National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for incandescent lighting-minimum efficacy

  1. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  2. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  3. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Laser-induced incandescence (LII) HomeClimate & Earth SystemsClimate Measurement & ModelingLaser-induced incandescence (LII) ...

  4. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting » Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings. Although

  5. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  6. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    courtesy of iStockphotoTokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings....

  7. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the filament hot with less electricity. They also provide excellent color rendition. Halogens are a little more expensive than standard incandescent lamps, but are less expensive...

  8. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    File Energy-saving incandescent lightbulbs - high-resolution EPS More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs CFL Lightbulbs

  9. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Image icon Energy-saving incandescent lighbulbs - high-resolution JPG More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard)

  10. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    induced incandescence (LII) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  11. Incandescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a special filament inside a glass bulb filled that is usually filled with an inert gas. The descriptive name "incandescence" comes from the surface physics governed by the ...

  12. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents November 5, 2014 - 11:39pm Addthis By...

  13. Dual LED/incandescent security fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauna, Kevin Wayne

    2005-06-21

    A dual LED and incandescent security lighting system uses a hybrid approach to LED illumination. It combines an ambient LED illuminator with a standard incandescent lamp on a motion control sensor. The LED illuminator will activate with the onset of darkness (daylight control) and typically remain on during the course of the night ("always on"). The LED illumination, typically amber, is sufficient to provide low to moderate level lighting coverage to the wall and ground area adjacent to and under the fixture. The incandescent lamp is integrated with a motion control circuit and sensor. When movement in the field of view is detected (after darkness), the incandescent lamp is switched on, providing an increased level of illumination to the area. Instead of an "always on" LED illuminator, the LEDs may also be switched off when the incandescent lamp is switched on.

  14. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  15. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Efficacy refers to the overall energy efficiency of light and is measured in lumens (measure of light output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb...

  16. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  17. EA-1911: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps.

  18. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  19. Operating temperatures for a convectively cooled recessed incandescent light fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.

    1980-12-01

    Test results are given for the operation of a recessed incandescent light fixture intended for residential use. The fixture is labeled for use in direct contact with attic thermal insulation. Temperature control of the powered fixture is provided by convective heat transfer from the ceiling side of the fixture. The fixture was operated at power levels up to two times the rated power of 75 watts and under thermal insulations up to R-40. In all operating configurations tested the fixture surface in contact with attic insulation was found to be less than 175/sup 0/C. The observed surface temperatures are judged to be safe for operation in contact with loose-fill or batt-type insulations. It was observed that the power leads inside one fixture configuration are exposed to temperatures as high as 168/sup 0/C. The electrical insulation could, therefore, have a limited life. The properties of the internal fixture wiring were not, however, studied in detail.

  20. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has published a final rule regarding the request for exclusion of 100 Watt R20 short incandescent reflector lamps from energy conservation standards.

  1. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflectors lamps, as issued by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on April 11, 2014.

  2. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  3. Effects of aggregate morphology and size on laser-induced incandescence and scattering from black carbon (mature soot)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bambha, Ray P.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2015-07-03

    We have used a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to measure time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) and laser scatter from combustion-generated mature soot with a fractal dimension of 1.88 extracted from a burner. We have also made measurements on restructured mature-soot particles with a fractal dimension of 2.3–2.4. We reproduced the LII and laser-scatter temporal profiles with an energy- and mass-balance model, which accounted for heating of particles passed through a CW-laser beam over laser–particle interaction times of ~10 μs. Furthermore, the results demonstrate a strong influence of aggregate size and morphology on LII and scattering signals. Conductive cooling competes with absorptivemore » heating on these time scales; the effects are reduced with increasing aggregate size and fractal dimension. These effects can lead to a significant delay in the onset of the LII signal and may explain an apparent low bias in the SP2 measurements for small particle sizes, particularly for fresh, mature soot. The results also reveal significant perturbations to the measured scattering signal from LII interference and suggest rapid expansion of the aggregates during sublimation.« less

  4. Effects of repetitive pulsing on multi-kHz planar laser-induced incandescence imaging in laminar and turbulent flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, James B.; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Meyer, Terrence R.

    2015-04-08

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) imaging is reported at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using a burst-mode laser system to enable studies of soot formation dynamics in highly turbulent flames. Furthermore, to quantify the accuracy and uncertainty of relative soot volume fraction measurements, the temporal evolution of the LII field in laminar and turbulent flames is examined at various laser operating conditions. Under high-speed repetitive probing, it is found that LII signals are sensitive to changes in soot physical characteristics when operating at high laser fluences within the soot vaporization regime. For these laser conditions, strong planar LII signals aremore » observed at measurement rates up to 100 kHz but are primarily useful for qualitative tracking of soot structure dynamics. However, LII signals collected at lower fluences allow sequential planar measurements of the relative soot volume fraction with a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio at repetition rates of 10–50 kHz. Finally, guidelines for identifying and avoiding the onset of repetitive probe effects in the LII signals are discussed, along with other potential sources of measurement error and uncertainty.« less

  5. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",4657,4172,2193,3778,607,430,572 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Lighting Standards for General Service Incandescent Lamps Prescribed by EISA 2007 General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life Modified Spectrum General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life By 2020, the minimum efficacy for general service incandescent will be 45 lm/W unless the Secretary of Energy has implemented another standard which saves as much or more energy than a 45 lm/W standard. Source(s): U.

  7. LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain PDF icon LED Efficacy-What America Stands to Gain November 2015.pdf

  8. LED Record Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp® power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright™ LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

  9. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning | Department of Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides an overview of seven energy efficiency program types that offer large savings opportunities, including building energy codes, city-led efficiency programs, combined heat and power, energy savings performance contracting, industrial energy efficiency, low income energy efficiency, and ratepayer-funded energy

  10. DOE Requires Manufacturer and Labeler to Cease Sale of Incandescent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company requiring that they halt the sale of 8 basic...

  11. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Work is progressing on totally different high efficiency lighting technologies as well. We'll be covering those in future blogs. Addthis Related Articles New Lighting Facts Label: ...

  12. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional ... The table below compares a 60 watt (W) traditional ... *Based on 2 hrsday of usage, an electricity rate of 11 ...

  13. New Funding Opportunity: High-Efficacy Lamp Product Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Funding Opportunity: High-Efficacy Lamp Product Development New Funding Opportunity: High-Efficacy Lamp Product Development April 21, 2016 - 10:18am Addthis The U.S. Department ...

  14. Incentive Fee Determination Summary Contractor: Washington Closure Hanford LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps consist of a wire filament inside a glass bulb that is usually filled with inert gas, and they produce light when an electric current heats the filament to a high temperature. Incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options-because most of the energy released is in the form of heat rather than light-and a short average operating life

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41 51 61 INCANDESCENT HALOGEN CFL LED 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 COUNCIL BASELINE MARKET AVERAGE TYPE: CURRENT PRACTICE BASELINE EFFICACY Linear Fluorescent Lamps, 4ft...

  16. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Neural Network Approach (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an

  17. Efficacy of 45 lm/W Achieved in White OLED

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED™) with a power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency to ~40% from ~20%, and by incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters that are capable of converting nearly all current passing through a WOLED into light.

  18. Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sweatt, William C. ; Spahn, Olga Blum ; Cowan, William D. ; Dagel, Daryl James ; Wick, David V. Publication

  19. Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide ... Title: Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide ...

  20. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2013-10-01

    An LED lamp or luminaire can generally be found that matches or exceeds the efficacy of benchmark technologies in a given product category, and LED products continue to expand into ever-higher lumen output niches. However, the price premium for LED continues to pose a barrier to adoption in many applications, in spite of expected savings from reduced energy use and maintenance. Other factors—such as dimmability and quality of light—can also present challenges. The appropriate type, timing, and magnitude of energy efficiency activities will vary from organization to organization based on local variables and the method of evaluation. A number of factors merit consideration when prioritizing activities for development. Category-specific projections for pricing and efficacy are provided herein to assist in efficiency program planning efforts.

  1. DOE Requires Manufacturer and Labeler to Cease Sale of Incandescent Reflector Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has issued Notices of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company requiring that they halt the sale of 8 basic...

  2. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  3. Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines Lead Performer: Cree, Inc. - Durham, NC DOE Total Funding: $1,499,971 Cost Share: $374,993 Project Term: 7/1/15 - 6/30/17 Funding Opportunity: SSL R&D Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) (DE-FOA-0001171) Project Objective This project will focus on developing high-efficacy, cost-effective LED light engines for next-generation luminaires. The goal is to incorporate

  4. Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel This paper describes various

  5. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2005-02-25

    This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  6. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  7. OSRAM SYLVANIA Demonstrates 1,439-Lumen Downlight with Efficacy of 82 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OSRAM SYLVANIA researchers have demonstrated a downlight luminaire that achieves 1,439 lumens at an efficacy of 82 lm/W in steady-state operation. These results exceed the project goals of achieving 1,300 lumens and 70 lm/W at a CCT of 3500K and CRI of 80. Improvements in LED chips, phosphors, optics, electronics, and thermal management at OSRAM all contributed to the higher-than-projected luminaire performance.

  8. Quantifying the impact of decay in bed-net efficacy on malaria transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Zhao, Ruijun; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal

    2014-08-23

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are at the forefront of malaria control programs and even though the percentage of households in sub-Saharan Africa that owned nets increased from 3% in 2000 to 53% in 2012, many children continue to die from malaria. The potential impact of ITNs on reducing malaria transmission is limited due to inconsistent or improper use, as well as physical decay in effectiveness. Most mathematical models for malaria transmission have assumed a fixed effectiveness rate for bed-nets, which can overestimate the impact of nets on malaria control. We develop a model for malaria spread that captures the decrease inmoreITN effectiveness due to physical and chemical decay, as well as human behavior as a function of time. We perform uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to identify and rank parameters that play a critical role in malaria transmission. These analyses show that the basic reproduction number R0, and the infectious human population are most sensitive to bed-net coverage and the biting rate of mosquitoes. Our results show the existence of a backward bifurcation for the case in which ITN efficacy is constant over time, which occurs for some range of parameters and is characterized by high malaria mortality in humans. This result implies that bringing R0 to less than one is not enough for malaria elimination but rather additional efforts will be necessary to control the disease. For the case in which ITN efficacy decays over time, we determine coverage levels required to control malaria for different ITN efficacies and demonstrate that ITNs with longer useful lifespans perform better in malaria control. We conclude that malaria control programs should focus on increasing bed-net coverage, which can be achieved by enhancing malaria education and increasing bed-net distribution in malaria endemic regions.less

  9. Quantifying the impact of decay in bed-net efficacy on malaria transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Zhao, Ruijun; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal

    2014-08-23

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are at the forefront of malaria control programs and even though the percentage of households in sub-Saharan Africa that owned nets increased from 3% in 2000 to 53% in 2012, many children continue to die from malaria. The potential impact of ITNs on reducing malaria transmission is limited due to inconsistent or improper use, as well as physical decay in effectiveness. Most mathematical models for malaria transmission have assumed a fixed effectiveness rate for bed-nets, which can overestimate the impact of nets on malaria control. We develop a model for malaria spread that captures the decrease in ITN effectiveness due to physical and chemical decay, as well as human behavior as a function of time. We perform uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to identify and rank parameters that play a critical role in malaria transmission. These analyses show that the basic reproduction number R0, and the infectious human population are most sensitive to bed-net coverage and the biting rate of mosquitoes. Our results show the existence of a backward bifurcation for the case in which ITN efficacy is constant over time, which occurs for some range of parameters and is characterized by high malaria mortality in humans. This result implies that bringing R0 to less than one is not enough for malaria elimination but rather additional efforts will be necessary to control the disease. For the case in which ITN efficacy decays over time, we determine coverage levels required to control malaria for different ITN efficacies and demonstrate that ITNs with longer useful lifespans perform better in malaria control. We conclude that malaria control programs should focus on increasing bed-net coverage, which can be achieved by enhancing malaria education and increasing bed-net distribution in malaria endemic regions.

  10. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L. ); Simmons, Mary Ann ); Simmons, Carver S. ); McKinstry, Craig A. ); Cook, Chris B. ); Thorsten, Susan L. ); Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2003-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the second year of a multi-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  11. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E. . E-mail: cng@ohri.ca

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  12. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-09-30

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three undergraduates participated in this work. Two of the undergraduate students are now in graduate school. The results were widely disseminated 20 archival journal publications (published, accepted or in preparation) and three conference proceedings resulted. The students presented their work at 11 different national/international conferences (32 oral or poster presentations) and the PIs delivered 12 invited, keynote or plenary lectures.

  13. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

  14. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarig, Hadar; Livne, Liran; Held-Kuznetsov, Victoria; Zaknoon, Fadia; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Mor, Amram

    2010-08-23

    Oligomers of acylated lysines (OAKs) are synthetic mimics of host defense peptides (HDPs) with promising antimicrobial properties. Here we challenged the OAK concept for its ability to generate both systemically efficient and economically viable lead compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. We describe the design and characterization of a miniature OAK composed of only 3 lysyls and 2 acyls (designated C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12}) that preferentially targets gram-positive species by a bacteriostatic mode of action. To gain insight into the mechanism of action, we examined the interaction of OAK with various potential targets, including phospholipid bilayers, using surface plasmon resonance, and Langmuir monolayers, using insertion assays, epifluorescence microscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, in a complementary manner. Collectively, the data support the notion that C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12} damages the plasma-membrane architecture similarly to HDPs, that is, following a near-classic 2-step interaction including high-affinity electrostatic adhesion and a subsequent shallow insertion that was limited to the phospholipid head group region. Notably, preliminary acute toxicity and efficacy studies performed with mouse models of infection have consolidated the potential of OAK for treating bacterial infections, including systemic treatments of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Such simple yet robust chemicals might be useful for various antibacterial applications while circumventing potential adverse effects associated with cytolytic compounds.

  15. Improvement of Stent Retriever Design and Efficacy of Mechanical Thrombectomy in a Flow Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, Katharina; Nagl, Frank; Wagner, Marlies Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-02-15

    In vitro experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical intracranial thrombectomy comparing the newly developed Aperio stent retriever and standard devices for stroke treatment. The Aperio (A), with an increased working length of 4 cm and a special cell design for capturing and withholding clots, was compared to three benchmark devices: the Solitaire retrievable stent (B), the Merci X6 (C), and the Merci L5 retriever (D). In a vascular glass model with pulsatile flow, reminiscent of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, we repeatedly induced occlusion by generating thrombi via a modified Chandler loop system. The numbers of recanalization attempts, peripheral embolizations, and recanalizations at the site of occlusion were recorded during 10 retrieval experiments with each device. Eleven devices were able to remove the blood clots from the occluded branch. In 34 of 40 experiments, restoration of flow was obtained in 1-3 attempts. The main differences between the study devices were observed in terms of clot withholding and fragmentation during retrieval. Although there was only one fragmentation recorded for device A, disengagement of the whole clot or peripheral embolization of fragments occurred more frequently (5-7 times) with devices B, C, and D. In a vascular model, the design of device A was best at capturing and withholding thrombi during retrieval. Further study will be necessary to see whether this holds true in clinical applications.

  16. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  17. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  18. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Sedlmair, Martin; Ritter, Christine; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Transarterial Radioembolization Versus Chemoembolization in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Luna, Laura E., E-mail: morenoluna.laura@gmail.com; Yang, Ju Dong; Sanchez, William [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Paz-Fumagalli, Ricardo [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Harnois, Denise M.; Mettler, Teresa A. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Gansen, Denise N. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Groen, Piet C. de; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Narayanan Menon, K. V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Alberts, Steven R. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Department of Oncology (United States); Gores, Gregory J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Fleming, Chad J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Slettedahl, Seth W.; Harmsen, William S.; Therneau, Terry M. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Health Sciences Research (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A.; Andrews, James C. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Roberts, Lewis R., E-mail: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually treated with locoregional therapy using transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Transarterial radioembolization (TARE) using {beta}-emitting yttrium-90 integral to the glass matrix of the microspheres is an alternative to TACE. This retrospective case-control study compared the outcomes and safety of TARE versus TACE in patients with unresectable HCC. Materials and Methods. Patients with unresectable HCC without portal vein thrombosis treated with TARE between 2005 and 2008 (n = 61) were retrospectively frequency-matched by age, sex, and liver dysfunction with TACE-treated patients (n = 55) in the Mayo Clinic Hepatobiliary Neoplasia Registry. Imaging studies were reviewed, and clinical and safety outcomes were abstracted from the medical records. Results. Complete tumor response was more common after TARE (12 %) than after TACE (4 %) (p = 0.17). When complete response was combined with partial response and stable disease, there was no difference between TARE and TACE. Median survival did not differ between the two groups (15.0 months for TARE and 14.4 months for TACE; p = 0.47). Two-year survival rates were 30 % for TARE and 24 % for TACE. TARE patients received fewer treatments (p < 0.001). Fifty-nine (97 %) TARE patients received outpatient treatment. In contrast, 53 (98 %) TACE patients were hospitalized for {>=}1 day (p < 0.001). Compared with TACE, TARE was more likely to induce fatigue (p = 0.003) but less likely to cause fever (p = 0.02). Conclusion. There was no significant difference in efficacy between TARE and TACE. TARE patients reported more fatigue but had less fever than TACE patients. Treatment with TARE required less hospitalization than treatment with TACE. These findings require confirmation in randomized trials.

  20. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  1. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tungsten halogen lamps are more energy-efficient than standard incandescent lamps. They ... Fluorescent lights are about 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent lighting and last ...

  2. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting will be examined here: * replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps * replacing incandescent exit signs with those lit by light emitting diodes (LED) * ...

  3. Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save ...

  4. World Record White OLED Performance Exceeds 100 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has successfully demonstrated a record-breaking white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 102 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using its proprietary, high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED technology. This achievement represents a significant milestone for OLED technology, demonstrating performance that surpasses the power efficacy of incandescent bulbs with less than 15 lm/W and fluorescent lamps at 60-90 lm/W. Funded in part by DOE, UDC's achievement is a major step toward DOE's roadmap goal of a 150 lm/W commercial OLED light source by 2015.

  5. Efficacy of low level electric current (A-C) for controlling quagga mussles in the Welland Canal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fears, C.; Mackie, G.L.

    1995-06-01

    The efficacy of systems (for which patents are pending) which use low-voltage A-C currents for preventing settlement and attachment by zebra mussels were tested with steel rods and plates placed near the intake of a pulp and paper plant in the Welland Canal at Thorold, Ontario. Six racks made of 16 ft. (4.9 m), 2x4s (5.1 x 10.2 cm) were placed into the Welland Canal on August 5, 1994. One rack had 1/8th in (3.2 mm) diam x 12 in (30.5 cm) long steel rods, each separated by 2 in (5.1 cm) attached to pressure treated wood and concrete blocks and an A-C current of 16 v (or 8 v/in); rack 2 had steel rods of the same configuration but 12 v (or 6 v/in) was applied; rack 3 was identical to these but no current was applied and was used as a rod control. The remaining three racks had steel plates, each plate being 3 in (7.6 cm) wide X 24 in (61 cm) long X 1/4 in (6.4 mm) thick and separated by 2 in (5.1 cm); one had 12 v applied (or 6 v/in), another had 16 v applied (or 8 v/in), and the third had no current and was used as a plate control. The racks were placed on the upstream and downstream side of the intake at a depth of about 7 ft (2.1 m) where the mussels populations were heaviest (as determined by SCUBA diving). All mussels were quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). The racks were pulled in mid November after settlement was complete and the results showed: (1) complete prevention of settlement of both new recruits and translocators at 8 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and with steel plate trash bars; (2) partial prevention of settlement at 6 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and steel plates; and (3) that, at current kilowatt hr rates, total efficacy at 8 volts/in would cost approximately $10.80/day/1000 sq ft using rods to protect concrete walls and about $16.32/day/1000 sq ft to protect 3 in wide x 1/4 in thick trash bars. These costs can be reduced even further with pulse dosed AC currents.

  6. EA-1664: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps

  7. Efficacy of Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers Using Coaxial Catheter Technique: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Hirata, Hideki; Higaki, Yuichiro; Tomita, Kichinobu

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for head and neck cancers using a coaxial catheter technique: the superficial temporal artery (STA)-coaxial catheter method. Thirty-one patients (21 males and 10 females; 37-83 years of age) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (maxilla, 2; epipharynx, 4; mesopharynx, 8; oral floor, 4; tongue, 10; lower gingiva, 1; buccal mucosa, 2) were treated by intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. Four patients were excluded from the tumor-response evaluation because of a previous operation or impossibility of treatment due to catheter trouble. Forty-eight sessions of catheterization were performed. A guiding catheter was inserted into the STA and a microcatheter was advanced into the tumor-feeding artery via the guiding catheter under angiographic guidance. When the location of the tumor or its feeding artery was uncertain on angiography, computed tomographic angiography was performed. The anticancer agent carboplatin (CBDCA) was continuously injected for 24 h through the microcatheter from a portable infusion pump attached to the patient's waist. The total administration dose was 300-1300 mg per body. External radiotherapy was administered during intra-arterial chemotherapy at a total dose of 21-70.5 Gy.The initial response was complete response in 15 patients, partial response in 7 patients, and no change in 5 patients; the overall response rate was 81.5% (22/27). Complication-related catheter maintenance was observed in 15 of 48 sessions of catheterization. Injury and dislocation of the microcatheter occurred 10 times in 7 patients. Catheter infection was observed three times in each of two patients, and catheter occlusion and vasculitis occurred in two patients. Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via the STA-coaxial catheter method could have potential as a favorable treatment for head and neck tumors.

  8. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 30–60 μm. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina; Pomoni, Maria; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Kelekis, Alexios; Charokopakis, Angelos Bouma, Evanthia Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Sotirchos, Vlasios; Karampelas, Theodoros Tamvakopoulos, Constantin; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, Enangelos; Marinis, Athanasios; Koskinas, John; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-11-22

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (Child–Pugh score A/B: 55.5 %/44.5 %) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 30–60 μm with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, at 6, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8 % reaching 22.2 % for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1 %, stable disease in 20 %, and progressive disease in 11.1 % of patients. Overall objective response (CR + PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9 % of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 1-year survival is 100 %. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 30–60 μm (35,195 ± 27,873 ng × min/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,960 ± 16,652 ng × min/ml; p = 0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 30–60 μm (83.9 ± 32.1 ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.3 ± 58.8 ng/ml; p = 0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 30–60 μm is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  9. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.« less

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Typical Efficacies and Lifetimes of Lamps (1) Current Technology CRI (2) Incandescent 10 - 19 97 Halogen 14 - 20 99 Fluorescent - T5 25 - 55 52 - 75 Fluorescent - T8 35 - 87 7,500 - 20,000 52 - 90 Fluorescent - T12 35 - 92 7,500 - 20,000 50 - 92 Compact Fluorescent 40 - 70 82 Mercury Vapor 25 - 50 15 - 50 Metal Halide 65 - 70 High-Pressure Sodium 22 Low-Pressure Sodium 0 Solid State Lighting 33-97 Note(s): Source(s): 18 - 180 18,000 20 - 100 15,000 - 50,000 1) Theoretical maximum luminous

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project -- Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Anglea, Steven M.; Simmons, Carver S.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Lecaire, R; Francis, S

    2002-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the first year of a long-term study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Colville Confederated Tribes are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville Tribal Fisheries. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions.

  13. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of leading oxime therapies in guinea pigs exposed to organophosphorus chemical warfare agents or pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelm, Christina M.; Snider, Thomas H.; Babin, Michael C.; Jett, David A.

    2014-12-15

    The currently fielded pre-hospital therapeutic regimen for the treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in the United States (U.S.) is the administration of atropine in combination with an oxime antidote (2-PAM Cl) to reactivate inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Depending on clinical symptoms, an anticonvulsant, e.g., diazepam, may also be administered. Unfortunately, 2-PAM Cl does not offer sufficient protection across the range of OP threat agents, and there is some question as to whether it is the most effective oxime compound available. The objective of the present study is to identify an oxime antidote, under standardized and comparable conditions, that offers protection at the FDA approved human equivalent dose (HED) of 2-PAM Cl against tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), and VX, and the pesticides paraoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon, and phorate oxon. Male Hartley guinea pigs were subcutaneously challenged with a lethal level of OP and treated at approximately 1 min post challenge with atropine followed by equimolar oxime therapy (2-PAM Cl, HI-6 DMS, obidoxime Cl{sub 2}, TMB-4, MMB4-DMS, HLö-7 DMS, MINA, and RS194B) or therapeutic-index (TI) level therapy (HI-6 DMS, MMB4-DMS, MINA, and RS194B). Clinical signs of toxicity were observed for 24 h post challenge and blood cholinesterase [AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)] activity was analyzed utilizing a modified Ellman's method. When the oxime is standardized against the HED of 2-PAM Cl for guinea pigs, the evidence from clinical observations, lethality, quality of life (QOL) scores, and cholinesterase reactivation rates across all OPs indicated that MMB4 DMS and HLö-7 DMS were the two most consistently efficacious oximes. - Highlights: • First comprehensive evaluation of leading AChE oxime reactivators • All oximes are compared against current U.S. therapy 2-PAM Cl. • Relative therapeutic oxime efficacies against OP CWNA and pesticides • Contribution to more effective antidotes for civilian and military populations.

