single transmission grating based extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) imaging spectrometers can be adapted to build an imaging radiometer for simultaneous measurement of both spectral ranges. This paper describes the design of such an imaging radiometer with dual transmission gratings. The radiometer will have an XUV coverage of 20-200 A with a {approx}10 A resolution and a VUV coverage of 200-2000 A with a {approx}50 A resolution. The radiometer is designed to have a spatial view of 16 Degree-Sign , with a 0.33 Degree-Sign resolution and a time resolution of {approx}10 ms. The applications for such a radiometer include spatially resolved impurity monitoring and electron temperature measurements in the tokamak edge and the divertor. As a proof of principle, the single grating instruments were used to diagnose a low temperature reflex discharge and the relevant data is also included in this paper.

Kumar, Deepak; Clayton, Daniel J.; Parman, Matthew; Stutman, Dan; Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

55

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable...

56

January 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of...

57

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information ...

58

Incidents of Security Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1210-2012 September 2012 DOE STANDARD Incidents of Security Concern U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1210-2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1210-2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................ IV INCIDENTS OF SECURITY CONCERN......................................................................................1 1. SCOPE ....................................................................................................................................1 2. PURPOSE...............................................................................................................................1

59

Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) facilities. The first was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent arctic Ocean (AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, during March 1999. One goal was to evaluate the ability of an

60

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network M. A. Miller, R. M. Reynolds, and J. J. Bartholomew Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction A network of ship-mounted marine fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) and broadband radiometers have been deployed over the fast four years on several backbone ships, funded jointly by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Studies (SIMBIOS). These radiometers operate continuously and automatically during daylight hours. There fundamental measurements made by the FRSRs in the network are the direct-normal irradiance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Advanced Rain/No-Rain Classification Methods for Microwave Radiometer Observations over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seto et al. developed rain/no-rain classification (RNC) methods over land for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI). In this study, the methods are modified for application to other microwave radiometers. The ...

Shinta Seto; Takuji Kubota; Nobuhiro Takahashi; Toshio Iguchi; Taikan Oki

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN THE ARCTIC Cadeddu, Maria Argonne National Laboratory Category: Instruments A new G-band (183 GHz) vapor radiometer (GVR), developed and built by Prosensing Inc. (http://www.prosensing.com), was deployed in Barrow, Alaska, in April 2005. The radiometer was deployed as part of the ongoing Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's effort to improve water vapor retrievals in the cold, dry Arctic environment. The instrument measures brightness temperatures from four double sideband channels centered at 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz from the 183.31-GHz water vapor line. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. The GVR will remain in Barrow

63

Attitude Determination from a Balloon-Borne Radiometer Using Two-Sided Limb Scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of the horizontal attitude of a balloon-borne, infrared, limb-scanning radiometer is discussed. In particular, the relationship between scan-angle, as measured by the instrument, and the tangent height of the ray path through ...

J. R. Drummond; D. Turner; A. Ashton

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Evaluation of a Self-Calibrating Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite radiometer measurements of global sea surface temperature (SST) with an accuracy of 0.3 K are required for climate change monitoring. In order to validate that this accuracy can be achieved, in situ measurements of sea surface radiance ...

J. P. Thomas; R. J. Knight; H. K. Roscoe; J. Turner; C. Symon

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Errors in Net Radiometry: Comparison and Evaluation of Six Radiometer Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net radiation is a fundamental variable in meteorology, but net radiometers have not been used extensively since the 1960s because of what is commonly considered as unreliable function. This study was conducted to determine whether this problem ...

Sven Halldin; Anders Lindroth

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Miami2001 Infrared Radiometer Calibration and Intercomparison. Part I: Laboratory Characterization of Blackbody Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second calibration and intercomparison of infrared radiometers (Miami2001) was held at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) during May–June 2001. The participants were from several groups ...

J. P. Rice; J. J. Butler; B. C. Johnson; P. J. Minnett; K. A. Maillet; T. J. Nightingale; S. J. Hook; A. Abtahi; C. J. Donlon; I. J. Barton

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Combining Microwave Radiometer and Wind Profiler Radar Measurements for High-Resolution Atmospheric Humidity Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent remote sensing physical method to retrieve atmospheric humidity high-resolution profiles by synergetic use of a microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) and wind profiler radar (WPR) is illustrated. The proposed technique is based ...

Laura Bianco; Domenico Cimini; Frank S. Marzano; Randolph Ware

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Retrieval of Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Backscattering Properties Using Combined Lidar and Infrared Radiometer (LIRAD) Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for retrieval of cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties using combined ruby lidar and infrared radiometer measurements is explained in detail. The retrieval algorithm includes estimation of a variable backscatter-to-extinction ...

Jennifer M. Comstock; Kenneth Sassen

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hurricane Surface Wind Measurements from an Operational Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, the NOAA/Aircraft Operations Center (AOC) flew stepped frequency microwave radiometers (SFMRs) on both WP-3D research aircraft for operational hurricane surface wind speed measurement in 2005. An unprecedented number of major ...

Eric W. Uhlhorn; Peter G. Black; James L. Franklin; Mark Goodberlet; James Carswell; Alan S. Goldstein

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wind Speed Effects on Sea Surface Emission and Reflection for the Along Track Scanning Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission and reflection properties of a rough sea surface are investigated, with particular emphasis on the wavelengths and viewing geometry relevant to the Along Track Scanning Radiometer. The authors start from Fresnel's equations for a ...

Philip D. Watts; Myles R. Allen; Timothy J. Nightingale

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Design, Operation, and Calibration of a Shipboard Fast-Rotating Shadowband Spectral Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, calibration, and deployment of a fast-rotating shadowband radiometer (FRSR) that accurately decomposes downward shortwave (solar) irradiance into direct-beam and diffuse components from a moving platform, such as ...

R. Michael Reynolds; Mark A. Miller; Mary J. Bartholomew

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optimizing Performance of a Microwave Salinity Mapper: STARRS L-Band Radiometer Enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne microwave radiometers for salinity remote sensing have advanced to a point where operational surveys can be conducted over the inner continental shelf to observe the evolution of freshwater plumes emanating from rivers and estuaries. To ...

Derek M. Burrage; Joel C. Wesson; Mark A. Goodberlet; Jerry L. Miller

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Vicarious Calibration of an Ocean Salinity Radiometer from Low Earth Orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical properties of the brightness temperature (TB) measured by a low-earth-orbiting radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz are considered as a means of calibrating and validating the sensor. Mapping of ocean salinity by such an instrument ...

Christopher S. Ruf

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Characteristics as Determined from a Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Nimbus-5 F-Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR-5) have been used to calculate latent heat release (LHR) and other rainfall parameters for over 70 satelite observations of 21 tropical cyclones during 1973, 1974 and 1975 ...

E. B. Rodgers; R. F. Adler

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multiwavelength Scanning Radiometer for Airborne Measurements of Scattered Radiation within Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-wavelength scanning radiometer has been developed for measuring the angular distribution of scattered radiation deep within a cloud layer. The purpose of the instrument is to provide measurements from which the single scattering albedo of ...

Michael D. King; Maxwell G. Strange; Peter Leone; Lamdin R. Blaine

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Structure of Florida Thunderstorms Using High-Altitude Aircraft Radiometer and Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of a unique radar and radiometer dataset from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high-altitude aircraft overlying Florida thunderstorms on 5 October 1993 during the Convection and ...

G. M. Heymsfield; J. M. Shepherd; S. W. Bidwell; W. C. Boncyk; I. J. Caylor; S. Ameen; W. S. Olson

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Enhanced NOAA Global Land Dataset from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global mapped data of reflected radiation in the visible (0.63 ?m) and near-infrared (0.85 ?m) wavebands of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites have been ...

Garik Gutman; Dan Tarpley; Aleksandr Ignatov; Steve Olson

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

High-Resolution Imaging of Rain Systems with the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) has been developed and flown in the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft for imaging various atmospheric and surface processes, primarily the internal structure of rain clouds. The AMPR is a ...

Roy W. Spencer; Robbie E. Hood; Frank J. Lafontaine; Eric A. Smith; Robert Platt; Joe Galliano; Vanessa L. Griffin; Elena Lobl

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Numerical Filtering of Spurious Transients in a Satellite Scanning Radiometer: Application to CERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer was designed to provide high accuracy measurements of the radiances from the earth. Calibration testing of the instruments showed the presence of an undesired slow transient ...

G. Louis Smith; D. K. Pandey; Robert B. Lee III; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Kory J. Priestley

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Spatial Variability of Summer Florida Precipitation and Its Impact on Microwave Radiometer Rainfall-Measurement Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional radar data for three summer Florida storm are used as input to a microwave radiative transfer model. The model simulates microwave brightness observations by a 19-GHz, nadir-pointing, satellite-borne microwave radiometer.

B. J. Turner; G. L. Austin

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bayesian Estimation of Precipitation from Satellite Passive Microwave Observations Using Combined Radar–Radiometer Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation estimation from satellite passive microwave radiometer observations is a problem that does not have a unique solution that is insensitive to errors in the input data. Traditionally, to make this problem well posed, a priori ...

Mircea Grecu; William S. Olson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Correlations between Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer Data and an Antecedent Precipitation Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive microwave brightness temperatures from the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) can be used to infer the soil moisture content over agricultural areas such as the southern Great Plains of the United States. A linear ...

Gregory D. Wilke; Marshall J. McFarland

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mobile Microwave Radiometer Observations: Spatial Characteristics of Supercooled Cloud Water and Cloud Seeding Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies of the spatial distribution of supercooled liquid water in winter storms over mountainous terrain were performed primarily with instrumented aircraft and to a lesser extent with scans from a stationary microwave radiometer. The ...

Arlen W. Huggins

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparison of Infrared Atmospheric Brightness Temperatures Measured by a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and a Filter Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased interest in using atmospheric brightness temperature measurements from simple infrared radiometers combined with radars and lidars has prompted the investigation of their accuracy for various sky conditions. In comparisons of ...

Joseph A. Shaw; Jack B. Snider; James H. Churnside; Mark D. Jacobson

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Producing Mega-pixel CMB Maps from Differential Radiometer Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major goal of cosmology is to obtain sensitive, high resolution maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy. Such maps, as would be produced by the recently proposed Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP), will contain a wealth of primary information about conditions in the early universe. To mitigate systematic effects when observing the microwave background, it is desirable for the raw data to be collected in differential form: as a set of temperature differences between points in the sky. However, the production of large (mega-pixel) maps from a set of temperature differences is a potentially severe computational challenge. We present a new technique for producing maps from differential radiometer data that has a computational cost that grows in the slowest possible way with increasing angular resolution and number of map pixels. The required central processor (CPU) time is proportional to the number of differential data points and the required random access memory (RAM) is proportional to the number of map pixels. We test our technique, and demonstrate its feasibility, by simulating one year of a space-borne anisotropy mission.

Edward L. Wright; Gary Hinshaw; Charles L. Bennett

1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Incident Investigation and Reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a model procedure for incident investigations based on an examination of programs at fourteen utilities believed to have good and effective procedures. The model was compiled by an expert who also drew on materials from other industries. An outline presents the basic procedure while the main text discusses in more detail alternate methods that may be preferable for a specific utility.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Determination of total ozone from DMSP multichannel filter radiometer measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) infrared sensor was first flown in 1977 on a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block 5D series satellite operated by the US Air Force. The first four satellites in this series carried MFR sensors from which total atmospheric column ozone amounts may be derived. The last MFR sensor ceased operating on February 16, 1980. The series of four sensors spans a data period of nearly three years. The MFR sensor measures infrared radiances for 16 channels. Total ozone amounts are determined from sets of radiance measurements using an empirical relationship that is developed using linear regression analysis. Total ozone is modeled as a linear combination of terms involving functions of the MFR radiances for four channels (1, 3, 7 and 16) and the secant of the zenith angle. The ozone retrieval methodology is described schematically. The ozone retrieval model is developed through regression analysis using sets of simulated MFR radiances derived from detailed radiative transfer calculations. The MFR total ozone data are compared with independent ground-based Dobson measurements in order to evaluate the ozone retrieval methodology. Many Dobson observatories have been providing their daily measurements of total ozone which are taken close in time to DMSP overpass times. MFR total ozone data are compared with Dobson measurements taken between January 1 and February 15, 1979, and the results are summarized. Comparisons were made where the MFR and Dobson measurements are within 300 km and 300 minutes of each other. Percentages are computed with respect to the Dobson values. The MFR data were processed using a preliminary methodology, and the data will be reprocessed in the near future.

Luther, F.M.; Weichel, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Airborne Radar and Passive Radiometer Measurements: Comparison with Dual-Frequency Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares precipitation rate profiles derived from a single frequency radar and radiometer with such profiles derived from a dual-frequency radar.

J. A. Weinman; R. Meneghini; K. Nakamura

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT  

SciTech Connect

To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fusion and Advanced Electromagnetic Technology Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Characterization of the Immersion Factor for a Series of In-Water Optical Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral immersion factors, If(?), account for the difference between the in-air and in-water absolute response of submersible radiometers and are required to properly apply the in-air absolute calibration of the sensor when used underwater. The ...

G. Zibordi; S. B. Hooker; J. Mueller; G. Lazin

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Validation of Atlantic Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures Measured by the ERS-1 Along Track Scanning Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period from October 1991 to May 1992 the royal research ship Bransfield made its annual voyage from the United Kingdom to Antarctica and back. Whenever the measurement swath of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) on the ERS-1 ...

J. P. Thomas; J. Turner

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect

The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Correcting Active Scatterometer Data for the Effects of Rain Using Passive Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for the effects of rain on scatterometer data is proposed. Data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) and the SeaWinds scatterometer, both on the Midori-II satellite, are used. The model includes three basic rain effects: ...

K. A. Hilburn; F. J. Wentz; D. K. Smith; P. D. Ashcroft

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

An Airborne Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer for Cloud, Precipitation, and Atmospheric Water Vapor Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel airborne total-power Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (MIR) was recently built to provide measurements of atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and precipitation. The instrument is a cross-track scanner that has a 3-dB beamwidth of 3.5°...

P. Racette; R. F. Adler; J. R. Wang; A. J. Gasiewski; D. M. Jakson; D. S. Zacharias

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 21:49 To: incidentcoordination@nist.gov Subject: Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MWR status MWR status M.P. Cadeddu New radiometers New radiometers ECO-00664 (MWR procurement) open Specifications have been written and submitted Draft of specifications sent to vendors last month A few changes were incorporated after vendors feedback. Final specification document will be sent next week. ECO-00664 (MWR procurement) open Specifications have been written and submitted Draft of specifications sent to vendors last month A few changes were incorporated after vendors feedback. Final specification document will be sent next week. PWV-LWP: 12 2-channel MWR Temperature-humidity profile: 2 profilers operating Low LWP-PWV: 2 183-GHz radiometers Low LWP: 2 90/150-GHz radiometers PWV-LWP: 12 2-channel MWR Temperature-humidity profile: 2 profilers

98

A Second-Generation Blackbody System for the Calibration and Verification of Sea-Going Infrared Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-operational shipborne radiometers provide a Fiducial Reference Measurement (FRM) for satellite validation of satellite sea surface skin temperature (SSTskin) retrievals. External reference blackbodies are required to verify the performance ...

Craig J. Donlon; W. Wimmer; I. Robinson; G. Fisher; M. Ferlet; T. Nightingale; B. Bras

99

The Calibration and Intercalibration of Sea-Going Infrared Radiometer Systems Using a Low Cost Blackbody Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many infrared radiometer systems available for the measurement of in situ sea surface skin temperature (SSST). Unfortunately, the marine environment is extremely hostile to optical components, and to ensure the accuracy of SSST ...

C. J. Donlon; T. Nightingale; L. Fiedler; G. Fisher; D. Baldwin; I. S. Robinson

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

First Three Years of the Microwave Radiometer aboard Envisat: In-Flight Calibration, Processing, and Validation of the Geophysical Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Envisat microwave radiometer is designed to correct the satellite altimeter data for the excess path delay resulting from tropospheric humidity. Neural networks have been used to formulate the inversion algorithm to retrieve this quantity ...

