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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN URANIUM RESOURCES AND PRODUCTION WITH EMPHASIS ON IN SITU LEACH MINING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources and production with emphasis on in situ leach mining Proceedings of a technical meeting organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Excursion control at in situ uranium mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes excursions (uncontrolled movement of lixiviant beyond the ore zone) based on case histories of 8 in situ uranium mines (7 in Wyoming and 1 in Texas). These case histories were compiled from data provided by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, and the Texas Department of Water Resources. Most of these data were provided to the above agencies by mining companies in response to regulatory requirements pertaining to licensing actions.

Staub, W.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

REVIEWS FOR IN SITU LEACH URANIUM EXTRACTION LICENSE APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Plan (NUREG–1569) which provides guidance for staff reviews of applications to develop and operate uranium in situ leach facilities. Under the provisions of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 40 (10 CFR Part 40), Domestic Licensing of Source Material, an NRC Materials License is required to conduct uranium recovery by in situ leach extraction techniques. Applicants for a new license and operators seeking an amendment or renewal of an existing license are required to provided detailed information on the facilities, equipment, and procedures used in the proposed activities. In addition, the applicant for a new license also provides an Environmental Report that discusses the effects of proposed operations on the health and safety of the public and assesses impacts to the environment. For amendment or renewal of an existing license, the original Environmental Report is supplemented, as necessary. This information is used by the NRC staff to determine whether the proposed activities will be protective of public health and safety and the environment and to fulfill NRC responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The purpose of the Standard Review Plan (NUREG–1569) is to provide the NRC staff with guidance on performing reviews of information provided by the applicant, and to ensure a consistent quality and

In Situ; Leach Uranium; In Situ; Leach Uranium; J. Lusher

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions. (DLC)

Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

SciTech Connect

The potential for contamination of groundwater by organic pollutants leached from in-situ spent shale was studied in a series of laboratory leaching experiments. Both batch-mode and continuous-flow column experiments were conducted to study the leaching phenomenon. Experimental variables included retorting characteristics of spent shale, leaching time, initial quality of leach water, temperature of leach water, and particle size of spent shale. Several unique samples of spent shale were examined during the eaching experiments, including spent shale samples produced during combustion retorting, inert gas retorting, and combustion retorting employing recycle gas. The solid-phase organic carbon content of spent shale samples ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 percent by weight. Leachate derived from the batch-mode experiments was analyzed for organic carbon, organic nitrogen, phenols, and acid/base/netral fractions. The highest levels of organic carbon were detected in leachate derived from spent shale produced during either inert gas retorting or combstion retorting using recycle gas. The highest levels of phenols were observed in leachate obtained from spent shale produced during inert gas retorting; significant levels of organic nitrogen were also detected in various leachate samples. The most predominant organic fraction measured in leachate samples was the neutral fraction associated with spent shale produced during inert gas retorting. Batch-mode experimental results describing equilibrium conditions were analyzed according to the Freundlich and langmuir isotherm models. Those models were found to be appropriate for describing equilibrium relationships between leachate and spent shale produced during inert gas retorting. To a somewhat lesser extent, these same models were found to be appropriate for modeling equilibrium relationships involving combustion-retorted spent shale. A kinetic analysis of results derived from the continuous-flow column experiments was conducted in an attempt to identify a rate-controlling mass transfer mechanism. Internal diffusion appeared to be the most likely rate-limiting mechanism for leaching from combustion-retorted spent shale. In contrast, no single mass transfer mechanism appeared to control the leaching phenomenon for inert gas-retorted spent shale over the entire range of leaching times examined. The results presented here suggest that groundwater resources in regions of potential in-situ development may be significantly degraded in quality as a consequence of leached organic contaminants. Overall, the leaching phenomenon represents a potentially chronic problem which may preclude beneficial uses of groundwater for decades.

Amy, Gary L.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Bicarbonate leaching of uranium  

SciTech Connect

The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

Mason, C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF FIGURES Areal extent of oil shale deposits in the Greencommercial in~·situ oil shale facility. Possible alternativefor pyrolysis of oil shale Figure 7. Establishment of

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF FIGURES Areal extent of oil shale deposits in the Greenof kerogen to shale oil and related by~products . • • ,of commercial in~·situ oil shale facility. Possible

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Leaching Assessment Methods for the Evaluation of the Effectiveness of In Situ Stabilization of Soil Material at Manufactured Gas Pl ant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effectiveness of in situ stabilization and solidification (ISS) as a means of remediating manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites, it is necessary to predict the leaching behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Current approaches to predicting this behavior have significant limitations. This technical update provides an overview and status report on a project to develop an alternative leaching assessment methodology for estimating the release of PAHs from ISS-treated soils.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

Composition and Leaching of FGD Gypsum and Mined Gypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) equipment on new and existing coal-fired power plants controls sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, and produces a solid that is removed in either slurry or dry form. EPRI sponsored an investigation to characterize FGD gypsum8212the solid produced by wet FGD systems with forced air oxidation8212from a representative sampling of U.S. power plants. A single contractor collected 32 samples from 29 power plants in 13 states. In addition, 11 natural gypsum samples from mines in the U...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa.

Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

REFERENCES CITED IN: Draft Technical Report: Considerations Related to Post-Closure Monitoring Of Uranium In-Situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2008, Cogema Mining, Inc, and Petrotek Engineering Corp. ML081060131. http://www.wise- uranium://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/ Crow Butte 2000. Mine Unit 1 Restoration Report, Crow Butte Uranium Project. Submitted to NRC January Of Uranium In-Situ Leach/In-Situ Recovery (ISL/ISR) Sites. How to obtain the references: Most

13

Use of explosives in deep rock mining: in situ energy and mineral recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical explosives may become a key element in many of the in situ energy and mineral recovery methods under development. The potential role of explosives in deep rock mining for resource recovery is discussed. Several energy and mineral recovery programs described are an outgrowth of the Plowshare Program and Explosives R and D conducted as part of the AEC/ERDA mission at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Several important aspects of the use of explosives in deep rock mining are reviewed. First, the status of knowledge of deep rock fracturing to create permeability underground is discussed. Completely contained blasting has not been a widely applied tool used in the mining industry. It is concluded that data available on deep rock fracture is minimal and that the mechanisms that control the processes must be understood before technical and economic feasibility can be established. The unusual problems in the selection of an explosive or blasting agent for deep rock applications including emphasis on the functioning at depth and safety aspects are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of similar activities within the U.S. is given.

Finger, M.; Larson, D.

1976-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EPRG WORKING PAPER Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian bitumen deposits. The results show the uncertainties associated with the future costs of synthetic crude oil. Carbon costs have a large impact of the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon-intensity of the recovery techniques. The influence of each parameter on the supply costs is examined. In the case of mined SCO, the maximum production rate, the ultimate recovery rate and the depletion parameters show the largest influence on the results, while learning parameters dominate in the case of in-situ SCO.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-Situ Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport sector will remain dependent on petroleum resources, if no oil substitute is available. Fuels from non-conventional oil resources... www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-situ Recovery EPRG Working Paper 1005...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

18

Analysis of Surface Leaching Processes in Vitrified High-Level Nuclear Wastes Using In-Situ Raman Imaging and Atomistic Modeling - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The in situ analysis of surface conditions of vitrified nuclear wastes can provide an important check of the burial status of radioactive objects without risk of radiation exposure. Raman spectroscopy was initially chosen as the most promising method for testing the surface conditions of glasses undergoing chemical corrosion, and was used extensively during the first year. However, it was determined that infrared reflection spectroscopy was better suited to this particular need and was used for the remaining two years to investigate the surface corrosion behavior of model silicate glasses for extension to nuclear waste glasses. The developed methodology is consistent with the known theory of optical propagation of dielectric media and uses the Kramers-Kronig formalism. The results show that it is possible to study the corrosion of glass by analyzing the glass surface using reflection fast Fourier infrared measurements and the newly developed ''dispersion analysis method.'' The data show how this analysis can be used to monitor the corrosion behavior of vitrified waste glasses over extended periods of storage.