  14. Save Money with LED Holiday Light Strings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LED (or light emitting diode) light strings can use 90% less energy than regular incandescent light strings. They also last about ten times longer, are cooler than incandescents (reducing fire hazards), and are more durable.

  15. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old incandescent bulbs ...

  16. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs,...

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Efficiency Standards for Incandescent Reflector Lamps (1) Effective for lamps manufactured after November 1, 1995 and before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Average Lamp Lamp Wattage Efficacy (lm/W) 40-50 10.5 51-66 11.0 67-85 12.5 86-115 14.0 116-155 14.5 156-205 15.0 Effective for lamps manufactured on or after July 14, 2012 Minimum Rated Lamp Rated Average Lamp Lamp Wattage Lamp Spectrum Diameter (in) Voltage (V) Efficacy (lm/W) (2) 40-205 Standard Spectrum >2.5 ≥125 6.8*P^0.27 40-205

  18. b39.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables 121 Incandescent Standard Fluorescent Compact Fluorescent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen Table ...

  19. b38.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables 118 Incandescent Standard Fluorescent Compact Fluorescent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen Table ...

  20. Have You Used LED Light Strings?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This week, you read about LED holiday light strings, which can use 90% less energy than regular incandescent light strings.

  1. A Conversation With Tribal Leaders in Denver | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  2. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One man's quest to replace his old incandescents with new bulbs to save energy and money on his electricity bill.

  3. Preliminary Study of the Efficacy of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence with Quasi-Monoenergetic Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Safeguards Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P; Hall, J M; Gonzalez, J J

    2011-02-17

    We have studied the efficacy of using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)-based techniques to assay spent nuclear fuel for Pu content using quasi-monoenergetic sources. We have developed two techniques to precisely determine the Pu content in a fuel rod/pin. One of our approaches is virtually free of systematic uncertainties. Using analytical models, we have determined the amount of time required to measure the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel rods and spent fuel assemblies to within 1% precision. We note that Pu content can be determined in a fuel assembly about as fast as in a single fuel pin. The performance of NRF-based assay techniques with improved photon sources, which are currently under development, will also estimated. For follow-on research we propose to: (1) Construct research prototype detection systems for both of the NRF-based assay systems proposed in this paper and measure their calibration curves; (2) Determine the systematic errors associated with both assay methods, explore ways to reduce the errors and fold the results into future performance calculations; (3) Develop an algorithm to assay a fuel assembly; (4) Perform validation measurements using a single pin and scaled assemblies; (5) Research and develop current-mode detection and/or threshold detection techniques to improve assay times; (6) Characterize the flux of newly constructed sources and fold the results into the calculations presented here to determine the feasibility of a variety of proposed sources; and (7) Collaborate with others in the safeguards community to build a prototype system and perform an NRF-based assay demonstration on spent fuel.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel Vascular Closure Device (Glubran 2 Seal) After Diagnostic and Interventional Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Corso, Andrea; Bargellini, Irene Cicorelli, Antonio; Perrone, Orsola; Leo, Michele; Lunardi, Alessandro; Alberti, Aldo; Tomei, Francesca; Cioni, Roberto; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate safety and efficacy of a novel vascular closure device (Glubran 2 Seal) after peripheral angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). From December 2010 to June 2011, all consecutive patients with PAOD undergoing peripheral angiography were prospectively enrolled onto the study after percutaneous antegrade or retrograde puncture of the common femoral artery. After angiography, the Glubran 2 Seal device was used to achieve hemostasis. The following data were registered: technical success and manual compression duration, patients' discomfort (scale 0-5), operators' technical difficulty (scale 0-5), and vascular complications. The site of hemostasis was evaluated by clinical inspection and color-coded Duplex ultrasound performed 1 day and 1 month after the procedure. One hundred seventy-eight patients were enrolled (112 male, mean age 70.8 years) with a total of 206 puncture sites, including 104 (50.5 %) antegrade accesses. The device was successful in 198(96.1 %) of 206 procedures, with 8 cases of manual compression lasting longer than 5 min (maximum 20 min). No major vascular complications were observed, resulting in 100 % procedural success. Minor complications occurred in seven procedures (3.4 %), including two cases of pseudoaneurysms, successfully treated by ultrasound-guided glue injection. The mean {+-} standard deviation score for patients' discomfort was 0.9 {+-} 0.7, whereas the mean score for operators' difficulty was 1.2 {+-} 0.9. In patients with PAOD, the Glubran 2 Seal represents a simple, painless, and efficient vascular closure device, able to achieve hemostasis both in antegrade and retrograde accesses.

  5. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  6. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy in Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittel, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Smith, Kristin L.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Stephenson, Andrew; Klein, Eric A.; Wilkinson, D. Allan; Ciezki, Jay P.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To report long-term efficacy and toxicity for a single-institution cohort of patients treated with low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy permanent implant (PI) monotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2007, 1989 patients with low-risk (61.3%), intermediate-risk (29.8%), high-intermediate-risk (4.5%), and high-risk prostate cancer (4.4%) were treated with PI and followed up prospectively in a registry. All patients were treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy to 144 Gy. Late toxicity was coded retrospectively according to a modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 scale. The rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were calculated. We identified factors associated with late grade ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, bRFS, DMFS, OS, PCSM, and incontinence. Results: The median age of the patients was 67 years, and the median overall and prostate-specific antigen follow-up times were 6.8 years and 5.8 years, respectively. The overall 5-year rates for bRFS, DMFS, OS, and PCSM were 91.9%, 97.8%, 93.7%, and 0.71%, respectively. The 10-year rates were 81.5%, 91.5%, 76.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The overall rates of late grade ≥3 GU and GI toxicity were 7.6% and 0.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, age and prostate length were significantly associated with increased risk of late grade ≥3 GU toxicity. The risk of incontinence was highly correlated with both pre-PI and post-PI transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy is an effective treatment for low-risk and low-intermediate-risk prostate cancer and appears promising as a treatment for high-intermediate-risk and high-risk prostate cancer. Significant long-term toxicities are rare when brachytherapy is performed as monotherapy.

  7. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boron-rich liposomes for oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heber, Elisa M.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Kueffer, Peter J.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Pozzi, Emiliano C. C.; Hughes, Andrea Monti; Maitz, Charles A.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Nigg, David W.; Curotto, Paula; Trivillin, Vernica A.; Schwint, Amanda E.

    2014-11-11

    Unilamellar liposomes formulated with an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, incorporating K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer, and encapsulating Na3[1-(2-B10-H9)-2-NH3B10H8] were prepared by probe sonication and investigated in vivo. Microwave assisted digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was utilized to determine the biodistribution of boron in various tissues following either a single tail vein injection or two identical injections (separated by 24 hours) of the liposomal suspension in BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 mammary adenocarcinomas in their right flank. Double-injection protocols resulted in a boron content in the tumor exceeding 50 g of boron per gram of tissue for 48 to 72 hours subsequent to the initial injection while tumor:blood boron ratios were more ideal from 54 hours (1.9:1) to 96 hours (5.7:1) subsequent to the initial injection. Tumor bearing mice were given a double-injection of liposomes containing the 10B-enriched analogs of the aforementioned agents and subjected to a 30 minute irradiation by thermal neutrons with a flux of 8.8 x 108 (7%) neutrons/cm2 s integrated over the energy range of 0.0 0.414 eV. Significant tumor response for a single BNCT treatment was demonstrated by growth curves versus a control group. Vastly diminished tumor growth was witnessed at 14 days (186% increase versus 1551% in controls) in mice that were given a second injection/radiation treatment 7 days after the first. Mice given a one hour neutron irradiation following the double-injection of liposomes had a similar response (169% increase at 14 days) suggesting that neutron fluence is the limiting factor towards BNCT efficacy in this study.

  9. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  10. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  12. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

  13. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

  14. Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

    2010-01-01

    LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

  15. Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Voelker

    2001-12-21

    The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other integral CFL and future dimmable integral and plug-in versions of the EFL products.

  16. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  17. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

  18. Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Fluorescent Lamps Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps This tool calculates the payback period for your calc retrofit project. Modify the default values to suit your project requirements. Existing incandescent lamp wattage Watts Incandescent lamp cost dollars Incandescent lamp life 1000 hours calc wattage Watts calc cost dollars calc life (6000 hours for moderate use, 10000 hours for high use) 8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours

  19. 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule | Department of Energy 30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and

  20. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) established these efficiency standards. The new energy-saving lightbulbs -- halogen incandescents, CFLs, and LEDs -- could save you about 50 per...

  1. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - by far the most common form of fluorescent lighting but rarely found in residential buildings -- are much more energy efficient than incandescent lamps and are ideally suited...

  2. Lighting Choices - White Background | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image icon All of these lightbulbs-CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving incandescents-meet the new energy standards that take effect from 2012-2014....

  3. Save Energy With A Picnic! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for...

  4. 2006 Draft Rulemaking Activities Data Sheets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chargers and External Power Supplies Test Procedure 4 Ceiling Fans and Ceiling Fan ... Conditioners and Heat Pumps (Residential) Test Procedure 10 Certain Incandescent ...

  5. Summer 2011 Intern Project- Michael Myers | Center for Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHOSPHOR IMPLEMENTATION SCHEMES FOR EFFICIENT LED-BASED WHITE LIGHT Michael Myers Chemical ... Modern day lighting solutions include highly inefficient sources such as incandescent and ...

  6. Types of Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    selection. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Incandescent Outdoor solar Light-emitting diode (LED) Also learn how energy-efficient lightbulbs compare to traditional...

  7. Westinghouse Lighting: Noncompliance Determination (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation finding that various models of incandescent reflector lamps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  8. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. ...

  9. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for incandescent bulbs such as table lamps, ceiling fixtures, and wall sconces. Globe lamps are similar to spiral lamps, but feature a globe or other decorative shape...

  10. 10-04-2010 CA-B-10-0154

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    develop a novel fieldable laser-induced incandescence sensor to measure black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) organic aerosols and their optical and chemical characteristics. ...

  11. APPLIANCE STANDARDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment General Service Incandescent Lamps General Service Fluorescent Lamps Small Electric Motors Electric Motors Water Heaters Furnace Fans Distribution Transformers Water...

  12. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    descriptions of the amount of electricity used for lighting and variations in households' consumption of electricity for lighting. Types of Lights Dominance of Incandescent Lights...

  13. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation ...

  14. Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Policy and Conservation Act GSFL - General Service Fluorescent Lamp GSIL - General Service Incandescent Lamp HID - High-Intensity Discharge (lamps) IEC - International ...

  15. 2010 Aug Report to Congress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (lamps) FY - Fiscal Year GSFL - General Service Fluorescent Lamp GSIL - General Service Incandescent Lamp HID - High-Intensity Discharge (lamps) IEC - International ...

  16. General Service LED Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A U.S. DOE SSL technology fact sheet that compares general service LED light bulbs with incandescent and CFL bulbs.

  17. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    position of the fixture affect the actual output of compact fluorescent bulbs, and the quality of the light may differ between compact fluorescents and incandescents....

  18. DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Company to allow the companies to resume sales of an incandescent reflector lamp ... issued Notices allowing Fuzhou and Westinghouse to resume distribution of those products. ...

  19. Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by 25% to 50%. Replacing 15 incandescent light bulbs with energy efficient bulbs can save approximately 50 per year. When shopping for appliances, look for the Energy Star...

  20. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Guidelines...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emitting Diodes, most commonly referred to as CFLs and LEDs, respectively. Although Halogens are more efficient than incandescents, we ultimately want to turn customers towards...

  1. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to date. The study - which evaluated not only the use but also the manufacturing, transport, and disposal of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps throughout each product...

  2. Thomas Edison

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Known as "The Wizard of Menlo Park," Edison was an American inventor who developed the first commercially practical incandescent light bulb.

  3. Quiz: Test Your Lighting IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Melville Nikola Tesla Thomas Edison Emmett Wiley Thomas Edison first patented the incandescent light bulb in 1879 but long before that, British inventors were demonstrating ...

  4. General Service LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that compares general service incandescent lamps—i.e., light bulbs—to LED and CFL alternatives.

  5. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  6. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US)","USDOE","LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  7. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    save you about 50 per year when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Measuring Light in Lumens The new efficiency standards require lightbulbs to consume...

  8. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation examines costs and benefits from the perspective of the individual household; and (2) The National Perspective projects the total national costs and benefits including both financial benefits, and energy savings and environmental benefits. The national perspective calculations are called the National Energy Savings (NES) and the Net Present Value (NPV) calculations. PAMS also calculate total emission mitigation and avoided generation capacity. This paper describes the data and methodology used in PAMS and presents the results of the proposed phase out of incandescent bulbs in Chile.

  9. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  10. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL...

  11. Fuzhou Sunlight: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-1402)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Co., Ltd. finding that a variety of models of incandescent reflector lamps do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  12. Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tool makes it easy to compare the fuel economy of used cars. April 24, 2014 LED lights are six to seven times more energy efficient than conventional incandescent lights,...

  13. Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In addition to using 70% less energy than traditional bulbs, they're brighter, eco-friendly, and are safer, as they are much cooler than incandescent lights. In addition, they...

  14. Untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 Bulb Type Incandescent Fluorescent Other Room Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other unknown Total 4,196 431...

  15. Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    drop 1.1 percent this year and then fall almost one-half percent in 2015. Compact fluorescent and LED lighting use about 75 percent less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs. ...

  16. School Energy Survey Student Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 40 new power plants. INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Brightness 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens Life of Bulb 1,000...

  17. School Energy Survey Teacher Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Student Guide Page 20 INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Number of bulbs to get 25,000 hours 25 8.3 2.5 1 Cost of bulbs for 25,000...

  18. Product Efficiency Cases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards). In its exception request, TLI requests exception relief for its principal product, a PAR-shaped daylight incandescent reflector lamp known as the SoLux PAR. September...

  19. Westinghouse Lighting: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Westinghouse Lighting Corporation failed to certify various flourescent and incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on lighting costs. Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old...

  1. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent...

  2. Pumpkin Patterns

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and lasts 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. Biomass is material made from plants and animals, and contains stored energy from the...

  3. Lighting Choices - White Background | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Choices - White Background Image icon All of these lightbulbs-CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving incandescents-meet the new energy standards that take effect from 2012-2014. More...

  4. Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Save You Money Banner Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner All of these lightbulbs-CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving incandescents-meet the new energy standards that take...

  5. DOE SSL Postings: March 16, 2015, issue

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    800 lm, roughly equivalent to a 60W incandescent lamp. The first of the new reports, Retail Lamps Study 3.1, focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of...

  6. Home | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs? MIT News highlighted work in the S3TEC center led by Marin Soljacic which... Read the full story The S3TEC Center aims at advancing ...

  7. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a similar shape to traditional incandescent bulbs. CFLs contain a very small amount of mercury and require special handling if they are broken. CFLs should be recycled at the end...

  8. CX-010744: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-010755: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  10. Aero-Tech: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co. failed to certify a variety of incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Aero-Tech: Order (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and closed this case against Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co., without civil penalty, after DOE found that Aero-Tech manufactured and/or privately labeled incandescent reflector lamps, but did not violate DOE regulations.

  12. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies for Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... bulbs 60 watts 2,820 watts CFL bulbs 14 watts 658 watts LED bulbs 9.5 watts 446.5 watts Lighting using kilowatt price of 12 cents * Monthly Cost of Using Incandescent Light ...

  13. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part I: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED ...

  14. Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    used is given off as heat. By replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs with energy-saving lights, you can save about 50 per year -- all while repelling vampires. Learn more...

  15. DuraLamp USA: Order (2010-CE-0912)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered DuraLamp USA, Inc. to pay a $2,500 civil penalty after finding DuraLamp USA had failed to certify that model PAR 30, an incandescent reflector lamp, complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. BPA-2012-01928-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pumps Resistive Cooking Resistive Heating Incandescent Lighting Distributed Generation Power Electronics Share of total system load B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R...

  17. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incandescent Bulbs Light the Way Long before Thomas Edison patented -- first in 1879 and ... Both Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla experimented with fluorescent lamps in the 1890s, but ...

  18. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Mary; Chwastyk, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings in nine applications where LEDs compete with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and certain types of fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  19. Georgia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or halogen: 6.50 LED lamp replacing incandescent or halogen: 9 Lighting Occupancy Sensor: 7 Lighting Daylight Sensor: 25 SplitPackaged Air Conditioners: 20-30ton Split...

  20. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jason R Hollomon Brad Dillon Heather E Snowden Swan Lesley J LED light emitting diode CFL incandescent halogen lamp bulb TCLP STLC TTLC WET hazardous waste electronic waste e...

  1. News | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs? MIT News highlighted work in the S3TEC center led by Marin Soljacic which improves the efficiency of incandescent light bulbs to the level of some CFLs and LEDs. Read full news Observation of Weyl points highlighted by APS and physicsworld.com Direct observations of Weyl points were named one of the top 10 breakthroughs of 2015 by physicsworld.com Read full news 'Molecular Accordion' Drives Thermoelectric Behavior in Promising Material

  2. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two

  3. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office Energy Checklist Office Energy Checklist This checklist outlines actions that conserve energy at the office. Checkbox Replace incandescent lights with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for desk lamps and overhead lighting. Using CFLs instead of comparable incandescent bulbs can save about 50% on your lighting costs. CFLs use only one-fourth the energy and last up to 10 times longer. Checkbox Switch off all unnecessary lights. Use dimmers, motion sensors, or

  4. Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer June 21, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day

  5. Studying Altocumulus Plus Virga with Ground-based Active and Passive Remote Sensors Zhien Wang1, Kenneth Sassen2, David Whiteman3, and Belay Demoz3 1University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228 2University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 E-mail: zhien@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic

  6. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 Common lightbulbs now sold in the United States typically use about 25%-80% less energy than traditional incandescents. Many bulbs meet these new standards, including halogen incandescents, CFLs, and LEDs. The new bulbs provide a wide range of choices in color and brightness, and many of them last much longer than traditional lightbulbs. The

  7. How Healthcare + Industry Breeds Better Inspection Technology | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  8. Partial Shading in Monolithic Thin Film PV Modules: Analysis and Design |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day assembly, learning firsthand about energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Did you know:

  9. Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adaptive Optics, Analysis and Methods sponsored by OSA held June 6-9, 2005 in Charlotte, NC.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the Adaptive Optics, Analysis ...

  10. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a ``Berty`` autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  11. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a Berty'' autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  12. High Efficacy Green LEDs by Polarization Controlled MOVPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Christian

    2013-03-31

    Amazing performance in GaInN/GaN based LEDs has become possible by advanced epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates over the last decade. An immediate push towards product development and worldwide competition for market share have effectively reduced production cost and generated substantial primary energy savings on a worldwide scale. At all times of the development, this economic pressure forced very fundamental decisions that would shape huge industrial investment. One of those major aspects is the choice of epitaxial growth substrate. The natural questions are to what extend a decision for a certain substrate will limit the ultimate performance and to what extent, the choice of a currently more expensive substrate such as native GaN could overcome any of the remaining performance limitations. Therefore, this project has set out to explore what performance characteristic could be achieved under the utilization of bulk GaN substrate. Our work was guided by the hypotheses that line defects such as threading dislocations in the active region should be avoided and the huge piezoelectric polarization needs to be attenuated if not turned off for higher performing LEDs, particularly in the longer wavelength green and deep green portions of the visible spectrum. At their relatively lower performance level, deep green LEDs are a stronger indicator of relative performance improvements and seem particular sensitive to the challenges at hand. The project therefore made use of recently developed non-polar and semipolar bulk GaN substrates that were made available at Kyma Technologies by crystallographic cuts from thick polar growth of GaN. This approach naturally leads to rather small pieces of substrates, cm along the long side while mm along the short one. Small size and limited volume of sample material therefore set the limits of the ensuing development work. During the course of the project we achieved green and deep green LEDs in all those crystal growth orientations: polar c-plane, non- polar a-plane, non-polar m-plane, and semipolar planes. The active region in those structures shows dramatically reduced densities of threading dislocations unless the wavelength was extended as far as 510 nm and beyond. With the appearance of such defects, the light output power dropped precipitously supporting the necessity to avoid any and all of such defects to reach the active region. Further aspects of the non-polar growth orientation proved extremely promising for the development of such structures. Chief among them is our success to achieve extremely uniform quantum wells in these various crystal orientations that prove devoid of any alloy fluctuation beyond the theoretical limit of a binominal distribution. This became very Rensselaer Wetzel DE?EE0000627 3 directly apparent in highly advanced atom probe tomography performed in collaboration at Northwestern University. Furthermore, under reduced or absence of piezoelectric polarization, green emitters in those growth geometries exhibit an unsurpassed wavelength stability over very wide excitation and drive current ranges. Such a performance had not been possible in any polar c-plane growth and now places green LEDs in terms of wavelength stability up par with typical 450 nm blue emitters. The project also incorporated enabling opportunities in the development of micro and nano- patterned substrate technologies. Originally developped as a means to enhance generated light extraction we have demonstrated that the method of nano-patterning, in contrast to micro- patterning also results in a substantial reduction of threading dislocation generation. In green LEDs, we thereby see equal contributions of enhanced light extraction and reduced defect generation to a threefold enhancement of the green light output power. These results have opened entirely new approaches for future rapid and low cost epitaxial material development by avoidance of thick defect accommodation layers. All methods developed within this project have meanwhile widely been publicized by the members o

  13. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  14. Evaluation of the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Edge, Ellen Publication Date: 2011-08-31 OSTI Identifier: 1027179 Report Number(s): PNNL-SA-60306 830403000; TRN: US201121%%346 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: ...

  15. Molecule Nanoweaver Improves Drug Delivery and Treatment Efficacy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    along the synthetic route by using the powerful tool of solid-state NMR analyses. Upon development of a mature protocol, the Molecule Nanoweaver would operate on an assembly...

  16. The Efficacy of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Pseudotumor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Chance; Bogardus, Carl; Thompson, J. Spencer; Farris, Bradley; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Wilkes, Byron; Syzek, Elizabeth; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for orbital pseudotumor. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 20 orbits in 16 patients diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor that received EBRT at the University of Oklahoma, Department of Radiation Oncology. Treated patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months. Results: Fifteen patients (93.7%) were initially treated with corticosteroids. Eight had recurrence after steroid cessation, six were unable to taper corticosteroids completely or partially, and one experienced progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid therapy. Fourteen patients (87.5%) initially responded to radiotherapy indicated by clinical improvement of preradiation symptoms and/or tapering of corticosteroid dose. Mean EBRT dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy). Thirteen patients (81.2%) continued to improve after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were complete cessation of corticosteroid therapy in nine patients (56.3%) and reduced corticosteroid dose in four patients (25%). Radiotherapy did not achieve long-term control for three patients (18.7%), who still required preradiation corticosteroid dosages. Three patients received retreatment(s) of four orbits, of which two patients achieved long-term symptom control without corticosteroid dependence. One patient received retreatment to an orbit three times, achieving long-term control without corticosteroid dependence. No significant late effects have been observed in retreated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for acute symptomatic improvement and long-term control of orbital pseudotumor. Orbital retreatment can be of clinical benefit, without apparent increase in morbidity, when initial irradiation fails to achieve complete response.

  17. Cree Sets New Benchmarks for LED Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree has successfully created a cool white LED prototype that delivers 107 lm/W at 350mA. This achievement builds on the Cree EZBright® LED chip platform, developed in part with prior funding support from DOE. Cree made the prototype LED under their DOE project focused on developing LED chips incorporating photonic crystal elements for improved light extraction and novel package technology for higher down-conversion efficiency compared to conventional LEDs. Based on a 1 millimeter-square chip, the new prototype LED produces white light with a CCT of 5500K and a CRI of 73. Integration of four of these prototype LEDs can produce luminous flux of more than 450 lumens.

  18. The Path to Higher Source, Package, and Product Efficacy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * Non-radiative Auger recombination process that limits efficiency at higher current density * Droop limits how hard LEDs can be driven and Lm Luxeon Q Data Sheet 5 Green Gap...

  19. Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, P.D.

    1985-10-03

    An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

  20. Very high efficacy electrodeless high intensity discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    1987-01-01

    An electrodeless arc lamp comprises an outer jacket hermetically sealing and thermally protecting an arc tube inside which has an upwardly convex bottom center section. The absence of chemically reactive electrode material makes it possible to use metal halides other than iodides. The tube contains chlorides, bromides or a mixture thereof of scandium and sodium in a nearly equimolar relationship in addition to mercury and an inert gas. Good color balance can be obtained at reduced reservoir temperature and with less power loss. Reduction in wall temperature makes it possible to attain longer lamp life.