E. Obligis; L. Eymard; N. Tran; S. Labroue; P. Femenias

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A High-Accuracy Multiwavelength Radiometer for In Situ Measurements in the Thermal Infrared. Part II: Behavior in Field Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performances of the new conveyable low-noise infrared radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground surface targets, or CLIMAT, are presented for in situ measurements. For this, quantitative analyses were carried out on measurements ...

Gérard Brogniez; Christophe Pietras; Michel Legrand; Philippe Dubuisson; Martial Haeffelin

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Change Detection Algorithm for Retrieving High-Resolution Soil Moisture From SMAP Radar and Radiometer Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A change detection algorithm has been developed in order to obtain high-resolution soil moisture estimates from future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) L-band radar and radiometer observations. The approach combines ...

Piles, Maria

103

The Global Trend in Sea Surface Temperature from 20 Years of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trend in sea surface temperature has been determined from 20 yr of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder data (version 5). The data span the period from January 1985 to December 2004, inclusive. The linear trends were calculated ...

S. A. Good; G. K. Corlett; J. J. Remedios; E. J. Noyes; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A New Look at Calibration and Use of Eppley Precision Infrared Radiometers. Part I: Theory and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration and accuracy of the Eppley precision infrared radiometer (PIR) is examined both theoretically and experimentally. A rederivation of the fundamental energy balance of the PIR indicates that the calibration equation in common use in ...

C. W. Fairall; P. O. G. Persson; E. F. Bradley; R. E. Payne; S. P. Anderson

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Retrieval of Cirrus Microphysical Properties with a Suite of Algorithms for Airborne and Spaceborne Lidar, Radar, and Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms are developed to convert data streams from multiple airborne and spaceborne remote sensors into layer-averaged cirrus bulk microphysical properties. Radiometers such as the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observe ...

Yuying Zhang; Gerald G. Mace

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of Near–Real Time Estimates of Integrated Water Vapor Derived with GPS, Radiosondes, and Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors compare the integrated water vapor (IWV) retrieved with a global positioning system (GPS) receiver, radiosondes (RS), and a microwave radiometer (MWR) using data collected simultaneously during a 3-month campaign in the ...

Joël Van Baelen; Jean-Pierre Aubagnac; Alain Dabas

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Inference of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Moisture and Temperature Structure Using Airborne Lidar and Infrared Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for retrieving near-surface moisture and profiles of mixing ratio and potential temperature through the depth of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) using airborne lidar and multichannel infrared radiometer data is ...

Stephen P. Palm; Denise Hagan; Geary Schwemmer; S. H. Melfi

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

109

A Steerable Dual-Channel Microwave Radiometer for Measurement of Water Vapor and Liquid in the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument that remotely senses the integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid on a path through the atmosphere is discussed. The vapor and liquid are measured simultaneously but independently by microwave radiometers. Comparison of the ...

D. C. Hogg; F. O. Guiraud; J. B. Snider; M. T. Decker; E. R. Westwater

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Remotely Sensed Measurements of Stratocumulus Properties during FIRE Using the C130 Aircraft Multi-channel Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gives a description of a narrow-hand near-infrared radiometer that was operated during the marine stratocumulus intensive field observation program of FIRE in 1987 from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office C130 aircraft. All data ...

F. Rawlins; J. S. Foot

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluating the Quality of Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Retrievals Using Detrended Fluctuation and Spectral Analysis Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series both of microwave radiometer brightness temperature measurements at 23.8 and 31.4 GHz and of retrievals of water vapor and liquid water path from these brightness temperatures are evaluated using the detrended fluctuation analysis ...

K. Ivanova; E. E. Clothiaux; H. N. Shirer; T. P. Ackerman; J. C. Liljegren; M. Ausloos

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Comparisons of Line-of-Sight Water Vapor Observations Using the Global Positioning System and a Pointing Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Line-of-sight measurements of integrated water vapor from a global positioning system (GPS) receiver and a microwave radiometer are compared. These two instruments were collocated at the central facility of the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric ...

John Braun; Christian Rocken; James Liljegren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Characterization of Precipitating Clouds by Ground-Based Measurements with the Triple-Frequency Polarized Microwave Radiometer ADMIRARI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A groundbreaking new-concept multiwavelength dual-polarized Advanced Microwave Radiometer for Rain Identification (ADMIRARI) has been built and continuously operated in two field campaigns: the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation ...

Alessandro Battaglia; Pablo Saavedra; Thomas Rose; Clemens Simmer

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ARM - Instrument - mfrsr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsmfrsr govInstrumentsmfrsr Documentation MFRSR : Handbook MFRSR : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports MFRSR : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Radiometric Picture of the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Picture of the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) General Overview The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a

115

Scaling Properties of Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrieved from Ground-Based Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical scale-by-scale analysis, for the first time, has been applied to the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieved from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) network. The MFRSR data were collected in September 2000 from ...

Mikhail D. Alexandrov; Alexander Marshak; Brian Cairns; Andrew A. Lacis; Barbara E. Carlson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

An Automated Method of MFRSR Calibration for Aerosol Optical Depth Analysis with Application to an Asian Dust Outbreak over the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, networks of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) and automated sun photometers have been established in the United States to monitor aerosol properties. The MFRSR alternately measures diffuse and global ...

John A. Augustine; Christopher R. Cornwall; Gary B. Hodges; Charles N. Long; Carlos I. Medina; John J. DeLuisi

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microfluidic labeling of biomolecules with radiometals for use in nuclear Tobias D. Wheeler,ab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The analysis was performed using the following gradient of 0.1 vol% TFA in de-ionized water (A) and 0.1 vol of concentrated reagents. As a model reaction, we radiolabel 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic of reservoirs for the incubation of the radiometal­ligand mixture and (3) a thin-film heater for heating

Kenis, Paul J. A.

118

Comparison of Historical Satellite Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowland Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-based solar radiation estimates have recently been incorporated into the 1990-2005 update to the 1961-1990 U.S. National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) also supplies satellite-based estimates of solar radiation. The usefulness of such data with respect to solar resources for site selection and designing solar energy conversion systems is often questioned. The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates. We compare the most recent shadowband radiometer MMDT with a complement of thermopile 'first class' solar radiometers at one site. Quantitative analysis shows that in most cases, the long-term average MMDT and measured data are comparable, within 10% of each other for global, and 20% for direct-radiation MMDT.

Myers, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

120

Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

Robert J. Turk

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer.

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ARM: G-band (183 GHz) Vapor Radiometer profiler: 15 microwave brightness temperatures from 170.0 to 183.3 GHz  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

G-band (183 GHz) Vapor Radiometer profiler: 15 microwave brightness temperatures from 170.0 to 183.3 GHz

Maria Cadeddu

124

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

125

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

126

Incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a fire at an oilfield waste disposal facility (hereafter, disposal facility) near Rosharon, Texas, south of Houston. The fire occurred as two vacuum trucks were off-loading liquid wastes from oil and gas production wells. The trucks arrived at the disposal facility within a few minutes of each other and were parked approximately 16 feet apart. The two drivers got out of their trucks, left the engines running, and told the disposal facility employees that the trucks were to be drained and rinsed out. Both drivers then went to the drivers ’ shed to complete paperwork and to wait for the washout to be completed. (1) The fire was caused by the ignition of hydrocarbon vapor released during the off-loading of basic

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Producing radiometals in liquid targets: Proof of feasibility with {sup 94m}Tc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sup 94m}Tc was produced in a liquid target loaded with a molybdenum-salt solution. This novel technique allows for the irradiation of metals dissolved in a liquid solution, normally only available in metal powder or foil form. By using this approach, the existing liquid targets and transfer infrastructure of many PET cyclotrons can be used to produce radiometals, avoiding the need, expense and challenges of operating solid targets. Such an approach allows for rapid testing of new isotopes for proof of feasibility studies. Different concentrations of Mo solution and their effect on the target performance were tested. Sufficient quantities to allow for preclinical studies were produced.

Hoehr, C.; Badesso, B.; Morley, T.; Trinczek, M.; Buckley, K.; Klug, J.; Zeisler, S.; Hanemaayer, V.; Ruth, T. R.; Benard, F.; Schaffer, P. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada) and BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada) and BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Avenue, V5Z 4E6 Vancouver, BC (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, V6T 2A3 Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cyber Security Incidents, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reporting Computing Security Incidents Reporting Computing Security Incidents Incident Reporting Hotline: 631-344-8484 Security Incidents A computer security incident can range from a simple virus to the disclosure of sensitive information. Incidents can be minor, important, or significant. Incidents that must be reported include computer or network related activity, internal or external to the Laboratory, that may impact the Laboratory's mission. Examples of such activities include: the possibility of: loss of data; denial of services; compromise of computer security; unauthorized access to data that the Laboratory is required to control by law, regulation, or DOE orders; investigative activity by legal, law enforcement, bureaucratic, or political authorities; or a public relations embarrassment.

131

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

132

Radiometric Validation of ERS-1 Along-Track Scanning Radiometer Average Sea Surface Temperature in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ERS-1 along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) provides a half-degree latitude by half-degree longitude average sea surface temperature (ASST) measurement representative of the thermal skin layer of the ocean that is intended for use in global ...

Craig J. Donlon; Ian S. Robinson

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluated the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer. One minute averages of 3-second data for 12 months from the test instrument measurements were compared with the computed reference data set. Combined uncertainty in the computed reference irradiance is 1.8% {+-} 0.5%. Total uncertainty in the pyranometer comparisons is {+-}2.5%. We show mean percent difference between reference global irradiance and test pyranometer 1 minute data as a function of zenith angle, and percent differences between daily totals for the reference and test irradiances as a function of day number. We offer no explicit conclusion about the performance of instrument models, as a general array of applications with a wide range of instrumentation and accuracy requirements could be addressed with any of the radiometers.

Myers, D.; Wilcox, S. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cloud Clearing over the Ocean in the Processing of Data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared radiometric measurements of surface parameters are prone to error if clouds are present in the observation path. The along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) with its novel dual-view feature is able to correct for absorption effects in the ...

Albin M. Závody; Christopher T. Mutlow; David T. Llewellyn-Jones

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers M. M. Khaiyer and J. Huang Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, B. Lin, and W. L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia A. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia A. Rapp Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Satellites are useful for monitoring climatological parameters over large domains. They are especially useful for measuring various cloud microphysical and radiative parameters where ground-based instruments are not available. The geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) has been used to retrieve cloud and radiative properties over an extended domain centered on the Atmospheric

136

Modification of the collective Thomson scattering radiometer in the search for parametric decay on TEXTOR  

SciTech Connect

Strong scattering of high-power millimeter waves at 140 GHz has been shown to take place in heating and current-drive experiments at TEXTOR when a tearing mode is present in the plasma. The scattering signal is at present supposed to be generated by the parametric decay instability. Here we describe the heterodyne detection system used to characterize the newly discovered signal measured at TEXTOR, and we present spectral shapes in which the signal can appear under different conditions. The radiation is collected by the receiver through a quasi-optical transmission line that is independent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating transmission line, and so the scattering geometry is variable. The signal is detected with 42 frequency channels ranging from 136 to 142 GHz. We demonstrate that the large signal does not originate from gyrotron spurious radiation. The measured signal agrees well with independent backscattering radiometer data.

Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P.; Stejner, M. [Association EURATOM - DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Risoe Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bongers, W.; Moseev, D.; Westerhof, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM - FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oosterbeek, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics, Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cyber Incident Information | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Cyber Incident Information July 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information (PII). January 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of employee and contractor Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Tips to Monitor Your Identity Here is a suggested list of tips to monitor and protect yourself. Assistive Technology Forms Guidance Capital Planning Information Collection Management

138

Definition: Angle of incidence | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angle of incidence Angle of incidence Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Angle of incidence In reference to solar energy systems: the angle a ray of sun makes with a line perpendicular to a surface; for example, a surface directly facing the sun has an angle of incidence of zero, and a surface parallel to the sun (such as a sunrise striking a horizontal rooftop) has an angle of incidence of 90°. Sunlight with an incident angle of 90° tends to be absorbed, while lower angles tend to be reflected.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Angle of incidence is a measure of deviation of something from "straight on", for example: in the approach of a ray to a surface, or the angle at which the wing or horizontal tail of an airplane is installed on the fuselage, measured relative to the axis of the fuselage.

139

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management » JC3 Incident Reporting Management » JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting Procedures U.S. Department of Energy Facilities/Contractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all cyber security incidents involving information or information systems, including privacy breaches, under DOE or DOE contractor control must be identified, mitigated, categorized, and reported to the Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (JC3) in accordance with JC3 procedures and guidance." This document outlines the referenced JC3 reporting procedures and guidance to facilitate your reporting and CIRC's response activity. CIRC should be informed of all reportable cyber security incidents as specified below.

140

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, ...

M. J. Bartholomew; R. M. Reynolds; A. M. Vogelmann; Q. Min; R. Edwards; S. Smith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Performance of Commercial Radiometers in Very Low Temperature and Pressure Environments Typical of Polar Regions and of the Stratosphere: A Laboratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing the performance of ground-based commercial radiometers in cold and/or low-pressure environments is critical for developing accurate flux measurements in the polar regions and in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Commercially ...

Wenying Su; Ellsworth Dutton; Thomas P. Charlock; Warren Wiscombe

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Rain/No-Rain Classification Methods for Microwave Radiometer Observations over Land Using Statistical Information for Brightness Temperatures under No-Rain Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Global Precipitation Measurement project, the successor to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), is to produce a 3-hourly global rainfall map using several spaceborne microwave radiometers. It is important, ...

Shinta Seto; Nobuhiro Takahashi; Toshio Iguchi

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Study of a Retrieval Method for Temperature and Humidity Profiles from Microwave Radiometer Observations Based on Principal Component Analysis and Stepwise Regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of principal component analysis and stepwise regression in the retrieval of vertical profiles of temperature and humidity based on the measurements of a 35-channel microwave radiometer. It uses the radiosonde ...

Haobo Tan; Jietai Mao; Huanhuan Chen; P. W. Chan; Dui Wu; Fei Li; Tao Deng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Scientific Basis and Initial Evaluation of the CLAVR-1 Global Clear/Cloud Classification Algorithm for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for the remote sensing of global cloud cover using multispectral radiance measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting ...

Larry L. Stowe; Paul A. Davis; E. Paul McClain

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Experimental Determination of Water Vapor Profiles from Ground-Based Radiometer Measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor profiles have been obtained from radiometer measurements at 21.0 and 31.4 GHz and ground values of humidity, temperature and pressure. The inversion technique was based on minimum variance estimation, including constraints derived ...

B. G. Skoog; J. I. H. Askne; G. Elgered

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiative Flux Estimation from a Broadband Radiometer Using Synthetic Angular Models in the EarthCARE Mission Framework. Part II: Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance-to-flux conversion for the broadband radiometer (BBR) on board the Earth Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) was assessed in Part I of this paper, by developing theoretical ...

Carlos Domenech; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; David P. Donovan; Tobias Wehr

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Radiometer and Profiler Analysis of the Effects of a Bore and a Solitary Wave on the Stability of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses data from a microwave profiling radiometer (MPR), along with 915-MHz wind profiler, Doppler radar, and surface data to quantify the kinematic and thermodynamic effects of two wave features, an undular bore and a soliton, on the ...

Timothy A. Coleman; Kevin R. Knupp

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Retrieval of Key Aerosol Optical Parameters from Spectral Direct and Diffuse Irradiances Observed by a Radiometer with Nonideal Cosine Response Characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral direct and diffuse irradiances observed by a radiometer with a horizontal surface detector have been frequently used to study aerosol optical parameters, such as aerosol optical thickness (?aer) and single scattering albedo (?). Such ...