Simmons, Joseph H.

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

The effect of Ca-Fe-As coatings on microbial leaching of metals in arsenic bearing mine waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous trace element derived from the natural weathering of As-bearing rock. With the onset of reducing conditions, the prevalence of aqueous As(III) may be intensified through biotic and abiotic processes. Here we evaluate the stability of arsenic bearing Ca-Fe hydroxide phases collected from exposed tailings at Ketza River mine, Yukon, Canada, during the reductive dissolution of both acid treated and untreated samples by Shewanella putrefaciens 200R and Shewanella sp. ANA-3. Samples were acid treated in order to remove Ca-Fe oxide coatings and evaluate the influence of these coatings on the rates of microbial Fe(III) and As(V) reduction. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) micrographs of the solid phase show significant differences in the chemistry and physical morphology of the material by the bacteria over time and are especially evident in the acid treated samples. Moreover, while solution chemistry showed similar As(III) respiration rates of the inoculated acid treated samples for both ANA3 and 200R at {approx}1.1 x 10{sup -6} {micro}M {center_dot} s{sup -1} {center_dot} m{sup -2}, the Fe(II) respiration rates differed at 1.4 x 10{sup -7} and 9.5 x 10{sup -8} {micro}M {center_dot} s{sup -1} {center_dot} m{sup -2} respectively, thus suggesting strain specific metal reduction metabolic pathways Additionally, the enhanced metal reduction observed in the acid treated inoculated samples suggests that the presence of the Ca-Fe hydroxide phase in the untreated samples acted as a barrier, inhibiting the bacteria from accessing the metals. This has implications for increased mobilization of metals by metal reducing bacteria within areas of increased acidity, such as acid mine drainage sites and industrial tailings ponds that can come into contact with surface and ground water sources.

Weisener, C.G.; Guthrie, J.W.; Smeaton, C.M.; Paktunc, D.; Fryer, B.J. (Windsor); (NRC)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ultrasonic-assisted alkaline leaching of vanadium from stone coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used to extract vanadium from the stone coal, with alkali as leaching reagent. ... of low grade copper sulfide ore(Chalcopyrite) of Sarcheshmeh copper mine.

22

The Effect of Composite Leaching Agent on the Swell of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... contribute to the landslides and other geological disasters in in-situ leaching rare earth ... Current Korean R&D and Investment Strategies in Response to REE

23

Control strategies for abandoned in situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

In situ oil shale retorting may result in a number of environmental impacts including degradation of local surface and groundwaters, low resource recovery, and subsidence. The target of present oil shale commercialization activities is the Mahogany zone in Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin. The principal oil shale resource in this area is surrounded by two confined aquifers. During mining and retorting, these aquifers are dewatered. When the site is abandoned, groundwater will reinvade the area and flow through the abandoned retorts, leaching potentially toxic or carcinogenic materials from the spent oil shale. This material may then be transported in local aquifers, withdrawn in wells or discharged into the Colorado River system as base flow. Certain control technologies appear potentially able to protect groundwater quality at reasonable cost. These include designing retort blocks to include a hydraulic bypass around abandoned retorts (about $0.50/bbl), placing absorbent clays in abandoned retorts to catch and hold leachable matter (about $0.50/bbl), collecting leachate and treating it on the surface (about $1.20/bbl), protecting abandoned retorts from leaching by placing a grout curtain around a block of abandoned retorts (about $2.00 to $3.00/bbl), or grouting abandoned retorts with spent shale (about $3 to $4/bbl).

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Graphite Leaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graphite moderators of retired gas-cooled nuclear reactors present a difficult challenge during demolition activities. As part of the EPRI graphite initiative on the technical issues involved in the management and disposal of irradiated nuclear graphite, this report examines the international data on leaching of radioactive isotopes from graphite, relevant to the decommissioning of graphite-moderated reactors.

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Review and analysis of oil shale technologies. Volume I. Oil shale deposits, mining methods, and environmental concerns  

SciTech Connect

This volume describes and discusses oil shale deposits of the U.S., applicable methods for mining the shale, and the environmental concerns associated with oil shale technologies. Mining is required to supply shale to the retorts of aboveground processes. The majority of oil shale mining is expected to be by the underground room-and-pillar method. Surface mining (i.e., open pit mining) may also be used to supply material for surface retorts and may be appropriate for up to 15 to 20% of the oil shale resources. Principal environmental issues unique to true and modified in situ oil shale processing include disposal of retort water and drill cuttings, migration of fluids during and after in situ processing, surface thermal changes, and hazardous materials that may be leached from spent shale. Other site-specific problems of in situ processing include off-gas emissions, fugitive dust generation, land disturbance, and water usage. The environmental issues are similar for oil shale surface processes, except for surface thermal changes. The degree of impact, however, is expected greater than that for either the true or the modified in situ process.

Jee, C.K.; White, J.D.; Bhatia, S.K.; Nicholson, D.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improved Aluminum Leaching  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M) Decant leachate Leach 5 h at 100 C 1.6 g of NaOH (between 1 and 5 M) Decant leachate Wash Sample Impact of increasing NaOH on leaching performance 5 Contract target Leach factor...

27

Environmental radioactivity assessment around old uranium mining sites near Mangualde (Viseu), Portugal  

SciTech Connect

Uranium ore was extracted in the surroundings of Mangualde city, North of Portugal, in the mines of Cunha Baixa, Quinta do Bispo and Espinho until a few years ago. Mining waste, milling tailings and acid mine waters are the on site remains of this extractive activity. Environmental radioactivity measurements were performed in and around these sites in order to assess the dispersal of radionuclides from uranium mining waste and the spread of acidic waters resulting from the in situ uranium leaching with sulphuric acid. Results show migration of acid waters into groundwater around the Cunha Baixa mine. This groundwater is tapped by irrigation wells in the agriculture area near the Cunha Baixa village. Water from wells displayed uranium ({sup 238}U) concentrations up to 19x10{sup 3} mBq L{sup -1} and sulphate ion concentrations up to 1070 mg L{sup -1}. These enhanced concentrations are positively correlated with low water pH, pointing to a common origin for radioactivity, dissolved sulphate, and acidity in underground mining works. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in horticulture and farm products from this area also and results suggest low soil to plant transfer of radionuclides and low food chain transfer of radionuclides to man. Analysis of aerosols in surface air showed re suspension of dust from mining and milling waste heaps. Therefore, it is recommended to maintain mine water treatment and to plan remediation of these mine sites in order to prevent waste dispersal in the environment. (authors)

Carvalho, Fernando P.; Torres, Lubelia M.; Oliveira, Joao M. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Continuous Sludge Leaching  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Sludge Leaching Reid Peterson and Renee Russell - Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Terry Sams and Bill Brasel - Parsons 2 What is CSL? * Process diagram * Full scale...

29

Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.  

SciTech Connect

Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.  