  1. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  2. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GENERAL PHYSICS; MORPHOLOGY; NEURAL NETWORKS; SHAPE; GALAXIES; PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS; RED SHIFT Astrophysics,ASTRO Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size N...

  3. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    Report to help utilities and energy efficiency organizations forecast the order in which important SSL applications will become cost-effective and estimate when each "tipping point" will be reached. Includes performance trend analysis from DOE's LED Lighting Facts® and CALiPER programs plus cost analysis from various sources.

  4. New Funding Opportunity: High-Efficacy Lamp Product Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Submission deadline for letter of intent: May 6, 2016, 5 p.m. ET Submission deadline for full applications: May 23, 2016, 5 p.m. ET The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office Emerging Technologies (ET) program is announcing the availability of up to $3 million in funding to develop energy efficient replacement lamps in general illumination applications.

  5. Downlight Demonstration Program: Hilton Columbus Downtown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Robert G.; Perrin, Tess E.

    2014-05-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that there were about 700 million downlight luminaires installed in residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. as of 2012, with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires representing less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have lower efficacies and shorter expected lifetimes than comparable LED systems, but the lower initial cost of the conventional technology and the uncertainties associated with the newer LED technology have restricted widespread adoption of LED downlight luminaires. About 278 tBtu of energy could be saved annually if LED luminaires were to saturate the downlight market, equating to an annual energy cost savings of $2.6 billion. This report summarizes an evaluation of LED recessed downlight luminaires in the guest rooms at the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Columbus, OH. The facility opened in October of 2012, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a post-occupancy assessment of the facility in January–March of 2014. Each of the 484 guest rooms uses seven 15 W LED downlights: four downlights in the entry and bedroom and three downlights in the bathroom. The 48 suites use the seven 15 W LED downlights and additional fixtures depending on the space requirements, so that in total the facility has more than 3,700 LED downlights. The downlights are controlled through wall-mounted switches and dimmers. A ceiling-mounted vacancy sensor ensures that the bathroom luminaires are turned off when the room is not occupied.

  6. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, <a href="/node/772396">learn more</a> about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and

  7. Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes Homes From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the <a href="/node/772396">long history of the light bulb</a> and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of the light bulb and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. Our homes are a major source of energy use

  8. #AskEnergySaver: LED Lights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LED Lights #AskEnergySaver: LED Lights April 24, 2014 - 6:00pm Addthis LED lights are six to seven times more energy efficient than conventional incandescent lights, cut energy use by more than 80 percent and can last more than 25 times longer. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. LED lights are six to seven times more energy efficient than conventional incandescent lights, cut energy use by more than 80 percent and can last more than 25 times longer. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder,

  9. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  10. Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.

    2004-12-20

    This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

  11. CX-007850: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Reflector Lamps CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/09/2012 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. ORISE: Enhancing Energy Efficiency Through Peer Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancing Energy Efficiency ORISE scientific peer review helps evaluate technologies that advance renewable energy ORISE Reviews and Evaluates Technologies that Advance Energy Efficiency In addition to renewable energy and changes in individual behavior, energy efficiency is generally achieved through the development of more efficient technologies. Buildings are being constructed with more energy efficient systems, fluorescent light bulbs are replacing incandescent lights, and new vehicle

  13. Efficacy of fixed filtration for rapid kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Yuan; Wang, Adam S.; Pelc, Norbert J.; Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Dose efficiency of dual kVp imaging can be improved if the two beams are filtered to remove photons in the common part of their spectra, thereby increasing spectral separation. While there are a number of advantages to rapid kVp-switching for dual energy, it may not be feasible to have two different filters for the two spectra. Therefore, the authors are interested in whether a fixed added filter can improve the dose efficiency of kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems. Methods: The authors hypothesized that a K-edge filter would provide the energy selectivity needed to remove overlap of the spectra and hence increase the precision of material separation at constant dose. Preliminary simulations were done using calcium and water basis materials and 80 and 140 kVp x-ray spectra. Precision of the decomposition was evaluated based on the propagation of the Poisson noise through the decomposition function. Considering availability and cost, the authors chose a commercial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screen as the filter for their experimental validation. Experiments were conducted on a table-top system using a phantom with various thicknesses of acrylic and copper and 70 and 125 kVp x-ray spectra. The authors kept the phantom exposure roughly constant with and without filtration by adjusting the tube current. The filtered and unfiltered raw data of both low and high energy were decomposed into basis material and the variance of the decomposition for each thickness pair was calculated. To evaluate the filtration performance, the authors measured the ratio of material decomposition variance with and without filtration. Results: Simulation results show that the ideal filter material depends on the object composition and thickness, and ranges across the lanthanide series, with higher atomic number filters being preferred for more attenuating objects. Variance reduction increases with filter thickness, and substantial reductions (40%) can be achieved with a 2 loss in intensity. The authors experimental results validate the simulations, yet were overall slightly worse than expectation. For large objects, conventional (non-K-edge) beam hardening filters perform well. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential of fixed K-edge filtration to improve the dose efficiency and material decomposition precision for rapid kVp-switching dual energy systems.

  14. EFFICACY OF FILTRATION PROCESSES TO OBTAIN WATER CLARITY AT K EAST SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2006-09-28

    The objective is to provide water clarity to the K East Basin via filtration processes. Several activities are planned that will challenge not only the capacity of the existing ion exchange modules to perform as needed but also the current filtration system to maintain water clarity. Among the planned activities are containerization of sludge, removal of debris, and hydrolasing the basin walls to remove contamination.

  15. Improved InGaN LED System Efficacy and Cost via Droop Reduction |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improve Operations & Maintenance Improve Operations & Maintenance Photo of an equipment room in a high-rise commercial office building with red and green equipment. Every building's energy consumption can benefit from rigorous operations and maintenance (O&M) practices. Properly planned and executed O&M is one of the most cost-effective strategies for ensuring equipment longevity, reliability, safety, and energy efficiency in commercial buildings. By one estimate, O&M

  16. Saline Infusion Markedly Reduces Impedance and Improves Efficacy of Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gananadha, Sivakumar Morris, David Lawson

    2004-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively new technique that has been investigated for the treatment of lung tumors. We evaluated for the first time the in vivo use of saline infusion during radiofrequency ablation of sheep lung. We performed RFA on 5 sheep using open and closed chest RFA and the RITA starburst XL and Xli probes using saline infusion with the Xli probe. The impedance and volume of ablation were compared. A total of 16 ablations were produced, 5 percutaneously and 11 open. The impedance during percutaneous and open RFA without saline infusion was 110 {+-} 16.2 and 183.3 {+-} 105.8 O, respectively. With the saline infusion the impedance was 71.3 {+-} 22O and 103.6 {+-} 37.5O. The effect of this was a significantly larger volume of ablation using the saline infusion during percutaneous RFA (90.6 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} vs 10.47 {+-} 2.9 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.01) and open RFA (107.8 {+-} 25.8 cm{sup 3} vs 24.9 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.0002). Saline infusion during RFA is associated with lower impedance, higher power delivery and larger lesion size.

  17. DOE Publishes Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published a report to help utilities and energy efficiency organizations forecast the order in which important SSL applications will become cost-effective and estimate when each tipping point will be reached. It includes performance

  18. The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Chance; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

  19. Measuring the efficacy of a root biobarrier with x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollner, E.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-08-16

    X-ray computed tomography is a useful tool for investigating soil physical properties nondestructively. There is a need to develop proper calibration relationships between soil properties and the x-ray absorption coefficient. The objective of the work was to evaluate soil factors affecting the x-ray absorption coefficient. Based on a theoretical analysis, experimental data from five soils and on results of several other investigators, it was concluded that for many applications, one calibration relationship is applicable to a wide range of soils. The montmorillinitic clay used in the study required special handling due to the extreme shrinkage of this soil upon drying. Knowledge of chemical composition enables approximations but not exact predictions of the x-ray absorption coefficient. The results suggested some reasonable alternative to exhaustive calibration for each anticipated soil condition. Quantification of root activity in terms of root growth and indirectly through water uptake is necessary for understanding plant growth dynamics. X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables qualitative as well as two quantitative outputs, one of which can lead to conclusions regarding root activity. A greenhouse study involving soil columns (Lakeland sand, bulk density 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3}) planted to soybean, Bahiagras, and control (no vegetation) was conducted in 1989. A treflan based on chemical barrier was placed in half of the soil column of each species. The mean x-ray absorption correlated to water content. Results suggested that root presence can also be indirectly inferred based on water content drawn down during planned stress events. It was concluded that x-ray CT may have a niche in soil-water-plant relation studies, particularly when plant species have large roots. 35 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A.

    2008-08-15

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  1. Improved InGaN LED System Efficacy and Cost via Droop Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lumileds, LLC - San Jose, CA Partners: Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque, NM DOE Total Funding: 1,495,990 Cost Share: 374,000 Project Term: 912015 - 8312017 Funding ...

  2. On the efficacy of imploding plasma liners for magnetized fusion target compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, P. B.

    2008-06-15

    A new theoretical model is formulated to study the idea of merging a spherical array of converging plasma jets to form a 'plasma liner' that further converges to compress a magnetized plasma target to fusion conditions [Y. C. F. Thio et al., 'Magnetized target fusion in a spheroidal geometry with standoff drivers', Current Trends in International Fusion Research II, edited by E. Panarella (National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 1999)]. For a spherically imploding plasma liner shell with high initial Mach number (M=liner speed/sound speed) the rise in liner density with decreasing radius r goes as {rho}{approx}1/r{sup 2}, for any constant adiabatic index {gamma}=d ln p/d ln {rho}. Accordingly, spherical convergence amplifies the ram pressure of the liner on target by the factor A{approx}C{sup 2}, indicating strong coupling to its radial convergence C=r{sub m}/R, where r{sub m}(R)=jet merging radius (compressed target radius), and A=compressed target pressure/initial liner ram pressure. Deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma liners with initial velocity {approx}100 km/s and {gamma}=5/3, need to be hypersonic M{approx}60 and thus cold in order to realize values of A{approx}10{sup 4} necessary for target ignition. For optically thick DT liners, T<2 eV, n>10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, blackbody radiative cooling is appreciable and may counteract compressional heating during the later stages of the implosion. The fluid then behaves as if the adiabatic index were depressed below 5/3, which in turn means that the same amplification A=1.6x10{sup 4} can be accomplished with a reduced initial Mach number M{approx_equal}12.7({gamma}-0.3){sup 4.86}, valid in the range (10

  3. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  4. 100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Decai

    2010-10-31

    An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramica and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumileds LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

  5. Energy Efficiency of LEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet discusses the current state of the LED market and discusses package efficacy, luminaire efficacy, and application efficacy.

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Annual Cost Active Idle Off Active Idle Off ($) (2) Kitchen Coffee Maker 1,000 70 0 38 229 8,493 58 5.6 Dishwasher (3) 365 (4) 120 11.6 Microwave Oven 1,500 3 70 8,690 131 12.6 Toaster Oven 1,051 37 54 5.2 Refrigerator-Freezer 660 63.1 Freezer 470 45.0 Lighting 18-W Compact Fluorescent 18 1,189 20 2.1 60-W Incandescent Lamp 60 672 40 3.9 100-W Incandescent Lamp 100 672 70 6.4 Torchiere Lamp-Halogen 300 1,460 440 42.0 Bedroom and Bathroom Hair Dryer 710 50 40 3.4 Waterbed Heater 350 3,051 1,070

  7. LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR®

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® LED Replacement Lamps: Current Performance and the Latest on ENERGY STAR® This May 19, 2009 webcast summarized CALiPER's recent benchmark testing of common omnidirectional incandescent lamps (e.g., A-lamps), and provided an update on ENERGY STAR criteria for LED integral replacement lamps - currently in its second draft. Robert Lingard of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) gave an

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research | OSTI,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is a type of solid-state lighting that uses a semiconductor to convert electricity to light. LED lighting products are beginning to appear in a wide variety of home, business, and industrial products such as holiday lighting, replacement bulbs for incandescent lamps, street lighting, outdoor area lighting and indoor ambient lighting. Over the past

  9. Another Side of Light - D

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. Three quantum phenomena In fluorescence, matter absorbs light waves of a high frequency and then emits light of the same or lower frequency. This process was studied and named by George Gabriel Stokes in the mid-19th century. Today, fluorescence is familiar to us from fluorescent light bulbs. A fluorescent bulb's filament produces ultraviolet light, which is absorbed by the bulb's inner coating, which then emits lower-frequency visible light-more visible light than an incandescent bulb

  10. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    06, Itron Inc. 1 Under the Bright Lights: Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Information Administration Annual Conference April 27, 2011 Joe Loper © 2006, Itron Inc. Boom Times for Energy Efficiency  EISA (2007) > Most significant EE legislation in previous 3 decades > Incandescent light bulb phase out starting 2012 > Vehicle fuel economy standards increased for first time since 1980s > Numerous program budget authorizations  Federal Stimulus Funding  Ratepayer Funded

  11. The Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit James Sweeney Stanford University Director Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (Née: Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency) Professor, Management Science and Engineering 6 Source: McKinsey & Co. Increased commercial space Gasoline Price Controls Compact Fluorescent Penetration LED: Traffic Lights, Task Lighting Appliance Energy Labeling Gasoline Rationing Much Incandescent Lighting Congestion Pricing Personal Computer

  12. LED Lights for All Occasions | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SSL Basics » LED Basics LED Basics Unlike incandescent lamps, LEDs are not inherently white light sources. Instead, LEDs emit nearly monochromatic light, making them highly efficient for colored light applications such as traffic lights and exit signs. However, to be used as a general light source, white light is needed. White light can be achieved with LEDs in three ways: Phosphor conversion, in which a phosphor is used on or near the LED to convert the colored light to white light RGB

  13. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit James Sweeney Stanford University Director Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (Née: Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency) Professor, Management Science and Engineering 6 Source: McKinsey & Co. Increased commercial space Gasoline Price Controls Compact Fluorescent Penetration LED: Traffic Lights, Task Lighting Appliance Energy Labeling Gasoline Rationing Much Incandescent Lighting Congestion Pricing Personal Computer

  14. Photo: US ITER/ORNL INSIDE: ITER Site Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Gallery: Energy Literacy in 2013 Photo Gallery: Energy Literacy in 2013 December 18, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis In celebration of Earth Day in April, elementary school students at Churchill Road Elementary School in McLean, Virginia, learned about energy literacy by riding the Energy Department’s energy bike. The bike enabled students to pedal for power and experience the difference in physical effort necessary to power incandescent, compact fluorescent, and LED lighting. This lesson

  15. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  16. Weatherization and Energy Efficiency Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Energy Efficiency Success Stories Weatherization and Energy Efficiency Success Stories November 3, 2009 - 6:00am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Last Friday was National Weatherization Day, which brought attention to the cost-saving and environmental benefits of: Weather stripping and caulking Properly insulating your home Reducing electricity use Replacing incandescent light bulbs with CFLs Buying energy-efficient appliances And other

  17. Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William Evans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that progressively brighten in response to a bicycler's physical effort. By monitoring the number of bulbs illuminated in a "light tower," the bicycler is able to judge the

  18. Rod-to-rod spacing illuminating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fodor, G.; Gaal, P.S.

    1984-03-14

    A system for obtaining an image of an object includes at least one light source having an incandescent filament. An image of the filament is projected onto an object to be observed. Using light reflected from the object, an image of the object is generated. Such a system may employ a television camera to generate the image, and is especially suited for remote observation of objects.

  19. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline

  20. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report Interpreting the temporal relationship between the scattering and incandescence signals recorded by the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Sedlacek et al. (2012) reported that 60% of the refractory black carbon containing particles in a plume containing biomass burning

  1. Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes & Buildings » Lighting & Daylighting » Lighting Basics Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Text Version There are many different types of artificial lights (formally called "lamps" in the lighting industry,) which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Lighting High-intensity Discharge Lighting Incandescent Lighting LED Lighting. New lamp designs that use energy-efficient technology are now readily available in the

  2. Veeco

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Veeco Veeco's collaboration with Sandia has helped us lower MOCVD cost of ownership through improved modeling and better temperature control. Dr. Bill Quinn Chief Technologist Veeco Instruments n Technologist Jeff Kempisty of SNL removes an InGaN LED wafer from the Veeco MOCVD system. Research Driving Down the Costs of Efficient LED Lighting Solid state lighting (SSL), which uses light emitting diodes (LEDs), has the potential to be 10 times more energy-efficient than traditional incandescent

  3. Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Doing Business with DOE's Solid-State Lighting Program Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises to make a significant impact on solving our nation's energy and environmental challenges. With the promise of being more than ten times as effcient as incandescent lighting and twice as effcient as fuorescent light- ing, SSL products using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) will mean "greener" homes and businesses that use

  4. NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices As of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates 700 million downlight luminaires were installed in residential and commercial buildings; light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires represent less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have

  5. Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED lightbulbs are

  6. Earth Day 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies On July 10, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Halco Lighting Technologies (Halco) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception

  7. The depletion of Interleukin-8 causes cell cycle arrest and increases the efficacy of docetaxel in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Nan; Chen, Liu-Hua; Ye, Run-Yi; Lin, Ying; Wang, Shen-Ming

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ? IL-8 depletion affects cell cycle distribution. ? Intrinsic IL-8 mediates breast cancer cell migration and invasion. ? IL-8 siRNA down regulates key factors that control survival and metastatic pathway. ? IL-8 depletion reduces integrin ?3 expression. ? IL-8 depletion increases the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. -- Abstract: IL-8 is a multi-functional pro-inflammatory chemokine, which is highly expressed in cancers, such as ER-negative breast cancer. The present study demonstrates the pervasive role of IL-8 in the malignant progression of ER-negative breast cancer. IL-8 siRNA inhibited proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle progression in MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. IL-8 silencing resulted in the upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p27, the downregulation of cyclin D1, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Akt and NF-?B activities. IL-8 depletion also increased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel. These results indicate a role for IL-8 in promoting tumor cell survival and resistance to docetaxel and highlight the potential therapeutic significance of IL-8 depletion in ER-negative breast cancer patients.

  8. On the efficacy of stochastic collocation, stochastic Galerkin, and stochastic reduced order models for solving stochastic problems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Richard V. Field, Jr.; Emery, John M.; Grigoriu, Mircea Dan

    2015-05-19

    The stochastic collocation (SC) and stochastic Galerkin (SG) methods are two well-established and successful approaches for solving general stochastic problems. A recently developed method based on stochastic reduced order models (SROMs) can also be used. Herein we provide a comparison of the three methods for some numerical examples; our evaluation only holds for the examples considered in the paper. The purpose of the comparisons is not to criticize the SC or SG methods, which have proven very useful for a broad range of applications, nor is it to provide overall ratings of these methods as compared to the SROM method.more » Furthermore, our objectives are to present the SROM method as an alternative approach to solving stochastic problems and provide information on the computational effort required by the implementation of each method, while simultaneously assessing their performance for a collection of specific problems.« less

  9. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  10. A Preclinical Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 500 Artificial Embolization Device in Sheep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, Richard J.; Nation, Patrick N.; Polakowski, Robert; Biliske, Jennifer A.; Tiege, Paul B.

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: This study evaluated the safety, effectiveness, and biodegradation of a new embolic agent, Occlusin Trade-Mark-Sign 503 Artificial Embolization Device (OCL 503). The agent consists of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (150-212 {mu}m) coated with type I bovine collagen and was compared with Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres (300-500 {mu}m) in this controlled study of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in sheep. Methods: Unilateral UAE was performed in 32 adult ewes randomly assigned. Vessels were embolized to effective stasis. The cohort was divided into four groups, which were sacrificed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Both agents were 100% effective in achieving stasis. At 6 months, all OCL 503-treated arteries were occluded, the microspheres degraded with time, and at 12 months all four animals examined demonstrated recanalization. OCL 503 was found in the untreated uterine artery in one animal with no other evidence of non target embolization. In the Embosphere-treated group, all vessels remained occluded and microspheres were detected in the contralateral uterine artery in 6 of 15 examined vessels and in 10 vaginal, 2 ovarian, and 1 vesical artery. No procedural-related complications were seen in either group. Conclusions: OCL 503 is as effective an embolic agent as Embosphere{sup Registered-Sign} Microspheres when embolizing ovine uterine arteries and resorbs with time, allowing recanalization of the treated arteries. No device-related issues or adverse events were observed.

  11. Assessment of the efficacy of laser hyperthermia and nanoparticle-enhanced therapies by heat shock protein analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Fei; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Ran; Guo, Junwei

    2014-03-15

    Tumor thermotherapy is a method of cancer treatment wherein cancer cells are killed by exposing the body tissues to high temperatures. Successful clinical implementation of this method requires a clear understanding and assessment of the changes of the tumor area after the therapy. In this study, we evaluated the effect of near-infrared laser tumor thermotherapy at the molecular, cellular, and physical levels. We used single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in combination with this thermotherapy. We established a mouse model for breast cancer and randomly divided the mice into four groups: mice with SWNT-assisted thermotherapy; mice heat treated without SWNT; mice injected with SWNTs without thermotherapy; and a control group. Tumors were irradiated using a near-infrared laser with their surface temperature remaining at approximately 45 C. We monitored the tumor body growth trend closely by daily physical measurements, immunohistochemical staining, and H and E (hematoxylin-eosin) staining by stage. Our results showed that infrared laser hyperthermia had a significant inhibitory effect on the transplanted breast tumor, with an inhibition rate of 53.09%, and also significantly reduced the expression of the heat shock protein Hsp70. Furthermore, we have found that protein analysis and histological analysis can be used to assess therapeutic effects effectively, presenting broad application prospects for determining the effect of different treatments on tumors. Finally, we discuss the effects of SWNT-assisted near-infrared laser tumor thermotherapy on tumor growth at the molecular, cellular, and physical levels.

  12. The efficacy of post porosity plasma protection against vacuum-ultraviolet damage in porous low-k materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lionti, K.; Volksen, W.; Darnon, M.; Magbitang, T.; Dubois, G.

    2015-03-21

    As of today, plasma damage remains as one of the main challenges to the reliable integration of porous low-k materials into microelectronic devices at the most aggressive node. One promising strategy to limit damage of porous low-k materials during plasma processing is an approach we refer to as post porosity plasma protection (P4). In this approach, the pores of the low-k material are filled with a sacrificial agent prior to any plasma treatment, greatly minimizing the total damage by limiting the physical interactions between plasma species and the low-k material. Interestingly, the contribution of the individual plasma species to the total plasma damage is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the specific damaging effect of vacuum-ultraviolet (v-UV) photons on a highly porous, k = 2.0 low-k material and we assessed the P4 protective effect against them. It was found that the impact of the v-UV radiation varied depending upon the v-UV emission lines of the plasma. More importantly, we successfully demonstrated that the P4 process provides excellent protection against v-UV damage.

  13. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  14. Role of curative radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer. [Clinical factors effecting efficacy and incidence of complications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coy, P.; Kennelly, G.M.

    1980-02-15

    From 1963 to 1974, 141 patients with lung cancer were treated with curative intent in the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic in Vancouver. The clinical presentation, age and sex distribution, histology, and reasons for surgery not being carried out are examined. The results of this treatment are presented. An attempt has been made to isolate a group of patients who have a better prognosis so that treatment selection can be improved. Hemoptysis, cough, dyspnea, and incidental finding on routine chest x-ray were the most common manner of presentation. Thirty-four percent of the patients were over 70 years of age and 13% were women. The crude overall three- and five-year survival rates were 18 and 10% (19 and 9% in the men, 17 and 14% in the women). Patients presenting with dyspnea had a better survival than those presenting with cough and hemoptysis. Patients with lesions less than 3 cm in diameter had a 28% three-year survival, compared with 14% for lesions greater than 5 cm in diameter. The three- and five-year survival rates in patients over 70 years of age were 23 and 17% respectively. The response to treatment and the survival were better in the patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-two percent were alive at three years and 12% at five years as compared with 9 and 5% for other histologies. Fifty-four percent of the 35 patients with a complete response and with squamous cell carcinoma were alive at three years, compared with only 8% of the 12 patients with other histologies who showed a complete response.