Pradeep Khatri; Tamio Takamura; Akihiro Yamazaki; Yutaka Kondo

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site C. M. R. Platt and R. T. Austin Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado C. M. R. Platt and J. A. Bennett Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Abstract The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (CSIRO/ARM) Program Mark II infrared (IR) filter radiometer operated continuously at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site for a period of five weeks. Data of high quality were obtained by remote operation and data transfer with no evidence of spurious

150

Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

Myers, D. R.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

Reda, I.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems are a challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal ... Keywords: Contrast, Dynamic detection of perturbations, Evolving system, Fast-neutron reactor, Neighbourhood, Noise

Laurent Hartert; Danielle Nuzillard; Jean-Philippe Jeannot

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Command System (ICS) Training Incident Command System (ICS) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports the emergency response community by promoting interagency cooperation and developing training that enhances response efforts. An example of such support involves the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Response and its compliance efforts toward the Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 (HSPD-5), which includes the implementation of National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Response Framework (NRF). The ICS, which has been recognized for its training curricula that has exceeded national standards, is an on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept that was originally designed for emergency management agencies, but

154

Chapter_11_Incidents_of_Security_Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Incidents of Security Concern This chapter covers the DOE HQ implementation of DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Attachment 5, Incidents of Security Concern. HS-91 manages the HQ Security Incidents Program. Incidents of Security Concern (henceforth referred to as Incidents) are actions, inactions, or events that are believed to: * Pose threats to national security interests and/or DOE assets * Create potentially serious or dangerous security situations * Significantly affect the safeguards and security program's capability to protect DOE safeguards and security interests * Indicate failure to adhere to security procedures * Reveal that the system is not functioning properly, by identifying and/or mitigating potential threats (e.g., detecting suspicious activity, hostile acts, etc.).

155

Overview of Incidents Related to Live Working  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress in the research on injury and fatality information among workers who perform energized (live) and/or de-energized work. While every effort is made in the industry to avoid incidents during work on energized and de-energized lines, they do occur, and there are lessons embedded within every incident from which the utility industry can benefit, if the incidents are thoroughly analyzed, root causes are identified, and corrective actions are taken. The primary objective of...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Definition: Cyber Security Incident | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Security Incident Security Incident Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cyber Security Incident Any malicious act or suspicious event that: Compromises, or was an attempt to compromise, the Electronic Security Perimeter or Physical Security Perimeter of a Critical Cyber Asset, or, Disrupts, or was an attempt to disrupt, the operation of a Critical Cyber Asset.[1] Related Terms Electronic Security Perimeter References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Cyber_Security_Incident&oldid=480296" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

157

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FacilitiesContractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all...

158

Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Global distributions of total ozone during January and February 1979 as determined from DMSP multichannel filter radiometer measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multichannel filter radiometer instrument (MFR) was first flown on a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block 5D series satellite in 1977. Daily analyses of the global distribution of retrieved total ozone are presented for January and February 1979. The temporal and spatial averages and variability of ozone during this period are discussed. Retrieved total column ozone data derived from the MFR measurements for January 1979 are compared with preliminary SBUV measurements and with distributions of total ozone measured between 1958 and 1967.

Luther, F.M.; Ellis, J.S.; Lovill, J.E.; Sullivan, T.J.; Weichel, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

163

AMI Cyber Security Incident Response Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used by system and asset owners to assist in the preparation and response to AMI cyber security incidents. This document was developed by conducting interviews with EPRI members, AMI asset owners, and vendors, regarding practices involved in responding to AMI cyber security incidents and mapping the responses to requirements put forth by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Smart Grid (Open-SG) Working ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer - The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer - A Look Ahead G. Hodges Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) is one of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's original instruments. As atmospheric research has advanced, the ways in which the MFRSR has been used have increased, along with an ever advancing desire from the scientific community for well calibrated measurements. As the ARM Program has matured, however, the upkeep of the MFRSR network and the refinement of its calibration procedures have not kept up as one would hope to accommodate the modern requirements of climate researchers. This has led to the

165

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers Mentor Report and Baseline Surface Radiation Network Submission Status G. Hodges Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Overview Currently 24 multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) operate within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Eighteen MFRSRs are located at Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, one is located at each of the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, and one is part of the instrumentation of the ARM Mobile Facility. The SGP site, that has four extended facilities that are equipped for an MFRSR but do not have one due to instrument failure or a lack of spare instruments. Table 1 lists all the sites supporting MFRSRs along with the instrument

166

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

167

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Section 94  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Shortwave Radiometry and Analysis at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site L. Harrison, J. J. Michalsky and Q. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York - Albany Albany, New York Here we report the results of three parallel efforts: the recal- 0.3%. Likewise, Joe Michalsky went to the SGP site with a ibration and reanalysis of pyrano-metric data from Southern recently calibrated Eppley Normal Incidence Pyrheliometer Great Plains (SGP) to improve its accuracy, use of the (NIP) and an Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP). multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) data to derive cloud optical depths and then tests of radiative transfer The Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Solar models to predict shortwave irradiance under cloudy skies,

169

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

170

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microphysical and Optical Properties from Microphysical and Optical Properties from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers E. Kassianov, J. Barnard, T. Ackerman, C. Flynn, and D. Flynn Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) provide measurements of the total and diffuse solar irradiances at six wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, 870 and 940 nm). Direct solar irradiances are inferred by finding the difference between the two measured irradiances, and the direct irradiances are used to derive spectral values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD; Harrison and Michalsky 1994; Alexandrov et al. 2002). Single-scattering albedos (SSAs) can be obtained from diffuse irradiances (Petters et al. 2003).

171

Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southeast Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a well-known consequence of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim of this study was to extract the HCC incidence rate in the province of Kerman, located in southern part of Iran, and compare the data with other parts of the country. Materials and Methods: All medical records related to HCC were collected through hospitals or outpatient services in public or private centers. The records of all oncology, radiotherapy, and pathology centers in Kerman province were actively searched between 1999 and 2006. The annual incidence of HCC around the country was calculated, using the

A Rticle; Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam; Ali-akbar Haghdoost; Seyed Hamed Hoseini; Rashid Ramazani; Mohammad Rezazadehkermani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Accurate Liquid Water Path Retrieval from Low-Cost Microwave Radiometers Using Additional Information from a Lidar Ceilometer and Operational Forecast Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water clouds have an important impact on the radiative balance of the earth. The use of ground-based dual-frequency microwave radiometers to derive both liquid water path (LWP) and water vapor path (WVP) is well established, but uncertainties ...

Nicolas Gaussiat; Robin J. Hogan; Anthony J. Illingworth

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Validation of Geolocation of Measurements of the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanning Radiometers aboard Three Spacecraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is a scanning radiometer for measuring Earth-emitted and -reflected solar radiation to understand Earth’s energy balance. One CERES instrument was placed into orbit aboard the ...

G. Louis Smith; Kory J. Priestley; Phillip C. Hess; Chris Currey; Peter Spence

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM 90/150 GHz data at ARM 90/150 GHz data at COPS M.P. Cadeddu, A. Vogelmann, D.D. Turner, S. Crewell, U. Lönhert MWRHF (90/150) data Data available at archives from 06/22 to 12/31 Challenges associated with instrument: New instrument - new technology We still need to learn about calibration Spectral region (WV continuum) still uncertain in models Data available at archives from 06/22 to 12/31 Challenges associated with instrument: New instrument - new technology We still need to learn about calibration Spectral region (WV continuum) still uncertain in models Weather conditions were not ideal for the initial testing of the instrument. The radiometer did not calibrate from 06/30 until 10/13 The few calibrations in June may have been affected by dew formation Calibration of summer data is

175

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COEIDTR01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COE­IDTR­01 1.0 Purpose To provide College faculty or disaster within a College-operated network closet. 2.0 Scope 2.1 Incident Response: Incident response for developing and implementing Disaster Tolerance/Recovery plans. 3.0 Policy 3.1 Incident Response: Any desktop

Demirel, Melik C.

176

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents  

SciTech Connect

There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment V. Mattioli Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Morris Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are widely used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). Comparisons of PWV derived from MWRs with water vapor retrievals from instruments like radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Raman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident Teams Responses. From NIST Tech Beat: June 28, 2013. ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

183

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recent Racial Incidents in Higher Education: A Contemporary Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Racial Incidents in Higher Education 1987b. "King Wants1988. "Hispanics Higher Education's Missing People." Change12-65. Chronicle of Higher Education. 1987. "Racial Brawl

Farrell, Walter C. Jr.; Jones, Cloyzelle K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In his after-action analysis, Haley has been surprised by the number of similarities in response planning, even when disaster scenarios differ dramatically. "Like this incident,...

186

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

187

PLUTONIUM RELEASE INCIDENT OF NOVEMBER 20, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A nonnuclear explosion involving an evaporator occurred in a shielded cell in the Radiochemical Processing Pilot Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on Nov. 20, 1959. Plutonium was released from the processing cell, probably as an aerosol of fine particles of plutonium oxide. It is probable that this evaporator system had accumulated -1100 g of nitric acid-insoluble plutonium in the steam stripper packing; the explosion released an estimated 150 g inside Cell 6, with about 135 g in the evaporator subcell, and about 15 g in the larger main cell. No radioactive material was released from the ventilation stacks; no contamination of grounds and facilities occurred outside of a relatively small area of OaK Ridge National Laboratory immediately adjacent to the explosion. No one was injured by the explosion, and no one received more than 2% of a lifetime body burden of plutonium or an overexposure to sources of ionizing radiation either at the time of the incident or daring subsequent cleanup operations. The explosion is considerdd to be the result of rapid reaction of nitrated organic compounds formed by the inadvertent nitration of about 14 liters of a proprietary decontaminating reagent. In cleanup the contamination was bonded to the nearby street and building surfaces with tar, paint, roofing compound, or masonry sealer, as appropriate to the surface. Decontamination of the interior of the pilot-plant building, except the processing cells, was 95% complete on Sept. 1, 1960. Decontamination of the processing cells was delayed 8 months until building modifications could be made to improve containment. Modifications to the pilot plant have been proposed which will preclude dischanges into the laboratory area and its environment of concentrations or amounts of radioactive materials that would be injurious to health or interfere with other laboratory programs. (auth)

King, L.J.; McCarley, W.T.

1961-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

SciTech Connect

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI published a Technical Update report, "Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching" (EPRI report 1016830), which introduced a report format and form designed to allow utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database. This new report summarizes work performed on the database in 2009.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MWRRET (Microwave Radiometer Retrievals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus Plus Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner Andy Vogelmann, Dave Turner & Jennifer Comstock & Jennifer Comstock Min Min Susanne Crewell Susanne Crewell Ulrich L Ulrich L ö ö rnard rnard Jim Liljegren Jim Liljegren John Ogre John Ogre . Y. Matrosov . Y. Matrosov Sally McFarlane Sally McFarlane Warren Wiscombe, Christine Chiu, Sasha Marshak, Maria Warren Wiscombe, Christine Chiu, Sasha Marshak, Maria Cadeddu, Qilong Min, Susanne Crewell, Ulrich L Cadeddu, Qilong Min, Susanne Crewell, Ulrich L ö ö hnert, Mandy hnert, Mandy M. Khaiyer, Greg McFarquhar , Chuck Long, Bill O M. Khaiyer, Greg McFarquhar , Chuck Long, Bill O ' ' Hirok, Bin Hirok, Bin Lin, Connor Flynn, Eli Mlawer, Graham Feingold, Jim Barnard, Lin, Connor Flynn, Eli Mlawer, Graham Feingold, Jim Barnard,

193

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness of the situation. Incident databases are excellent resources to learn from past mistakes; however, in order to be effective, incident databases need to be functional in disseminating the lessons learned to users. Therefore, this research is dedicated to improving user accessibility of incident databases. The objective of this research is twofold. The first objective is improving accessibility of the database system by allowing the option of word search as well as folder search for the users. This will satisfy research needs of users who are aware of the hazards at hand and need to access the relevant information. The second objective is to activate the database via integration of the database with an operational software. This will benefit research needs of users who are unaware of the existing hazards. Literature review and text mining of Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) database short reports are employed to develop an initial taxonomy, which is then refined and modified by expert review. The incident reports in MARS database is classified to the right folders in the taxonomy and implemented in a database system based on Microsoft Excel, where the users can retrieve information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords on hazardous substances and equipment is prepared. If the keywords exist in the MOC interface, they will be highlighted, and with the click of a button, will return up to ten relevant incident reports. Using an active and knowledge-based system, people can learn from incidents and near-misses and will be more active to reduce the frequency of recurring incidents.

Khan, Sara Shammni

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Climate Influences on Meningitis Incidence in Northwest Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of meningitis. In this study, the influence of climate on monthly meningitis incidence was examined. Monthly counts of clinically diagnosed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected from ...

Auwal F. Abdussalam; Andrew J. Monaghan; Vanja M. Dukic; Mary H. Hayden; Thomas M. Hopson; Gregor C. Leckebusch; John E. Thornes

196

The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cyber Security Incident Management Program, Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department of Energy operates numerous interconnected computer networks and systems to help accon~plishit s strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science, and the environment. These systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could potentially affect the Department's ability to carry out its mission. During Fiscal Year 2006, the Department experienced 132 incidents of sufficient severity to require reporting to law enforcement, an increase of 22 percent over the prior year. These statistics, troubling as they may be, are not unique to the Department; they are, in fact, reflective of a trend in cyber attacks throughout the government.

197

Public health: emergency management: capability analysis of critical incident response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9/11 terrorist incident, homeland security efforts and the readiness of local emergency management agencies have become focal points in the war on terrorism. A significant issue faced by front line responders has been the significant increase ...

Thomas F. Brady

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

199

Estimation of Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from GOES Visible Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important parameter for terrestrial ecosystem models. Because of its high temporal resolution, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations are very suited to ...

Tao Zheng; Shunlin Liang; Kaicun Wang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Efficiency of critical incident management systems: Instrument development and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is much literature in the area of emergency response management systems. Even so, there is in general a lacuna of literature that deals with the issue of measuring the effectiveness of such systems. The aim of this study is to develop and validate ... Keywords: Critical incident management system (CIMS), Decision support, Emergency response systems, Instrument, Measurement, Media richness theory, National incident management systems (NIMS), Validation

Jin Ki Kim; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

Charles Solbrig

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

203

US DOE/NNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation NNSADataRepositoryGuide.pdf...

204

Managing Incidents in Smart Grids à la Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the Cloud Computing paradigm has emerged as a panacea for many problems in traditional IT infrastructures. Much has been said about the potential of Cloud Computing in the context of the Smart Grid, but unfortunately it is still ... Keywords: Smart Grid, SCADA systems, Incident Management, Cloud Computing, Cryptography, Searchable Encryption

Cristina Alcaraz; Isaac Agudo; David Nunez; Javier Lopez

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary results of a research task sponsored by EPRI's Power Switching Safety and Reliability (PSS&R) project to develop a report format and form that will allow multiple utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies  

SciTech Connect

More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, D.L. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sumio (Hiroshima Perfectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ARM - Datastreams - mfr10m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmfr10m Datastreamsmfr10m Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025224 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example mfr10m Archive Data Plot Example mfr10m Archive Data Plot Datastream : MFR10M Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR): upwelling irradiance at 10-meter height Active Dates 1994.03.26 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Airmass unitless airmass ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt Azimuth angle degrees azimuth_angle ( time )

208

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosols in Southern Great Plains Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosols in Southern Great Plains Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Datasets M. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University New York, New York M. Alexandrov, B E. Carlson, A.A. Lacis, and B. Cairns National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction We present results obtained using the new version of the multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) data analysis algorithm (Alexandrov et al. 2005). This algorithm allows the partition of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) into fine and coarse aerosol modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius (r eff ). A bimodal gamma distribution is used as the aerosol particle size model. The algorithm has been used for analysis of a multi-year dataset from the local MFRSR network at the

209

ARM - Datastreams - mfr25m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmfr25m Datastreamsmfr25m Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025225 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example mfr25m Archive Data Plot Example mfr25m Archive Data Plot Datastream : MFR25M Multi-Filter Radiometer (MFR): upwelling irradiance at 25-meter height Active Dates 1994.04.17 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Airmass unitless airmass ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt Azimuth angle degrees azimuth_angle ( time )

210

Section 85  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ' -ln I i I 0 i *µ%c i µ, c i Wm &2 c i NO 2 O 3 NO 2 c i c i NO 2 Session Papers 379 (1) Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol Size Distribution Parameters, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide Column Amounts from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data M. Alexandrov, A. A. Lacis, B. E. Carlson and B. Cairns National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction The MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) (Harrison and Michalsky 1994a, 1994b) measures atmospheric column extinction of the direct solar beam and the diffuse radiation intensity at six wavelengths. Located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, the instrument has six spectral channels at 415, 501, 616, 672, 870, and 940

211

ARM - Datastreams - mfrsr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmfrsr Datastreamsmfrsr Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1023898 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example mfrsr Archive Data Plot Example mfrsr Archive Data Plot Datastream : MFRSR Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances Active Dates 1996.10.21 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Airmass unitless airmass ( time ) Alltime Hemispheric Broadband Irradiance counts alltime_hemisp_broadband ( time )

212

Section 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in in ' c n I o n exp (&T in / µ i ) T i,n ' µ i log (I o n / I i,n ) % µ i log (c n ) Session Papers 145 (1) (2) Multi-Spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction Analysis of Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements A.A. Lacis and B.E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Abstract MACE Analysis of MFRSR Multi-spectral Atmospheric Column Extinction (MACE) analysis of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements yield detailed time series information on the variations of the column amounts of atmospheric NO 2 and ozone and of aerosol optical depth, including the effective

213

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past incidents. Analysis of data stored in existing databases can lead to useful conclusions and reduction of chemical incidents and consequences of incidents. An incident database is a knowledge based system that can give an insight to the situation which led to an incident. Effective analysis of data from a database can help in development of information that can help reduce future incidents: cause of an incident, critical equipment, the type of chemical released, and the type of injury and victim. In this research, Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss incidents. Petroleum related incidents are also excluded from the HSEES system. Studies show that HSEES covers only 37% of all incidents in the US. This scaling ratio was used to estimate the total universe size.