SciTech Connect

Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Developments in Leach Testing  

Characterization of reuse materials •….Recent National Academy of Science (NAS) report on CCR use in mine filling stated that full

32

Recent advances in in situ vitrification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is an innovative mobile remediation technology for soils and other underground contamination: Developed by the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), ISV has advanced during the past decade from a laboratory concept to a remediation technology commercially available for contaminated soils. ISV technology is currently being developed for remediation of DOE waste sites at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), and other sites. The incentives for application of ISV can convert contaminated sites to a solid, highly durable block similar to naturally occurring obsidian. The ISV product has been shown capable of passing US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) tests such as the Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). Retrieval, handling and transport of untreated hazardous material would normally not be required after application of ISV. Therefore, costs, exposure to personnel, risk of releases to the environment, and generation of secondary wastes are greatly reduced compared with remove-and-treat technologies.

Bonner, W.F.; Luey, Ja-Kael.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recent advances in in situ vitrification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is an innovative mobile remediation technology for soils and other underground contamination: Developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), ISV has advanced during the past decade from a laboratory concept to a remediation technology commercially available for contaminated soils. ISV technology is currently being developed for remediation of DOE waste sites at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Idaho National Laboratory (INEL), and other sites. The incentives for application of ISV can convert contaminated sites to a solid, highly durable block similar to naturally occurring obsidian. The ISV product has been shown capable of passing US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) tests such as the Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). Retrieval, handling and transport of untreated hazardous material would normally not be required after application of ISV. Therefore, costs, exposure to personnel, risk of releases to the environment, and generation of secondary wastes are greatly reduced compared with remove-and-treat technologies.

Bonner, W.F.; Luey, Ja-Kael

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility Jrmy. Nosa,1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility control Jérémy Mines, Tour AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense Cedex, France The uranium in situ, into the deposit to selectively dissolve uranium. The solution enriched in uranium is pumped out and processed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings, structures, foundations, equipment, and utilities; surface reclamation of contaminated area including operating areas, roads, wellfields, and surface impoundments; groundwater restoration in mining areas; radiological surveying and environmental monitoring; and long-term radiation and

36

In situ measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

Lord, D.E.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Simulator for Copper Ore Leaching  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Copper is a strategic metal and the nation needs a secure supply both for industrial use and military needs. However, demand is growing worldwide and is outstripping the ability of the mining industry to keep up. Improved recovery methods are critically needed to maintain the balance of supply and demand. The goal of any process design should be to increase the amount of copper recovered, control movement of acid and other environmentally harmful chemicals, and reduce energy requirements. To achieve these ends, several improvements in current technology are required, the most important of which is a better understanding of, and the ability to quantify, how fluids move through heterogeneous materials in a complex chemical environment. The goal of this project is create a new modeling capability that couples hydrology with copper leaching chemistry . once the model has been verified and validated, we can apply the model to specific problems associated with heap leaching (flow channeling due to non-uniformities in heap structure, precipitation/dissolution reactions, and bacterial action), to understand the causes of inefficiencies, and to design better recovery systems. We also intend to work with representatives of the copper mining industry to write a coordinated plan for further model development and application that will provide economic benefits to the industry and the nation.

Travis, B.

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Monitoring Nanomaterials in Situ Elaboration, Structure, Morphology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium · In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

39

COMPARISON OF LEACHING RESULTS FOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EFFECTS OF pH, ORP, AND CONDUCTIVITY ON EFFECTS OF pH, ORP, AND CONDUCTIVITY ON LEACHING OF TRACE METALS FROM FLY ASH George Kazonich U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Environmental Science Division P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 ABSTRACT Leaching of metals from coal utilization by-products (CUB) is being studied to assess the potential for environmental damage. Samples contained in fixed-bed columns were leached with five lixiviants. The lixiviants simulated environmental liquids and varied from acidic to alkaline (pH 1 to pH 11). The leachates were analyzed for major and trace metals. Trace metals that formed cations were leached by acidic lixiviants although, in most cases, the total amount leached was small. The concentrations of metals were low initially, increased rapidly

40

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE  

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE USDOE Aluminum Chromium Leaching Workshop January 24th, 2007 Jennifer E. Holland, Ph.D. Chairman, President, CEO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development and Utilization of Changpo Oil Shale Mining Area in Hainan Province China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper according to the Hainan provincial governor slope occurrence of oil shale mining, analyzing the direction of oil shale mining, development mode and reasonable development of the scale. Analysis showed that the long slope of oil shale mining ... Keywords: oil shale, a long slope mining, retorting, oil shale, in situ retorting

Wang Haijun; Li Kemin; Chen Shuzhao; Wang Bowen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

44

Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Longwall mining  

SciTech Connect

As part of EIA`s program to provide information on coal, this report, Longwall-Mining, describes longwall mining and compares it with other underground mining methods. Using data from EIA and private sector surveys, the report describes major changes in the geologic, technological, and operating characteristics of longwall mining over the past decade. Most important, the report shows how these changes led to dramatic improvements in longwall mining productivity. For readers interested in the history of longwall mining and greater detail on recent developments affecting longwall mining, the report includes a bibliography.

NONE

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Water-related impacts of in-situ oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses the water-related impacts of an in-situ oil shale industry located in the Upper Colorado River Basin. It focuses on a 50,000 barrel per day industry based on the modified in-situ process and located in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. It reviews the history of oil shale development in the United States and the reserves, geology, and characteristics of domestic oil shales. In-situ technologies that have been tested or are under active consideration for commercialization are reviewed, and their commercial potential is evaluated. The existing hydrology and water quality of the Upper Colorado River Basin is surveyed as is water use and the statuatory framework for water availability and water quality for in-situ oil shale development. The major environmental problem of in-situ processing, groundwater disruption from in-situ leachates and large-scale dewatering, is analyzed, pertinent experimental results are summarized and interpreted, and recommendations are made for additional research. Methods to control groundwater disruption are identified and discussed and preliminary cost projections are developed. Finally, the reuse, treatment and disposal of effluents produced by in-situ retorting - retort water, gas condensate, mine waters, and others - are discussed.

Fox, J.P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fraction associated with shale gas retorting. Batch~modeCombustion Inert gas Air gas shale s N2 N2 Air + recycle gasType 2 1s an a s.o inert~gas shale. Those data in Table 36

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

less economical in shale oil production, is and, when air issurface. The production of oil from oil shale by the in~situfrom oil shale may result in: (1) the production of certain

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

less economical in shale oil production, is and, when air isfrom oil shale may result in: (1) the production of certainshale in place below the ground surface. The production of oil

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Characterization of Spent Shale s . , , . • • . . • ,4. Preparation of Spent Shale Samples and Procedure forof Particular Types of Spent Shale References • Appendix A.

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

In-situ spectrophotometric probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

Prather, W.S.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

In-situ spectrophotometric probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric probe for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and coterminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focussing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 3 figs.

Prather, W.S.

1990-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

In-situ spectrophotometric probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric probe for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and coterminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focussing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid.

Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

In-situ Microscopy and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation, I will present our recent in-situ deformation transmission .... and propagation of crack lines upon the application of mechanical stresses.

57

In-situ degradation of high explosives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research is to develop an in situ method to biodegrade high explosives in the vadose zone. The research project involves the… (more)

Brown, Justin Heath

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Frontiers of In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... significance and versatility of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has ... applied stimulus is observed as it happens inside the microscope. ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mining (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides general rules and regulations pertaining to mining practices in the state of Montana. It addresses mining locations and claims, procedures for rights-of-way and eminent domain...