  15. Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

    2011-09-01

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

  16. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  17. LED exit signs: Improved technology leads the way to energy savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sardinsky, R.; Hawthorne, S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent innovations in light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs may make LED signs the best choice among the energy efficient options available. In the past, LED signs have offered low power consumption, projected long lamp life, and low maintenance requirements. Now, the best of the LED signs also offer improved optical designs that reduce their already low power consumption while improving visibility and appearance, and even reduce their cost. LED exit signs are gaining market share, and E Source expects this technology to eventually dominate over incandescent, compact fluorescent, and electroluminescent signs. More research is needed, however, to confirm manufacturers` claims of 20-year operating lives for LED signs. Conservative estimates place the number of exit signs in US buildings at about 40 million. Although each sign represents a very small part of a building`s load, exit signs are ready targets for energy efficiency upgrades -- they operate continuously and most use inefficient incandescent sources. With an LED sign, annual energy and maintenance costs can be reduced by more than 90 percent compared to a typical incandescent sign. Low annual costs help to offset the LED sign`s relatively high first cost. More than 25 utilities offer DSM incentives for energy efficient exit signs, and efficient alternatives are becoming more readily available. Recent improvements in optical designs enable many LED signs to visually out perform other sources. In addition to these benefits, LED exit signs have lower life cycle cost than most other options. The biggest barrier to their success, however, is that their first cost has been considerably higher than competing technologies. LED sign prices are falling rapidly, though, because manufacturers are continually improving optical designs of the fixtures to use fewer LEDs and thus even less energy while providing better performance.

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Total Lighting Technology Light Output, by Sector (Trillion Lumen-Hour per Year)(1) Residential Commercial Industrial Other (2) Total Incandescent 1640 49% 180 1% 0 0% 50 1% 1870 5% General (A-type, Decorative) 1390 42% 120 0% 0 0% - - 1510 4% Reflector 190 6% 60 0% 0 0% - - 250 1% Miscellaneous 60 2% 0 0% - - 50 1% 110 0% Halogen 170 5% 240 1% 0 0% 20 0% 430 1% General 20 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 20 0% Reflector 110 3% 100 0% 0 0% - - 210 1% Low Voltage Display 10 0% 130 1% - - - - 140 0%

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 2003 Lighted Floorspace for the Stock of Commercial Buildings, by Type of Lamp (1) Type of Lamp (Billion SF) (2) Standard Fluorescent 59.7 96% Incandescent 38.5 62% Compact Fluorescent 27.6 44% High-Intensity Discharge 20.6 33% Halogen 17.7 29% Note(s): Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B44, p. 220. Lighted Floorspace Percent of Total Lighted Floorspace: 62.06 Billion SF Lighted Floorspace 1) Mall buildings

  20. L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs This September 23, 2008 webcast provided an overview of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) technology competition. The L Prize calls for super-efficient SSL products to replace two of the most common light bulbs used today: the 60-watt incandescent and the PAR-38 halogen reflector. Kelly Gordon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, kicked off the webcast with an overview of the

  1. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  2. Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money May 30, 2012 - 11:58am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy If you've been to a home improvement store lately, you've probably noticed more and more energy-saving light bulbs available on the shelves. Traditional incandescent light bulbs give off about 90% of the energy they use in the form of heat,

  3. WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? Who said it, Nikola Tesla or Thomas Edison? Test your knowledge of these two important energy inventors with our downloadable quote quiz cards. Four cards feature a quote only; the corresponding cards reveal the answer. Want to learn more about Tesla and Edison? Check out our top things you didn't know about Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Learn the history of the light bulb -- from incandescent to LED -- in our interactive timeline.

  4. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver » Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED

  5. How Do I Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holiday Lights Work? How Do Holiday Lights Work? December 16, 2015 - 11:31am Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Sarah Gerrity Sarah Gerrity Former Multimedia Editor, Office of Public Affairs Want to learn more about Holiday Lights? Check out our recent post on the Top 5 Things You Didn't Know About Holiday Lights. Last year, we told you how incandescent holiday string lights work, but we left out an important topic: LED string

  6. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  7. WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? Who said it, Nikola Tesla or Thomas Edison? Test your knowledge of these two important energy inventors with our downloadable quote quiz cards. Four cards feature a quote only; the corresponding cards reveal the answer. Want to learn more about Tesla and Edison? Check out our top things you didn't know about Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Learn the history of the light bulb -- from incandescent to LED -- in our interactive timeline.

  8. A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting A Rising Star: Solid-State Lighting June 16, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Just when consumers started getting familiar with the spiral ice-cream cone-shaped and prong-shaped compact fluorescents (CFLs), along comes LED lighting, a solid-state lighting (SSL) solution. Some experts are predicting that solid-state lighting is set to turn the current lighting industry on its head, and perhaps in the not-too-distant future make the century-old incandescent

  9. Have You Found Any Energy-Efficient Bargains? | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Found Any Energy-Efficient Bargains? Have You Found Any Energy-Efficient Bargains? January 13, 2012 - 11:52am Addthis This week, Elizabeth shared her retail adventures in the clearance section of a store where she picked up some LED light strings at bargain prices. Whether you use them for holidays or every day just because they're irresistibly cheerful, light strings are an excellent example of LED products. LED holiday lights have many advantages over ordinary incandescent lights: Running LED

  10. Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

  11. Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur-782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2011-11-29

    Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

  12. 36 ways to save energy and money - right now! Hawai'i Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 ways to save energy and money-right now! STATE OF HAWAII ACTIONS THAT WILL TAKE SOME PLANNING AND/OR HOME REMODELING: 1 Shut off lights and appliances when you leave the room. 2 Use task lighting and shut off general and overhead lighting. 3 Change incandescent bulbs to compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). 4 If you are near a window, use natural daylight, not electric lighting. 5 Use the ENERGY STAR settings in your computers, printers, copiers, and appliances to power down when idle. But

  13. A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions August 4, 2011 - 3:09pm Addthis This 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on) could save the nation about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity or $3.9 billion in one year and avoid 20 million metric tons of carbon emissions if every 60-watt incandescent bulb in the U.S. was replaced with the L Prize winner. | Photo

  14. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    2008-01-15

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  15. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  16. Method of improving BeO as a thermoluminescent detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gammage, Richard B.; Thorngate, John H.; Christian, Danny J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of radiation exposure below 1 mR are possible with a BeO ceramic thermoluminescent detector (TLD) by treating the TL signal in a manner that discriminates against an interferring pyroelectric incandescence (PI). This is accomplished by differentiating the signals electronically to cause the composite signal to cross the baseline. A zero-crossing detector then senses and clips the negative-going portion of the signal. The resultant signal is integrated, producing a result wherein the true TL signal is substantially greater than the PI signal.

  17. Optical double-slit particle measuring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tichenor, D.A.; Wang, J.C.F.; Hencken, K.R.

    1982-03-25

    A method for in situ measurement of particle size is described. The size information is obtained by scanning an image of the particle across a double-slit mask and observing the transmitted light. This method is useful when the particle size of primary interest is 3..mu..m and larger. The technique is well suited to applications in which the particles are non-spherical and have unknown refractive index. It is particularly well suited to high temperature environments in which the particle incandescence provides the light source.

  18. How Do Holiday Lights Work? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Holiday Lights Work? How Do Holiday Lights Work? December 16, 2015 - 11:31am Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Sarah Gerrity Sarah Gerrity Former Multimedia Editor, Office of Public Affairs Want to learn more about Holiday Lights? Check out our recent post on the Top 5 Things You Didn't Know About Holiday Lights. Last year, we told you how incandescent holiday string lights work, but we left out an important topic: LED string

  19. Chou_1980.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money May 30, 2012 - 11:58am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy If you've been to a home improvement store lately, you've probably noticed more and more energy-saving light bulbs available on the shelves. Traditional incandescent light bulbs give off about 90% of the energy they use in the form of heat,

  20. Optical double-slit particle measuring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Tichenor, Daniel A. (Freemont, CA); Wang, James C. F. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A method for in situ measurement of particle size is described. The size information is obtained by scanning an image of the particle across a double-slit mask and observing the transmitted light. This method is useful when the particle size of primary interest is 3 .mu.m and larger. The technique is well suited to applications in which the particles are non-spherical and have unknown refractive index. It is particularly well suited to high temperature environments in which the particle incandescence provides the light source.

  1. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1997-06-24

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  2. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  3. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  4. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  5. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Rosenfeld, Scott M.

    2012-06-22

    This report documents observations and results obtained from a lighting demonstration project conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Program at the Smithsonain American Art Museum in Washington, DC. LED Lamp samples were tested in the museum workshop, temporarily installed in a gallery for feedback, and ultimately replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery of modernist art at the American Art Museum and partially replacing lamps in two galleries at the Musesum's Renwick Gallery. This report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of usign LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

  6. Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers. The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N. J.; Poplawski, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    DOE GATEWAY program report reviewing how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps these dimmers were originally designed to control, and how those differences can lead to complications when attempting to dim LEDs. Providing both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects—as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures—the report aims to reduce the chance of experiencing compatibility-related problems and, if possible, ensure good dimming performance.

  7. ARM - Instrument - sp2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentssp2 Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Instrument Categories Aerosols The SP2 measures the soot (black carbon) mass of individual aerosol particles by laser-induced incandescence down to concentrations as low as 10 ng/m^3. The SP2 is part of the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). See Also Contact(s) Stephen Springston Brookhaven

  8. Assess the Efficacy of an Aerial Distant Observer Tool Capable of Rapid Analysis of Large Sections of Collector Fields: FY 2008 CSP Milestone Report, September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Burkholder, F.; Gray, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2009-02-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing an aerial Distant Observer optical characterization tool for collector fields in concentrating solar power plants.

  9. Efficacy of TACE in TIPS Patients: Comparison of Treatment Response to Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients With and Without a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Yuo-Chen Kohi, Maureen P. Naeger, David M. Tong, Ricky T. Kolli, K. Pallav Taylor, Andrew G. Laberge, Jeanne M. Kerlan, Robert K. Fidelman, Nicholas

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To compare treatment response after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with and without a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent conventional TACE for HCC between January 2005 and December 2009 identified 10 patients with patent TIPS. From the same time period, 23 patients without TIPS were selected to control for comparable Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child-Pugh-Turcotte scores. The two groups showed similar distribution of Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer and United Network of Organ Sharing stages. Target HCC lesions were evaluated according to the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST) guidelines. Transplantation rate, time to tumor progression, and overall survival (OS) were documented. Results: After TACE, the rate of complete response was significantly greater in non-TIPS patients compared with TIPS patients (74 vs. 30 %, p = 0.03). Objective response rate (complete and partial response) trended greater in the non-TIPS group (83 vs. 50 %, p = 0.09). The liver transplantation rate was 80 and 74 % in the TIPS and non-TIPS groups, respectively (p = 1.0). Time to tumor progression was similar (p = 0.47) between the two groups. OS favored the non-TIPS group (p = 0.01) when censored for liver transplantation. Conclusion: TACE is less effective in achieving complete or partial response using mRECIST criteria in TIPS patients compared with those without a TIPS. Nevertheless, similar clinical outcomes may be achieved, particularly in TIPS patients who are liver-transplantation candidates.

  10. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Maty, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the various approaches attempted to make solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol-gel and solutionbased synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3- SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.

  11. Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide Reduction Salt Utilized in the Reprocessing of Used Uranium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyas, Josef; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes various approaches for making sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to recover uranium from used oxide fuel. The approaches include sol-gel and solution-based synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2O and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt.

  12. Efficacy of a solution-based approach for making sodalite waste forms for an oxide reduction salt utilized in the reprocessing of used uranium oxide fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Frank, Steven M.; Matyáš, Josef; Burns, Carolyne A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the various approaches attempted to make solution-derived sodalite with a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt used to dissolve used uranium oxide fuel so the uranium can be recovered and recycled. The approaches include modified sol-gel and solutionbased synthesis processes. As-made products were mixed with 5 and 10 mass% of a Na2O-B2O3- SiO2 glass binder and these, along with product without a binder, were heated using either a cold-press-and-sinter method or hot uniaxial pressing. The results demonstrate the limitation of sodalite yield due to the fast intermediate reactions between Na+ and Cl- to form halite in solution and Li2Omore » and SiO2 to form lithium silicates (e.g., Li2SiO3 or Li2Si2O5) in the calcined and sintered pellets. The results show that pellets can be made with high sodalite fractions in the crystalline product (~92 mass%) and low porosities using a solution-based approach and this LiCl-Li2O salt but that the incorporation of Li into the sodalite is low.« less

  13. Effect of Hyperoxygenation on Tissue pO{sub 2} and Its Effect on Radiotherapeutic Efficacy of Orthotopic F98 Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Nadeem; Mupparaju, Sriram M.S.; Hekmatyar, Shahryar K.; Hou Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P.; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David J.; Kauppinen, Risto A.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Lack of methods for repeated assessment of tumor pO{sub 2} limits the ability to test and optimize hypoxia-modifying procedures being developed for clinical applications. We report repeated measurements of orthotopic F98 tumor pO{sub 2} and relate this to the effect of carbogen inhalation on tumor growth when combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry was used for repeated measurements of tumor and contralateral brain pO{sub 2} in rats during 30% O{sub 2} and carbogen inhalation for 5 consecutive days. The T{sub 1}-enhanced volumes and diffusion coefficients of the tumors were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The tumors were irradiated with 9.3 Gy x 4 fractions in rats breathing 30% O{sub 2} or carbogen to determine the effect on tumor growth. Results: The pretreatment F98 tumor pO{sub 2} varied between 8 and 16 mmHg, while the contralateral brain had 41 to 45 mmHg pO{sub 2} during repeated measurements. Carbogen breathing led to a significant increase in tumor and contralateral brain pO{sub 2}; however, this effect declined over days. Irradiation of the tumors in rats breathing carbogen resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth and an increase in the diffusion coefficient measured by MRI. Conclusions: The results provide quantitative measurements of the effect of carbogen inhalation on intracerebral tumor pO{sub 2} and its effect on therapeutic outcome. Such direct repeated pO{sub 2} measurements by EPR oximetry can provide temporal information that could be used to improve therapeutic outcome by scheduling doses at times of improved tumor oxygenation. EPR oximetry is currently being tested for clinical applications.

  14. Pre-clinical studies of toxin-specific Nanobodies: Evidence of in vivo efficacy to prevent fatal disturbances provoked by scorpion envenoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hmila, Issam; Cosyns, Bernard; Tounsi, Hayfa; Roosens, Bram; Caveliers, Vicky; Abderrazek, Rahma Ben; Boubaker, Samir; Muyldermans, Serge; Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels ; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss; Facult de Mdecine de Tunis, Universit de Tunis-El Manar ; Lahoutte, Tony

    2012-10-15

    Scorpions represent a significant threat to humans and animals in various countries throughout the world. Recently, we introduced Nanobodies (Nbs) to combat more efficiently scorpion envenoming and demonstrated the performance of NbAahIF12 and NbAahII10 to neutralize scorpion toxins of Androctonus australis hector venom. A bispecific Nb construct (NbF12-10) comprising these two Nbs is far more protective than the classic Fab?{sub 2} based therapy and is the most efficient antivenom therapy against scorpion sting in preclinical studies. Now we investigate the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc labeled Nbs by in vivo imaging in rodents and compared these data with those of the Fab?{sub 2} product (PAS). The pharmacodynamics of the Nbs was investigated in rats by in vivo echocardiography and it is shown that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose of venom. Moreover, even a late injection of NbF12-10 restores the heart rate and brings the blood pressure to baseline values. Histology confirms that NbF12-10 prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. In conjunction, in this preclinical study, we provide proof of concept that NbF12-10 prevents effectively the fatal disturbances induced by Androctonus venom, and that the Nanobody based therapeutic has a potential to substitute the classic Fab?{sub 2} based product as immunotherapeutic in scorpion envenoming. Further clinical study using larger cohorts of animals should be considered to confirm the full protecting potential of our NbF12-10. -- Highlights: ? Nanobody therapy prevents the hemodynamic disturbances induced by a lethal dose. ? Late injection of Nanobody restores hemodynamic parameters to baseline values. ? Nanobody therapy prevents lung and heart lesions of treated mice after envenoming. ? Labeled Nanobody and Fab2 pharmacokinetics curves reach plateau in favour of Nanobody.

  15. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. However, the distribution of swimming directions for fish detected by the transducer immediately to the north of the lights was bimodal, with some fish swimming south toward the lighted region. This behavior was similar to that seen at night when the lights were on. Fourth, kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye were detected near the strobe lights. Data were obtained from three sources: fish size from the hydroacoustic sensors and fish species from gill netting and video recording. Fish ranging in length from 30 to 600 mm (averaging 125 mm) were detected by the splitbeam transducers. There was little difference in target strength for fish detected above 25 m depth with respect to time of day or light treatment. Below 25 m and closer to the strobe lights, larger fish were present when the lights were on during the night, and smaller fish were present during the day.

  16. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-14

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  17. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Wainwright, H.; Molins, S.; Davis, J.; Arora, B.; Faybishenko, B.; Krishnan, H.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Moulton, D.; Lipnikov, K.; Gable, C.; Miller, T.; Freshley, M.

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along with its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  18. Failure Mechanisms and Color Stability in Light-Emitting Diodes during Operation in High- Temperature Environments in Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Zhang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-05-26

    The energy efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED) technology compared to incandescent light bulbs has triggered an increased focus on solid state luminaries for a variety of lighting applications. Solid-state lighting (SSL) utilizes LEDs, for illumination through the process of electroluminescence instead of heating a wire filament as seen with traditional lighting. The fundamental differences in the construction of LED and the incandescent lamp results in different failure modes including lumen degradation, chromaticity shift and drift in the correlated color temperature. The use of LED-based products for safety-critical and harsh environment applications necessitates the characterization of the failure mechanisms and modes. In this paper, failure mechanisms and color stability has been studied for commercially available vertical structured thin film LED (VLED) under harsh environment conditions with and without the presence of contaminants. The VLED used for the study was mounted on a ceramic starboard in order to connect it to the current source. Contamination sources studied include operation in the vicinity of vulcanized rubber and adhesive epoxies in the presence of temperature and humidity. Performance of the VLEDs has been quantified using the measured luminous flux and color shift of the VLEDs subjected to both thermal and humidity stresses under a forward current bias of 350 mA. Results indicate that contamination can result in pre-mature luminous flux degradation and color shift in LEDs.

  19. LED Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Mark L.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2006-09-01

    This article, which will appear in RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING MAGAZINE, interviews PNNL's Kelly Gordon and presents the interview in question and answer format. The topic is a light emitting diode (LED) lighting also known as solid state lighting. Solid state lighting will be a new category in an energy efficient lighting fixture design competition called Lighting for Tomorrow sponsored by the US Department of Energy Emerging Technologies Office, the American Institute for Lighting, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. LED technology has been around since the ’60s, but it has been used mostly for indicator lights on electronics equipment. The big breakthrough was the development in the 1990s of blue LEDs which can be combined with the red and green LEDs that already existed to make white light. LEDs produce 25 to 40 lumens of light per watt of energy used, almost as much as a CFL (50 lumens per watt) and much more efficient than incandescent sources, which are around 15 lumens per watt. They are much longer lived and practical in harsh environments unsuitable for incandescent lighting. They are ready for niche applications now, like under-counter lighting and may be practical for additional applications as technological challenges are worked out and the technology is advancing in leaps and bounds.

  20. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temperature, color rendering and luminous efficacy) while keeping the properties of the underlying blue OLED constant. The success of the downconversion approach is ultimately based upon the ability to produce efficient emission in the blue. Table 1 presents a comparison of the current performance of the conjugated polymer, dye-doped polymer, and dendrimer approaches to making a solution-processed blue OLED as 2006. Also given is the published state of the art performance of a vapor-deposited blue OLED. One can see that all the approaches to a blue OLED give approximately the same external quantum efficiency at 500 cd/m{sup 2}. However, due to its low operating voltage, the fluorescent conjugated polymer approach yields a superior power efficiency at the same brightness.

  1. Energy Efficiency of LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet on energy efficiency of LEDs, characterizing the current state of the market and discussing package efficacy, luminaire efficacy, and application efficacy.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Selected Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamp Sales (thousands) Commercial Trends 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 T12 Rapid-Start Fluorescent (Mainly 4') 213 206 182 176 163 T8 Medium Bi-Pin Fluorescent (Mainly 4') 164 164 172 196 216 Total (mainly) 4' 377 370 354 372 378 2' U-Shaped T12 10 9 9 7 9 2' U-Shaped T8 8 7 7 9 9 Total 2' U lamp 18 16 16 16 17 8' Slimline T12 (Mainly 8') 43 41 37 36 34 8' Slimline T8 (Mainly 8') 4 5 5 6 5 Total Slimline (Mainly 8') 48 47 42 42 39 8' HO T12 (Mainly 8') 24 24 24

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2010 Total Lighting Technology Electricity Consumption, by Sector (TWh per Year) (1) Incandescent 136 78% 15 4% 0 0% 4 4% 156 22% General (A-type, Decorative) 112 64% 9 3% 0 0% - - 122 17% Reflector 19 11% 5 2% 0 0% - - 24 3% Miscellaneous 5 3% 0 0% 0 0% 4 4% 9 1% Halogen 12 7% 15 4% 0 0% 1 1% 28 4% General 1 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 1 0% Reflector 8 5% 7 2% 0 0% - - 15 2% Low Voltage Display 1 0% 7 2% - - - - 8 1% Miscellaneous 2 1% 1 0% 0 0% 1 1% 4 1% Compact Fluorescent 15 9% 16 5% 0 0% 1 1% 32 5%

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2010 Lamp Wattage, Number of Lamps, and Hours of Usage Lamp Wattage (Watts per lamp) Number of Lamps per Building Hours of Usage per Day Res Com Ind Other (1) Res Com Ind Res Com Ind Other Incandescent 56 53 46 68 32 14 1 2 10 13 9 General (A-type, Decorative) (2) 58 58 46 N/A 27 8 1 2 10 13 N/A Reflector 69 79 65 N/A 4 4 0 (3) 2 10 12 N/A Miscellaneous 45 7 0 68 1 3 N/A 2 11 0 9 Halogen 65 68 68 149 2 9 0 2 12 12 11 General 50 46 36 N/A 0 0 0 2 12 12 N/A Reflector 68 78 64 N/A 1 4 0 2 12 12

  5. Method and apparatus for dispensing small quantities of mercury from evacuated and sealed glass capsules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Pai, R.Y.

    1985-08-13

    A technique is disclosed for opening an evacuated and sealed glass capsule containing a material that is to be dispensed which has a relatively high vapor pressure such as mercury. The capsule is typically disposed in a discharge tube envelope. The technique involves the use of a first light source imaged along the capsule and a second light source imaged across the capsule substantially transversely to the imaging of the first light source. Means are provided for constraining a segment of the capsule along its length with the constraining means being positioned to correspond with the imaging of the second light source. These light sources are preferably incandescent projection lamps. The constraining means is preferably a multiple looped wire support. 6 figs.

  6. Method and apparatus for dispensing small quantities of mercury from evacuated and sealed glass capsules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.; Pai, Robert Y.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for opening an evacuated and sealed glass capsule containing a material that is to be dispensed which has a relatively high vapor pressure such as mercury. The capsule is typically disposed in a discharge tube envelope. The technique involves the use of a first light source imaged along the capsule and a second light source imaged across the capsule substantially transversely to the imaging of the first light source. Means are provided for constraining a segment of the capsule along its length with the constraining means being positioned to correspond with the imaging of the second light source. These light sources are preferably incandescent projection lamps. The constraining means is preferably a multiple looped wire support.

  7. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Winters, Caroline; Farias, Paul Abraham; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  8. Effects of volatile coatings on the morphology and optical detection of combustion-generated black carbon particles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambha, Ray P.; Dansson, Mark Alex; Schrader, Paul E.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2013-09-01

    We have measured time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) from combustion-generated mature soot extracted from a burner and (1) coated with oleic acid or (2) coated with oleic acid and then thermally denuded using a thermodenuder. The soot samples were size selected using a differential mobility analyser and characterized with a scanning mobility particle sizer, centrifugal particle mass analyser, and transmission electron microscope. The results demonstrate a strong influence of coatings particle morphology and on the magnitude and temporal evolution of the LII signal. For coated particles higher laser fluences are required to reach LII signal levels comparable to those of uncoated particles. This effect is predominantly attributable to the additional energy needed to vaporize the coating while heating the particle. LII signals are higher and signal decay rates are significantly slower for thermally denuded particles relative to coated or uncoated particles, particularly at low and intermediate laser fluences.

  9. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylindermore » chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.« less

  10. Investigation of methyl decanoate combustion in an optical direct-injection diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A. S.; Dumitrescu, Cosmin E.; Mueller, Charles J.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, an optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of methyl decanoate (MD) on combustion and emissions. A specific goal of the study was to determine if MD could enable soot-free leaner-lifted flame combustion (LLFC) – a mode of mixing-controlled combustion associated with fuel-air equivalence ratios below approximately two. An ultra-low sulfur diesel certification fuel (CF) was used as the baseline fuel, and experiments were conducted at two fuel-injection pressures with three levels of charge-gas dilution. In addition to conventional pressure-based and engine-out emissions measurements, exhaust laser-induced incandescence, in-cylinder natural luminosity (NL), and in-cylinder chemiluminescence (CL) diagnostics were used to provide detailed insight into combustion processes.