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Feature: Washing Your Laundry in Public - An Analysis of Recent High-Publicity Security Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is, reportedly, a significant rise in the frequency of information security incidents. Quite obviously, there is a very significant rise in the public reporting of such incidents. Whereas all of us are more or less experienced in protecting our ...

Matthew Pemble

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

218

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956  

SciTech Connect

Pertinert details of the incidents are given. Some are illustrated with photographs or diagrams. (M.H.R.)

Hayes, D.F.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NIST Lunar spectro-radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... each of which is connected to a spectrograph covering a different ... to be approximately 0.5 % through visible atmospheric window bands and less ...

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident  

SciTech Connect

If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

Sullivan,T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE INCIDENCE OF GALACTIC TIDAL FEATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a sample of 54 galaxy clusters (0.04 < z < 0.15) containing 3551 early-type galaxies suitable for study, we identify those with tidal features both interactively and automatically. We find that {approx}3% have tidal features that can be detected with data that reach a 3{sigma} sensitivity limit of 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Regardless of the method used to classify tidal features, or the fidelity imposed on such classifications, we find a deficit of tidally disturbed galaxies with decreasing clustercentric radius that is most pronounced inside of {approx}0.5 R{sub 200}. We cannot distinguish whether the trend arises from an increasing likelihood of recent mergers with increasing clustercentric radius or a decrease in the lifetime of tidal features with decreasing clustercentric radius. We find no evidence for a relationship between local density and the incidence of tidal features, but our local density measure has large uncertainties. We find interesting behavior in the rate of tidal features among cluster early-types as a function of clustercentric radius and expect such results to provide constraints on the effect of the cluster environment on the structure of galaxy halos, the build-up of the red sequence of galaxies, and the origin of the intracluster stellar population.

Adams, Scott M.; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

Knize, R.J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical incidents can be prevented or mitigated by improving safety performance and implementing the lessons learned from past incidents. Despite some limitations in the range of information they provide, chemical incident databases can be utilized as sources of lessons learned from incidents by evaluating patterns and relationships that exist between the data variables. Much of the previous research focused on studying the causal factors of incidents; hence, this research analyzes the chemical incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining and text mining methodologies. Both methodologies were performed with the aid of STATISTICA software. The analysis studied 12,737 chemical process related incidents and extracted descriptions of incidents in free-text data format from 3,316 incident reports. The structured data was analyzed using data mining tools such as classification and regression trees, association rules, and cluster analysis. The unstructured data (textual data) was transformed into structured data using text mining, and subsequently analyzed further using data mining tools such as, feature selections and cluster analysis. The data mining analysis demonstrated that this technique can be used in estimating the incident severity based on input variables of release quantity and distance between victims and source of release. Using the subset data of ammonia release, the classification and regression tree produced 23 final nodes. Each of the final nodes corresponded to a range of release quantity and, of distance between victims and source of release. For each node, the severity of injury was estimated from the observed severity scores' average. The association rule identified the conditional probability for incidents involving piping, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene in the value of 0.19, 0.04, 0.12, and 0.04 respectively. The text mining was utilized successfully to generate elements of incidents that can be used in developing incident scenarios. Also, the research has identified information gaps in the HSEES database that can be improved to enhance future data analysis. The findings from data mining and text mining should then be used to modify or revise design, operation, emergency response planning or other management strategies.

Mahdiyati, -

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NIST SP 800-83, Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Special Publication 800-83 Sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

Coccidioidomycosis Incidence in Arizona Predicted by Seasonal Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental mechanisms that determine the inter-annual and seasonal variability in incidence of coccidioidomycosis are unclear. In this study, we use Arizona coccidioidomycosis case data for 1995–2006 to generate a timeseries of monthly estimates of exposure rates in Maricopa County, AZ and Pima County, AZ. We reveal a seasonal autocorrelation structure for exposure rates in both Maricopa County and Pima County which indicates that exposure rates are strongly related from the fall to the spring. An abrupt end to this autocorrelation relationship occurs near the the onset of the summer precipitation season and increasing exposure rates related to the subsequent season. The identification of the autocorrelation structure enabled us to construct a ‘‘primary’ ’ exposure season that spans August-March and a ‘‘secondary’ ’ season that spans April– June which are then used in subsequent analyses. We show that October–December precipitation is positively associated with rates of exposure for the primary exposure season in both Maricopa County (R = 0.72, p = 0.012) and Pima County (R = 0.69, p = 0.019). In addition, exposure rates during the primary exposure seasons are negatively associated with concurrent precipitation in Maricopa (R = 20.79, p = 0.004) and Pima (R = 20.64, p = 0.019), possibly due to reduced spore dispersion. These associations enabled the generation of models to estimate exposure rates for the primary exposure season. The models explain 69 % (p = 0.009) and 54 % (p = 0.045) of the variance in the study period for Maricopa and Pima counties, respectively. We did not find any significant predictors for exposure rates during the secondary season. This study

James D. Tamerius; Andrew C. Comrie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

On the Incidence and Kinematics of Strong Mg II Absorbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of two investigations into the nature of strong (rest equivalent width > 1.0 Ang) Mg II absorption systems at high redshift. The first line of questioning examines the complete SDSS- DR3 set of quasar spectra to determine the evolution of the incidence of strong Mg II absorption. The redshift evolution of the comoving line-of-sight number density, l(x), is characterized by a roughly constant value at z > 0.8, indicating that the product of the number density and gas cross-section of halos hosting strong Mg II is unevolving at these redshifts. At z gas cross-section to strong Mg II absorption and therefore a decline in the physical processes relevant to such absorption. This evolution roughly tracks the global evolution of the SFR density. The decrease of l(x) is more pronounced for larger equivalent width systems. We also present the results of a search for strong Mg II absorption in 91 high resolution quasar spectra, which allow us to investigate the kinematics of such systems. These systems are characterized by the presence of numerous components spread over a ~200 km/s velocity width and the presence of more highly ionized species, which display kinematic profiles similar to the corresponding Mg II absorption. We consider these results in light of two competing theories to explain strong Mg II absorption: post-starburst, SN-driven galactic winds and accreting gas in the halos of massive galaxies. The later model is disfavored by the absence of evolution in l(x) at z > 1. We argue that the strong Mg II phenomenon primarily arises from feedback processes in relatively low mass galactic halos related to star formation.

Gabriel E. Prochter; Jason X. Prochaska; Scott Burles

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Components of an Incident Management Simulation and Gaming Framework and Related Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's emergency responders need to work in a coordinated, well-planned manner to best mitigate the impact of an emergency incident. They need to be trained and ready to act in view of the increased security threat. The training has been traditionally ... Keywords: architecture, component, emergency response, gaming, incident management, integration, modeling, simulation

Sanjay Jain; Charles R. Mclean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

On the Surface Temperature Sensitivity of the Reflected Shortwave, Outgoing Longwave, and Net Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean top-of-atmosphere incident solar radiation (ISR) minus the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and the reflected shortwave radiation (RSW) is the net incident radiation (NET). This study analyzes the global-mean NET sensitivity to a ...

Hartmut H. Aumann; Alexander Ruzmaikin; Ali Behrangi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data in Niamey E. Kassianov, T. Ackerman, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction One of the key uncertainties in the earth's radiation balance is the effect of dust on radiative fluxes (aerosol radiative forcing), which in turn affects climatic processes on both planetary and local scales (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2001; Sokolik et al. 2001). Since Saharan dust is one of the main sources of dust over the globe, its radiative effect has long been the subject of intensive studies. Recently, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed to Niamey, Niger, to participate in a large field campaign directed at elucidating the radiative effect of Saharan dust

239

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Agency/Company /Organization Resources for the Future Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Topics Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.rff.org/RFF/Documen Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica[1] Abstract "Although fuel taxes are a practical means of curbing vehicular air pollution, congestion, and accidents in developing countries-all of which are typically major problems-they are often opposed on distributional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Simple Physical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from GOES Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the suface from GOES satellite brightness measurements in clear and cloudy conditions. In this simple physical model, the effect of Rayleigh scattering is taken into account. ...

Catherine Gautier; Georges Diak; Serge Masse

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Use of DFDR Information in the Analysis of a Turbulence Incident over Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital flight data recorder (DFDR) tapes from commercial aircraft can provide useful information about the mesoscale environment of severe turbulence incidents. Air motion computations from these data and their errors are briefly described. An ...

Peter F. Lester; Orhan Sen; R. E. Bach Jr.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

246

Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Cloud on Incident Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fire, smoke cloud on incident broadband and spectral solar irradiance was studied using measurements made at the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, Golden, ...

Roland L. Hulstrom; Thomas L. Stoffel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inferring Cloud Properties from Narrow-Field-of-View Spectral Radiometers Inferring Cloud Properties from Narrow-Field-of-View Spectral Radiometers Marshak, A.(a), Knyazikhin, Y.(b), Evans, K.(c), and Wiscombe, W.(a), NASA/GSFC (a), Boston University (b), UMBC/JCET (c) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The most common approach for retrieving cloud optical depth from ground-based observations uses downwelling fluxes measured by pyranometers and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR). The key element in both retrieval techniques is the one-to-one mapping of the "observed" fluxes into cloud optical depth through plane-parallel radiative transfer. Both methods are expected to work well only for completely overcast clouds giving an effective optical depth for the whole sky. To infer cloud optical

248

Prevention of a wrong-location misadministration through the use of an intradepartmental incident learning system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A series of examples are presented in which potential errors in the delivery of radiation therapy were prevented through use of incident learning. These examples underscore the value of reporting near miss incidents. Methods: Using a departmental incident learning system, eight incidents were noted over a two-year period in which fields were treated 'out-of-sequence,' that is, fields from a boost phase were treated, while the patient was still in the initial phase of treatment. As a result, an error-prevention policy was instituted in which radiation treatment fields are 'hidden' within the oncology information system (OIS) when they are not in current use. In this way, fields are only available to be treated in the intended sequence and, importantly, old fields cannot be activated at the linear accelerator control console. Results: No out-of-sequence treatments have been reported in more than two years since the policy change. Furthermore, at least three near-miss incidents were detected and corrected as a result of the policy change. In the first two, the policy operated as intended to directly prevent an error in field scheduling. In the third near-miss, the policy operated 'off target' to prevent a type of error scenario that it was not directly intended to prevent. In this incident, an incorrect digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) was scheduled in the OIS for a patient receiving lung cancer treatment. The incorrect DRR had an isocenter which was misplaced by approximately two centimeters. The error was a result of a field from an old plan being scheduled instead of the intended new plan. As a result of the policy described above, the DRR field could not be activated for treatment however and the error was discovered and corrected. Other quality control barriers in place would have been unlikely to have detected this error. Conclusions: In these examples, a policy was adopted based on incident learning, which prevented several errors, at least one of which was potentially severe. These examples underscore the need for a rigorous, systematic incident learning process within each clinic. The experiences reported in this technical note demonstrate the value of near-miss incident reporting to improve patient safety.

Ford, Eric C.; Smith, Koren; Harris, Kendra; Terezakis, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Instrumentation and Technique for Deducing Cloud Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a photodiode radiometer to infer optical depth of thin clouds from solar intensity measurements is examined. Data were collected by a photodiode radiometer which measured incident radiation at angular fields of view of 2, ...

R. A. Raschke; S. K. Cox

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program DOE/IG-0878 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 11, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy operates numerous networks and systems to help accomplish its strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science and the environment. The systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could impact the Department's

251

EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards  

SciTech Connect

The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

Stenner, Robert D.

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of the incidence angle of the beam radiation on CPC. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Analytic expressions have been derived for the projected incidence angles {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub 2} from a two-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator solar collector. For a CPC the fraction of the incident rays on the aperture at angle {var theta}, which reaches the absorber, depends only on the {var theta}{sub 1} angle. In this paper, a mathematical expression for {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub t} has been calculated to determine the times at which acceptance of the sun's beam radiation begins and ceases for a CPC consisting of arbitrary orientation.

Pinazo, J.M.; Canada, J.; Arago, F. (Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

050 050 Towers Handbook DR Cook February 2010 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research February 2010, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-050 iii Acronyms and Abbreviations ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility CF Central Facility CO 2 FLX Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement System DQ Data Quality ECOR Eddy Correlation System GPS global positioning system MFR Multi-Filter Radiometer NSA North Slope of Alaska PGS precision gas system PRTD Platinum Resistance Temperature Detector RMS root mean square SGP Southern Great Plains SIRS Solar and Infrared Station SMOS Surface Meteorological Observation Station Also, see the ARM Acronyms and Abbreviations.

255

Water vapor from sunradiometry in comparison wit microwave and balloon-sonde measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM site  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor plays an important role in weather in climate; it is the most important greenhouse gas and the most variable in space and time. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is studying the column abundance and distribution of water vapor with altitude. Although the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is mainly for measurements of spectral short-wave radiation and spectral extinction by aerosol, it can also measure total column water vapor. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of MFRSR`s capabilities for total column water vapor under cloudless conditions.

Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States); Liljegren, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

schwartz(3)-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

57 57 Correlated Short Term Fluctuations in Aerosol Optical Thickness and Shortwave Radiative Quantities S. E. Schwartz Environmental Chemistry Division Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract Close examination of direct normal solar irradiance (DNSI) and downwelling diffuse irradiance (DDI) on cloud-free days at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site reveals anticorrelated short- term (several minute) fluctuations, especially prominent in the hours around local solar noon; i.e., DDI increases as DNSI decreases. These fluctuations are correlated or anticorrelated with other direct and derived radiometric quantities, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and

257

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

258

Discrepancies in Shortwave Diffuse Measured and Modeled Irradiances in Antarctica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrepancies in Shortwave Diffuse Measured and Discrepancies in Shortwave Diffuse Measured and Modeled Irradiances in Antarctica A. Payton, P. Ricchiazzi, and C. Gautier University of California Santa Barbara, California D. Lubin Scripps Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Measurements of clear-sky shortwave (SW) radiation at the surface show discrepancies between measurements and model simulations, but only for certain measurements across time and space. Most of the observations entail broadband measurements. A spectral and spatial analysis of the occurrence of this discrepancy may lend insight into the responsible processes. Langley calibrated multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements collected at the Antarctic coastline reveal significant

259

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992 Category STATEMENT 5.1 The University shall establish a comprehensive and integrated Disaster Response Plan and appropriate measures are in place to prevent predictable or potential disasters and possible critical

260

nicter: a large-scale network incident analysis system: case studies for understanding threat landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have been developing the Network Incident analysis Center for Tactical Emergency Response (nicter), whose objective is to detect and identify propagating malwares. The nicter mainly monitors darknet, a set of unused IP addresses, to observe global ... Keywords: correlation analysis, malware analysis, network monitoring

Masashi Eto; Daisuke Inoue; Jungsuk Song; Junji Nakazato; Kazuhiro Ohtaka; Koji Nakao

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oscillating two stream instability at the resonance of obliquely incident radiation in inhomogeneous plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The growth rate and the threshold value were calculated for the oscillating two-stream instability for an electromagnetic wave obliquely incident on an inhomogeneous plasma. The localization of the instability is found to be in the overdense region near the threshold and to shift toward the local plasma resonance when the pump intensity increases. (auth)

Kuo, Y.Y.; Oberman, C.; Liu, C.S.; Troyon, F.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

263

Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

Ostmeyer, R.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra for the clinical linac agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using the unfolded electron energies) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 3.7%. The corresponding measured and EGSnrc-calculated transmission data agree within 1.5%, where the typical transmission measurement uncertainty on the clinical linac is 0.4% (not including the uncertainties on the incident electron parameters). Conclusions: The approach proposed in an earlier study for unfolding photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data is accurate and practical for clinical use.

Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council, M-35 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Case Study: Preparing for the Smart Grids - Identifying Current Practice for Information Security Incident Management in the Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry faces the implementation of smart grids, which will introduce new information security threats to the power automation systems. The ability to appropriately prepare for, and respond to, information security incidents, is of utmost ... Keywords: Information security, incident respons, smart grids

Maria B. Line

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evaluation of the integrated application of intelligent transportation system technologies using stochastic incident generation and resolution modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of the microscopic vehicle traffic simulation software PARAMICS to evaluate different incident management implementation alternatives in South Carolina. This study customized the simulation model for random spatial and temporal ... Keywords: freeway service patrol, intelligent transportation systems, traffic incident management, traffic simulation

Yongchang Ma; Ryan Fries; Mashrur Chowdhury; Imran Inamdar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R. [HASYLAB, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Incident-energy and system-size dependence of directed flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present STAR's measurements of directed flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200$ GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity, transverse momentum and centrality. We find that directed flow depends on the incident energy, but not on the system size. We extend the validity of limiting fragmentation hypothesis to different collision systems.

Gang Wang

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments: Modeling of Incident Thermal Energy of Long Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc flash hazard assessment of their facilities operating at and above 1000 V. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the incident thermal energy of arc flash were developed for low and medium-voltage industri...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Establishing Tower-Top Equipotential Zones--Case-Study of Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide protection and training for workers who perform work on de-energized and energized lines. This Technical Update report contains the draft script of a new training video on DVD under development on establishing tower-top equipotential zones. The script contains case studies and analysis of specific selected incidents that have occurred in the field. It also includes recommendations for minimizing risks and avoiding elec...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Comparative analysis of hydrogen fire and explosion incidents: quarterly report No. 2, December 1, 1977--February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional hydrogen incident reports compiled during this quarter have increased the size of the computerized data base to a current total of 280 incidents. Listings of 165 incidents that have occurred in industrial and transportation operations since 1968 are presented here. Sample case histories in six different cause categories are provided together with a discussion of common safety problems contributing to these incidents. Some of these problems are inadequate detection measures for hydrogen leaks and fires and ineffective purging with inert gas. A preliminary comparison of losses due to natural gas fires/explosions and hydrogen incidents indicates that hydrogen explosions have been, on the average, four-to-six times as damaging as natural gas explosions. Some tentative explanations for this result are presented but await confirmation from a more sophisticated statistical analysis.

Zalosh, R.G.; Short, T.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NIST Transfer radiometers and reference detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... We are presently developing a pair of next generation reference detectors: an ... development for use as a primary standard in low power calibrations. ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

NIST Transfer and working standard radiometers and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... routine, monochromator-based spectral power responsivity scale ... with noise-equivalent powers that are ... The NIST-developed first generation Si, Ge ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

Prototype Cryospheric Experimental Synthetic Aperture Radiometer (CESAR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.W.Lawrence@.nasa.gov 6 Colorado State University, Steven.Reising@ColoState.edu 7 Valparaiso University, Thomas in instrumentation that uses the underside of the fuselage and wing space of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAVs-Band frequency survey (nanosat), instrumentation developed for soil moisture and salinity measurements (Rad

Reising, Steven C.

278

NIST Primary optical watt radiometer (POWR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... better optimized for specific transfer wavelengths and power levels. Major Accomplishments: POWR impacts total solar irradiance measurements. ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analytical Land–Atmosphere Radiometer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of radiometric land surface temperature (?r) to an equivalent isothermal (aerodynamic) surface temperature (?i) is important in balancing the land surface energy budget with satellite-based ?r measurements. An analytical land–...

Ayman Suleiman; Richard Crago

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NIST Missile defense transfer radiometer (MDXR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test facilities against the NIST primary optical power ... can also evaluate non-Planckian sources that may fall ... and a spectral calibration source for the ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NIST Thermal infrared transfer radiometer (TXR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The primary method uses either the ambient background water bath blackbody and ... where it performed in-situ measurements of various sources in a ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Angular velocity control for a windmill radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an inexpensive and simple control experiment which could be readily used to demonstrate proportional integral (PI) compensator design through root locus is presented. This work is also a useful example of analog control, which is not often ...

A. Arenas; L. Victoria; F. J. Abellan; J. A. Ibanez

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to U.S. Nuclear Weapon Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a)), this Instruction: a. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for the DoD response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents in accordance with DoDD 3150.08 (Reference (b)). b. Authorizes DoD support for the Nuclear Weapons Accident Incident Response Subcommittee (NWAIRS) to the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) Committee of Principals (CoP) to address the Federal Government response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect

Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Depths and Liquid Water Paths Optical Depths and Liquid Water Paths at the NSA CART J. C. Doran, J. C. Barnard, and S. Zhong Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington C. J. Jakob European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, England Introduction As part of our efforts to characterize the cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART), we have used microwave radiometers (MWRs) and multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) at Barrow (a coastal site) and Atqasuk (an inland site) to measure liquid water paths (LWPs) and cloud optical depths ( ) during the period June through September 1999. In addition to developing a climatology of cloud properties at the two sites, which will require the

288

Section 37  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

' ' T(J,csza) T " ' T%"a sph T/(1&"a sph ) Session Papers 161 (1) (2) Cloud Optical Properties Obtained from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Instrument: Methodology and Analysis of Data Obtained in Fairbanks, Alaska E. Leontieva and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Introduction A retrieval technique is presented to infer the cloud optical depth from data obtained by a ground-based, multi-channel radiometer operating in the solar and near-infrared (IR) range. An approach is introduced that uses observed and model-simulated transmittances rather than irradiances. Cloud optical depth retrievals are most meaningful under com- pletely overcast cloud conditions. The observed atmospheric transmittances under fractional cloud cover are of interest by

289

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance  

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upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments RAD-AIR : Airborne Radiometers

290

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance  

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downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NFOV : Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer

291

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Feingold, Graham NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Frisch, Shelby NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties We will present an analysis of the effect of aerosol on clouds at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. New methods for retrieving cloud droplet effective radius with radar (MMCR), multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and microwave radiometer (MWR) will be discussed. Relationships based on adiabatic clouds will be used to constrain retrievals. We will investigate the use of a range of proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, ranging from surface measurements of light scattering and accumulation mode number concentration, to lidar-measured extinction or

292

Radiometry J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer  

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J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, J. Michalsky, L. Harrison, M. Beik, W. Berkheiser III, and J. Schlemmer Atmospheric Sciences Research Center University at Albany State University of New York Albany, NY 12205 depths without the necessity of human intervention (Harrison and Michalsky 1993); 3) the cosine bench for measuring the cosine response functions of the RSRs and other radiometers (Michalsky et al. 1992); 4) rotating shadowband spectroradiometer progress (Harrison et al., in press); and 5) the effects of Mount Pinatubo on the aerosol above the Oklahoma-Kansas Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site (Michalsky and Larson 1993). Introduction Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer The MFRSR (see Figure 1) is a ground-based instrument for simultaneously measuring total horizontal, diffuse

293

Water vapor from sunradiometry in comparison with microwave and balloon-sonde measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM Site  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor plays a fundamental role in weather and climate. It is the most important greenhouse gas and the most variable in space and time. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is devoting a large fraction of its resources for the accurate characterization of the column abundance and the distribution of water vapor with altitude. Balloon sondes, microwave radiometers, and Raman lidars are the major instruments either currently in use or under consideration for these tasks. Although the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is primarily intended for use in accurate measurements of spectral short-wave radiation and in the measurement of spectral extinction by aerosol, it has the potential to measure total column water vapor as well. In this paper the authors report on a preliminary investigation of the MFRSR`s capabilities with regard to accurate measurements of total column water vapor at times when there is a clear path to the sun, i.e., cloudless conditions.

Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center; Liljegren, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

min-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Model-Predicted Total Shortwave with Comparison of Model-Predicted Total Shortwave with Measurements Under Overcast Cloud Conditions Q. Min and L. C. Harrison Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Abstract We use surface measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site made with the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and microwave radiometer (MWR) to obtain time-series of cloud optical depths and mean effective droplet radii using the method described by Min and Harrison (1996). We then use these data as inputs to three atmospheric shortwave models, and compare the result to surface pyranometric observations [Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Solar and Infrared Observing System (SIROS)]. We have extended this work

295

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Differences in Cloud Characteristics at Barrow and Atqasuk at the NSA/AAO Differences in Cloud Characteristics at Barrow and Atqasuk at the NSA/AAO CART Doran, J.C., Barnard, J.C., Zhong, S., and Jakob, C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Data obtained from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs) and microwave radiometers (MWRs) have been used to examine the differences in the cloud characteristics at Barrow and Atqasuk during the period June-September of 1999. Because the size of a grid cell in a GCM may be on the order of 100 km or more, it is important to determine to what extent meteorological and radiometric observations made at Barrow or Atqasuk

296

Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

Wei, Lei

297

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. =}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gamma-Rays from Grazing Incidence Cosmic Rays in the Earth’s Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high energy cosmic rays with the earth’s atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond time scales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earth’s surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 1020 eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than earth based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the earth’s atmosphere. Subject headings: atmospheric effects- cosmic rays- Earth- gamma-rays: bursts

Andrew Ulmer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measuring Solar Spectral and Angle-ofIncidence Effects on Photovoltaic Modules and Solar Irradiance Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation. INTRODUCTION It is common knowledge to people familiar with photovoltaic technology that the electrical current generated by photovoltaic devices is influenced by the spectral distribution (spectrum) of sunlight. It is also commonly understood that the spectral distribution of sunlight vari...

David L. King; Jay A. Kratochvil; William E. Boyson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electromagnetic energy within a magnetic infinite cylinder and scattering properties for oblique incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we analytically calculate the time-averaged electromagnetic energy stored inside a nondispersive magnetic isotropic cylinder which is obliquely irradiated by an electromagnetic plane wave. An expression for the optical-absorption efficiency in terms of the magnetic internal coefficients is also obtained. In the low absorption limit, we derive a relation between the normalized internal energy and the optical-absorption efficiency which is not affected by the magnetism and the incidence angle. This mentioned relation, indeed, seems to be independent on the shape of the scatterer. This universal aspect of the internal energy is connected to the transport velocity and consequently to the diffusion coefficient in the multiple scattering regime. Magnetism favors high internal energy for low size parameter cylinders, which leads to a low diffusion coefficient for electromagnetic propagation in 2D random media.

Tiago Jose Arruda; Alexandre Souto Martinez

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Self-Organized Criticality in Daily Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous periodogram power spectral analysis of daily incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reported at a leading hospital for cardiology in Pune, India for the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994 show that the power spectra follow the universal and unique inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and have been identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. The unique quantification for self-organized criticality presented in this paper is shown to be intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing fractal space-time fluctuation patterns in dynamical systems. The results are consistent with El Naschie's concept of cantorian fractal spacetime characteristics for quantum systems.

A. M. Selvam; D. Sen; S. M. S. Mody

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Twisted-light-induced intersubband transitions in quantum wells at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the intersubband transitions induced by laser beams of light with orbital angular momentum (twisted light) in semiconductor quantum wells at normal incidence. These transitions become possible in the absence of gratings thanks to the fact that collimated laser beams present a component of the light's electric field in the propagation direction. We derive the matrix elements of the light-matter interaction for a Bessel-type twisted-light beam represented by its vector potential in the paraxial approximation. Then, we consider the dynamics of photo-excited electrons making intersubband transitions between the first and second subbands of a standard semiconductor quantum well. Finally, we analyze the light-matter matrix elements in order to evaluate which transitions are more favorable for given orbital angular momentum of the light beam in the case of small semiconductor structures.

Sbierski, B; Tamborenea, P I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electric-Field Enhancement by Nodular Defects in Multilayer Coatings Irradiated at Normal and 45 (degree) Incidence  

SciTech Connect

The standing-wave electric-field profile within multilayer coatings is significantly perturbated by a nodular defect. The intensity, which is proportional to the electric field squared, is increased in the high index material by {>=}3x at normal incidence and {>=}12x at 45 degrees incidence angle. Therefore it is not surprising that nodular defects are initiation sites of laser-induced damage. In this study, the impact of reflectance-band centering and incident angle are explored for a 1 {micro}m diameter nodular defect seed overcoated with a 24 layer high-reflector constructed of quarter-wave thick alternating layers of hafnia and silica. The modeling was performed using a three-dimensional finite-element analysis code.

Stolz, C J; Genin, F Y; Pistor,T V

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Numerical simulation to determine the effects of incident wind shear and turbulence level on the flow around a building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of incident shear and turbulence on flow around a cubical building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence and shear results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow fields with the available wind-tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977). Comparing the authors' results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Huber, A.H.; Arya, S.P.S.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors  

SciTech Connect

Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

Palmer, R.C. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ansari, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Freibert, E.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident  

SciTech Connect

Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydrogen Film Cooling With Incident and Swept-Shock Interactions in a Mach 6.4 Nitrogen Free Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium ...