60

Development Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, twenty-eighth of an annual series, describes mineral, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada in 2006: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of orebodies, new mines opened, and expansion and other activities of existing mines. Statistics of known gold and silver deposits, and directories of mines

Mark Alden; Stavros Anthony; Cedric Crear; Thalia M. Dondero; Dorothy Sewell Gallagher; Jason Geddes; Ron Knecht; James D. Leavitt; Howard Rosenberg; Jack L. Schofield; Steve Sisolak; James E. Rogers; Milton D. Glick; Jeffrey Thompson; Interim Dean; James V. Taranik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of fly ash disposal in mined areas. In: Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on CoalThe role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a , Harmanjit, 2005). CAIR permanently caps emissions of NOx and SOx from large stationary sources including coal

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

62

INHERENTLY SAFE IN SITU URANIUM RE OVERY  

Nuclear power and waste opportunities contact us at Mining operations Increased safety of uranium removal Environmentally friendly process

63

Method for in situ combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved in situ combustion method for the recovery of hydrocarbons from subterranean earth formations containing carbonaceous material. The method is practiced by penetrating the subterranean earth formation with a borehole projecting into the coal bed along a horizontal plane and extending along a plane disposed perpendicular to the plane of maximum permeability. The subterranean earth formation is also penetrated with a plurality of spaced-apart vertical boreholes disposed along a plane spaced from and generally parallel to that of the horizontal borehole. Fractures are then induced at each of the vertical boreholes which project from the vertical boreholes along the plane of maximum permeability and intersect the horizontal borehole. The combustion is initiated at the horizontal borehole and the products of combustion and fluids displaced from the earth formation by the combustion are removed from the subterranean earth formation via the vertical boreholes. Each of the vertical boreholes are, in turn, provided with suitable flow controls for regulating the flow of fluid from the combustion zone and the earth formation so as to control the configuration and rate of propagation of the combustion zone. The fractures provide a positive communication with the combustion zone so as to facilitate the removal of the products resulting from the combustion of the carbonaceous material.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

In situ bioremediation in Europe  

SciTech Connect

Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

Porta, A. [Battelle Europe, Geneva (CH); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700/sup 0/C for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

Mallon, R.G.

1979-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of radium and toxic element leaching characteristics of Florida phosphogypsum stockpiles. Report of investigations/1983  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines conducted studies to determine if phosphogypsum, a waste material from the processing of phosphate rock, contains hazardous toxic materials as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and whether leaching of these toxic materials and radium may occur. Samples of the phosphogypsum stockpiled material were evaluated using the EPA extraction procedure, atomic absorption, neutron activation, X-ray diffraction, and chemical and physical means. Radiological tests performed used both the germanium-lithium and emanation methods.

May, A.; Sweeney, J.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Environmental Leaching Characteristics and Bioavailabilities of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

69

URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

McClaine, L.A.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

Precision Mining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precision Mining Precision Mining Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Precision Mining at WIPP is Routine All tunnels that make up the WIPP underground are mined with the same precision that is exhibited in this photo. Typical drift cross sections are about 8m x 4m. Custom excavation and maintenance of openings of any configuration can be made. In 2005, WIPP completed renovations to the 6,000 cubic meter North Experimental Area (NExA). The area, located at the northern end of the mine, was refurbished through rib trimming, floor grading, removal of loose muck, ground support and restoration of basic lighting and mine communications. As of 2010, the NExA is used for the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO), the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC)

71

Modelling nitrogen leaching from overlapping urine patches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urine depositions have been shown to be the main source of N leaching from grazing systems and thus it is important to consider them in simulation models. The inclusion of urine patches considerably increases the complexity of the model and this can ... Keywords: APSIM, Grazing system, Heterogeneity, Leaching, Nitrogen, Simulation modelling, Urine patches

R. Cichota; V. O. Snow; I. Vogeler

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modeling of the in-situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soil into a durable, leach-resistant product similar to obsidian or basalt. The process, which was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for remediation of contaminated soil, is now in the field demonstration and implementation stage. Demonstration tests using the US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned large-scale system are underweight or planned for applications at Hanford and other DOE sites, including the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Savannah River Site. In addition, a private company, Geosafe Corporation, is beginning remediation of commercial contaminated soil sites. A mathematical and computer model has been developed at PNL as a predictive tool to assist engineers and researchers in the application of ISV to different sites. The model, currently configured on a Macintosh personal computer, predicts vitrification time, depth, width, and electrical consumption based on user inputs of electrode configuration, soil parameters, and molten glass characteristics. The model time and depth predications are useful for operations planning, cost estimates, and site selection. Additionally, the depth and width predictions will be used to direct ISV operations to ensure that the contaminated area is completely vitrified and to help mitigate the effect of ISV on adjacent structures. 1 ref., 8 figs.

Koegler, S.S.; Kindle, C.H.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

In-Situ Sensors for Liquid Metal Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In-Situ Sensors for Liquid Metal Quality. Author(s) ... Rugged, Verifiable In-Situ Oxygen Analyzers for Combustion Optimization in Steel Reheat  ...

74

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Paper presented at the Third...

75

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissionin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of...

76

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ...

77

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning Secure Fuels from Domestic Resources - Oil Shale and Tar Sands...

78

Geomechanics of the Climax mine-by, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A generic test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies in an underground chamber is being conducted at the Nevada Test Site. The horizontal shrinkage of the pillars is not explainable, but the vertical pillar stresses are easily understood. A two-phase project was initiated to estimate the in-situ deformability of the Climax granite and to refine the in-situ stress field data, and to model the mine-by. (DLC)

Heuze, F.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3rd Quarter 2011 Domestic Uranium Production Report Subject: U.S ... drilling, employment, exploration, in situ leach, inventory, mill, mine, nuclear, ...

80

In situ chemical fixation of arsenic-contaminated soils: An experimental study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaching procedure (TCLP) and EPA Method 1312 [USEPA. Methodbest results with subsequent TCLP sequential leaching, SPLPSequential leaching; TCLP; SPLP; Sequential chemical

Yang, Li; Donahoe, Rona J.; Redwine, James C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CNST Hosts Workshop on In Situ Measurements using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CNST Hosts Workshop on In Situ Measurements using Transmission Electron Microscopy. June 6, 2013. ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

82

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

83

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed.

Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Reich, Morris (Kew Gardens Hills, NY); Barletta, Robert (Wading River, NY)

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Candace Kairies, Carol Cardone, and Karl Schroeder U.S. Dept. of Energy, NETL, PO Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 KEYWORDS: extraction, mercury, fly ash, fluidized bed combustion, flue gas desulfurization Abstract Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. The fixed-bed column offers the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the

86

Mines and Mining (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mines and Mining (Maryland) Mines and Mining (Maryland) Mines and Mining (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment It is the policy of the state to encourage the development of mined resources in Maryland while protecting the environment and public health and safety. This legislation establishes the Bureau of Mines within the Department of the Environment and provides for the establishment of rules and regulations governing mining activity. The legislation addresses the

87

Data Mining Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Data Mining Portal. Data Mining Portal. Programs and Projects. Data Science Symposium 2013 ... Data Science ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Determining the leaching characteristics of solidified/stabilized wastes using constant pH leaching tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solidification/Stabilization treatment using Portland cement is an established procedure in the management of hazardous wastes. The technology is relatively simple, cheap, and highly reliable in prohibiting the migration of hazardous contaminants into groundwater. The success of this technology is measured by the amount of contaminants retained in the solidified matrix system. The most widely-used procedure to determine the amount that can leach out of the solidified waste is the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP), which was developed by the EPA. The TCLP, however, lacks control on the shape and dimensions of the samples, as well as the pH at which the test takes place. Thus, it does not provide a true leaching characteristic of the contaminants through the solidified matrix. By keeping the pH at a constant value and using samples with fixed dimensions, the TCLP can be vastly improved. These conditions allow most of the contaminants to leach out of the matrix at controlled conditions. Consequently, the characteristics of the leaching process can be measured more accurately. The procedure developed in this research, the Constant pH Leaching Test (CPLT), is a modification of the TCLP. It is designed to measure the leaching rates of a fixed-dimension sample at a constant pH. In addition to measuring the leaching rates, the research also investigated the effects of different water-to-cement ratios, pH of the acid baths, and concentrations of the acid baths.