  11. Dimming LEDs with Phase-Cut Dimmers: The Specifier's Process for Maximizing Success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    This report reviews how phase-cut dimmers work, how LEDs differ from the incandescent lamps that the dimmers were historically designed to control, and how these differences can lead to complications when trying to dim LEDs. Compatibility between a specific LED source and a specific phase-cut dimmer is often unknown and difficult to assess, and ensuring compatibility adds complexity to the design, specification, bidding, and construction observation phases for new buildings and major remodel projects. To maximize project success, this report provides both general guidance and step-by-step procedures for designing phase-controlled LED dimming on both new and existing projects, as well as real-world examples of how to use those procedures.

  12. Program Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain Considers the projected impacts of future LED lighting efficacy gains in advancing major national goals, as well as in strengthening the ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... antibiotic teicoplanin has proven efficacy against gram-positive pathogens. ... antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. ...

  14. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  15. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  16. Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlike conventional lighting technologies, SSL technology still has significant room for additional performance and efficacy improvements, through improved materials, optics, ...

  17. DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... efficacy of sequestration, verify regional CO2 sequestration capacities, satisfy project permitting requirements, and conduct public outreach and education activities. ...

  18. Clone Bacterial Thermal Stable Enzymes in T. Reesei: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-01-00105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himmel, M. E.

    2010-08-01

    The focus of this CRADA was on improving the efficacy of GCI's primary host for commercial cellulase production, Trichoderma reesei.

  19. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K. [School of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  20. LED Lighting: Applying Lessons Learned from the CFL Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Gordon, Kelly L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Ton, My K.

    2008-08-20

    Light emitting diode (LED) technology has emerged as an exciting new lighting alternative with the potential for significant energy savings. There is concern, however, that white light LEDs for general illumination could take a long, bumpy course similar to another energy-efficient lighting technology – compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Recognizing the significant potential energy-efficient lighting has to reduce U.S. energy consumption, Congress mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) develop Solid State Lighting (SSL) through a Next Generation Lighting Initiative. DOE’s first step was to analyze the market introduction of compact fluorescent lighting to determine what lessons could be learned to smooth the introduction of SSL in the United States (Sandahl et al. 2006). This paper summarizes applicable lessons learned from the market introduction of CFLs and describe how DOE and others are applying those lessons to speed the development and market introduction of energy-efficient LED lighting for general illumination applications. A description of the current state of LED technology and compares LEDs to incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen lights is also provided.

  1. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-02

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  2. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  3. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-08-09

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result.

  4. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik R.

    2002-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  5. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  6. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  7. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E.; Peercy, Paul S.

    1983-01-01

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  8. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M.

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  9. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  10. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  11. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  12. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  13. Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficacy and action mechanisms (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity: Efficacy and action mechanisms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity: Efficacy and action mechanisms Research highlights: {yields} Short antimicrobial peptides with nine and eleven residues were developed. {yields} These peptides

  14. Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    show efficacy in treating prostate cancer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer Systemic delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors is hindered by vascular and interstitial barriers. We hypothesized that

  15. Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-02-16

    Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007) a better understanding of flashlight use-patterns is crucial (Tracy et al., 2009). In addition, the economic implications faced by rural flashlight end-users provide further incentive for a move toward higher quality low-cost flashlights. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their use patterns and costs associated with owning and operating flashlight products. While flashlights used in their portable mode typically do not represent a substitute for kerosene or other forms of fuel-based lighting, at times they are used in stationary applications in place of a fuel-based lamp. In either case, these products often represent end users first exposure to LED technology and rechargeable dry cell batteries, and thus stand to either provide a positive or negative impression of these technologies for a diversity of lighting applications.

  16. Cytometric Therapies for Cell Delivery - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Cytometric Therapies for Cell Delivery Maximizing Efficacy of Cell Delivery Oak Ridge National Laboratory ...

  17. SREL Reprint #3111

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    labor intensive. We initiated studies to examine the efficacy of using head counts in tidal creeks as a rapid-assessment technique for monitoring terrapin populations. From 2005...

  18. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    from the engineering literature, based on CBECS building activity.) 4. Efficacy: an energy efficiency measure. Technically, the amount of light produced per unit of energy...

  19. Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    prostate cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' ...

  1. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Sensor Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 1: Characterization of Energy Use in Residential Clothes Dryers. The efficacy and energy efficiency of clothes dryers are studied in this evaluation.

  2. Identification and Mitigation of Droop Mechanism in GaN-Based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines Next-Generation "Giant" Quantum Dots: Performance-Engineered for Lighting Stable and ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... these results? Phase 2 Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Concurrent Radiation for ... efficacy and safety of weekly low-dose docetaxel and cisplatin therapy concurrent with ...

  4. SSL Postings, January 22, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environments. To learn more about how this type of environment affects LED lumen and color maintenance, luminaire efficacy, and luminaire component lifetimes, DOE's GATEWAY...

  5. The June 11, 2015, issue of DOE's Solid-State Lighting Postings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    16, 2015 The Prospects for Creating Efficient Color-Mixed White LEDs The efficacy of LED lighting products has already surpassed that of traditional technologies for most...

  6. Design rules for dislocation filters (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design rules for dislocation filters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design rules for dislocation filters The efficacy of strained layer threading dislocation filter...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... models to supplement and interpret observational records. less January 2016 , Springer-Verlag Efficacy of a Solution-Based Approach for Making Sodalite Waste Forms for an Oxide ...

  8. Over the past decade, lighting became more efficient across all...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Lighting efficiency is often expressed as efficacy, or the ratio of light output (measured in lumens) to the electric power input (measured in Watts). Since the DOE's previous ...

  9. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    lighting project is different, and tradeoffs between such factors as visual comfort, color, visibility, and efficacy are inevitable. There is no glare metric that works reliably...

  10. Optimized Alumina Coagulants for Water Purification - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    purification. By inserting a single gallium atom in the center of an aluminum oxide cluster, the stability and efficacy of the reagent is greatly improved. This stability also...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Zou, Yaozhong ; Brunzelle, Joseph S. ; Nair, Satish K. ; NWU) The lipoglycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. ...

  12. Quality and Performance of LED Flashlights in Kenya: Common End User Preferences and Complaints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jenny; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2009-09-14

    Flashlights that use LED technology have quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya. While flashlights do not normally provide a substitute for kerosene and other highly inefficient fuels, they are an important early manifestation of LED lighting in the developing world that can serve as a platform - or deterrent - to the diffusion of the technology into the broader off-grid lighting market. The lead acid batteries embedded in flashlights also represent an important source of hazardous waste, and flashlight durability is thus an important determinant of the rate of waste disposal. Low-cost LED flashlights with prices from $1 to $4 are now widely available in shops and markets throughout Kenya. The increased penetration of LED technology in the flashlight market is significant, as over half of all Kenyan households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). While this shift from conventional incandescent technology to modern LEDs may appear to be a promising development, end users that our research team interviewed expressed a number of complaints about the quality and performance of these new flashlights. This raises concerns about the interests of low-income flashlight users, and it may also indicate the onset of a broader market spoiling effect for off-grid lighting products based on LED technology (Mills and Jacobson, 2008; Lighting Africa, 2007). The quality of low-cost LED flashlights can contribute to market spoiling because these products appear to represent the first contact that most Kenyans have with LED technology. In this report, our team uses interviews with 46 end users of flashlights to collect information about their experiences, perceptions, and preferences. We focus especially on highlighting common complaints from respondents about the flashlights that they have used, as well as on noting the features that they indicated were important when evaluating the quality of a flashlight. In previous laboratory tests, researchers from our team found a wide range of quality and performance among battery powered LED lights (Granderson, et al. 2008).

  13. Development of an operational, full-scale fish protection system at a major pumped-storage hydropower dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nestler, J.M.; Ploskey, G.R.; Weeks, G.

    1995-12-31

    A large scale, fully operational, integrated fish protection system was developed for Richard B. Russell Dam, a Corps of Engineers pumped-storage hydropower facility with 640 MW conventional generation capacity and 340 MW pumping capacity, on the Savannah River between Georgia and South Carolina. The fish protection system, designed to operate during pumping operation only, combines: (1) knowledge of seasonal and diel movement patterns of fishes to develop guidelines to restrict pumping to periods of minimal fish entrainment potential; (2) detailed 2-dimensional physical and numerical hydraulic modeling to identify high velocity entraining flow zones, low velocity zones, and slack water zones; (3) an acoustic repulsion system employing high-frequency sound to divert blueback herring out of the entraining zone and into low velocity or slack water zones; (4) banks of high pressure sodium incandescent lights located in the low velocity-slack water zones to attract and hold fishes during pumping operation; and (5) a veneer made of 0.32-cm wedge wire on 5.08-cm centers that is placed directly over the trash racks to divert fishes larger than about 35-cm in length from the trash racks. Strobe lights were initially included in the system, but later abandoned after evaluation for effectiveness. Yearlong full recovery net monitoring supplemented by fixed aspect hydroacoustics sampling using two of the four pumped-storage units demonstrates the effectiveness of the fish protection. The total cost of the system was less than one million dollars. Integrating separate fish protection technologies into a comprehensive fish protection system can be used to increase fish protection at hydropower dams.

  14. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berst, Kara; Howeth, Maria

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  15. Research Highlights 2007-2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation has successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED™) with a record power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency, and incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters. (June 2007) Learn more.

  16. Prediction of Lumen Output and Chromaticity Shift in LEDs Using Kalman Filter and Extended Kalman Filter Based Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Davis, J Lynn

    2014-06-24

    Abstract Solid-state lighting (SSL) luminaires containing light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the potential of seeing excessive temperatures when being transported across country or being stored in non-climate controlled warehouses. They are also being used in outdoor applications in desert environments that see little or no humidity but will experience extremely high temperatures during the day. This makes it important to increase our understanding of what effects high temperature exposure for a prolonged period of time will have on the usability and survivability of these devices. Traditional light sources burn out at end-of-life. For an incandescent bulb, the lamp life is defined by B50 life. However, the LEDs have no filament to burn. The LEDs continually degrade and the light output decreases eventually below useful levels causing failure. Presently, the TM-21 test standard is used to predict the L70 life of LEDs from LM-80 test data. Several failure mechanisms may be active in a LED at a single time causing lumen depreciation. The underlying TM-21 Model may not capture the failure physics in presence of multiple failure mechanisms. Correlation of lumen maintenance with underlying physics of degradation at system-level is needed. In this paper, Kalman Filter (KF) and Extended Kalman Filters (EKF) have been used to develop a 70-percent Lumen Maintenance Life Prediction Model for LEDs used in SSL luminaires. Ten-thousand hour LM-80 test data for various LEDs have been used for model development. System state at each future time has been computed based on the state space at preceding time step, system dynamics matrix, control vector, control matrix, measurement matrix, measured vector, process noise and measurement noise. The future state of the lumen depreciation has been estimated based on a second order Kalman Filter model and a Bayesian Framework. Life prediction of L70 life for the LEDs used in SSL luminaires from KF and EKF based models have been compared with the TM-21 model predictions and experimental data.

  17. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

  18. The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

  19. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    maps Topic Energy in the Forecast by Daphne Evans 13 Aug, 2012 in Science Communications ... in 2011, to "develop a wind energy forecast system, and demonstrate its efficacy in ...

  20. Advances in Chip Technology, Packaging Enable White LED Breakthroughs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Significant advances in chip technology have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with record efficacies as high as 74 lumens per watt - on par with...

  1. UNDERSTANDING LED COLOR-TUNABLE PRODUCTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LED luminaires with the ability to deliver varying light color have been on the architectural lighting market since the early days of LED lighting, but improved efficacy, colors, controls, and...

  2. Lumileds Develops High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Lumileds has developed a high-voltage LED light engine with an integrated driver, achieving an efficacy greater than 128 lm/W at a luminous flux greater than 4,100 lm...

  3. Looking Ahead: The Best Is Yet to Come

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8, 2015 Portland, Oregon U.S. Department of Energy LOOKING AHEAD: The Best Is Yet to Come 2 LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain 3 Beyond the Halfway Mark 4 Beyond the Halfway...

  4. DOE Brochure Highlights Ethanol Life-Cycle Results Obtained with GREET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently published a brochure highlighting the efficacy of Argonne National Laboratory's GREET model in evaluating the complete energy life cycle for ethanol.

  5. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires," using IESNA LM-41, ANSI C82.2-2002 for fluorescent ballasts, and ANSI C78.81-2005 for fluorescent lamps. Finding the Luminaire Efficacy Rating LERs should be...

  6. Microsoft Word - EXC-12-0001thru03.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lumens-per- watt (lmW) efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) levels, as follows: ... 14, 2012, for the specified correlated color temperature (CCT) range: 3 LampTube type ...

  7. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: to characterize the geothermal reservoir using novel technologies and integrating this information into a 3D geologic and reservoir model numerical model to determine the efficacy of future geothermal production.

  8. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DOE Share: 700,000; Cost Share: 175,000 Recipient: Cree, Inc. (Durham, NC) Title: Materials and Designs for High-Efficacy LED Light Engines Summary: This project will focus on ...

  9. An investigation of the properties of pitch coke modified by chemically active additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulakov, V.V.; Fedeneva, E.N.; Neproshin, E.I.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented of the influence of chemically active additives on the yield and properties of coke from hard-coal pitch. A comparison has been made of the efficacy of the influence of these additives.

  10. DOE SSL Postings: September 9, 2015, issue

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    investigated the photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps compared to benchmark halogens, found that while all of the LED MR16s offered some efficacy advantage over the...

  11. Lumileds Develops Patterned Sapphire Substrate Technology for High-Power LEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) technology is an effective approach to improving efficacy and reducing cost of LEDs and has gained wide use in mid-power LEDs. With the help of DOE funding,...

  12. Promising Technology: Parabolic Aluminized Reflector Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parabolic aluminized reflectors, or PARs, are directional lamps typically used in recessed lighting. In contrast to CFLs, LEDs offer additional advantages including no warm up time, improved dimming and control capabilities, and for some products much greater efficacy ratings.

  13. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Folami Alamudun

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Folami Alamudun Ph.D. student helps improve efficacy of mammograms through research program Folami Alamudun at ORNL Folami Alamudun spent his summer in the Research Alliance Math and Science Program at ORNL, analyzing the visual scanning pattern radiologists use to detect cancer in mammograms. His goal is to help increase the efficiency and efficacy of these screenings through improved detection tools. Folami Alamudun, fourth-year doctoral student at Texas A&M University Sketch Recognition

  14. DE-NT0005667 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE/NETL Methane Hydrate Projects Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotropic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments Last Reviewed 1/8/2013 DE-NT0005667 Goal The goal of this project is to assess the efficacy of aerobic methanotrophy in preventing the escape of methane from marine, hydrate-bearing reservoirs to the atmosphere and ultimately to better define the role of aerobic methanotrophy in the global carbon cycle. Methane seeps with the resulting methane plume, Geophysical

  15. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  16. High Quality Down Lighting Luminaire with 73% Overall System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Harrison; Steven C. Allen; Joseph Bernier; Robert Harrison

    2010-08-31

    This report summarizes work to develop a high flux, high efficiency LED-based downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-08NT01582. A new high power LED and electronic driver were developed for these downlights. The LED achieved 100 lumens per watt efficacy and 1700 lumen flux output at a correlated color temperature of 3500K. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.99, and total harmonic distortion <10%. Two styles of downlights using the LED and driver were shown to exceed the project targets for steady-state luminous efficacy and flux of 70 lumens per watt and 1300 lumens, respectively. Compared to similar existing downlights using compact fluorescent or LED sources, these downlights had much higher efficacy at nearly the same luminous flux.

  17. Analysis of the Chinese Market for Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Shi, Qing

    2014-03-20

    China will account for about half of the new construction globally in the coming decade. Its floorspace doubled from 1996 to 2011, and Chinese rural buildings alone have as much floorspace as all of U.S. residential buildings. Building energy consumption has also grown, increasing by over 40% since 1990. To curb building energy demand, the Chinese government has launched a series of policies and programs. Combined, this growth in buildings and renovations, along with the policies to promote green buildings, are creating a large market for energy efficiency products and services. This report assesses the impact of China’s policies on building energy efficiency and on the market for energy efficiency in the future. The first chapter of this report introduces the trends in China, drawing on both historical analysis, and detailed modeling of the drivers behind changes in floorspace and building energy demand such as economic and population growth, urbanization, policy. The analysis describes the trends by region, building type and energy service. The second chapter discusses China’s policies to promote green buildings. China began developing building energy codes in the 1980s. Over time, the central government has increased the stringency of the code requirements and the extent of enforcement. The codes are mandatory in all new buildings and major renovations in China’s cities, and they have been a driving force behind the expansion of China’s markets for insulation, efficient windows, and other green building materials. China also has several other important policies to encourage efficient buildings, including the Three-Star Rating System (somewhat akin to LEED), financial incentives tied to efficiency, appliance standards, a phasing out of incandescent bulbs and promotion of efficient lighting, and several policies to encourage retrofits in existing buildings. In the third chapter, we take “deep dives” into the trends affecting key building components. This chapter examines insulation in walls and roofs; efficient windows and doors; heating, air conditioning and controls; and lighting. These markets have seen significant growth because of the strength of the construction sector but also the specific policies that require and promote efficient building components. At the same time, as requirements have become more stringent, there has been fierce competition, and quality has at time suffered, which in turn has created additional challenges. Next we examine existing buildings in chapter four. China has many Soviet-style, inefficient buildings built before stringent requirements for efficiency were more widely enforced. As a result, there are several specific market opportunities related to retrofits. These fall into two or three categories. First, China now has a code for retrofitting residential buildings in the north. Local governments have targets of the number of buildings they must retrofit each year, and they help finance the changes. The requirements focus on insulation, windows, and heat distribution. Second, the Chinese government recently decided to increase the scale of its retrofits of government and state-owned buildings. It hopes to achieve large scale changes through energy service contracts, which creates an opportunity for energy service companies. Third, there is also a small but growing trend to apply energy service contracts to large commercial and residential buildings. This report assesses the impacts of China’s policies on building energy efficiency. By examining the existing literature and interviewing stakeholders from the public, academic, and private sectors, the report seeks to offer an in-depth insights of the opportunities and barriers for major market segments related to building energy efficiency. The report also discusses trends in building energy use, policies promoting building energy efficiency, and energy performance contracting for public building retrofits.

  18. Failure Mode Classification for Life Prediction Modeling of Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakalaukus, Peter Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Since the passing of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the U.S. government has mandated greater energy independence which has acted as a catalyst for accelerating and facilitating research efforts toward the development and deployment of market-driven solutions for energy-saving homes, buildings and manufacturing, as well as sustainable transportation and renewable electricity generation. As part of this effort, an emphasis toward advancing solid-state lighting technology through research, development, demonstration, and commercial applications is assisting in the phase out of the common incandescent light bulb, as well as developing a more economical lighting source that is less toxic than compact fluorescent lighting. This has led lighting manufacturers to pursue SSL technologies for a wide range of consumer lighting applications. An SSL luminaire’s lifetime can be characterized in terms of lumen maintenance life. Lumen maintenance or lumen depreciation is the percentage decrease in the relative luminous flux from that of the original, pristine luminous flux value. Lumen maintenance life is the estimated operating time, in hours, when the desired failure threshold is projected to be reached at normal operating conditions. One accepted failure threshold of SSL luminaires is lumen maintenance of 70% -- a 30% reduction in the light output of the luminaire. Currently, the only approved lighting standard that puts forth a recommendation for long-term luminous flux maintenance projections towards a specified failure threshold of an SSL luminaire is the IES TM-28-14 (TM28) standard. iii TM28 was derived as a means to compare luminaires that have been tested at different facilities, research labs or companies. TM28 recommends the use of the Arrhenius equation to determine SSL device specific reaction rates from thermally driven failure mechanisms used to characterize a single failure mode – the relative change in the luminous flux output or “light power” of the SSL luminaire. The use of the Arrhenius equation necessitates two different temperature conditions, 25°C and 45°C are suggested by TM28, to determine the SSL lamp specific activation energy. One principal issue with TM28 is the lack of additional stresses or parameters needed to characterize non-temperature dependent failure mechanisms. Another principal issue with TM28 is the assumption that lumen maintenance or lumen depreciation gives an adequate comparison between SSL luminaires. Additionally, TM28 has no process for the determination of acceleration factors or lifetime estimations. Currently, a literature gap exists for established accelerated test methods for SSL devices to assess quality, reliability and durability before being introduced into the marketplace. Furthermore, there is a need for Physics-of-Failure based approaches to understand the processes and mechanisms that induce failure for the assessment of SSL reliability in order to develop generalized acceleration factors that better represent SSL product lifetime. This and the deficiencies in TM28 validate the need behind the development of acceleration techniques to quantify SSL reliability under a variety of environmental conditions. The ability to assess damage accrual and investigate reliability of SSL components and systems is essential to understanding the life time of the SSL device itself. The methodologies developed in this work increases the understanding of SSL devices iv through the investigation of component and device reliability under a variety of accelerated test conditions. The approaches for suitable lifetime predictions through the development of novel generalized acceleration factors, as well as a prognostics and health management framework, will greatly reduce the time and effort needed to produce SSL acceleration factors for the development of lifetime predictions.

  19. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-06

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the second quarter of the third year, LLNL finalized all immunological assessments of NLP vaccine formulations in the F344 model. Battelle has immunized rats with three unique NLP formulations by either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All inoculations have been completed, and protective efficacy against an aerosolized challenge will begin at the end of October, 2014.

  20. Computational model, method, and system for kinetically-tailoring multi-drug chemotherapy for individuals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, Shea Nicole

    2007-10-23

    A method and system for tailoring treatment regimens to individual patients with diseased cells exhibiting evolution of resistance to such treatments. A mathematical model is provided which models rates of population change of proliferating and quiescent diseased cells using cell kinetics and evolution of resistance of the diseased cells, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. Cell kinetic parameters are obtained from an individual patient and applied to the mathematical model to solve for a plurality of treatment regimens, each having a quantitative efficacy value associated therewith. A treatment regimen may then be selected from the plurlaity of treatment options based on the efficacy value.

  1. CALiPER Report 21.1. Linear (T8) Lamps in a 2x4 K12-Lensed Troffer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    This report focuses on the performance of the same 31 linear LED lamps operated in a typical troffer with a K12 prismatic lens. In general, luminaire efficacy is strongly dictated by lamp efficacy, but the optical system of the luminaire substantially reduces the differences between the luminous intensity distributions of the lamps. While the distributions in the luminaire are similar, the differences remain large enough that workplane illuminance uniformity may be reduced if linear LED lamps with a narrow distribution are used. At the same time, linear LED lamps with a narrower distribution result in slightly higher luminaire efficiency.

  2. Research Highlights 2009-2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OSRAM SYLVANIA researchers have demonstrated a downlight luminaire that achieves 1,439 lumens at an efficacy of 82 lm/W in steady-state operation. These results exceed the project goals of achieving 1,300 lumens and 70 lm/W at a CCT of 3500K and CRI of 80. (September 2010) Learn more.

  3. 2013-04 "LANL Clean-up" | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 "LANL Clean-up" 2013-04 "LANL Clean-up" A timely report on the status of recommendations will be a great aid for the NNMCAB in determining its efficacy, efficiency and pertinence or relevance. PDF icon Rec 2013-04 - May 2

  4. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  5. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  6. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  7. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  8. An open letter to the 2008 presidential candidates: get the facts right on what's responsible for global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, Henry R.

    2008-07-15

    The two remaining presidential candidates have adopted policies for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions that address factors that are mistakenly held responsible as the primary cause of global warming. Here's what they need to keep in mind in order to craft genuinely efficacious policies. (author)

  9. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  10. Palladium deuteride formation in the cathode of an electrochemical cell: An in situ neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotella, F.J.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Redey, L.; Felcher, G.P.; Hitterman, R.L.; Kleb, R.

    1991-12-31

    In this report, neutron diffraction of palladium cathodes is utilized to reveal palladium deuteride formation within the crystal structure of the metal. The experiment described in this report demonstrates the efficacy of neutron powder diffraction as a tool for structural studies of metal deuterides/hydrides and the feasibility of in situ diffraction measurements from a working electrochemical cell. (JL)

  11. Prescription for a pharmacyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-10

    The efficient homing capacity of T cells may be used to deliver cell-associated, drug-laden nanoparticles to lymphoma cells that are resident in lymph nodes, increasing drug efficacy compared with drug encapsulated in free nanoparticles or free drug (Huang et al., this issue).

  12. CX-000631: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act: Jadoo Power Fuel Cell Demonstration: An Efficacy Demonstration of an Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Power System over a Two Year PeriodCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/21/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. UDC Develops Prototype High-Efficiency OLED Undercabinet Luminaire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has demonstrated the real-world application of a novel lighting technology by developing two pre-prototype OLED undercabinet lighting systems that exceed 420 total lumens at an efficacy of more than 55 lm/W, with an estimated lifetime (LT70) in excess of 10,000 hours, and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 85.