Olsen G. C.; Nowak R. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

319

Can reduced processing decision support interfaces improve the decision-making of less-experienced incident commanders?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-based decision support systems have been proposed as a tool to improve the decision-making of less-experienced personnel by reducing the information processing demands necessary for decision-making. This study investigated the utility of three ... Keywords: Cognitive load, Decision-making, Experience, Expertise, Fire-fighting, Incident command

Nathan C. Perry; Mark W. Wiggins; Merilyn Childs; Gerard Fogarty

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

Jones, L.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Incidence angle modifiers in cylindrical solar collector design. Final report, June 1996--May 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis presents an analysis of the thermal performance of cylindrical solar collectors. A major contributor to performance is optics, the principle focus of this work. A tool used to compute the incidence angle modifiers (IAM`s) for cylindrical solar collectors is presented. The Monte Carlo Method is employed in a Fortran 90 computer code to compute the hemispheric IAM`s of cylindrical solar collectors. Using concentric cylinders, the tubes are modeled with and without back plane reflectors of varying size. The computed IAM`s are verified both analytically and experimentally. Outdoor experiments on an array of cylindrical tubes with various back planes and two different tube spacings are described. Agreement with TRNSYS runs in daily energy gain is excellent. Over the 38 data sets, taken on different days, a maximum error of 11.2% is observed, with an average error of 3%. Heat loss tests, used to calculate an overall heat loss coefficient for the collector, are also described. A parametric variation study is used to illustrate the effect of varying many of the collector parameters. This study provides insight into the significant design parameters for cylindrical solar collectors. This insight is used to analyze the effect of these design parameters on the annual energy delivered by the collector. In addition, a simple cost analysis illustrates the benefits of varying the design parameters. The use of this new program and a detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis are the tools needed for optimizing the design of a cylindrical solar collector. 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Ryan, J.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program  

SciTech Connect

This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV--0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MegaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of {approx}80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 {mu}m over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 {mu}m resolution over an 800-{mu}m-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 {mu}m over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

Rosch, R.; Boutin, J. Y.; Le Breton, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Soullie, G.; Lidove, G.; Maroni, R. [CEA/DIF, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

Greenaway, Alan

325

Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media  

SciTech Connect

During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 Japan (Japan); Takahashi, Migaku [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Center for Nanobioengineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, 220, Gung-Dong, Yuseong-Gu., Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Attitudes and Perceptions of Texas Public Safety Training Officers Regarding the Effectiveness of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis sought to understand reasons for noncompliant respondents and ineffective leadership in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) by Texas public safety training officers. Research has been conducted on the policies and their implications for NIMS, organizational culture and its impact on NIMS, and the hierarchy network of the Incident Command System (ICS). However, research evaluating the attitudes and perceptions regarding the effectiveness of NIMS is scarce. Training officers from rural fire departments, emergency medical services, and law enforcement agencies were the population for this study (n=33). The results of this study have implications for combined fire department, emergency medical services, and law enforcement training (interoperability), simplification of the management structure, and a mentoring program. This study should be explored further in an urban setting, based on this model. This study showed that respondents agreed that rural emergency responders tend to be noncompliant with NIMS. Respondents mentioned that rural emergency responders disagree with the effectiveness of NIMS. This study showed that a correlation occurred between the effectiveness of NIMS and the number of times a respondent was involved in a formal NIMS incident command. The following recommendations were made based on the findings and conclusions of this study. Researchers should continue to look at what public safety training officers believe affects the adaptability of NIMS. Training officers should consider contributing to the future NIMS curriculum. Training officers should focus on interoperability issues through increased field exercises. Research should be conducted to determine what improvements to curriculum effect future NIMS compliance. Further research should be conducted on the effectiveness of individual compliance, and achievement.

Wilson, Jason

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters  

SciTech Connect

The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

Denise Baclawski

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Geographic Information Science (GISc) Approach to Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns of Terrorist Incidents in Iraq, 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect

As terrorism on all scales continues, it is necessary to improve understanding of terrorist and insurgent activities. This article takes a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to advance the understanding of spatial, social, political, and cultural triggers that influence terrorism incidents. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal patterns of terrorist attacks are examined to improve knowledge about terrorist systems of training, planning, and actions. The results of this study aim to provide a foundation for understanding attack patterns and tactics in emerging havens as well as inform the creation and implementation of various counterterrorism measures.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Siebeneck, Laura K. [University of Utah; Hepner, George F. [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Computation of Domain-Averaged Shortwave Irradiance by a One-Dimensional Algorithm Incorporating Correlations between Optical Thickness and Direct Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiative transfer algorithm that accounts for correlations between the optical thickness and the incident direct solar radiation is developed to compute the domain-averaged shortwave irradiance profile. It divides the direct ...

Seiji Kato

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Relationship between Incident and Double-Way Transmittances: An Application for the Estimate of Surface Albedo from Satellites over the African Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inference of surface reflectance from satellite observations requires the knowledge of the double-way transmittance through the atmosphere. Since the existing pyranometer networks routinely provide measurements of the incident transmittance ...

B. Pinty; D. Tanre

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

Morris, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 Y in parts of Sweden with high {sup 137}Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation form {sup 137}Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from {sup 137}Cs was apparent. A some-what decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Tondel, M.; Flodin, U.; Skoeldestig, A.; Axelson, O. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ARM - Datastreams - mfrirt25m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmfrirt25m Datastreamsmfrirt25m Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : MFRIRT25M Infrared Thermometer (MFRIRT): upwelling radiance, instantaneous 20-sec at 25-meter height Active Dates 2001.04.01 - 2001.09.26 Measurement Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer (MFRIRT) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Surface skin temperature sfc_ir_temp Longwave broadband upwelling irradiance up_long_hemisp Shortwave broadband total upwelling irradiance up_short_hemisp Locations Southern Great Plains

335

harrison-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer Analysis of Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Data L. C. Harrison, J. J. Michalsky, Q. Min, and M. Beauharnois Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction The rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS, shown in Figure 1) is our most recently developed instrument. It can be thought of as a 512-channel multifilter rotating shadow- band radiometer (MFRSR) spanning the wavelength range 360 nm to 1050 nm. (a) This portion of the shortwave spectrum represents about 75% of the sun's total energy. The RSS implements the same automated shadowbanding Camera Lens Collimating Lens Shadow Band Diffuser Slit Motor Latitude Adjustment Prisms CCD Figure 1. Cross-section of the RSS. (For a color version of this figure, please see http://www.arm.gov/

336

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Using EOF analysis to  

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Using EOF analysis to uncover inhomogeneities in data from ground-based Using EOF analysis to uncover inhomogeneities in data from ground-based aerosol monitoring devices Gianelli, Scott NASA/GISS Carlson, Barbara NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Lacis, Andrew NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis is performed on ground-based shadowband and sun photometer data. The instruments examined for this study include the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) and the CIMEL sun photometer CSPHOT located at the central facility of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site; networks of Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) devices sponsored by ARM and the USDA; and the network of nephelometers and aerosol particle counters of the Climate Monitoring Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL). The original purpose of this investigation

337

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence for Aerosol Effects on AERI Clear-Sky Radiance at the SGP Evidence for Aerosol Effects on AERI Clear-Sky Radiance at the SGP Ma, Y., and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) 10-micron window residuals have been examined relative to the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) 0.87-micron optical depth for clear-sky periods during 1997-98. The analysis shows an increasing aerosol influence on the downwelling radiance with aerosol optical depth for columnar water totals below about 3 cm. Above 3 cm, the residuals become negatively correlated with both aerosol optical depth and precipitable water. This change in the characteristics suggests that the current LBLRTM

338

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a MFRSR to Calculate Direct and Diffuse Broadband Measurements from Using a MFRSR to Calculate Direct and Diffuse Broadband Measurements from Global Broadband Measurements Cornwall, C.R. (a,b), Hodges, G.B. (a,b), and DeLuisi, J.D. (b), University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (a), NOAA Air Resources Lab (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Research Objective: To infer values of direct solar irradiance using data from a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and a broadband pyranometer measuring global horizontal irradiance. Methodology: The MFRSR measures global and diffuse radiation over six narrow spectral bands as well as one broadband (silicon pyranometer). Values for corresponding direct normal irradiances are automatically calculated as part of the MFRSR

339

cheng-98.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Development of a Two-Year-Long ARM Total Optical Depth Data Set Using the Least-Median-Squares Technique M.-D. Cheng Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Introduction A 2-year-long total optical depth (TOD) data set of 30-minute resolution from September 20, 1995, to May 18, 1997, has been constructed for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The TOD values were derived from the surface shortwave irradiance measurements taken by one [E13/Solar Infrared Observing System (SIROS)] of the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSRs). This data set represents the "best" TOD estimate that spans several ARM intensive observation periods (IOPs). The best estimate of TOD value was computed as the composite of TODs that

340

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Optical Scale Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties Over the SGP Site based on MFRSR and MODIS Data Alexandrov, M.D.(a,b), Marshak, A.(b), Cairns, B.(a,b), Lacis, A.A.(b), and Carlson, B.E.(b), Columbia University (a), NASA (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We present scale-by-scale analysis of variability of atmospheric aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and (preliminary) of the Angstrom exponent. This analysis is based on retrievals from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) and from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data. This type of analysis has been applied to a remote sensing aerosol dataset for the first time. The MFRSR data were collected

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ARM - Measurement - Surface skin temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skin temperature skin temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface skin temperature The radiative surface skin temperature, from an IR thermometer measuring the narrowband radiating temperature of the ground surface in its field of view. Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments IRT : Infrared Thermometer MFRIRT : Multifilter Radiometer and Infrared Thermometer External Instruments

342

Integrated Study of MFRSR-derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facili...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facilities - Comparison with Satellite and Other Ground-Based Measurements M. D. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. A. Lacis and B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Comparison of SGP MFRSR Network Aerosol Retrievals with MODIS Aerosol Product The network of Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site consists of 21 instrument sites

343

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance  

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upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, that has been scattered in the atmosphere at least once, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer

344

ARM - VAP Product - mfrsrcldod1min  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productsmfrsrcldodmfrsrcldod1min Productsmfrsrcldodmfrsrcldod1min Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027296 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : MFRSRCLDOD1MIN Derived: Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR, MWR, Langley Analysis Active Dates 1997.08.21 - 2013.10.08 Originating VAP Process Cloud Optical Properties from MFRSR Using Min Algorithm : MFRSRCLDOD Description The mfrsrcldod1min value-added product produces cloud optical properties (optical depth and effective radius) from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) , micorwave radiomter (MWR) and the Langley analysis Value Added Product (Langley VAP).

345

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

346

Section 48  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Comparison of Water Vapor Data at the Southern Great Plains Site and its Implications for Water Vapor Continuum Absorption in the Near-Infrared During the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment Period A. M. Vogelmann, V. Ramanathan and W. C. Conant Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Center for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction ARESE Data and Modeling Several studies find that the observed atmospheric solar Narrowband water vapor transmission and aerosol optical absorption is systematically greater than that computed by depths are retrieved from direct beam irradiances measured by models in clear skies (Wild et al. 1995; Charlock and Alberta the Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR)

347

ARM - Data Announcements Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2013 [Data Announcements] 5, 2013 [Data Announcements] Rejected! Update to Langley VAP Dismisses Outliers Bookmark and Share An example of a clear day where most values made it through the cloud screening algorithm. An example of a clear day where most values made it through the cloud screening algorithm. A Langley plot is a regression of log (signal) versus airmass. Under appropriate conditions, the Langley regression yields values that represent the response of an instrument in absence of atmosphere (i.e., at the top of atmosphere), and these values are ultimately useful for instrument calibration. The existing LANGLEY VAP (available through special request from the ARM Data Archive) uses input from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR). This new addition to LANGLEY uses the

348

austin-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Effective Drop Size Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Effective Drop Size Using Radar Data and Shortwave Optical Depth R. T. Austin and G. L. Stephens Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction We present a new retrieval of liquid water path (LWP), effective drop size, and liquid water content (LWC) of water clouds, based on data from the Millimeter-Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) and shortwave optical depths retrieved from the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) (Min and Harrison 1996). This algorithm is being developed in anticipation of the 94-GHz radar and Profiling Oxygen A-band Spectrometer/Visible Imager (PABSI) data to be available from the CloudSat platform

349

ARM - Evaluation Product - SASHE Langley Regressions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsSASHE Langley Regressions ProductsSASHE Langley Regressions Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : SASHE Langley Regressions Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SAS-He) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) - an instrument that has been in the ACRF stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SAS-He provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

350

ARM - Measurement - Surface albedo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

albedo albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface albedo The fraction of incoming solar radiation at a surface (i.e. land, cloud top) that is effectively reflected by that surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer External Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

351

ARM - Instrument - rss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsrss govInstrumentsrss Documentation RSS : Handbook RSS : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports RSS : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Instrument Categories Radiometric General Overview The Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) implements the same automated shadowbanding technique used by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and so it too provides spectrally resolved, direct-normal, diffuse-horizontal, and total-horizontal irradiances, and can be calibrated in situ via Langley regression. The irradiance spectra are measured simultaneously at all spectral elements (pixels) in 360-nm to

352

ARM - PI Product - Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data 2000.01.01 - 2000.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670

353

Dynamic investigation of gold nanocrystal assembly using in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering.  

SciTech Connect

Here we investigate the dynamic self-assembly pathway of ordered gold nanocrystal arrays during the self-assembly of gold nanocrystal micelles, with and without the presence of colloidal silica precursors, using grazing-incidence X-ray scattering performed at a synchrotron source. With silica precursors present, a lattice with rhombohedral symmetry is formed from the partial collapse of a face-centered cubic structure. In the absence of silica, a transient body-centered orthorhombic phase appears, which rapidly collapses into a glassy nanocrystal film. The appearance of face-centered and body-centered structures is consistent with a phase diagram for charged colloidal particles with assembly modulated via Coulomb screening.

Dunphy, D.; Fan, H.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Brinker, C. J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of New Mexico; SNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DHS National Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Transforming Federal Cyber Security Management June 12, 2013 1 Page 2. Outline 1. Securing .gov 2. Why CDM1? ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Incident Handling at BMDO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Adverse events such as natural disasters and power ... for damage by ensuring response actions are ... We must prioritize our responses to have the ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident conditions and frequencies. Just under 6000 records, each representing a single event involving rail freight shipments moving on mainline track, were subjected to statistical frequency analysis, then included in the construction of classification and regression trees as described by Breimann et al. (1984). Variables related to damage cost defined the initial splits,'' or branchings of the tree. An interesting implication of the results of this analysis with respect to transportation of hazardous wastes by rail is that movements should be avoided when ambient temperatures are extreme (significantly 80{degrees}F), but that there should be no a priori bias against shipping wastes in longer train consists. 2 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Saricks, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Janssen, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dissolution dynamics of the calcite-water interface observed in situ by glancing-incidence X-ray scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Glancing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source were used to investigate dissolution dynamics in situ at the calcite-water interface. The relation between calcite saturation state and roughness of the calcite (1014) cleavage surface as a function of time was examined during pH titrations of an initially calcite-saturated solution. Systematic variations in roughness were observed as a function of saturation state as pH was titrated to values below that of calcite saturation. Different steady-state values of roughness were evident at fixed values of {Delta}G{sub r}, and these were correlated with the extent of undersaturation. A significant increase in roughness begins to occur with increasing undersaturation at a {Delta}G{sub r} value of approximately {minus}2.0 kcal/mol. The dissolution rate corresponding to this increase is about 1.5 x 10{sup 7} mmol/cm {center_dot} sec. This increase in roughness is attributed to a transition in the principal rate-determining dissolution mechanism, and is consistent with both powder-reaction studies of dissolution kinetics and single-crystal dissolution studies by atomic force microscopy. These data indicate some important potential applications of GIXS in the study of mineral-water interface geochemistry.

Sturchio, N.C.; Chiarello, R.P.

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32Forrestal Building 1000 Independence...

363

Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals Dexing Zeng a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

murine tumour models [3­5] and patient studies [5,6], with promising results. The prepara- tion to possibly more reactive minor impurities), product purification and product analysis can be prob- lematic or tall), mixing units, heaters, pumping sys- tems, are able to control and process chemical or biological

Kenis, Paul J. A.

364

Parametric Rainfall Retrieval Algorithms for Passive Microwave Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology is described to construct fully parametric rainfall retrieval algorithms for a variety of passive microwave sensors that exist today and are planned for the future. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (...

Dong-Bin Shin; Christian Kummerow

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During June–July 1999, the NOAA R/V Ron H. Brown (RHB) sailed from Australia to the Republic of Nauru where the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a long-term climate observing station. During July, ...

Edgeworth R. Westwater; B. Boba Stankov; Domenico Cimini; Yong Han; Joseph A. Shaw; Barry M. Lesht; Carles N. Long

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An Evaluation of Oceanographic Radiometers and Deployment Methodologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project is to produce water-leaving radiances within an uncertainty of 5% in clear-water regions, and chlorophyll a concentrations within 35% over the range of 0.05–50 ...

Stanford B. Hooker; Stephane Maritorena

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Parameters Using a Microwave Imaging Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the radiative transfer theory, the microwave radiance emanating from ice clouds at arbitrary viewing angles is expressed as an analytic function of the cloud ice water path (IWP), the particle effective diameter (De), and the particle ...

Fuzhong Weng; Norman C. Grody

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Evaluation of Wind Profiler, RASS, and Microwave Radiometer Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several ground-based remote Sensors were operated together in Colorado during February and March 1991 to obtain continuous profiles of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. Instrument performance is compared for five ...