Sofjan, Indratjahja

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mining engineering analysis  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to fill the gap between theory and application in mining engineering. The book is based on SME Mining Engineering Handbook and the Coal Mining Technology - Theory and Practice. Each chapter deals with the theory and then presents problems of applications and the solutions to them. Topics considered include underground mining, surface mining, geophysics, mining equipment, and rock mechanics.

Bise, C.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Physical and chemical properties of the products of in situ vitrification engineering tests 5, 6, and 7  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is an in situ thermal treatment process that is being investigated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to buried waste sites. ISV is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. The INEL is evaluating whether the treatment process is a viable one for remediating a buried mixed transuranic waste site at the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. As part of the INEL investigation, a series of tests have been performed that address issues associated with vitrification of buried waste. Two pilot ISV tests and four tests at laboratory scale, formerly called engineering scale, were performed in 1990 to support the INEL investigation. The chemical composition and leaching of the produce glass is described.

Loehr, C.A.; Weidner, J.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Amonette, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Priorities for In-situ Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements Parameters * Aerosol light absorption coefficient - spectral, including UV, vis, and IR - as f(RH), and at ambient RH * Phase function - or relevant integral properties (how many?) * Ice nuclei * Scattering vs. RH, for RH>90% * CCN, as f(S, D p ) * Size distribution * Chemical composition - for determining climate forcing, vs. radiative effect Calibration * Number concentration * Size and shape * Light absorption reference method Characterization * Accuracy and precision - need well-understood error bars * Algorithm comparisons * Closure studies * Facilities for method testing - aircraft time Methods * Inlets - shattering/splashing - location on airplane - passing efficiency - inletless analyzers/samplers * Packaging - modular/portable "pods" for multiple a/c

94

Geothermal energy for copper dump leaching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the possibility of using geothermal energy to heat a sulfuric acid leaching solution for the purpose of faster and more efficient copper recovery from copper-containing minerals. Experimental studies reported in the literature have shown that this technique can be economically feasible for the extraction of copper from low-grade dump ores. Its main advantage appears to be the considerable reduction in long-term leaching periods; it could also be less expensive than other conventional processing operations if an economical geothermal resource were provided. However, this process has some pitfalls which might restrict the extent of geothermal energy use. Nevertheless, the process is still technologically sound, especially if groundwaters are used directly in the leaching operation.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

In situ SST Quality Monitor (iQuam)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality of in situ sea surface temperatures (SST) is critical for calibration and validation of satellite SSTs. In situ SSTs come from different countries, agencies, and platforms. As a result, their quality is often suboptimal, non-uniform, and ...

Feng Xu; Alexander Ignatov

96

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~Mathematical Hodel for In-Situ Shale Retorting," in SecondBriefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, Lawrence Livermore

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and their performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, to be combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a W boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. The in situ combination method has advantages of scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and of insensitivity to correlations between triggers. We compare the inclusion and in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF WH search.

Buzatu, Adrian; Warburton, Andreas; /McGill U.; Krumnack, Nils; /Baylor U.; Yao, Wei-Ming; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Leaching hierarchies in co-combustion residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching propensities from co-combustion residues of 10 trace elements (Be, V, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Hg, Pb) were evaluated. Eight fuels varying from coal blends to coal and secondary fuel mixtures to ternary mixtures were co-combusted in two reactor configurations and at two temperatures (850 and 950{sup o}C). The ash was subjected to a miniaturized toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) developed for this study, and the trace element content in the leachate was analyzed, andpercentage retentions of elements in the ashes and leachates were calculated. Hg and Se were almost completely volatilized during combustion and, therefore, were largely absent from the ashes, in all cases. For the other trace elements, it was not possible to establish a hierarchy of relative trace-element retention. Retention was primarily a function of the combustion method, with no clear effect of temperature retention being observed. The measured trace-element retentions were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, using the MTDATA software. The model successfully predicted the measured values in many cases; however, many anomalies were also noted. From trace-element analysis in the leachates, an extent-of-leaching hierarchy could be established. The elements that underwent low degrees of leaching were Zn, Hg, Pb, low to moderate leaching were Be, Cr, and Cd, and thoseleached to a greater extent were V, As, Se, and Ba. This hierarchy was observed for all fuels and conditions studied. Leaching was found to be a strong function of the combustion temperature and combustion method. When assessing the potential toxicity of leachate from co-combustion residues, Zn, Hg, and Pb may be deemed of least concern, while a greater emphasis should be placed in mitigating the release of the remaining elements. 18 refs., 7 tabs.

A. George; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Using in Situ Thin Film Stress Measurements to Understand ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors. Presentation Title, Using in Situ Thin Film Stress Measurements to ...

100

Accelerated Environmental Aging Effects and In-Situ ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Accelerated Environmental Aging Effects and In-Situ Functional Testing of Commercial Photovoltaic Modules T ...

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101

SY101 in situ viscometer instrument system design description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This documents the design and description of the in situ viscometer, developed for the hydrogen mitigation project.

Pearce, K.L.; Stokes, T.I.; Vagelatos, N.

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

In situ chemical fixation of arsenic-contaminated soils: Anexperimental study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of an experimentalstudytesting a low-cost in situ chemical fixation method designed to reclaimarsenic-contaminated subsurface soils. Subsurface soils from severalindustrial sites in southeastern U.S. were contaminated with arsenicthrough heavy application of herbicide containing arsenic trioxide. Themean concentrations of environmentally available arsenic in soilscollected from the two study sites, FW and BH, are 325 mg/kg and 900mg/kg, respectively. The soils are sandy loams with varying mineralogicaland organic contents. The previous study [Yang L, Donahoe RJ. The form,distribution and mobility of arsenic in soils contaminated by arsenictrioxide, at sites in Southeast USA. Appl Geochem 2007;22:320 341]indicated that a large portion of the arsenic in both soils is associatedwith amorphous aluminum and iron oxyhydroxides and shows very slowrelease against leaching by synthetic precipitation. The soil's amorphousaluminum and iron oxyhydroxides content was found to have the mostsignificant effect on its ability to retain arsenic.Based on thisobservation, contaminated soils were reacted with different treatmentsolutions in an effort to promote the formation of insolublearsenic-bearing phases and thereby decrease the leachability of arsenic.Ferrous sulfate, potassium permanganate and calcium carbonate were usedas the reagents for the chemical fixation solutions evaluated in threesets of batch experiments: (1) FeSO4; (2) FeSO4 and KMnO4; (3) FeSO4,KMnO4 and CaCO3. The optimum treatment solutions for each soil wereidentified based on the mobility of arsenic during sequential leaching oftreated and untreated soils using the fluids described in EPA Method 1311[USEPA. Method 1311: toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. Testmethods for evaluating solid waste, physical/chemical methods. 3rd ed.Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of SolidWaste. U.S. Government Printing Office; 1992]toxic characteristicsleaching procedure (TCLP) and EPA Method 1312 [USEPA.Method 1312:synthetic precipitation leaching procedure. Test methods for evaluatingsolid waste, physical/chemical methods. 3rd ed. Washington, DC: U.S.Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste. U.S. GovernmentPrinting Office; 1994]synthetic precipitation leaching procedure(SPLP).Both FW and BH soils showed significant decreases in arsenicleachability for all three treatment solutions, compared to untreatedsoil. While soils treated with solution (3) showed the best results withsubsequent TCLP sequential leaching, SPLP sequential leaching of treatedsoils indicated that lowest arsenic mobility was obtained using treatmentsolution (1). Treatment solution (1) with only FeSO4 is considered thebest choice for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil because SPLPsequential leaching better simulates natural weathering. Analysis oftreated soils produced no evidence of newly-formed arsenic-bearing phasesin either soil after treatment. Sequential chemical extractions oftreated soils indicate that surface complexation of arsenic on ferrichydroxide is the major mechanism for the fixation process.