  14. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  15. Miniature 'Wearable' PET Scanner Ready for Use

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paul Vaska

    2013-07-22

    Scientists from BNL, Stony Brook University, and collaborators have demonstrated the efficacy of a "wearable," portable PET scanner they've developed for rats. The device will give neuroscientists a new tool for simultaneously studying brain function and behavior in fully awake, moving animals.

  16. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Suspended Fluorescent Luminaires...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Required Model Less Efficient Light Output 4,939 lm 4,259 lm 4,285 lm Luminaire Efficacy Rating (LER) 85 lmW 73 lmW 67 lmW Required Input Power 58 W 59 W 64 W Annual Energy ...

  17. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Ceiling-Mounted Fluorescent Luminaires...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Required Model Less Efficient Light Output 4,300 lm 4,300 lm 4,300 lm Luminaire Efficacy Rating (LER) 104 lmW 89 lmW 77 lmW Input Power 41 W 48 W 56 W Annual Energy Use 148 ...

  18. Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

    2011-09-11

    This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

  19. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  20. Promising Technology: Retrofit Lights to Light-Emitting Diodes in Refrigerators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs increase in efficacy at lower temperatures, in contrast with conventional fluorescents. The low temperatures in display cases, therefore, make this an attractive application of LEDs to reduce energy consumption. In addition to saving lighting energy, an LED retrofit can potentially reduce the cooling load in a display case because LEDs emit less heat than do fluorescent bulbs.

  1. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  2. Breakthroughs in Practical-Sized, High Quality OLED Light Panel Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Electric Global Research has achieved a major breakthrough, developing a fully functional 2 ft. x 2 ft. light panel that produces more than 1200 lumens of quality white light with an efficacy of 15 lumens per watt. This device offers 50% better energy performance than their previous device, breaking two world records.

  3. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  4. Magical Mystery Devices or Not: How do LED Lamps and Luminaires Really Measure-Up?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, Maria L.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Steward, Heidi E.

    2008-08-15

    Solid-state lighting products for general lighting applications are now gaining a market presence, and more and more people are asking, “Which of these are ‘good’ products? Do they perform as claimed? How do they compare? Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) differ from other light sources enough to require new procedures for measuring their performance and comparing to other lighting options, so both manufacturers and buyers are facing a learning curve. The energy-efficiency community has traditionally compared light sources based on system efficacy: rated lamp lumens divided by power into the system. This doesn’t work for LEDs because there are no standard LED “lamp” packages and no lamp ratings, and because LED performance depends heavily on thermal, electrical, and optical design of complete lighting unit or ‘luminaire’. Luminaire efficacy is the preferred metric for LEDs because it measures the net light output from the luminaire divided by power into the system.

  5. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  6. MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesley, Gina K.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Woodrum, David A.

    2013-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) ablation of uterine fibroids provides a minimally invasive outpatient technique for targeting and treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a guidance platform that has high temporal and spatial resolution for guiding, as well as thermal monitoring of the procedure. The high-intensity focused ultrasound provides a mechanism for delivering large amounts of energy directly into the fibroid without causing detrimental effects to the nontarget tissues. Early and intermediate follow-up of patients treated with MRgFUS provided promising results on the efficacy of the technique for providing symptom relief to patients. As more long-term follow-up data are published, the efficacy of this technique can be compared to more invasive surgical and minimally invasive catheter treatments.

  7. Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Using LEDs » Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting Considerations When Comparing LED and Conventional Lighting When comparing LED lighting performance to conventional lighting, buyers will want to consider energy efficiency, operating life and lumen depreciation, light output/distribution, color quality, color shift, dimmability, and expected lifetime. Energy efficiency The final energy efficiency of any lighting system depends on more than the efficacy of the

  8. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Light- Emitting Diode Luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarsa, Eric

    2015-08-31

    During this two-year program Cree developed a scalable, modular optical architecture for low-cost, high-efficacy light emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Stated simply, the goal of this architecture was to efficiently and cost-effectively convey light from LEDs (point sources) to broad luminaire surfaces (area sources). By simultaneously developing warm-white LED components and low-cost, scalable optical elements, a high system optical efficiency resulted. To meet program goals, Cree evaluated novel approaches to improve LED component efficacy at high color quality while not sacrificing LED optical efficiency relative to conventional packages. Meanwhile, efficiently coupling light from LEDs into modular optical elements, followed by optimally distributing and extracting this light, were challenges that were addressed via novel optical design coupled with frequent experimental evaluations. Minimizing luminaire bill of materials and assembly costs were two guiding principles for all design work, in the effort to achieve luminaires with significantly lower normalized cost ($/klm) than existing LED fixtures. Chief project accomplishments included the achievement of >150 lm/W warm-white LEDs having primary optics compatible with low-cost modular optical elements. In addition, a prototype Light Module optical efficiency of over 90% was measured, demonstrating the potential of this scalable architecture for ultra-high-efficacy LED luminaires. Since the project ended, Cree has continued to evaluate optical element fabrication and assembly methods in an effort to rapidly transfer this scalable, cost-effective technology to Cree production development groups. The Light Module concept is likely to make a strong contribution to the development of new cost-effective, high-efficacy luminaries, thereby accelerating widespread adoption of energy-saving SSL in the U.S.

  9. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube

  10. Tunable Catalysts - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Tunable Catalysts Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary For automobile manufacturers using expensive noble metals to make vehicle catalytic converters, often with limited lifetimes, Berkeley Lab Tunable Catalysts, made with affordable metals, utilize graphene to electrically tune the converting rate efficacy and efficiency

  11. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, William Newell (Niskayuna, NY); Thomas, Robert James (Rexford, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast.

  12. Training Work Group Charter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charter Training Work Group Charter The Training Work Group fosters improvements in the quality, efficacy, and delivery of DOE safety training, and realizes significant efficiencies by minimizing redundancies across the DOE Complex. The Work Group provides a collaborative opportunity for DOE to gain insights from operating contractors, the contractor work force and their representatives, and to combine the best wisdom to assure that the most efficient and effective worker health and safety

  13. New Class of Quantum Dots Makes the Leap from SBIR Project to Small-Business Market Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renaissance Lighting, an American small business headquartered in Herndon, Virginia, showcased the SoliaTM lamp, an innovative downlight, at the May 2010 LIGHTFAIR, becoming the first manufacturer to apply a new phosphor-converted LED technology with superior lumen efficacy and color rendering, and offering warm color temperatures. What was the back story behind this promising product introduction? An SBIR-funded research project initiated by Nanomaterials & Nanofabrication Laboratories (NN-Labs, LLC) in 2007.

  14. Effective Radius of Cloud Droplets Derived from Ground-based Remote Sensing at the ARM SGP site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficacy of Aerosol - Cloud Interactions under Varying Meteorological Conditions Byung-Gon Kim, @ Mark Miller, # Stephen Schwartz, $ Yangang Liu, $ Qilong Min % Kangnung National University, @ Rutgers University # Brookhaven National Laboratory, $ State Univ. of NY at Albany % (Courtesy Magritte) Cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulators of cloud optical properties in certain situations. Entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by

  15. Home Energy Score: Analysis & Improvements to Date

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar Home Energy Score Webinar File webinar_homeenergyscore_20101117.wmv More Documents & Publications Home Energy Score Launch Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Home Energy Score Update Webinar Slides

    Home Energy Score: � Analysis & Improvements to Date � Joan Glickman Senior Advisor/Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy July 24, 2012 1 eere.energy.gov Presentation Overview 1) Background 2) Program Improvements 3) Analysis: Efficacy of Tool & Program -

  16. OSRAM SYLVANIA Develops High-Efficiency LED Troffer Replacement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, OSRAM SYLVANIA is developing a high-efficiency LED 2'x2' troffer replacement that is expected to be commercially available in the spring of 2012 and to be cost-competitive with existing troffers of that size. It is projected to have a light output of up to 4,000 lumens, an efficacy of more than 100 lm/W, and a CCT of 3500K.

  17. Pedestrian-Friendly Nighttime Lighting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webcasts » Pedestrian-Friendly Nighttime Lighting Pedestrian-Friendly Nighttime Lighting This November 19, 2013 webinar presented issues and considerations related to pedestrian-friendly nighttime lighting, such as color rendering, safety, and adaptation. When it comes to outdoor lighting, the industry has understandably focused on footcandles and uniformity, efficacy, pole spacing, and cutoff-but those are not the chief criteria for all neighborhoods. Presenter Naomi Miller of Pacific

  18. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  19. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 ?g), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ? Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ? This NM model is a cost effective system to evaluate and optimize therapeutics. ? Show that doxycycline and dexamethasone reduce NM-caused ocular injuries ? Demonstrate that silibinin effectively reverses NM-caused ocular injury endpoints ? Suggest optimization of identified agents against ocular injuries by vesicants.

  20. SREL Reprint #3313

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Efficacy of labeling wetlands with enriched 15N to determine amphibian dispersal David E. Scott1, Yurena Yanes2, Betsie B. Rothermel3, Melissa Pilgrim4, and Christopher S. Romanek1 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA 3Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL 33960, USA 4University of South Carolina – Upstate, Spartanburg, SC 29303, USA Abstract: Stable isotope enrichment

  1. Mission Support Contract Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 298 1 ATTACHMENT J-4-d Mission Support Contract FY 2013 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan The Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) details the administration of performance incentives and allocation of total available fee as defined in Section B, Supplies or Services and Prices/Costs. 1. PERFORMANCE INCENTIVES This PEMP contains both objective and subjective performance incentives in order to maximize the efficacy of the

  2. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and

  3. Solid-State Lighting Sub-Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance awareness of needed product improvements Accelerate technology advances through stakeholder engagement Outreach to stakeholders with information & workshops Prototypes to fill technical gaps (materials, devices, luminaires) LED & OLED product cost & performance data (e.g. prices, efficacies) Competitive & shared R&D by researchers in lab / test facilities LED & OLED product testing in national lab & independent lab facilities Market reports / outreach

  4. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2001-02-21

    This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

  5. Diesel engine performance and emissions using different fuel/additive combinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, D.L.; Rush, M.W.; Richards, P.

    1988-01-01

    It is probable that diesel fuel quality in Europe will fall as the need to blend conversion components into the diesel pool increases. In particular diesel ignition quality and stability could decrease and carbon residue and aromatic content increase. This paper discusses the effects of worsening fuel quality on combustion, injection characteristics and emissions and the efficacy of appropriate additives in overcoming these effects. Both direct injection and indirect injection engines were used in the investigations.

  6. New Efficiency Record Achieved for White OLED Device

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Osram Opto-Semiconductors, Inc. has successfully demonstrated a white organic light emitting diode (OLED) with a record efficiency of 25 lumens per watt, the highest known efficiency achieved to date for a polymer-based white OLED. The 25 LPW cool-white-emitting device was produced by applying a standard external inorganic phosphor to Osram's record-breaking blue-emitting phosphorescent polymer device with a peak luminous efficacy of 14 LPW.

  7. White LED Benchmark of 65 Lumens Per Watt Achieved

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel chip design and the balance of multiple interrelated design parameters have enabled Cree, Inc.'s Santa Barbara Technology Center to demonstrate white LEDs with efficacies greater than 65 lumens per watt at 350 mA. The results are particularly significant because they were achieved with a pre-production prototype chip using the same package used in Cree's commercially available XLamp® 7090 high power LED, rather than a laboratory device.

  8. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Susumu Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

    2013-08-01

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  9. Radar operation in a hostile electromagnetic environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-03-01

    Radar ISR does not always involve cooperative or even friendly targets. An adversary has numerous techniques available to him to counter the effectiveness of a radar ISR sensor. These generally fall under the banner of jamming, spoofing, or otherwise interfering with the EM signals required by the radar sensor. Consequently mitigation techniques are prudent to retain efficacy of the radar sensor. We discuss in general terms a number of mitigation techniques.

  10. Working Toward Robust Process Monitoring for Safeguards Applications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Working Toward Robust Process Monitoring for Safeguards Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Working Toward Robust Process Monitoring for Safeguards Applications New safeguards technologies allow continuous monitoring of plant processes. Efforts to deploy these technologies, as described in a preponderance of literature, typically have consisted of case studies attempting to prove their efficacy in proof-of-principle installations. While the

  11. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric A.; Demain, Arnold L.; Madia, Ashwin

    1985-09-10

    A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  12. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  13. All-Weather Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Decontamination of CBRN Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, George W.; Procell, Lawrence R.; Sorrick, David C.; Lawson, Glenn E.; Wells, Claire M.; Reynolds, Charles M.; Ringelberg, D. B.; Foley, Karen L.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Blanchard, David L.

    2010-03-11

    A hydrogen peroxide-based decontaminant, Decon Green, is efficacious for the decontamination of chemical agents VX (S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GD (Soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and HD (mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide); the biological agent anthrax (Bacillus anthracis); and radiological isotopes Cs-137 and Co-60; thus demonstrating the ability of this decontamination approach to ameliorate the aftermath of all three types of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Reaction mechanisms afforded for the chemical agents are discussed as are rationales for the enhanced removal efficacy of recalcitrant 60Co on certain surfaces. Decontaminants of this nature can be deployed, and are effective, at very low temperatures (-32 °C), as shown for studies done with VX and HD simulants, without the need for external heat sources. Finally, the efficacy of a lower-logistics, dry decontaminant powder concentrate (utilizing the solid active-oxygen compounds peracetyl borate and Peroxydone) which can be reconstituted with water in the field prior to use, is presented.

  14. Ultra-Compact High-Efficiency Luminaire for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Lowes

    2012-04-08

    Cree has developed a new ultra-compact light emitting diode (LED) luminaire capable of providing high efficacy with excellent color quality that can lead to significant energy savings in today??s commercial and retail applications. This success was based on an integrated development effort tailoring the LED component characteristics, optics, thermal management and driver design for the small footprint to achieve an overall system efficiency of ? 70%. A new LED component was designed to provide high brightness and efficacy in a form factor that allowed for a small directional beam with a luminaire housing design able to dissipate the heat effectively using a small physical envelope. A very compact, 90% efficient driver was developed to meet the system performance while not taking away any thermal mass from the heat sink. A 91% efficient secondary optics was designed to maximize efficiency while providing a smooth beam. The reliability of the new LED component was robust under accelerated testing conditions. Luminaires were assembled integrating the novel LED component, secondary optics, heat sink and driver technology to demonstrate the system improvement. Cree has successfully completed this project by developing an ultra-compact LED luminaire that provided 380 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2822 K and color rendering index (CRI) of 94 with an efficacy of 94 lumens per watt (LPW) when operating at 4 W input power (steady state) with an overall system efficiency of 81%. At a higher input power of 9 Watts, the lamp provided 658 lumens at 71 LPW.

  15. In silico evaluation and exploration of antibiotic tuberculosis treatment regimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienaar, Elsje; Dartois, Véronique; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2015-11-14

    Improvement in tuberculosis treatment regimens requires selection of antibiotics and dosing schedules from a large design space of possibilities. Incomplete knowledge of antibiotic and host immune dynamics in tuberculosis granulomas impacts clinical trial design and success, and variations among clinical trials hamper side-by-side comparison of regimens. Our objective is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of isoniazid and rifampin regimens, and identify modifications to these antibiotics that improve treatment outcomes. We pair a spatio-temporal computational model of host immunity with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on isoniazid and rifampin. The model is calibrated to plasma pharmacokinetic and granuloma bacterial load data from non-human primate models of tuberculosis and to tissue and granuloma measurements of isoniazid and rifampin in rabbit granulomas. We predict the efficacy of regimens containing different doses and frequencies of isoniazid and rifampin. We predict impacts of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modifications on antibiotic efficacy. We demonstrate that suboptimal antibiotic concentrations within granulomas lead to poor performance of intermittent regimens compared to daily regimens. Improvements from dose and frequency changes are limited by inherent antibiotic properties, and we propose that changes in intracellular accumulation ratios and antimicrobial activity would lead to the most significant improvements in treatment outcomes. Results suggest that an increased risk of drug resistance in fully intermittent as compared to daily regimens arises from higher bacterial population levels early during treatment. In conclusion, our systems pharmacology approach complements efforts to accelerate tuberculosis therapeutic development.

  16. In silico evaluation and exploration of antibiotic tuberculosis treatment regimens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pienaar, Elsje; Dartois, Véronique; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2015-11-14

    Improvement in tuberculosis treatment regimens requires selection of antibiotics and dosing schedules from a large design space of possibilities. Incomplete knowledge of antibiotic and host immune dynamics in tuberculosis granulomas impacts clinical trial design and success, and variations among clinical trials hamper side-by-side comparison of regimens. Our objective is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of isoniazid and rifampin regimens, and identify modifications to these antibiotics that improve treatment outcomes. We pair a spatio-temporal computational model of host immunity with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on isoniazid and rifampin. The model is calibrated to plasma pharmacokinetic and granuloma bacterial load data frommore » non-human primate models of tuberculosis and to tissue and granuloma measurements of isoniazid and rifampin in rabbit granulomas. We predict the efficacy of regimens containing different doses and frequencies of isoniazid and rifampin. We predict impacts of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modifications on antibiotic efficacy. We demonstrate that suboptimal antibiotic concentrations within granulomas lead to poor performance of intermittent regimens compared to daily regimens. Improvements from dose and frequency changes are limited by inherent antibiotic properties, and we propose that changes in intracellular accumulation ratios and antimicrobial activity would lead to the most significant improvements in treatment outcomes. Results suggest that an increased risk of drug resistance in fully intermittent as compared to daily regimens arises from higher bacterial population levels early during treatment. In conclusion, our systems pharmacology approach complements efforts to accelerate tuberculosis therapeutic development.« less

  17. Advancing strategic environmental assessment in the offshore oil and gas sector: Lessons from Norway, Canada, and the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fidler, Courtney; Noble, Bram

    2012-04-15

    Abstract: Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) for offshore oil and gas planning and development is utilized in select international jurisdictions, but the sector has received limited attention in the SEA literature. While the potential benefits of and rationale for SEA are well argued, there have been few empirical studies of SEA processes for the offshore sector. Hence, little is known about the efficacy of SEA offshore, in particular its influence on planning and development decisions. This paper examines SEA practice and influence in three international offshore systems: Norway, Atlantic Canada and the United Kingdom, with the intent to identify the challenges, lessons and opportunities for advancing SEA in offshore planning and impact assessment. Results demonstrate that SEA can help inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project-based assessment in the offshore sector, however weak coordination between higher and lower tiers limit SEA's ability to influence planning and development decisions in a broad regional environmental and socioeconomic context. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA can inform and improve the efficacy and efficiency of project EA offshore Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scope and deliverables of SEA offshore often differ from stakeholder expectations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable variability in influence of SEA output beyond licensing decisions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sector-based SEA offshore is often too restrictive to generate expected benefits.

  18. A Systems Approach to Bio-Oil Stabilization - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Robert C; Meyer, Terrence; Fox, Rodney; Submramaniam, Shankar; Shanks, Brent; Smith, Ryan G

    2011-12-23

    The objective of this project is to develop practical, cost effective methods for stabilizing biomass-derived fast pyrolysis oil for at least six months of storage under ambient conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy has targeted three strategies for stabilizing bio-oils: (1) reducing the oxygen content of the organic compounds comprising pyrolysis oil; (2) removal of carboxylic acid groups such that the total acid number (TAN) of the pyrolysis oil is dramatically reduced; and (3) reducing the charcoal content, which contains alkali metals known to catalyze reactions that increase the viscosity of bio-oil. Alkali and alkaline earth metals (AAEM), are known to catalyze decomposition reactions of biomass carbohydrates to produce light oxygenates that destabilize the resulting bio-oil. Methods envisioned to prevent the AAEM from reaction with the biomass carbohydrates include washing the AAEM out of the biomass with water or dilute acid or infusing an acid catalyst to passivate the AAEM. Infusion of acids into the feedstock to convert all of the AAEM to salts which are stable at pyrolysis temperatures proved to be a much more economically feasible process. Our results from pyrolyzing acid infused biomass showed increases in the yield of anhydrosugars by greater than 300% while greatly reducing the yield of light oxygenates that are known to destabilize bio-oil. Particulate matter can interfere with combustion or catalytic processing of either syngas or bio-oil. It also is thought to catalyze the polymerization of bio-oil, which increases the viscosity of bio-oil over time. High temperature bag houses, ceramic candle filters, and moving bed granular filters have been variously suggested for syngas cleaning at elevated temperatures. High temperature filtration of bio-oil vapors has also been suggested by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory although there remain technical challenges to this approach. The fast pyrolysis of biomass yields three main organic products: condensable vapors, non-condensable gases, and liquid aerosols. Traditionally these are recovered by a spray quencher or a conventional shell and tube condenser. The spray quencher or condenser is typically followed by an electrostatic precipitator to yield 1 or 2 distinct fractions of bio-oil. The pyrolyzer system developed at Iowa State University incorporates a proprietary fractionating condenser train. The system collects the bio-oil into five unique fractions. For conditions typical of fluidized bed pyrolyzers, stage fractions have been collected that are carbohydrate-rich (anhydrosugars), lignin-rich, and an aqueous solution of carboxylic acids and aldehydes. One important feature is that most of the water normally found in bio-oil appears in the last stage fraction along with several water-soluble components that are thought to be responsible for bio-oil aging (low molecular weight carboxylic acids and aldehydes). Research work on laser diagnostics for hot-vapor filtration and bio-oil recovery centered on development of analytical techniques for in situ measurements during fast pyrolysis, hot-vapor filtration, and fractionation relative to bio-oil stabilization. The methods developed in this work include laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced incandescence (LII), and laser scattering for elemental analysis (N, O, H, C), detection of particulates, and detection of aerosols, respectively. These techniques were utilized in simulated pyrolysis environments and applied to a small-scale pyrolysis unit. Stability of Bio-oils is adversely affected by the presence of particulates that are formed as a consequence of thermal pyrolysis, improving the CFD simulations of moving bed granular filter (MBGF) is useful for improving the design of MBGF for bio-oil production. The current work uses fully resolved direct numerical simulation (where the flow past each granule is accurately represented) to calculate the filter efficiency that is used in the CFD model at all flow speeds. This study shows that fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) is successful in calculating the filter efficiency at all speeds. Aldehydes and acids are thought to play key roles in the stability of bio-oils, so the catalytic stabilization of bio-oils was focused on whether a reaction approach could be employed that simultaneously addressed these two types of molecules in bio-oil. Our approach to post treatment was simultaneous hydrogenation and esterification using bifunctional metal/acidic heterogeneous catalyst in which reactive aldehydes were reduced to alcohols, creating a high enough alcohol concentration so that the carboxylic acids could be esterified.

  19. Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlon, B.