B. E. Martner; D. B. Wuertz; B. B. Stankov; R. G. Strauch; E. R. Westwater; K. S. Gage; W. L. Ecklund; C. L. Martin; W. F. Dabberdt

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Studies of urban atmospheric aerosols using lidar and sky radiometer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis discusses the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, the corresponding instrumental technology and inversion algorithm. The urban aerosol optical properties in Hong Kong have… (more)

Yang, Xun (??)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

130 The Journal of Ocean Technology Spindrift Copyright Journal of Ocean Technology 2012 Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, GIS data, and personnel. It activated its Disaster Response Team to provide assistance to users and services through its disaster response web site. These included an online oil spill plume trajectory model Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident, an analysis

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

371

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant's wave scattering theory to evaluate degradation of the beam performance. For a damaged surface

Tillack, Mark

372

Modified Hitschfeld–Bordan Equations for Attenuation-Corrected Radar Rain Reflectivity: Application to Nonuniform Beamfilling at Off-Nadir Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by Takahashi et al., multiple path attenuation estimates over the field of view of an airborne or spaceborne weather radar are feasible for off-nadir incidence angles. This follows from the fact that the surface reference technique, which ...

Robert Meneghini; Liang Liao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients for H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} incident upon spacecraft surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients were made for gas-surface interactions between the Space Shuttle reaction control jet plume gases and the solar panel array materials to be used on the International Space Station. Actual conditions were simulated using a supersonic nozzle source to produce beams of the gases with approximately the same average velocities as the gases have in the Shuttle plumes. Samples of the actual solar panel materials were mounted on a torsion balance that was used to measure the force exerted on the surfaces by the molecular beams. Measurements were made with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} incident upon the solar array material, Kapton, SiO{sub 2}-coated Kapton, and Z93-coated Al. The measurements showed that molecules scatter from the surfaces more specularly as the angle of incidence increases and that scattering behavior has a strong dependence upon both the incident gas and velocity. These results show that for some technical surfaces the simple assumption of diffuse scattering with complete thermal accommodation is entirely inadequate. It is clear that additional measurements are required to produce models that more accurately describe the gas-surface interactions encountered in rarefied flow regimes.

Cook, S.R.; Hoffbauer, M.A.

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Univ. of British Columbia (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Significant factors in rail freight accidents: A statistical analysis of predictive and severity indices in the FRA accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Association maintains a file of carrier-reported accidents and incidents that meet threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. Using a five year period from this data base, an investigation was conducted into the relationship between quantifiable risk factors and accident frequency and severity. Specific objectives were to identify key variables in accidents, formulate a model to predict future accidents, and assess the relative importance of these variables from the perspective of routing and shipping decision making. The temporal factors YEAR and MONTH were found to be significant predictors of risk; accident severity was greatest for accidents caused by track and roadbed defects. Train speed was an indicator of accident severity; track class and training tonnage were inversely proportional to accident severity. Investigation of the data base is continuing, with a final report expected by late summer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Lee, Tze-San; Saricks, C.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north?central Oklahoma: 1992–2008  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow?band, interference?filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloudscreening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun’s elevation is greater than 9.25°. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month?by?month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, Joseph J.; Denn, Frederick; Flynn, Connor J.; Hodges, G. B.; Kiedron, Piotr; Koontz, Annette S.; Schlemmer, James; Schwartz, Stephen E.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Climatology of aerosol optical depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, since the fall of 1992. Most of the data presented are from the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer, a narrow-band, interference-filter Sun radiometer with five aerosol bands in the visible and near infrared; however, AOD measurements have been made simultaneously and routinely at the site by as many as three different types of instruments, including two pointing Sun radiometers. Scatterplots indicate high correlations and small biases consistent with earlier comparisons. The early part of this 16 year record had a disturbed stratosphere with residual Mt. Pinatubo aerosols, followed by the cleanest stratosphere in decades. As such, the last 13 years of the record reflect changes that have occurred predominantly in the troposphere. The field calibration technique is briefly described and compared to Langley calibrations from Mauna Loa Observatory. A modified cloud-screening technique is introduced that increases the number of daily averaged AODs retrieved annually to about 250 days compared with 175 days when a more conservative method was employed in earlier studies. AODs are calculated when the air mass is less than six; that is, when the Sun's elevation is greater than 9.25{sup o}. The more inclusive cloud screen and the use of most of the daylight hours yield a data set that can be used to more faithfully represent the true aerosol climate for this site. The diurnal aerosol cycle is examined month-by-month to assess the effects of an aerosol climatology on the basis of infrequent sampling such as that from satellites.

Michalsky, J.; Schwartz, S.; Denn, F.; Flynn, C.; Hodges, G.; Kiedron, P.; Koontz, A.; Schlemmer, J., and Schwartz, S. E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Investigation of Bottle Related Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure · Analysis of Glass Breakage · Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

382

Free form incident light fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents methods for photo-realistic rendering using strongly spatially variant illumination captured from real scenes. The illumination is captured along arbitrary paths in space using a high dynamic range, HDR, video camera system with position ...

Jonas Unger; Stefan Gustavson; Per Larsson; Anders Ynnerman

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reporting of Nuclear Incidents (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Each operator of a nuclear power generating facility shall notify the Commissioner of Environmental Protection or his designee, which may be another State Agency, as soon as possible but in all...

384

Radiation Incident on Tilted Collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solar energy system design purposes, observations of solar radiation on a horizontal surface must be converted to values on a tilted energy collector. An empirical conversion relationship, introduced by Liu and Jordan (1960) and based on ...

P. J. Robinson

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Incident Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virus Pages Sophos Virus Info Page Symantec Trend Micro Virus Encyclopedia Virus Bulletin Home Page Cyber Security Sites AUSCERT FIRST NSA (National Security Agency) NVD (National...

386

The incident at Stagg Field  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the events leading up to the first controlled release of atomic energy under the abandoned West Stands of Scagg Field at the University of Chicago on December 2, 1942. This experiment was a milestone in a multifaceted project geared toward producing an atomic bomb in time to affect the outcome of World War II. This article traces the origins of the Manhattan Project from the first letter written by Einstein to the first successful graphite modulated chain reacting pile and including a brief afterward on the use of the bombs produced by this project on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Other articles in this magazine also discuss various aspects of the project and serve, along with this article, as a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

Moore, M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Method of normalizing the measured scattered light from a surface defect located arbitrarily in a Gaussian intensity distribution incident on the surface  

SciTech Connect

The intensity distribution of the beam from a laser operated in the TEM/sub infinity/ mode is Gaussian in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the beam. In some applications it is desirable to have a uniform intensity over a certain region in space. For example, when a Gaussian beam is incident on a smooth surface containing small isolated defects the light scattered by a defect will depend on the position of the defect relative to the center of the beam. In the past, several techniques have been devised to convert a Gaussian intensity profile into a uniform intensity over a specified region in space. In the present work a different approach is taken. A method of normalization is described which makes direct use of the Gaussian intensity distribution of the TEM/sub infinity/ mode. By this method, the amount of light scattered by a defect can be normalized to the value which would be observed if the defect were located at the center of the beam, for a defect small in size compared with the l/e/sup 2/ diameter of the Gaussian profile. The normalization requires that three measurements be made of the scattering by the defect for an arbitrary location of the defect relative to the center of the beam. Experimental data was obtained which verifies the theory.

Klingsporn, P.E.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

Mesa, Matthew

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Factorization of the Cross Section for the {sup 12}C(p,p{alpha}){sup 8}Be(g.s.) Reaction at an Incident Energy of 100 MeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross sections and analyzing powers for the reaction {sup 12}C(p,p{alpha}){sup 8}Be at an incident energy of 100 MeV, measured over a range of quasifree scattering angle pairs, are compared with elastic scattering of protons from {sup 4}He. Remarkable agreement between angular distributions of the two sets of data, presented as a function of the scattering angle in the two-body centre-of mass, is found. Thus the {alpha}-cluster reacts to the projectile just like a free particle.

Cowley, A. A.; Mabiala, J. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Buthelezi, E. Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Steyn, G. F. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Obliquity factors for {sup 60}Co and 4, 10, and 18 MV x rays for concrete, steel, and lead and angles of incidence between 0{degrees} and 70{degrees}  

SciTech Connect

The attenuation of {sup 60}Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 10, and 18 MV x-ray beams by concrete, steel, and lead has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique for angles of incidence 0{degrees}, 30{degrees}, 45{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 70{degrees}. Transmission factors have been determined down to < 2 x 10{sup {minus}5} in all cases. The results show that deviation from the obliquity factor increases with angle but is not significant for angles {le} 45{degrees}. AT 70{degrees} angle of incidence and a transmission factor of 10{sup {minus}5}, the obliquity factor varies between 1.2 and 1.9 for concrete, between 1.4 and 1.7 for steel, and between 1.4 and 1.5 for lead for the range of energies investigated. This amounts to an additional 86 and 50 cm of concrete, 25 and 23 cm of steel, and 8 and 14 cm of lead for {sup 60}Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. The results for {sup 60}Co is concrete and lead are in good agreement with previously published experimental work. Fits to the data using mathematical models allow reconstruction of all data curves to better than 1% on average and 7% in the worst single case. 9 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Biggs, P.J. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Comparison of Measurements of Atmospheric Wet Delay by Radiosonde, Water Vapor Radiometer, GPS, and VLBI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of the Global Positioning System (GPS) as an instrument for measuring the integrated water vapor content of the atmosphere has been evaluated by comparison with concurrent observations made over a 14-day period by radiosonde, ...

A. E. Niell; A. J. Coster; F. S. Solheim; V. B. Mendes; P. C. Toor; R. B. Langley; C. A. Upham

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An Objective Method for Forecasting Tropical Cyclone Intensity Using Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical analysis program, based on finding an optimal representation of the data, has been applied to 120 observations of twenty nine 1973 and 1974 North Pacific tropical cyclones. Each observation consists of a field of Nimbus-5 ...

Herbert E. Hunter; Edward B. Rodgers; William E. Shenk

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thunderstorm Top Structure Observed by Aircraft Overflights with an Infrared Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thunderstorm top structure is examined with high spatial resolution radiometric data (visible and infrared) from aircraft overflights together with other storm views, including geosynchronous satellite observations. Results show that overshooting ...

Robert F. Adler; Michael J. Markus; Douglas D. Fenn; Gerard Szejwach; William E. Shenk

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Performance and Uncertainty of CNR1 Net Radiometers during a One-Year Field Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net radiation flux in correlation with surface energy budget, snowmelt, glacier ice balance, and forest or agricultural flux exchange investigations is measured in numerous field experiments. Instrument costs and energy consumption versus ...

Dominik Michel; Rolf Philipona; Christian Ruckstuhl; Roland Vogt; Laurent Vuilleumier

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) Climate Dataset: A Resource for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the joint National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Pathfinder program, the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) has created ...

Herbert Jacobowitz; Larry L. Stowe; George Ohring; Andrew Heidinger; Kenneth Knapp; Nicholas R. Nalli

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of AIRS and IASI Radiances Using GOES Imagers as Transfer Radiometers toward Climate Data Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), together with the future Cross-track Infrared Sounder, will provide long-term hyperspectral measurements of the earth and its atmosphere at 10 ...

Likun Wang; Xiangqian Wu; Mitch Goldberg; Changyong Cao; Yaping Li; Seung-Hee Sohn

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Comparison of Precipitable Water Observations in the Near Tropics by GPS, Microwave Radiometer, and Radiosondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensing of precipitable water (PW) using the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the near Tropics is investigated. GPS data acquired from the Central Weather Bureau’s Taipei weather station in Banchao (Taipei), Taiwan, and each of nine ...

Yuei-An Liou; Yu-Tun Teng; Teresa Van Hove; James C. Liljegren

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Immersion Factor of In-Water Radiance Sensors: Assessment for a Class of Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral immersion factor of in-water radiance sensors If quantifies the effects of changes in the sensor's response when operated in water versus in air. The values of If are currently computed with a relationship derived from a basic sensor ...

Giuseppe Zibordi

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Deriving soil moisture with the combined L-band radar and radiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we develop a combined active/passive technique to estimate surface soil moisture with the focus on the short vegetated surfaces. We first simulated a database for both active and passive signals under SMAP's ...

Shi, Jiancheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Simple Method for Testing Brightness Temperatures from Satellite Microwave Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed for testing microwave measurements from spaceborne sensors by computing collocated simulated brightness temperatures from the ECMWF numerical weather meteorological model using an atmospheric radiative transfer model and the ...

J-Y. Lojou; R. Bernard; L. Eymard

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atmospheric Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics Derived from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the remote sensing of three-dimensional latent heating distributions in precipitating tropical weather systems from satellite passive microwave observations is presented. In this method, cloud model simulated hydrometeor/latent ...

William S. Olson; Christian D. Kummerow; Ye Hong; Wei-Kuo Tao

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1 ? QR) where Q1 is the apparent ...

Mircea Grecu; William S. Olson; Chung-Lin Shie; Tristan S. L’Ecuyer; Wei-Kuo Tao

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Characterization of the Nimbus-7 SBUV Radiometer for the Long-Term Monitoring of Stratospheric Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precise knowledge of in-orbit sensitivity change is critical for the successful monitoring of stratosphere ozone by satellite-based remote sensors. This paper evaluates those aspects of the in-flight operation that influence the long-term ...

R. P. Cebula; H. Park; D. F. Heath

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

137 and 165 GHZ radiometer measurements of hot electrons in LDX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary form only given. The levitated dipole experiment (LDX) is investigating a levitated dipole magnetic configuration as an alterative confinement concept for fusion plasmas. A 1.1 MA, 68 cm mean diameter, 560 kg ...

Woskov, Paul P.

406

Hydrologic data assimilation of multi-resolution microwave radiometer and radar measurements using ensemble smoothing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been used to estimate soil moisture and related fluxes by merging noisy low frequency microwave observations with forecasts from a conventional though uncertain land surface ...

Dunne, Susan Catherine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Microwave Properties of Ice-Phase Hydrometeors for Radar and Radiometers: Sensitivity to Model Assumptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified framework is presented for assessing the qualitative sensitivities of computed microwave properties, satellite brightness temperatures, and radar reflectivities to assumptions concerning the physical properties of ice-phase ...

Benjamin T. Johnson; Grant W. Petty; Gail Skofronick-Jackson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Theoretical Study of the Accuracy of Tomographic Retrieval of Cloud Liquid with an Airborne Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior studies of the technique of inferring the Liquid water distribution in a cloud with microwave cloud tomography have concentrated on the use of ground-based instruments. An extension of the technique to the analysis of measurements at 31.65 ...

J. F. Drake; J. Warner

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

410

Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Anatolia - Rancho Cordova, California (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A partnership with industry and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

411

NREL Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This measurement station at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment.

Lustbader, J.; Andreas, A.

412

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

413

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

414

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

415

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

416

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

417

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Parameters from Doppler Radar and Infrared Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new method to retrieve vertical profiles of the parameters of cirrus cloud microphysics that are important for the estimation of climatic feedback. These parameters are the particle characteristic size and ice mass content. ...

S. Y. Matrosov; B. W. Orr; R. A. Kropfli; J. B. Snider

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) Climate Dataset: Initial Analyses and Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the joint National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration–National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA–NASA) Pathfinder program, the NOAA/National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) has created a ...

Larry L. Stowe; Herbert Jacobowitz; George Ohring; Kenneth R. Knapp; Nicholas R. Nalli

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Anatolia - Rancho Cordova, California (Data)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A partnership with industry and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Design and development of an airborne microwave radiometer for atmospheric sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite-based passive microwave remote sensing is a valuable tool for global weather monitoring and prediction. This thesis presents the design and development of a low-cost airborne weather sensing instrument to ...

Scarito, Michael P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Calibration of Sun Radiometer–Based Atmospheric Water Vapor Retrievals Using GPS Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the validation and calibration process for integrated water vapor (IWV) measurements derived from sun radiometry at the 940-nm solar absorption channel employed in the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Aerosol Canada (AEROCAN) is ...