Yang, Li; Donahoe, Rona J.; Redwine, James C.

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox© assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 ºC) than the OKEB biochar (450 ºC). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

104

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leaching and addresses subsidence and resource recovery asgroundwater disruption, subsidence, and resource recovery--predict inci~ deuces of subsidence, and there are presently

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop and implement data mining technology suited to the analysis of large collections of unstructured data. This has taken the form of a software tool, PADMA (Parallel Data Mining Agents), which incorporates parallel data accessing, parallel scalable hierarchical clustering algorithms, and a web-based user interface for submitting Structured Query Language (SQL) queries and interactive data visualization. The authors have demonstrated the viability and scalability of PADMA by applying it to an unstructured text database of 25,000 documents running on an IBM SP2 at Argonne National Laboratory. The utility of PADMA for discovering patterns in data has also been demonstrated by applying it to laboratory test data for Hepatitis C patients and autopsy reports in collaboration with the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

Lee, K.; Kargupta, H.; Stafford, B.G.; Buescher, K.L.; Ravindran, B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

In-situ stabilization of TRU/mixed waste project at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the DOE complex, buried waste poses a threat to the environment by means of contaminant transport. Many of the sites contain buried waste that is untreated, prior to disposal, or insufficiently treated, by today`s standards. One option to remedy these disposal problems is to stabilize the waste in situ. This project was in support of the Transuranic/Mixed Buried Waste - Arid Soils product line of the Landfill Focus Area, which is managed currently by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (BNL) provided the analytical laboratory and technical support for the various stabilization activities that will be performed as part of the In Situ Stabilization of TRU/Mixed Waste project at the INEL. More specifically, BNL was involved in laboratory testing that included the evaluation of several grouting materials and their compatibility, interaction, and long-term durability/performance, following the encapsulation of various waste materials. The four grouting materials chosen by INEL were: TECT 1, a two component, high density cementious grout, WAXFIX, a two component, molten wax product, Carbray 100, a two component elastomeric epoxy, and phosphate cement, a two component ceramic. A simulated waste stream comprised of sodium nitrate, Canola oil, and INEL soil was used in this study. Seven performance and durability tests were conducted on grout/waste specimens: compressive strength, wet-dry cycling, thermal analysis, base immersion, solvent immersion, hydraulic conductivity, and accelerated leach testing.

Milian, L.W.; Heiser, J.H.; Adams, J.W.; Rutenkroeger, S.P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Environmental research on a modified in situ oil shale task process. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the US Department of Energy's Oil Shale Task Force in its research program at the Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. facility at Logan Wash, Colorado. More specifically, the Task Force obtained samples from Retort 3E and Retort 6 and submitted these samples to a variety of analyses. The samples collected included: crude oil (Retort 6); light oil (Retort 6); product water (Retort 6); boiler blowdown (Retort 6); makeup water (Retort 6); mine sump water; groundwater; water from Retorts 1 through 5; retort gas (Retort 6); mine air; mine dust; and spent shale core (Retort 3E). The locations of the sampling points and methods used for collection and storage are discussed in Chapter 2 (Characterization). These samples were then distributed to the various laboratories and universities participating in the Task Force. For convenience in organizing the data, it is useful to group the work into three categories: Characterization, Leaching, and Health Effects. While many samples still have not been analyzed and much of the data remains to be interpreted, there are some preliminary conclusions the Task Force feels will be helpful in defining future needs and establishing priorities. It is important to note that drilling agents other than water were used in the recovery of the core from Retort 3E. These agents have been analyzed (see Table 12 in Chapter 2) for several constituents of interest. As a result some of the analyses of this core sample and leachates must be considered tentative.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

In-situ continuous water monitoring system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

In situ recovery of shale oil  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean oil shale deposit by excavating a columnar void having a vertically extending free face, drilling blasting holes adjacent to the columnar void and parallel to the free face, loading the blasting holes with explosive, and detonating the explosive in a single round to expand the shale adjacent to the columnar void toward the free face in layers severed in a sequence progressing away from the free face and to fill with fragmented oil shale the columnar void and the space in the in situ retort originally occupied by the expanded shale prior to the expansion. A room having a horizontal floor plan that coincides approximately with the horizontal cross section of the retort to be formed is excavated so as to intersect the columnar void. The blasting holes are drilled and loaded with explosive from the room. The room can lie above the columnar void, below the columnar void, or intermediate the ends of the columnar void. In one embodiment, the columnar void is cylindrical and the blasting holes are arranged in concentric rings around the columnar void. In another embodiment, the columnar void is a slot having one or more large parallel, planar vertical free faces, toward which the oil shale in the retort under construction can be explosively expanded. The blasting holes are arranged in planes parallel to these faces. The resulting retort generally has a cross section coinciding with the placement of the blasting holes and a height determined for the greater part by the vertical height of the columnar void. To form a retort having a large cross-sectional area, a plurality of columnar voids can be excavated and the shale in the retort expanded toward the respective columnar voids to form a continuous fragmented permeable mass of oil shale.

French, G.B.

1977-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

A Novel in situ Trigger Combination Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Searches for rare physics processes using particle detectors in high-luminosity colliding hadronic beam environments require the use of multi-level trigger systems to reject colossal background rates in real time. In analyses like the search for the Higgs boson, there is a need to maximize the signal acceptance by combining multiple different trigger chains when forming the offline data sample. In such statistically limited searches, datasets are often amassed over periods of several years, during which the trigger characteristics evolve and system performance can vary significantly. Reliable production cross-section measurements and upper limits must take into account a detailed understanding of the effective trigger inefficiency for every selected candidate event. We present as an example the complex situation of three trigger chains, based on missing energy and jet energy, that were combined in the context of the search for the Higgs (H) boson produced in association with a $W$ boson at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We briefly review the existing techniques for combining triggers, namely the inclusion, division, and exclusion methods. We introduce and describe a novel fourth in situ method whereby, for each candidate event, only the trigger chain with the highest a priori probability of selecting the event is considered. We compare the inclusion and novel in situ methods for signal event yields in the CDF $WH$ search. This new combination method, by virtue of its scalability to large numbers of differing trigger chains and insensitivity to correlations between triggers, will benefit future long-running collider experiments, including those currently operating on the Large Hadron Collider.

Adrian Buzatu; Andreas Warburton; Nils Krumnack; Wei-Ming Yao

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring.