    2012-04-01

    Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

  20. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

  1. QER- Comment of Janice Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposal for Conservation Reward Rate for Electricity First of all, thank you for the time you are taking to hear from the public along with the industry and government officials in this critical matter. I attended the public hearing in Hartford CT two days ago and was able to comment on parts of what we are proposing here. We are writing to open a conversation with you about a proposal that we have been discussing in our past meetings. We would like to see you initiate legislation that would mandate a "stepped rate" for electricity, under which consumers who used less would pay a lower rate per kilowatt hour than those who used more. Background North Quabbin Energy is a community group from the nine North Quabbin towns in north central Massachusetts that focuses on education and local action relating to ways to conserve energy and support local and regional enterprises that reduce our dependence on imported resources. The towns are Athol, Orange, Petersham, Royalston, Warwick, Wendell, New Salem, Erving and Phillipston. Our members include representatives from the appointed Energy Committees of these towns. For the past six years, we have participated in many different types of events and activities, always with an emphasis on the idea that the single best way to address the high financial, social, and environmental costs of our current energy use patterns is to consume less energy in the first place. What we have discovered in our community work is that most people seem aware of the reasons for conserving energy (lowering greenhouse gas emissions, saving money, reducing dependence on oil and other imported resources, etc.). Many are also knowledgeable about the basic weatherization and conservation strategies that utilities, municipalities, and community groups like ours try to promote (for example, adding insulation to homes, turning thermostats down, or using fluorescent or LED lighting rather than incandescent bulbs). Yet except when energy prices are extraordinarily high, it appears that there is a great deal of inertia among the general public about actually making changes in their energy consumption patterns. This proposal would address that issue of inertia by creating a direct incentive program for using less electricity. People could very quickly and easily make changes that would lower their electric use, and would see immediate results on their electric bills. Comparable programs Many utilities are beginning to offer peak and off-peak metering as a way to equalize demand on the electric grid, but although this is useful in making people more aware of their energy use patterns, it does nothing to reduce overall demand and may actually encourage more wasteful consumption at off-peak times. A few utilities are starting to offer the kind of stepped rate or rewards program that we are proposing. For example, Western Massachusetts Electric Company recently inaugurated a program that awards "points" (redeemable for consumer items) for the numbers of kilowatt hours saved. In our opinion, this kind of program sends the wrong message because it encourages people to save in one area (electricity use) in order to consume in another. Examples of programs more in line with what we are proposing already exist. One is British Columbia Hydro's "Conservation Rate," started in April 2010. Under their Residential Conservation Rate, customers pay 7.52 cents per kWh for the first 1,350 kWh they use over an average two-month billing period. Above that amount, customers pay 11.27 cents per kWh for the balance of the electricity used during the billing period. In nearby Vermont, the Washington Electric Cooperative has had stepped or tiered rates for years. They reward residential users with a relatively very low rate of 9.43 cents per kWhr for the first 200 kWhrs, and then charge a significantly higher rate of 21.06 cents thereafter. As a result, their customers use on average about 11% less than the households in our area. Points for discussion What might be a reasonable target figure for the stepped rate? The current Massachusetts average is about 610 kWh/month. Members of North Quabbin Energy have demonstrated that it is quite possible to use a half or even a third of that amount without any decline in standard or quality of living1. In fact, this level of reduction is imperative given the seriousness of climate change and resource depletion. How could this change best be promoted to the public? We would argue that this is not a rate increase, but rather a rate redistribution that rewards lower energy consumption. It seems important to emphasize the positive rewards of this kind of change, rather than framing it as a penalty for higher use2. It also seems crucial to demonstrate from the outset that reducing a household's electric use can be done with surprising ease, given a greater awareness of how much energy waste can be avoided with a change in behavior. How could the concerns of low-income customers, those with large families, or those who heat exclusively with electricity be addressed? The BCHydro and Washington Electric Cooperative programs provide useful models for addressing these questions, and there is a great deal of regional data that shows how these consumers would by no means be penalized in the kind of pricing structure we are proposing. What programs could be funded with the increased revenues? Public outrage would be justified if the money went into the general coffers of the utility companies and fossil fuel energy supply and distribution companies. Enhanced conservation programs should be the target of these revenues. Attachments: 1 NQE individual.pdf, 2 NQE proposed incentive rate Note - if attachments do not go through, see this web page for these documents: http://northquabbinenergy.org/wordpress/?page_id=205

  2. CALiPER Exploratory Study: Recessed Troffer Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2013-04-28

    This report describes an exploration of troffer lighting as used in office and classroom spaces, which was conducted by the CALiPER program. Twenty-four pairs of 2×2 and 2×4 troffers were procured anonymously, documented, tested for photometric and electrical performance, and installed in a mockup office space in Portland, Oregon. Three of the pairs were T8 fluorescent benchmark products, 12 were dedicated LED troffers, five were fluorescent troffers modified for LED lamps (sometimes referred to as "tubes"), and another four troffers were modified with LED retrofit kits. The modifications were performed by a commercial electrical contractor, following the instructions provided by the retrofit lamp or kit manufacturer. Once installed in the mockup facility, the converted luminaires were examined by a NRTL (Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory) safety expert, who provided feedback on safety issues. In September 2012, a group of lighting designers, engineers, and facility managers were brought in to observe the LED luminaires in comparison to fluorescent benchmarks. This report documents performance in measures that go beyond illuminance values or luminaire efficacy. Dedicated LED troffers are ready to compete with fluorescent troffers in terms of efficacy (lumens per watt), and in many lighting quality issues such as glare, light distribution, visual appearance, and color quality. That is not to say that each one is stellar, but each one tested in this CALiPER study bested the fluorescent benchmarks in terms of efficacy, and almost all were rated highly in several categories -- only one luminaire of twelve performed consistently poorly.

  3. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard Wood, Lance Seefeldt, Ronald Sims, Bradley Wahlen, and Dan Dye

    2012-06-29

    The solar energy available within the visible portion of the solar spectrum is about 300 W/m2 (43%) and that available in the UV and IR portion is about 400 W/m2 (57%). This provides opportunities for developing integrated energy systems that capture and use specific wavelengths of the solar spectrum for different purposes. For example: biofuels from photosynthetic microbes use only the visible light; solar cells use a narrow band of the solar spectrum that could be either mostly in the visible or in the IR regions of the solar spectrum, depending on the photovoltaic materials, e.g., gallium antimonide (GaSb) cells utilize predominately IR radiation; and finally, solar panels that heat water utilize a broad range of wavelengths (visible plus IR). The basic idea of this research is that sunlight has many possible end-use applications including both direct use and energy conversion schemes; it is technically feasible to develop multifunctional solar energy systems capable of addressing several end-use needs while increasing the overall solar energy utilization efficiency when compared to single-purpose solar technologies. Such a combination of technologies could lead to more cost-competitive ?multifunctional? systems that add value and broaden opportunities for integrated energy systems. The goal of this research is to increase the overall energy efficacy and cost competitiveness of solar systems. The specific objectives of this research were: 1) Evaluate the efficacy of a combined photobioreactor and electric power system; 2) Improve the reliability and cost effectiveness of hybrid solar lighting systems ? a technology in which sunlight is collected and distributed via optical fibers into the interior of a building; 3) Evaluate the efficacy of using filtered light to increase the production of biomass in photobioreactors and provide more solar energy for other uses; 4) Evaluates several concepts for wavelength shifting such that a greater percentage of the solar spectrum energy can be used for photosynthesis.

  4. LOW-COST LED LUMINAIRE FOR GENERAL ILLUMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Ted

    2014-07-31

    During this two-year Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Manufacturing R&D project Cree developed novel light emitting diode (LED) technologies contributing to a cost-optimized, efficient LED troffer luminaire platform emitting at ~3500K correlated color temperature (CCT) at a color rendering index (CRI) of >90. To successfully achieve program goals, Cree used a comprehensive approach to address cost reduction of the various optical, thermal and electrical subsystems in the luminaire without impacting performance. These developments built on Cree’s high- brightness, low-cost LED platforms to design a novel LED component architecture that will enable low-cost troffer luminaire designs with high total system efficacy. The project scope included cost reductions to nearly all major troffer subsystems as well as assembly costs. For example, no thermal management components were included in the troffer, owing to the optimized distribution of compact low- to mid-power LEDs. It is estimated that a significant manufacturing cost savings will result relative to Cree’s conventional troffers at the start of the project. A chief project accomplishment was the successful development of a new compact, high-efficacy LED component geometry with a broad far-field intensity distribution and even color point vs. emission angle. After further optimization and testing for production, the Cree XQ series of LEDs resulted. XQ LEDs are currently utilized in Cree’s AR series troffers, and they are being considered for use in other platforms. The XQ lens geometry influenced the independent development of Cree’s XB-E and XB-G high-voltage LEDs, which also have a broad intensity distribution at high efficacy, and are finding wide implementation in Cree’s omnidirectional A-lamps.

  5. Administered activity and metastatic cure probability during radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in nude mice with {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgqvist, Joergen . E-mail: jorgen.elgqvist@radfys.gu.se; Andersson, Hakan; Bernhardt, Peter; Baeck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Bengt R.; Lindegren, Sture; Olsson, Marita; Palm, Stig; Warnhammar, Elisabet; Jacobsson, Lars

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the therapeutic efficacy of {alpha}-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice. This study: (i) estimated the minimum required activity (MRA), giving a reasonable high therapeutic efficacy; and (ii) calculated the specific energy to tumor cell nuclei and the metastatic cure probability (MCP) using various assumptions regarding monoclonal-antibody (mAb) distribution in measured tumors. The study was performed using the {alpha}-particle emitter Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) labeled to the mAb MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. Methods and Materials: Animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with {approx}1 x 10{sup 7} cells of the cell line NIH:OVCAR-3. Four weeks later animals were treated with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 74). Another group of animals was treated with a nonspecific mAb: 100 kBq {sup 211}At-Rituximab F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 18). Eight weeks after treatment the animals were sacrificed and presence of macro- and microscopic tumors and ascites was determined. An MCP model was developed and compared with the experimentally determined tumor-free fraction (TFF). Results: When treatment was given 4 weeks after cell inoculation, the TFFs were 25%, 22%, 50%, and 61% after treatment with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}, respectively, the specific energy to irradiated cell nuclei varying between {approx}2 and {approx}400 Gy. Conclusion: As a significant increase in the therapeutic efficacy was observed between the activity levels of 50 and 100 kBq (TFF increase from 22% to 50%), the conclusion was that the MRA is {approx}100 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. MCP was most consistent with the TFF when assuming a diffusion depth of 30 {mu}m of the mAbs in the tumors.

  6. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of silibinin against SM-induced skin injury.

  7. SU-E-J-03: A Comprehensive Comparison Between Alpha and Beta Emitters for Cancer Radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.Y.; Guatelli, S; Oborn, B; Allen, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to perform a comprehensive comparison of the therapeutic efficacy and cytotoxicity of alpha and beta emitters for Radioimmunotherapy (RIT). For each stage of cancer development, specific models were built for the separate objectives of RIT to be addressed:a) kill isolated cancer cells in transit in the lymphatic and vascular circulation,b) regress avascular cell clusters,c) regress tumor vasculature and tumors. Methods: Because of the nature of short range, high LET alpha and long energy beta radiation and heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells, the microdosimetric approach is essential for the RIT assessment. Geant4 based microdosimetric models are developed for the three different stages of cancer progression: cancer cells, cell clusters and tumors. The energy deposition, specific energy resulted from different source distribution in the three models was calculated separately for 4 alpha emitting radioisotopes ({sup 211}At, {sup 213}Bi, {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac) and 6 beta emitters ({sup 32}P, {sup 33}P, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I and {sup 177}Lu). The cell survival, therapeutic efficacy and cytotoxicity are determined and compared between alpha and beta emitters. Results: We show that internal targeted alpha radiation has advantages over beta radiation for killing isolated cancer cells, regressing small cell clusters and also solid tumors. Alpha particles have much higher dose specificity and potency than beta particles. They can deposit 3 logs more dose than beta emitters to single cells and solid tumor. Tumor control probability relies on deep penetration of radioisotopes to cancer cell clusters and solid tumors. Conclusion: The results of this study provide a quantitative understanding of the efficacy and cytotoxicity of RIT for each stage of cancer development.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin ≤35 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped ≤35 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot Slimline ≤65 45 80.0 May 1,

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Efficiency Standards for Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps (1) Factor Requirements Lamp Power (W) & Configuration Minimum Efficacy: lumens/watt (based upon initial lumen data) Bare Lamp: Lamp Power < 15 45.0 Lamp Power ≥ 15 60.0 Covered Lamp (no reflector): Lamp Power < 15 40.0 15 ≤ Lamp Power < 19 48.0 19 ≤ Lamp Power < 25 50.0 25 ≤ Lamp Power 55.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Effective for products manufactured on or after January 1, 2006

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.7 Efficiency Standards for Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Efficiency Standards for Lighting March 2011 7.7.2 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994

  11. CALiPER Publishes New Snapshot on MR16 Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CALiPER Publishes New Snapshot on MR16 Lamps CALiPER Publishes New Snapshot on MR16 Lamps February 9, 2016 - 3:34pm Addthis DOE's CALiPER program has published a new Snapshot Report on LED MR16 lamps, which updates a similar Snapshot Report published in January 2014. In the past two years, LED technology has progressed rapidly, but the progress has been much slower for LED MR16s. The increase in mean efficacy is about half of that seen for other categories, and lumen output and center beam

  12. The potential use of Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate the predictions of environmental radiological assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, C.R.; Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Lesslie, P.A.; Miller, C.W.; Ng, Y.C.; Till, J.E.

    1988-06-01

    The objectives of the Model Validation Committee were to collaborate with US and foreign scientists to collect, manage, and evaluate data for identifying critical research issues and data needs to support an integrated assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; test environmental transport, human dosimetric, and health effects models against measured data to determine their efficacy in guiding decisions on protective actions and in estimating exposures to populations and individuals following a nuclear accident; and apply Chernobyl data to quantifications of key processes governing the environmental transport, fate and effects of radionuclides and other trace substances. 55 refs.

  13. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Koltai, Rita; McGowan, Terry

    2013-12-31

    This GATEWAY report discusses the problems of pedestrian lighting that occur with all technologies with a focus on the unique optical options and opportunities offered by LEDs through the findings from two pedestrian-focused projects, one at Stanford University in California, and one at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. Incorporating user feedback this report reviews the tradeoffs that must be weighed among visual comfort, color, visibility, efficacy and other factors to stimulate discussion among specifiers, users, energy specialists, and in industry in hopes that new approaches, metrics, and standards can be developed to support pedestrian-focused communities, while reducing energy use.

  14. Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emergency Decay Heat Removal in a GEN-IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor A series of transient analyses using the system code RELAP5-3d has been performed to confirm the efficacy of a proposed hybrid active/passive combination approach to the decay heat removal for an advanced 2400 MWt GEN-IV gas-cooled fast reactor. The accident sequence of interest

  15. High-Order Membrane Complexes from Activated G-Protein Subunits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting can provide high efficacy and long

  16. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Goodrich-Mahoney; Paul Ziemkiewicz

    2006-07-19

    This is the third quarter progress report of Phase II of a three-phase project to develop and evaluate the efficacy of developing multiple environmental market trading credits on a partially reclaimed surface mined site near Valley Point, Preston County, WV. Construction of the passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment system was completed but several modifications from the original design had to be made following the land survey and during construction to compensate for unforeseen circumstances. We continued to collect baseline quality data from the Conner Run AMD seeps to confirm the conceptual and final design for the passive AMD treatment system.

  17. Price Incentivised Electric Vehicle Charge Control for Community Voltage Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Damian; Baroncelli, Fabio; Fowler, Christopher; Boundy, David; Pratt, Annabelle

    2014-11-03

    With the growing availability of Electric Vehicles, there is a significant opportunity to use battery 'smart-charging' for voltage regulation. This work designs and experimentally evaluates a system for price-incentivised electric vehicle charging. The system is designed to eliminate negative impacts to the user while minimising the cost of charging and achieving a more favourable voltage behaviour throughout the local grid over time. The practical issues associated with a real-life deployment are identified and resolved. The efficacy of the system is evaluated in the challenging scenario in which EVs are deployed in six closely distributed homes, serviced by the same low voltage residential distribution feeder.

  18. Investigations into Performance and Lifetime Enhancements of OPV Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-263

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate Plextronics new additives and derivatives in lithium-ion Battery Applications, Plextronics will provide to NREL, a starting point, including materials and initial data for proof of concept. The central focus of this project is to acertain the nature of the efficacy of the Plextronics additives through physical and electrical characterization, including evaluations of new derivatives, system evaluations on batteries made with Plexcore and to study long term cycling performance differences. The initial focus is to establish Plexcore mode of action to support the commercialization of the first commercial evaluations of Plexcore in Sept. 2013.

  19. A feasibility assessment of magnetic bearings for free-piston Stirling space power converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curwen, P.W.; Rao, D.K.; Wilson, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes work performed by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) under NASA Contract NAS3-26061, {open_quotes}A Feasibility Assessment of Magnetic Bearings for Free-Piston Stirling Space Engines.{close_quotes} The work was performed over the period from July 1990 through August 1991. The objective of the effort was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of applying magnetic bearings to free-piston Stirling-cycle power conversion machinery of the type currently being evaluated for possible use in future long-term space missions.

  20. Improved multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, I.A.; Stallard, R.P.; Woodward, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines the results of an investigation of existing multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms and introduces two new algorithms which significantly improve some aspects of the performance of their predecessors. The two algorithms arise from different starting assumptions. One considers the case where the algorithm will terminate successfully whatever list structure is being processed and assumes that the extra data space should be minimised. The other seeks a very fast garbage collection time for list structures that do not contain loops. Results of both theoretical and experimental investigations are given to demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithms. 7 references.

  1. Polymer performance in cooling water: The influence of process variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amjad, Z.; Pugh, J.; Zibrida, J.; Zuhl, B.

    1997-01-01

    The key to the efficacy of phosphate and phosphonates in stabilized phosphate and all-organic cooling water treatment (CWT) programs is the presence and performance of polymeric inhibitors/dispersants. The performance of polymeric additives used in CWT programs can be adversely impacted by the presence of iron, phosphonate, or cationic polymer and influenced by a variety of process variables including system pH and temperature. In this article, the performance of several polymeric additives is evaluated under a variety of stressed conditions.

  2. High-Power Warm-White Hybrid LED Package for Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soer, Wouter

    2013-09-19

    In this project, an integrated warm-white hybrid light engine was developed. The hybrid approach involves combining phosphor-converted off-white InGaN LEDs and direct-emitting red AlInGaP LEDs in a single light engine to achieve high efficacy together with high color rendering index. We developed and integrated technology improvements in InGaN and AlInGaP die technology, phosphor technology, package architecture and encapsulation, to realize a hybrid warm-white LED package with an efficacy of 140 lm/W at a correlated color temperature of 3000K and a color rendering index of 90, measured under representative operating conditions. This efficacy is 26% higher than the best warm-white LEDs of similar specification that are commercially available at the end of the project. Since the InGaN- and AlInGaP-based LEDs used in the hybrid engine show different behavior as a function of current and temperature, a control system needs to be in place to ensure a stable color point over all operating conditions. In this project, we developed an electronic control circuit that is fully integrated into the light engine in such a way that the module can simply be driven by a conventional single-channel driver. The integrated control circuit uses a switch-mode boost converter topology to control the LED drive currents based on the temperature and the input current of the light engine. A color control performance of 5 SDCM was demonstrated, and improvement to 3 SDCM is considered well within reach. The combination of high efficacy and ease of integration with existing single-channel drivers is expected to facilitate the adoption of the hybrid technology and accelerate the energy savings associated with solid-state lighting. In the product commercialization plan, downlights and indirect-lit troffers have been selected as the first target applications for this product concept. Fully functional integrated prototypes have been developed for both applications, and the business case evaluation is ongoing as of the end of the project.

  3. Best Possible Strategy for Finding Ground States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, Astrid; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz; Salamon, Peter

    2001-06-04

    Finding the ground state of a system with a complex energy landscape is important for many physical problems including protein folding, spin glasses, chemical clusters, and neural networks. Such problems are usually solved by heuristic search methods whose efficacy is judged by empirical performance on selected examples. We present a proof that, within the large class of algorithms that simulate a random walk on the landscape, threshold accepting is the best possible strategy. In particular, it can perform better than simulated annealing and Tsallis statistics. Our proof is the first example of a provably optimal strategy in this area.

  4. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  5. The New World of Human Genetics: A dialogue between Practitioners & the General Public on Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schofield, Amy

    2014-12-08

    The history and reasons for launching the Human Genome project and the current uses of genetic human material; Identifying and discussing the major issues stemming directly from genetic research and therapy-including genetic discrimination, medical/ person privacy, allocation of government resources and individual finances, and the effect on the way in which we perceive the value of human life; Discussing the sometimes hidden ethical, social and legislative implications of genetic research and therapy such as informed consent, screening and preservation of genetic materials, efficacy of medical procedures, the role of the government, and equal access to medical coverage.

  6. Applying New Network Security Technologies to SCADA Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, Steven A.; Stamp, Jason E.; Duggan, David P.; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2006-11-01

    Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems for automation are very important for critical infrastructure and manufacturing operations. They have been implemented to work in a number of physical environments using a variety of hardware, software, networking protocols, and communications technologies, often before security issues became of paramount concern. To offer solutions to security shortcomings in the short/medium term, this project was to identify technologies used to secure %22traditional%22 IT networks and systems, and then assess their efficacy with respect to SCADA systems. These proposed solutions must be relatively simple to implement, reliable, and acceptable to SCADA owners and operators. 4This page intentionally left blank.

  7. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  8. Systems and methods for modeling and analyzing networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Colin C; Church, Bruce W; McDonagh, Paul D; Khalil, Iya G; Neyarapally, Thomas A; Pitluk, Zachary W

    2013-10-29

    The systems and methods described herein utilize a probabilistic modeling framework for reverse engineering an ensemble of causal models, from data and then forward simulating the ensemble of models to analyze and predict the behavior of the network. In certain embodiments, the systems and methods described herein include data-driven techniques for developing causal models for biological networks. Causal network models include computational representations of the causal relationships between independent variables such as a compound of interest and dependent variables such as measured DNA alterations, changes in mRNA, protein, and metabolites to phenotypic readouts of efficacy and toxicity.

  9. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  10. Effect of pipe insulation losses on a loss-of-heat sink accident for an LMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Wood, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy of pipe radiation losses as a heat sink during LOHS in a loop-type LMR plant is investigated. The Super System Code (SSC), which was modified to include pipe radiation losses, was used to simulate such an LOHS in an LMR plant. In order to enhance these losses, the pipes were assumed to be insulated by rock wool, a material whose thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature. A transient was simulated for a total of eight days, during which the coolant temperatures peaked well below saturation conditions and then declined steadily. The coolant flow rate in the loop remained positive throughout the transient.

  11. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgu, Muslum

    2012-07-23

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  12. OLED Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SSL Basics » OLED Basics OLED Basics OLEDs are organic LEDs, which means that their key building blocks are organic (i.e., carbon-based) materials. Unlike LEDs, which are small-point light sources, OLEDs are made in sheets that are diffuse-area light sources. OLED technology is developing rapidly, and there are a handful of product offerings with efficacy, lifetime, and color quality specs that are comparable to their LED counterparts. However, OLEDs are still some years away from widespread

  13. High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting can provide high efficacy and long

  14. Polar-direct-drive experiments with contoured-shell targets on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, F. J.; Radha, P. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; et al

    2016-01-28

    Polar-driven direct-drive experiments recently performed on the OMEGA Laser System have demonstrated the efficacy of using a target with a contoured shell with varying thickness to improve the symmetry and fusion performance of the implosion. The polar-driven contoured-shell implosions have substantially reduced low mode perturbations compared to polar-driven spherical-shell implosions as diagnosed by x-ray radiographs up to shell stagnation. As a result, fusion yields were increased by more than a factor of ~2 without increasing the energy of the laser by the use of contoured shells.

  15. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  16. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs Print Friday, 27 February 2015 17:11 Hu et al. designed a new yellow phosphor with high quantum yield by immobilizing a preslected chromophore into the rigid framework of a metal-organic framework (MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous efficacy. The new yellow phosphor demonstrates

  17. Calibration and Forward Uncertainty Propagation for Large-eddy Simulations of Engineering Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Blaylock, Myra L.; Domino, Stefan P.; Hewson, John C.; Kumar, Pritvi Raj; Ling, Julia; Najm, Habib N.; Ruiz, Anthony; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Stewart, Alessia; Wagner, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the efficacy of using calibration strategies from Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) to determine model coefficients for LES. As the target methods are for engineering LES, uncertainty from numerical aspects of the model must also be quantified. 15 The ultimate goal of this research thread is to generate a cost versus accuracy curve for LES such that the cost could be minimized given an accuracy prescribed by an engineering need. Realization of this goal would enable LES to serve as a predictive simulation tool within the engineering design process.

  18. Visual inspection reliability for precision manufactured parts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    See, Judi E.

    2015-09-04

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted an experiment for the National Nuclear Security Administration to determine the reliability of visual inspection of precision manufactured parts used in nuclear weapons. In addition visual inspection has been extensively researched since the early 20th century; however, the reliability of visual inspection for nuclear weapons parts has not been addressed. In addition, the efficacy of using inspector confidence ratings to guide multiple inspections in an effort to improve overall performance accuracy is unknown. Further, the workload associated with inspection has not been documented, and newer measures of stress have not been applied.

  19. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

    1999-08-31

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

  20. Comparison of real-time and linear-response time-dependent density functional theories for molecular chromophores ranging from sparse to high densities of states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tussupbayev, Samat; Govind, Niranjan; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2015-03-10

    We assess the performance of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) for the calculation of absorption spectra of 12 organic dye molecules relevant to photovoltaics and dye sensitized solar cells with 8 exchange-correlation functionals (3 traditional, 3 global hybrids, and 2 range-separated hybrids). We compare the calculations with traditional linear-response (LR) TDDFT. In addition, we demonstrate the efficacy of the RT-TDDFT approach to calculate wide absorption spectra of two large chromophores relevant to photovoltaics and molecular switches.

  1. Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

    2012-07-30

    The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

  2. Cohesive Modeling of Dynamic Crack Growth in Homogeneous and Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Zhengyu; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Celes, Waldemar

    2008-02-15

    This paper presents a Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) approach for investigating dynamic crack propagation in homogeneous and Functionally Graded Materials (FGMs). The failure criterion is incorporated in the CZM using both a finite cohesive strength and work to fracture in the material description. A novel CZM for FGMs is explored and incorporated into a finite element framework. The material gradation is approximated at the element level using a graded element formulation. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the CZM approach, in which the influence of the material gradation on the crack growth pattern is studied.