Amadou Idrissa Bokoye; Alain Royer; Patrick Cliche; Norm O’Neill

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Microwave Radiative Transfer Studies Using Combined Multiparameter Radar and Radiometer Measurements during COHMEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations of the upwelling microwave radiances from clouds containing layers of rain, ice, and a melting region were performed at frequencies of 18, 37, and 92 GHz. These frequencies coincide with high-resolution microwave ...

J. Vivekanandan; J. Turk; G. L. Stephens; V. N. Bringi

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis of Supercooled Liquid Water Measurements Using Microwave Radiometer and Vibrating Wire Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is made of the theoretical basis for using a vibrating wire to measure supercooled liquid water in clouds. The device consists of a vibrating wire and associated electronics added to radiosondes. The sensing wire that collects ...

Geoffrey E. Hill

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Heavy Thunderstorms Observed Over Land by the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an examination of microwave data from the Nimbus 7 satellite, brightness temperatures were found that were much lower than those expected for the radiation emanating from rain-producing clouds. Every case of very cold brightness temperature ...

R. W. Spencer; W. S. Olson; Wu Rongzhang; D. W. Martin; J. A. Weinman; D. A. Santek

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Calibration of METEOSAT Infrared Radiometer using Split Window Channels of NOAA AVHRR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multispectral/multiangular procedure is proposed to calibrate the infrared channel of METEOSAT-2 IR 1 (760–980 cm?1), using the radiances of NOAA-7 AVHRR channels 4 (870–980 cm?1) and 5 (795–885 cm?1). The METEOSAT radiance can be successfully ...

A. Asem; P. Y. Deschamps; D. Ho

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NREL Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This measurement station at NREL's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment.

Lustbader, J.; Andreas, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

429

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

Angular Power Spectrum of the Microwave Background Anisotropy seen by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The angular power spectrum estimator developed by Peebles (1973) and Hauser & Peebles (1973) has been modified and applied to the 2 year maps produced by the COBE DMR. The power spectrum of the real sky has been compared to the power spectra of a large number of simulated random skies produced with noise equal to the observed noise and primordial density fluctuation power spectra of power law form, with $P(k) \\propto k^n$. Within the limited range of spatial scales covered by the COBE DMR, corresponding to spherical harmonic indices $3 \\leq \\ell \\lsim 30$, the best fitting value of the spectral index is $n = 1.25^{+0.4}_{-0.45}$ with the Harrison-Zeldovich value $n = 1$ approximately 0.5$\\sigma$ below the best fit. For $3 \\leq \\ell \\lsim 19$, the best fit is $n = 1.46^{+0.39}_{-0.44}$. Comparing the COBE DMR $\\Delta T/T$ at small $\\ell$ to the $\\Delta T/T$ at $\\ell \\approx 50$ from degree scale anisotropy experiments gives a smaller range of acceptable spectral indices which includes $n = 1$.

E. L. Wright; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; P. M. Lubin

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Angular Power Spectrum of the Microwave Background Anisotropy seen by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The angular power spectrum estimator developed by Peebles (1973) and Hauser & Peebles (1973) has been modified and applied to the 4 year maps produced by the COBE DMR. The power spectrum of the observed sky has been compared to the power spectra of a large number of simulated random skies produced with noise equal to the observed noise and primordial density fluctuation power spectra of power law form, with $P(k) \\propto k^n$. The best fitting value of the spectral index in the range of spatial scales corresponding to spherical harmonic indices $3 \\leq \\ell \\lesssim 30$ is an apparent spectral index $n_{app}$ = 1.13 (+0.3) (-0.4) which is consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich primordial spectral index $n_{pri} = 1$ The best fitting amplitude for $n_{app} = 1$ is $\\langle Q_{RMS}^2\\rangle^{0.5}$ = 18 uK.

E. L. Wright; C. L. Bennett; K. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; G. F. Smoot

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of the Synthesis and Growth of CdS Quantum Dots from Constituent Atoms in SiO2 Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering was applied to study the synthesis and growth of CdS quantum dots (QDs) from Cd and S atoms implanted in SiO{sub 2}. For a dose of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}, the partial synthesis of CdS QDs occurred already during implantation, with only moderate size increase upon subsequent annealing up to T{sub a} = 1073 K. The dynamics of QD synthesis and growth were considerably different for just two times lower dose, where synthesis started only if the implanted samples were annealed at T{sub a} = 773 K or higher, with a strong increase of the size of QDs upon annealing at higher T{sub a}. The results suggest that high-dose implantation followed by low-temperature annealing could lead to better defined sizes and narrower size distributions of QDs.

Desnica, U. V. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Dubcek, P. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Desnica-Frankovic, I. D. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Buljan, M. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy; White, Clark W [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purposes of this response, we categorise the cyber security maturity of organisations into these three categories with these attributes: ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

439

On the Incidence of Tornadoes in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological analyses of tornado occurrence in the state of California for the period 1950–1992 are presented. In constructing these analyses, the official historical record of California tornadoes was supplemented and corrected with tornado ...

Warren Blier; Karen A. Batten

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Using Incident Reporting to Combat Human Error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnson,C.W. Booktitle: 'People and Computers XIV. In Proceedings of HCI 2000. (McDonald, S., Waern, Y., and Cockton, G., Eds.) pp 311-326 Springer

Johnson, C.W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ORISE: The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dose estimation (US and SI units) treatment of whole body and acute local irradiation issues assessment and treatment of internal contamination with radioactive...

442

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

443

TASK 2: Identification of Building Collapse Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shopping Elveden Forest, Suffolk, UK Unknown 2 April ... Country Club Lewisburg, VA Unknown 2 December 19 ... practice in fire resistance testing is to ...

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

445

Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRAINING 4 UNSAFE EQUIPMENT / POOR DESIGN 5 INSUFFICIENT CARE 6 IMPROPER POSITION OR POSTURE 7 FAILURE ORDER JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS DONE 4 IMPROVED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 5 EQUIPMENT REPAIR TO BE USED FOR COMPLETION OF WSIB CLAIM FORM #7 WHITE COPY - Department Chair, Manager or Director YELLOW

Hitchcock, Adam P.

446

Electron-impact rotationally elastic total cross sections for H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of incident energy (0.01-2000 eV)  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports computational results of the total cross sections for electron impact on H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of electron impact energies from 0.01 eV to 2 keV. The total cross section is presented as sum of the elastic and electronic excitation cross sections for incident energies. The calculation uses two different methodologies, below the ionization threshold of the target the cross section is calculated using the UK molecular R-matrix code through the Quantemol-N software package while cross sections at higher energies are evaluated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The two methods are found to be consistent at the transition energy ({approx}15 eV). The present results are, in general, found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results (wherever available) and, thus, the present results can serve as a benchmark for the cross section over a wide range of energy.

Vinodkumar, Minaxi [V P and R P T P Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Bhutadia, Harshad [Government Engineering College, Patan 384265, Gujarat (India); Antony, Bobby [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad JH-826004 (India); Mason, Nigel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

448

Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiometer. ARM has a long history of using the MFRSR, shadowband radiometer, left panel. A shipboard version, fast-rotating shadowband radiometer, was developed to make...

450

Characterizing the Performance of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer An Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, the NIP was seated on a piece of closed-cell insulating foam without any clamping. For outdoor to the cold side of the thermopile and the disc that is directly connected to the "hot" side of the thermopile determined by the temperature difference between the hot and cold junctions inside the instrument. Without

Oregon, University of

451

Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma in April 1996, under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated sunphotometer and a rotating Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance - A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 2 shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncerta...

Rangasayi Halthore; Schwartz; S. E.; Michalsky; J. J.; Anderson; G. P.; Gail P. Anderson; Ferrare R. A.; ten Brink H. M; Holben B. N.; Harry M. Ten Brink

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A Concept for a Gas-Filter Correlation Radiometer to Remotely Sense the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Column from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern about the climatic effects of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 has resulted in a growing need, both scientifically and politically, to monitor atmospheric CO2. The development of a satellite instrument that could measure the global ...

Boyd T. Tolton

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Radiometric and Engineering Performance of the SeaWiFS Quality Monitor (SQM): A Portable Light Source for Field Radiometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable and stable source of radiant flux, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Quality Monitor (SQM), was developed as a field instrument for use in experiments away from the calibration laboratory such as those encountered ...

B. Carol Johnson; Ping-Shine Shaw; Stanford B. Hooker; Don Lynch

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Atmospheric Temperature and Absolute Humidity Profiles over the Beaufort Sea and Amundsen Gulf from a Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Radiometrics MP-3000A microwave radiometric profiler (MWRP) provided high temporal resolution atmospheric profiles for temperature and absolute humidity up to 10 km, while 113 radiosondes were launched (and 68 were used in the analysis) over sea ...

Lauren M. Candlish; Richard L. Raddatz; Matthew G. Asplin; David G. Barber

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Texture-Polarization Method for Estimating Convective–Stratiform Precipitation Area Coverage from Passive Microwave Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational and modeling studies have revealed the relationships between convective–stratiform rain proportion and the vertical distributions of vertical motion, latent heating, and moistening in mesoscale convective systems. Therefore, remote ...

William S. Olson; Ye Hong; Christian D. Kummerow; Joseph Turk

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Ice Cloud Retrievals and Analysis with the Compact Scanning Submillimeter Imaging Radiometer and the Cloud Radar System during CRYSTAL FACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submillimeter-wave radiometry is a new technique for determining ice water path (IWP) and particle size in upper-tropospheric ice clouds. The first brightness temperatures images of ice clouds above 340 GHz were measured by the Compact Scanning ...

K. Franklin Evans; James R. Wang; Paul E. Racette; Gerald Heymsfield; Lihua Li

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds ...

Henri Sauvageot

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

459

Calibration Evaluation and Radiometric Testing of Field Radiometers with the SeaWiFS Quality Monitor (SQM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the goals of calibration and validation programs supporting ocean color satellites is to produce water-leaving radiances with an uncertainty of 5% in clear-water regions. This objective requires field instruments with a calibration and ...

Stanford B. Hooker; James Aiken

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Instrument Characterization for the Detection of Long-term Changes in Stratospheric Ozone: An Analysis of the SBUY/2 Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific objective of unambiguously detecting subtle global trends in upper stratospheric ozone requires that one maintain a thorough understanding of the satellite-based remote sensors intended for this task. The instrument now in use for ...

S. E. Frederick; R. P. Cebula; D. F. Heath

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Combined Use of the Radar and Radiometer of TRMM to Estimate the Influence of Drop Size Distribution on Rain Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of passive microwave and radar observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite is used to investigate the consistency between the two sensors. Rather than relying on some absolute “truth” to verify ...

Nicolas Viltard; Christian Kummerow; William S. Olson; Ye Hong

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Stabilized Radiometer Platform (STRAP)—An Actively Stabilized Horizontally Level Platform for Improved Aircraft Irradiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of solar and infrared irradiance by instruments rigidly mounted to an aircraft have historically been plagued by the introduction of offsets and fluctuations into the data that are solely due to the pitch and roll movements of the ...

Anthony Bucholtz; Robert T. Bluth; Ben Kelly; Scott Taylor; Keir Batson; Anthony W. Sarto; Tim P. Tooman; Robert F. McCoy Jr.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Vertical Variability of Near-Surface Salinity in the Tropics: Consequences for L-Band Radiometer Calibration and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two satellite missions are planned to be launched in the next two years; the European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius missions aim at detecting sea ...

Claire Henocq; Jacqueline Boutin; Gilles Reverdin; François Petitcolin; Sabine Arnault; Philippe Lattes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Determining the Susceptibility of Cloud Albedo to Changes in Droplet Concentration with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion Processes that Produce greenhouse gases also increase cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, which in turn increase cloud droplet concentrations and thereby cloud albedo. A calculation of cloud susceptibility, defined in this ...

S. Platnick; S. Twomey

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Web Interface for Solar Tracking is Right on Target New Web Interface for Solar Tracking is Right on Target Bookmark and Share New solar tracking interface helps eliminate judgment calls and create an objective assessment of tracker performance each day. New solar tracking interface helps eliminate judgment calls and create an objective assessment of tracker performance each day. At ARM's Tropical Western Pacific site, radiometer sensors mounted on solar trackers provide critical radiation balance measurements. If a tracker is off even a small amount, the data from the diffuse radiometers and the normal incidence pyrheliometer (NIP) are worthless, and therefore the overall combined data coming from the site's other instruments is less valuable. As part of an investigation into performance problems with the

467

Design principles of coordinated multi-incident emergency response systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response systems play an important role in homeland security nowadays. Despite this, research in the design of emergency response systems is lacking. An effective design of emergency response system involves multi-disciplinary design considerations. ...

Rui Chen; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optical properties of glazing materials at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Rubin, M.; Powles, R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

2013 New York Wildfire and Incident Management Academy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of toiletries) are located in the Post Office (www.bnl.govmapspoint.php?Lat40.86776&Lng-72.88106) (Building 179) and the Research Support Building (www.bnl.govguvmap.asp)...

470

NIST SP 800-61 Revision 2, Computer Security Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... laptop, loaded with appropriate software (eg, packet sniffers, digital forensics ... 22 The National Software Reference Library (NSRL) Project maintains ...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

471

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

472

NIST SP 800-61 Revision 2, Computer Security Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... those caused by natural disasters, power failures ... are reflected in response operations. ... addition, following standardized responses should minimize ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

Austin, B.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

474

Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Incident-Based Training Modules for Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a second phase of the project undertaken in 2009 by EPRI's Switching Safety and Reliability Project to develop a comprehensive set of training materials designed to reinforce behaviorsprincipally strict procedural compliancethat make errors less likely to occur in the conduct of power switching operations. The report describes the general approach taken to developing the training materials and the 11 modules produced to date. The additional training material are attached to the main...

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

476

2013 New York Wildfire and Incident Management Academy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Registered Attendees Food at BNL Local Weather at BNL Visiting BNL Disclaimer 2013 Wildfire Academy Event Registration Process for Brookhaven National Laboratory NY...

477

2013 New York Wildfire and Incident Management Academy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-800-HAMPTON Fax: 1-631-732-5522 Group Code: NYW Reservation Cutoff Date: November 04, 2013 Method of Payment: Self-Pay (credit card) A block of rooms at the Hampton Inn have been...

478

Beryllium based multilayers for normal incidence extreme ultraviolet reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the experimental results of beryllium based multilayer mirrors for use in the 11.4 nm region. Mirrors using molybdenum as the high-Z material have demonstrated 68.7% peak reflectance at 11.3 nm.

Skulina, K.; Alford, C.; Bionta, R.; Makowiecki, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gullikson, E.; Soufli, R.; Kortright, J.; Underwood, J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

High-Rise and Large/Complex Incident Communications ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... After the first aircraft struck the World Trade Center One building there was an approximate factor of 5 ... WTC 1 WTC 2 Marriott Hotel West & Liberty ...

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiation of sound from surfaces at grazing angles of incidence.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is difficult to predict the sound radiation from large factory roofs. The existing infinite panel theories of sound insulation are not sufficient when the… (more)

Pavasovic, V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incidence multifilter radiometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like to acknowledge and thank the regional emergency managers, pubic health and medical services- tial economic implications, the possible impacts on public health and medical services, and the deci those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY

482

Incident Solar Radiation over Europe Estimated from METEOSAT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily sums of the downward solar radiation, i.e., the global radiation, have been computed from imaging data of reflected solar and emitted infrared radiation which were measured from the geostationary satellites METEOSAT I and II during the ...

Werner Möser; Ehrhard Raschke

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Incident-Based Training Modules for Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a project undertaken by EPRI's Switching Safety and Reliability Project to develop materials for training in prevention of errors in the conduct of high voltage switching operations. The report describes the general approach taken to developing the training materials and presents all materials (training modules) required for presentation of four lessons. Additional modules are under development.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Multiple brands of Web browsers (eg, Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Google Chrome, Opera) can be installed on a single ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

485

Developing a Practical Forecasting Screener for Domestic Violence Incidents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a Practical Forecasting Screener for Domesticcomplicated did not improve forecasting skill. Taking thethe local costs of forecasting errors. It is also feasib