N.T. Raczka

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

In Situ Observation on Dislocation Dynamics in Nanocrystalline and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk will cover in situ TEM and MD modeling on the nanoscale ... Structures and Properties of Higher Pressure Combustion Driven Compacted ...

114

In Situ Band Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes  

VOLUME 79, NUMBER 11 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 15SEPTEMBER 1997 In Situ Band Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes Vincent H. Crespi* and Marvin L. Cohen

115

Rugged, Verifiable In-Situ Oxygen Analyzers for Combustion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional, heated in-situ sensors must be located in cooler furnace regions far from combustion and have similar time delays, a need for frequent calibration

116

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are unique to in-situ oil shale production, Literature fromother industries to oil shale production because these datapotential for spent shale grout production and to design a

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Developing in situ Diagnostic Tools for UHTC Materials in Extreme ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation we will discuss the role of optical diagnostics in characterizing these challenging test environments, as well as their ability to provide in situ ...

118

Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy ... of lithium ion batteries provides an important route to reducing the lifetime costs of ...

119

In Situ Neutron Powder Diffraction on Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In order to pursue hydrogen storage research on powder samples ... A Case Study in Future Energy Challenges: Towards In Situ Hard X-

120

Simulating Realistic Conditions and In-Situ Studies Using Neutron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First ex-situ/in-situ measurements of strains/stresses at engineering diffractometer VULCAN at SNS · FSP-Induced Plastic Deformation and Elastic Strains in ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic .... What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

122

In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to accurately characterize the dynamic electrochemical processes at the nanometer and atomic level, we have employed a set of complementary, in situ X-ray characterization...

123

IN SITU STUDIES OF FUEL CELL INTERFACES USING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to in situ measurement of operating fuel cell interfaces from two studies: Ambient-Pressure XPS (APXPS) measurements of SOFC gas/electrode ...

124

In-Situ Characterization of Bainite Transformation by Confocal Laser ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured kinetics which are projected ones of true kinetics are revised based ... Hybrid System for the In-Situ Observation of Microstructure Formation in Steel ...

125

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanocompression testing, we ... Ab Initio DFT Modeling of the Dislocation and Its Mobility in TiN Ceramic.

126

In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano-materials under High Pressure via Synchrotron Techniques. Author(s) ...

127

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

128

Process for controlling calcium in a leach operation  

SciTech Connect

A method for controlling calcium, e.g. calcite, build-up in the leach solution of a uranium and/or related values recovery operation wherein the leach solution is flowed through a value bearing ore to dissolve the desired values. A soluble fluoride, e.g. sodium fluoride, is added to the leach solution after it has passed through the ore to thereby precipitate calcium fluoride from the leach solution and lower the calcium content of the leach solution. The soluble fluoride may be added to the leach solution before the leach solution passes through the process equipment which is used to remove the values from the leach solution or the soluble fluoride may be added after the leach solution passes through the process equipment. If added before, it is preferable to also add a carbonate/bicarbonate solution along with the soluble fluoride to prevent coprecipitation of uranyl/desired value fluoride or to redissolve coprecipitated fluoride back into the leach solution.

Habib, E.J.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mining Engineering Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal, base and ferrous metals. Action 1.3.2: The Tianfu Mining University Opportunity: Strengthen.1.2: Endowed Chair in Energy: Endow a $3 million Chair in Mining Engineering with emphasis on Energy form Coal Control, Mineral-Materials-Coal Processing, Mine Health and Safety, and Mine Survey laboratories. Action 4

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

130

Rights and Duties of Mines and Mine Owners, General (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation addresses general operational guidelines for mine owners regarding public notices, fees, land and mineral ownership, requirements for mining in certain municipalities, and mining...

131

Inherently Safe In-Situ Uranium Recovery - Energy Innovation Portal  

Nuclear power & waste applications; Mining operations; More Information US Patent Pending Technology Status. Technology ID Development Stage Availability Published

132

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CT transformations in Hanford soil. This work assessed the potential for in situ CT biotransColumn Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material a column reactor system containing Hanford Aquifer material in order to assess the potential of in situ

Hren, Michael

133

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

134

In Situ Visualization for Large-Scale Combustion Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific supercomputing moves toward petascale and exascale levels, in situ visualization stands out as a scalable way for scientists to view the data their simulations generate. This full picture is crucial particularly for capturing and understanding ... Keywords: in situ visualization, large-scale simulation, parallel rendering, supercomputing, scalability, computer graphics, graphics and multimedia

Hongfeng Yu; Chaoli Wang; Ray W. Grout; Jacqueline H. Chen; Kwan-Liu Ma

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Solubility limits of importance to leaching  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed from the Oklo natural fission reactor studies. It had been determined in the Oklo studies that many fission products and actinides remained in the reactor site during the periods of their radioactive decay following formation in the reactor zone two billion years ago. An explanation for this retention of fission products and actinides uses the extreme insolubility of uraninite (UO/sub 2/) in very reducing water environments. One can estimate from available thermodynamic data that the concentration of uranium in equilibrium with uraninite in pH 7 water that is free of dissolved oxygen is approx. 7 x 10/sup -6/ ppM. This low value suggested that the reducing conditions that can occur in deep geologic burial would result in a very slow leaching of spent fuel elements in contact with water since spent fuel elements are largely sintered UO/sub 2/. Studies on the leaching of spent fuel elements were conducted to verify this phenomenon. Results of the studies show that the solubilities of some radionuclides, especially rare earths and actinides, may be an important and controlling factor in leaching of waste forms. These solubilities should be measured accurately as a function of pH and not as a part of a multicomponent system. Although the amount of data is small it is interesting to postulate that a negative temperature coefficient of solubility is being exhibited by the actinides and rare earths. Individual solubilities should be measured as a function of temperature to determine if a kinetic effect is being observed in the data. A negative temperature coefficient of solubility for actinides and rare earths in water would have important consequences for nuclear reactor safety and for the management of nuclear wastes.

Ogard, A.; Bentley, G.; Bryant, E.; Duffy, C.; Grisham, J.; Norris, E.; Orth, C.; Thomas, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Enhancing in situ bioremediation with pneumatic fracturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major technical obstacle affecting the application of in situ bioremediation is the effective distribution of nutrients to the subsurface media. Pneumatic fracturing can increase the permeability of subsurface formations through the injection of high pressure air to create horizontal fracture planes, thus enhancing macro-scale mass-transfer processes. Pneumatic fracturing technology was demonstrated at two field sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Tests were performed to increase the permeability for more effective bioventing, and evaluated the potential to increase permeability and recovery of free product in low permeability soils consisting of fine grain silts, clays, and sedimentary rock. Pneumatic fracturing significantly improved formation permeability by enhancing secondary permeability and by promoting removal of excess soil moisture from the unsaturated zone. Postfracture airflows were 500% to 1,700% higher than prefracture airflows for specific fractured intervals in the formation. This corresponds to an average prefracturing permeability of 0.017 Darcy, increasing to an average of 0.32 Darcy after fracturing. Pneumatic fracturing also increased free-product recovery rates of number 2 fuel from an average of 587 L (155 gal) per month before fracturing to 1,647 L (435 gal) per month after fracturing.

Anderson, D.B.; Peyton, B.M.; Liskowitz, J.L.; Fitzgerald, C.; Schuring, J.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hydrometallurgical Purification from Leach Liquor of Printed Circuit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... requiring the study of recycling processes to stimulate this activity or the reuse of its components. The separation of nickel from sulphate leach solution, which ...

138

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized ...  

Leaching of Trace Elements From Highway Materials Stabilized with Coal Fly Ash Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Professor, Geo Engineering Program Dept. of ...