  3. Chemical and biological warfare: Biochemistry, therapy, and treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning biochemistry, therapy, and treatment of the effects of military chemical and biological warfare agents. References include surveys and studies of immunizing agents and drugs, the efficacy of these drugs, and the effect of the drugs on the patient. Also included are biochemical studies, assay techniques, and antidote development, some of which is supported by animal studies. Citations concerning detection and warning, defoliants, protection, biology and toxicology, and general studies are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 189 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Chemical and biological warfare: Biochemistry, therapy, and treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning biochemistry, therapy, and treatment of the effects of military chemical and biological warfare agents. References include surveys and studies of immunizing agents and drugs, the efficacy of these drugs, and the effect of the drugs on the patient. Also included are biochemical studies, assay techniques, and antidote development, some of which is supported by animal studies. Citations concerning detection and warning, defoliants, protection, biology and toxicology, and general studies are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Chemical and biological warfare: Biochemistry, therapy, and treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning biochemistry, therapy, and treatment of the effects of military chemical and biological warfare agents. References include surveys and studies of immunizing agents and drugs, the efficacy of these drugs, and the effect of the drugs on the patient. Also included are biochemical studies, assay techniques, and antidote development, some of which is supported by animal studies. Citations concerning detection and warning, defoliants, protection, biology and toxicology, and general studies are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. International Experiences and Frameworks to Support Country-Driven Low-Emissions Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.

    2012-08-01

    Countries can use low-emission development strategies (LEDS) to advance sustainable development, promote private-sector growth, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper proposes a framework -- or support infrastructure -- to enable the efficient exchange of LEDS-related knowledge and technical assistance. Under the proposed framework, countries share LEDS-related resources via coordinating forums, 'knowledge platforms,' and networks of experts and investors. The virtual 'knowledge platforms' foster learning by allowing countries to communicate with each other and share technical reports, data, and analysis tools in support of LEDS development. Investing in all elements of the framework in an integrated fashion increases the efficacy of support for country-driven LEDS.

  7. Boron biodistribution for BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model: Combined administration of BSH and BPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Nigg; William Bauer; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is being investigated clinically for BNCT. We examined the biodistribution of BSH and BPA administered jointly in different proportions in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. The 3 assayed protocols were non-toxic, and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus precancerous and normal tissue and therapeutic tumor boron concentration values (7085 ppm). All 3 protocols warrant assessment in BNCT studies to contribute to the knowledge of (BSH+BPA)-BNCT radiobiology for head and neck cancer and optimize therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Beneficial role of noise in artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-06-18

    We demonstrate enhancement of neural networks efficacy to recognize frequency encoded signals and/or to categorize spatial patterns of neural activity as a result of noise addition. For temporal information recovery, noise directly added to the receiving neurons allow instantaneous improvement of signal-to-noise ratio [Monterola and Saloma, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2002]. For spatial patterns however, recurrence is necessary to extend and homogenize the operating range of a feed-forward neural network [Monterola and Zapotocky, Phys. Rev. E 2005]. Finally, using the size of the basin of attraction of the networks learned patterns (dynamical fixed points), a procedure for estimating the optimal noise is demonstrated.

  9. User`s guide for SeedCalc: A decision-support system for integrated pest management in slash pine seed orchards. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatzinger, C.W.; Dixon, W.N.

    1996-03-01

    SeedCalc, a decision-support system designed for use on personal computers, evaluates the consequences of different pest management strategies in slash pine (Pinus elliotti Engelm. var. elliottii) seed orchards. This interactive program allows managers to enter orchard survey data and manipulate pesticides applied, application equipment costs, insect damage rates, strobilus development rates and beginning population, and pesticide efficacy rates to develop a pest management program that best fits their needs. This guide provides user instructions for SeedCalc, presents screen and printer examples, and describes the structure, assumptions, default values and flow charts of the system.

  10. CEEM Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, John

    2014-11-26

    The mission of the Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM) was to serve the Department of Energy and the nation as a center of excellence dedicated to advancing basic research in nano-structured materials and devices for applications to solar electricity, thermoelectric conversion of waste heat to electricity, and solidstate lighting. The foundation of CEEM was based on the unique capabilities of UCSB and its partner institutions to control, synthesize, characterize, model, and apply materials at the nanoscale for more efficient sustainable energy resources. This unique expertise was a key source of the synergy that unified the research of the Center. Although the Center’s focus was basic research, It’s longer-term objective has been to transfer new materials and devices into the commercial sector where they will have a substantial impact on the nation’s need for efficient sustainable energy resources. As one measure of the impact of the Center, two start-up companies were formed based on its research. In addition, Center participants published a total of 210 archival journal articles, of which 51 were exclusively sponsored by the DOE grant. The work of the Center was structured around four specific tasks: Organic Solar Cells, Solid-State Lighting, Thermoelectrics, and High Efficiency Multi-junction Photovoltaic devices. A brief summary of each follows – detailed descriptions are in Sections 4 & 5 of this report. Research supported through CEEM led to an important shift with respect to the choice of materials used for the fabrication of solution deposited organic solar cells. Solution deposition opens the opportunity to manufacture solar cells via economically-viable high throughput tools, such as roll to roll printing. Prior to CEEM, most organic semiconductors utilized for this purpose involved polymeric materials, which, although they can form thin films reliably, suffer from batch to batch variations due to the statistical nature of the chemical reactions that produce them. In response, the CEEM team developed well-defined molecular semiconductors that produce active layers with very high power conversion efficiencies, in other words they can convert a very high fraction of sunlight into useful electrical power. The fact that the semiconductor is formed from molecular species provides the basis for circumventing the unreliability of polymer counterparts and, as an additional bonus, allows one to attain much grater insight into the structure of the active layer. The latter is particularly important because efficient conversion is the result of a complex arrangement of two semiconductors that need to phase separate in a way akin to oil and water, but with domains that are described by nanoscale dimensions. CEEM was therefore able to provide deep insight into the influence of nanostructure, through the application of structural characterization tools and theoretical methods that describe how electrical charges migrate through the organic layer. Our research in light emitting diode (LED)-based solid state lighting (SSL) was directed at improving efficiency and reducing costs to enable the widespread deployment of economically-viable replacements for inefficient incandescent, halogen, and fluorescent-based lighting. Our specific focus was to advance the fundamental science and technology of light emitting diodes to both understand factors that limit efficiencies and to provide innovative and viable solutions to the current impediments. One of the main challenges we faced is the decrease in efficiency when LEDs are driven harder to increase light output---the so called “droop” effect. It requires large emitting surfaces to reach a desired optical output, and necessitates the use of costly heat sinks, both of which increase the cost. We successfully reduced droop by growing LED crystals having non-conventional orientations. As recognized by the award of the 2014 Nobel prize to the inventors of the nitride LEDs (one of whom was a member of CEEM), LEDs already have a large societal impact in both developed (leading to large energy savings) and developing countries (bringing light where there is no electrical grid). The improvements in efficiency sought after in the CEEM project are key to a further impact of solid state lighting by LEDs with a projected doubling in efficiency by year 2020. Direct generation of electricity from heat has enormous promise for beneficial use of waste heat. But practical power generation directly from heat requires understanding and development of new and improved materials that will be more efficient and rugged than today’s thermoelectric materials. To accomplish this goal CEEM has synthesized five distinct and promising new classes of thermoelectric materials: (a) nanoparticle arrays that are effective in maximizing electric power generation and reducing detrimental loss of heat; (b) nitride and (c) oxide thermal electric materials that are effective at high temperatures where much beneficial heat is available; (d) arrays of silicon nano-wires that integrate thermal electricity generation into silicon-based electronics and materials; and (e) chemically synthesized nanostructured compounds that are cost effective, earth abundant, and environmentally friendly. The further development of these thermoelectric sources of electricity could have revolutionary impact for society in the recovery of waste heat from sources such as power plants and automobile exhaust, where there could be significant associated energy saving. It could even, in the future, provide disruptive alternatives and replacements for today’s internal combustion engines and could enable improved all-electric propulsion by the heat from shipboard nuclear reactors. The High Efficiency Multi-junction Photovoltaics task was a UCSB/NREL collaboration which bonded sub-cells from two different compound semiconductors material systems to make high efficiency multijunction solar cells for concentrating photovoltaic applications thathave substantially higher efficiency than single substrate cells made of elemental semiconductors such as silicon. This task required the development of new cell bonding methods with excellent coupling of both photons and electrons between the sub-cells. To accomplish this, we developed (1) GaInN solar cells with enhanced performance by using quantum-well absorbers and front-surface optical texturing, (2) a hybrid "pillar-array" bond which uses an array of metal pillars for electrical coupling, and (3) a "hybrid moth-eye" optical coating which combines the benefits of nano-imprinted moth-eye coatings and traditional multilayer coatings. The technical effectiveness was assessed by measurement of the photovoltaic efficiency of solar cells made using these techniques; the ultrahigh efficiencies targeted by this work are of compelling economic value for concentrating photovoltaics.

  11. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-09-15

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system.

  12. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  13. Science of consciousness and the hard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1996-05-22

    Quantum theory is essentially a rationally coherent theory of the interaction of mind and matter, and it allows our conscious thoughts to play a causally efficacious and necessary role in brain dynamics. It therefore provides a natural basis, created by scientists, for the science of consciousness. As an illustration it is explained how the interaction of brain and consciousness can speed up brain processing, and thereby enhance the survival prospects of conscious organisms, as compared to similar organisms that lack consciousness. As a second illustration it is explained how, within the quantum framework, the consciously experienced {open_quotes}I{close_quotes} directs the actions of a human being. It is concluded that contemporary science already has an adequate framework for incorporating causally efficacious experimential events into the physical universe in a manner that: (1) puts the neural correlates of consciousness into the theory in a well defined way, (2) explains in principle how the effects of consciousness, per se, can enhance the survival prospects of organisms that possess it, (3) allows this survival effect to feed into phylogenetic development, and (4) explains how the consciously experienced {open_quotes}I{close_quotes} can direct human behaviour.

  14. Development of Efficient UV-LED Phosphor Coatings for Energy Saving Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uwe Happek

    2006-05-15

    The University of Georgia, in collaboration with GE Global Research, has investigated the relevant quenching mechanism of phosphor coatings used in white light devices based on UV LEDs. The final goal of the project was the design and fabrication of a high-efficacy white light UV-LED device through improved geometry and optimized phosphor coatings. At the end of the research period, which was extended to seamlessly carry over the research to a follow-up program, we have demonstrated a two-fold improvement in the conversion efficiency of a white light LED device, where the increase efficacy is due to both improved phosphor quantum efficiency and lamp geometry. Working prototypes have been displayed at DOE sponsored meetings and during the final presentation at the DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC. During the first phase of the project, a fundamental understanding of quenching processes in UV-LEDs was obtained, and the relationships that describe the performance of the phosphor as a function of photon flux, temperature, and phosphor composition were established. In the second phase of the project, these findings were then implemented to design the improved UV-LED lamp. In addition, our research provides a road map for the design of efficient white light LEDs, which will be an important asset during a follow-up project led by GE.

  15. Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Galvin, James; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Clear, Robert; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2008-12-18

    This report is a product of our ongoing effort to support the development of high-quality yet affordable products for off-grid lighting in the developing world that have good potential to succeed in the market. The effort includes work to develop low-cost testing procedures, to identify useful performance metrics, and to facilitate the development of industry standards and product rating protocols. We conducted laboratory testing of nine distinct product lines. In some cases we also tested multiple generations of a single product line and/or operating modes for a product. The resultsare summarized in Table 1. We found that power consumption and light output varied by nearly a factor of 12, with efficacy varying by a factor of more than six. Of particular note, overall luminous efficacy varied from 8.2 to 53.1 lumens per watt. Color quality indices variedmaterially, especially for correlated color temperature. Maximum illuminance, beamcandlepower, and luminance varied by 8x, 32x, and 61x respectively, suggesting considerable differences among products in terms of service levels and visual comfort. Glare varied by1.4x, and was above acceptable thresholds in most cases. Optical losses play a role in overall performance, varying by a factor of 3.2 and ranging as high as 24percent. These findings collectively indicate considerable potential for improved product design.

  16. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 times better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.

  17. Efficient White SSL Component for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Evans

    2011-01-31

    Cree has developed a new, high-efficiency, low-cost, light emitting diode (LED) module that should be capable of replacing standard, halogen, fluorescent and metal halide lamps based on the total cost of ownership. White LEDs are produced by combining one or more saturated color LEDs with a phosphor or other light down-converting media to achieve white broad-band illumination. This two year project addressed LED chip, package and phosphor efficiency improvements to establish a technology platform suitable for low-cost, high-efficiency commercial luminaires. New phosphor materials with improved quantum efficiency at 'real-life' operating conditions were developed along with new package technology to improve the efficiency of warm white LED modules compared to the baseline technology. Specifically, Cree has successfully demonstrated warm white LED modules providing 540 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3000 K. The LED module had an efficacy of 102.8 lumens per watt (LPW) using 1 mm2 chips biased at 350 mA - a 27% improvement over the technology at project start (81 LPW at 3000K). The white modules also delivered an efficacy of 88 LPW at elevated junction temperatures of 125 C. In addition, a proof-of-concept 4-inch downlight luminaire produced a flux of 1183 lumens at a CCT of 2827 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 80 using this project's phosphor developments.

  18. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  19. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body ?-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 ?g/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body ?-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  20. Mode-selective chemistry on metal surfaces: The dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Pt(111)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Han; Jackson, Bret

    2016-05-13

    A quantum approach based on an expansion in vibrationally adiabatic eigenstates is used to explore CH4 dissociation on Pt(111). Computed sticking probabilities for molecules in the ground, 1v3 and 2v3, states are in very good agreement with the available experimental data, reproducing the variation in reactivity with collision energy and vibrational state. As was found in similar studies on Ni(100) and Ni(111), exciting the 1v1 symmetric stretch of CH4 is more effective at promoting the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 than exciting the 1v3 antisymmetric stretch. This behavior is explained in terms of symmetry, mode-softening, and nonadiabatic transitions between vibrationally adiabaticmore » states. We find that the efficacies of the bending modes for promoting reaction are reasonably large, and similar to the 1v3 state. The vibrational efficacies for promoting reaction on Ni(111) are larger than for reaction on Pt(111), due to the larger nonadiabatic couplings. As a result, our computed sticking probabilities are in good agreement with results from recent ab initio molecular dynamics and reactive force field studies.« less

  1. MR-guided Periarterial Ethanol Injection for Renal Sympathetic Denervation: A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streitparth, F. Walter, A.; Stolzenburg, N.; Heckmann, L.; Breinl, J.; Rinnenthal, J. L.; Beck, A.; De Bucourt, M.; Schnorr, J.; Bernhardt, U.; Gebauer, B.; Hamm, B.; Guenther, R. W.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of image-guided periarterial ethanol injection as an alternative to transluminal radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Unilateral renal periarterial ethanol injection was performed under general anesthesia in 6 pigs with the contralateral kidney serving as control. All interventions were performed in an open 1.0 T MRI system under real-time multiplanar guidance. The injected volume was 5 ml (95 % ethanol labelled marked MR contrast medium) in 2 pigs and 10 ml in 4 pigs. Four weeks after treatment, the pigs underwent MRI including MRA and were killed. Norepinephrine (NE) concentration in the renal parenchyma served as a surrogate parameter to analyze the efficacy of sympathetic denervation. In addition, the renal artery and sympathetic nerves were examined histologically to identify evidence of vascular and neural injury. Results. In pigs treated with 10 ml ethanol, treatment resulted in neural degeneration. We found a significant reduction of NE concentration in the kidney parenchyma of 53 % (p < 0.02) compared with the untreated contralateral kidney. In pigs treated with 5 ml ethanol, no significant changes in histology or NE were observed. There was no evidence of renal arterial stenosis in MRI, macroscopy or histology in any pig. Conclusion. MR-guided periarterial ethanol injection was feasible and efficient for renal sympathetic denervation in a swine model. This technique may be a promising alternative to the catheter-based approach in the treatment of resistant arterial hypertension.

  2. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 timesmore » better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.« less

  3. Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Yuan

    2008-01-09

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

  4. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  5. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  6. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

  7. Application Summary Report 22: LED MR16 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-07-23

    This report analyzes the independently tested photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps. It describes initial performance based on light output, efficacy, distribution, color quality, electrical characteristics, and form factor, with comparisons to a selection of benchmark halogen MR16s and ENERGY STAR qualification thresholds. Three types of products were targeted. First, CALiPER sought 3000 K lamps with the highest rated lumen output (i.e., at least 500 lm) or a claim of equivalency to a 50 W halogen MR16 or higher. The test results indicate that while the initial performance of LED MR16s has improved across the board, market-available products still do not produce the lumen output and center beam intensity of typical 50 W halogen MR16 lamps. In fact, most of the 18 lamps in this category had lower lumen output and center beam intensity than a typical 35 W halogen MR16 lamp. Second, CALiPER sought lamps with a CRI of 90 or greater. Only four manufacturers were identified with a product in this category. CALiPER testing confirmed the performance of these lamps, which are a good option for applications where high color fidelity is needed. A vast majority of the LED MR16 lamps have a CRI in the low 80s; this is generally acceptable for ambient lighting, but may not always be acceptable for focal lighting. For typical LED packages, there is a fundamental tradeoff between CRI and efficacy, but the lamps in the high-CRI group in this report still offer comparable performance to the rest of the Series 22 products in other performance areas. Finally, CALiPER sought lamps with a narrow distribution, denoted as a beam angle less than 15°. Five such lamps were purchased. Notably, no lamp was identified as having high lumen output (500 lumens or greater), high CRI (90 or greater), a narrow distribution (15° or less), and an efficacy greater than 60 lm/W. This would be an important achievement for LED MR16s especially if output could reach approximately 700 800 lumens, or the approximate equivalent of a 50 W halogen MR16 lamp. Many factors beyond photometric performance should be considered during specification. For example, performance over time, transformer and dimmer compatibility, and total system performance are all critical to a successful installation. Subsequent CALiPER reports will investigate more complex issues.

  8. Solution-Procesed Small-Molecule OLED Luminaire for Interior Illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Ian

    2012-02-29

    Prototype lighting panels and luminaires were fabricated using DuPont Displays solution-processed small-molecule OLED technology. These lighting panels were based on a spatially-patterned, 3-color design, similar in concept to an OLED display panel, with materials chosen to maximize device efficacy. The majority of the processing steps take place in air (rather than high vacuum). Optimization of device architecture, processing and construction was undertaken, with a final prototype design of 50 cm{sup 2} being fabricated and tested. Performance of these panels reached 35 lm/W at illuminant-A. A unique feature of this technology is the ability to color tune the emission, and color temperatures ranging from 2700 to > 6,500K were attained in the final build. Significant attention was paid to low-cost fabrication techniques.

  9. Internal corrosion monitoring of subsea oil and gas production equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joosten, M.W.; Fischer, K.P.; Lunden, K.C.

    1995-10-01

    Internal corrosion monitoring provides data vital to the operation of high-capital-cost, subsea equipment such as pipelines, flowlines, manifolds and water injection equipment. Monitoring can be used to determine the efficacy of corrosion/erosion mitigation techniques and allows operation of subsea equipment to maximize useful equipment life and minimize maintenance. For the operation of subsea systems that utilized corrosion inhibitors, there is a particular need to monitor the inhibitor performance. Methods for remote monitoring of corrosion are rapidly developing as the pace of subsea developments increase. Subsea completions set a record in 1993, exceeding the previous all-time high by 18% and exceeding 1992 installations by 73%. This paper will review experiences with offshore corrosion monitoring, the currently installed subsea corrosion monitoring systems, discuss the use of intelligent pigs as monitoring tools, and review some of the technologies that could possibly be utilized in the future such as ion selective electrodes, radioactive tracers and spectroscopy.

  10. The design and testing of subsea production equipment: Current practice and potential for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, A.J.C.; Ford, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an analysis of the current approach to the design and testing of equipment used in subsea developments. The paper critically assesses the current equipment specification, design, manufacture and testing process. An essential part of the analysis is a review of the standards used by the industry and statutory regulations which impact on this process. It raises significant questions about the efficacy of the design and testing procedures and the role of the regulating bodies in that process. It discusses the impact of poor specification and design procedures, and inadequate testing, of the safety and reliability of the equipment. As a consequence of the analysis it is suggested that the manner in which equipment is specified, designed and tested may need to be changed in order to meet future needs. The above issues are focused, by considering the production of a subsea wellhead, from specification by the operator to delivery by the manufacturer.

  11. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  12. Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc.

    2001-04-04

    The intent of this project was to increase production and extend the economic life of this mature field through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and drilling technology, demonstrating the efficacy of these technologies to other small operators of aging fields. Two study periods were proposed; the first to include data assimilation and reservoir characterization and the second to drill the demonstration well. The initial study period showed that a single tri-lateral well would not be economically efficient in redevelopment of Carpinteria's multiple deep water turbidite sand reservoirs, and the study was amended to include the drilling of a series of horizontal redrills from existing surplus well bores on Pacific Operators' Platform Hogan.

  13. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  14. Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

    2008-07-09

    An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF COPPER AND BRONZE FOR ZINC CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P. S.

    2012-11-02

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the efficacy of using copper and bronze sheet and screen under high vacuum conditions to capture zinc vapor. The experiments were conducted in a parametric manner using a fixed zinc vaporization temperature (350°C) but varying the filter temperature from ambient to 550°C. Consistent with previous work, metallic zinc was deposited at low temperatures, but the deposit was non‐adherent. At an intermediate temperature range (350‐450°C), the deposit formed an alloy with both copper and bronze materials. At higher temperatures (> 500°C) the zinc did not deposit on the surfaces likely due to its high vapor pressure. Additional testing to optimize the zinc 'getter' chemistry and surface condition is warranted.

  16. Attainment of the spirit of NEPA: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstrom, D.J. ); Kott, F.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Great Lakes Gas Transmission Company recently undertook a major expansion of their interstate natural gas pipeline system. The environmental permitting process for this large (460 mile), multi-state construction project exemplified the pervasiveness of the spirit of NEPA in dozens of federal, state, and local jurisdictional agencies, as well as associated organizations which lacked permitting authority but which took an active interest in the permitting process. Additionally, approvals from watershed districts, county zoning offices, and military preserves were obtained. Permit applications and agency consultations were complex and extremely labor-intensive. Overlapping jurisdictional authority turned permit acquisition into a labyrinth for which progress needed to be tracked weekly, and interagency logjams proved to be problematic. One specific example involved an archaeological site at the edge of a wetland under an eagle's nest. While the efficiency of multiple agencies administering NEPA is questionable, there seems little doubt as to the efficacy of the spirit of NEPA in this geographic region.

  17. UDC Demonstrates Phosphorescent OLED Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC), along with project partners Armstrong World Industries and the universities of Michigan and Southern California, have successfully demonstrated two phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) luminaire systems, the first of their kind in the U.S. This achievement marks a critical step in the development of practical OLED lighting in a complete luminaire system, including decorative housing, power supply, mounting, and maintenance provisions. Each luminaire has overall dimensions of approximately 15x60 cm and is comprised of four 15x15 cm phosphorescent OLED panels. With a combined power supply and lamp efficacy of 51 lm/W, the prototype luminaire is about twice as efficient as the market-leading halogen-based systems. In addition, the prototype OLED lighting system snaps into Armstrong's TechZone™ Ceiling System, which is commercially available in the U.S.x

  18. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  19. Expert judgment on markers to deter inadvertent human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trauth, K.M.; Hora, S.C.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1993-11-01

    The expert panel identified basic principles to guide current and future marker development efforts: (1) the site must be marked, (2) message(s) must be truthful and informative, (3) multiple components within a marker system, (4) multiple means of communication (e.g., language, pictographs, scientific diagrams), (5) multiple levels of complexity within individual messages on individual marker system elements, (6) use of materials with little recycle value, and (7) international effort to maintain knowledge of the locations and contents of nuclear waste repositories. The efficacy of the markers in deterring inadvertent human intrusion was estimated to decrease with time, with the probability function varying with the mode of intrusion (who is intruding and for what purpose) and the level of technological development of the society. The development of a permanent, passive marker system capable of surviving and remaining interpretable for 10,000 years will require further study prior to implementation.

  20. The effects of erodent particle size and composition on the erosion of chromium carbide based coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.N.; Quets, J.M.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    A number of studies and field experience have demonstrated the efficacy of use of chromium carbide based coatings on steam turbine components to reduce the effects of solid particle erosion. To optimize the performance of these coatings, a cost effective laboratory test is needed to facilitate the choice of coating composition, morphology, and deposition method. A variety of test types and test parameters have been reported with varying relative rankings of the various coatings evaluated. A critical review of past work has been made, with new data added for clarification. The particle size of the erodent used as well as its composition has been shown to be of particular importance. A correlation between field experience and selected laboratory test parameters then facilitates the optimum choice of coatings.