139

Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISASMELT™ for Recycling of Valuable Elements Contributing to a More Sustainable Society · Leaching of Uranium and Vanadium from Korean Domestic Ore.

140

Leaching Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Preparation of Synthetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Gibbs free energy change of reactions were calculated . The metal and ... A Study on Waste Packaging Containers Generated by Household in Taiwan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Particle Size Distribution Model for Leaching Kinetics of Alumina. Author(s), Li Bao, Ting-an Zhang, Weimin Long, Anh V Nguyen, Guozhi Lv, ...

142

Chloride Leaching of Spent Lead-Acid Battery Paste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study leaching of spent lead acid-battery paste in sodium ... Cost, Energy, Emissions, and Resource Assessment of the Production of ...

143

Cyanide Leaching of Gold-Copper Porphyries: Chemistry and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porphyry ores are frequently a source of low-grade gold ore, but gold in these ... Assessment of Acid Rock Drainage and Metal Leaching Risks at Barrick Gold ...

144

Actinide speciation in glass leach-layers: An EXAFS study  

SciTech Connect

Uranium L{sub 3} X-ray absorption data were obtained from two borosilicate glasses, which are considered as models for radioactive wasteforms, both before and after leaching. Surface sensitivity to uranium speciation was attained by a novel application of simultaneous fluorescence and electron-yield detection. Changes in speciation are clearly discernible, from U(VI) in the bulk to (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+}-uranyl in the leach layer. The leach-layer uranium concentration variations with leaching times are also determined from the data.

Biwer, B.M.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Greegor, R.B. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States); Lytle, F.W. [EXAFS Co., Pioche, NV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Leaching of Lead from Solder Material Used in Electrical and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

146

In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at a well (which can lead to clogging). A final particularly attractive characteristic of this approach is its long-term sustainability; the remediation scheme is geared toward environments that are already saturated with respect to calcite, and in such systems the bulk of any newly precipitated calcite will remain stable once engineered manipulations cease. This means that the co-precipitated contaminants will be effectively sequestered over the long term. We are currently conducting integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate a) the relationships between urea hydrolysis rate, calcite precipitation rate, and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions; and b) the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and calcite precipitate distribution and metal uptake. We are also assessing the application of geophysical and molecular biological tools to monitor the relevant chemical and physical processes. The primary emphasis is on field-scale processes, with the laboratory and modeling activities designed specifically to support the field studies. Field experiments are being conducted in perched water (vadose zone) at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at the Idaho National Laboratory; the VZRP provides an uncontaminated setting that is an analog of the 90Sr-contaminated vadose zone at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. A summary of results to date will be presented.

Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER  

SciTech Connect

In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges Xindong Wu University of Vermont, USA; Hefei University Systems 2004 ...... #12;3 Outline 1.1. Data Mining OpportunitiesData Mining Opportunities Major Conferences and Journals in Data Mining Main Topics in Data Mining Some Research Directions in Data Mining 2

Wu, Xindong

151

Characterization of Ammonia Leaching from Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents the results of a preliminary laboratory assessment of the leaching of ammonia from coal ashes that have been ammoniated by pollution control devices installed on power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. This laboratory assessment project was designed to measure the leaching rates of ammonia from ashes in a disposal environment.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mining Regulations (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation applies to all mines in this state engaged in the mining or extraction of minerals for commercial purposes, except barite, marble, limestone, and sand and gravel, or the...

153

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

Mine Mesh Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and analyzed underground measurements of MF signal strength in the NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory Safety Research Coal Mine to refine ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

155

Data Mining: An Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data mining, the process of extracting not-so-obvious but useful information from large databases, has emerged as a key business intelligence technology. This report provides an introductory overview of data mining technology and products. It also provides several examples of data mining applications in different industries.

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mining Local Buffer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web mining employs the techniques of data mining to extract information from the Web for a variety of purposes. The usual sources of data are the log files of WWW or proxy servers. The paper examines the possibility of using the local browser buffer ... Keywords: Behavioural Targeting, Browser Cache, Cacheability, Data Mining, Heaps Law, Internet, Latency, Zipf Law

Andrzej Siemi?ski

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning In situ decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a contaminated facility. At present, ISD is not recognized or addressed in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Office of Environmental Management (EM) lexicon; however, ISD is not a revolutionary concept. Since the 1970s, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recognized the option of entombing a facility as a decommissioning option. Permanent entombment of a radioactively contaminated facility as a decommissioning option has been completed for one facility at the Idaho National Laboratory and is currently planned at a limited number of selected DOE facilities. The

158

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

159

Advanced Instrumentation for In Situ Field Monitoring of Soil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation for In Situ Field Monitoring of Soil Carbon Sequestration S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) M.Z. Martin (martinm1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7828)...

160

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceHeley, Water Management ln Oil Golder Associates, Kirkland,

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

162

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 15, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for Materials Design and Discovery Stephen K. Streiffer Deputy...

163

In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

Rabold, D.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are unique to in-situ oil shale production, Literature fromother industries to oil shale production because these dataThe processes used in production of oil shale have not been

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN-SITU COMBUSTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN-SITU COMBUSTION Topical Report: Task 2 - Combustion and Emissions Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT40913 April 30, 2004 by D.M. Bachovchin T.E....

166

Assessing the Rosemount Icing Detector with In Situ Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ measurements of microphysics conditions, obtained during 38 research flights into winter storms, have been used to characterize the performance of a Rosemount Icing Detector (RID). Characteristics of the RID were determined under a wide ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; Alexei V. Korolev

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceReactions in Colorado Oil Shale, Lawrence Report UCRL-

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Water Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea,

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Characterisation of Deformation Induced Microstructures by In-Situ X ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Another application of in-situ X-ray line profile analysis points out the relevance of ... H-3: The Competition between the Stress Relaxation and Load Transfer in ...

170

Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea, Salinity

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamic TEM: Observing In Situ Reactions with Nanometer and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, a summary of the DTEM and in-situ stages for both the existing microscope at LLNL and a new aberration corrected DTEM at UC-Davis will be described.

172

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project successfully demonstrated a newly developed technique to determine catalyst activity in situ. This report describes the technique and presents results from a two-ozone-season demonstration conducted on Unit 10 at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gorgas, during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The in situ measurements of activity were in good agreement with laboratory measurements, and the technique has some advantages over the laboratory method.

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

In situ redox manipulation treatability test -- waste management plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan provides guidance for the management of waste generated from groundwater well installations in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The well installations are necessary to implement the In Situ Redox Manipulation Treatability Test to determine methods for in situ remedial efforts to prevent discharge of hexavalent chromium at levels above those considered protective of aquatic life in the Columbia River and riverbed sediments

A. J. Knepp

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Non-Traditional In Situ Vitrification - A Technology Demonstration at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) sponsored a technology demonstration of non-traditional in situ vitrification (NTISV) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project team for this demonstration included MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Geosafe Corporation, and LANL. The technology demonstration involved the performance of two large-scale test melts. The first, referred to as the ''cold'' test, was performed on a simulated absorption bed that contained surrogate contaminants. The cold test was conducted in April 1999. The second demonstration, referred to as the ''hot'' test, took place at LANL's Material Disposal Area (MDA) V in April 2000. The hot test was conducted on a portion of an absorption bed that received radionuclide and metal-contaminated wastewater from a laundry facility and a research laboratory from the mid-1940s to the early 1960s. This paper presents the results of drilling and sampling following the hot test at LANL's MDA V. The objectives of the sample collection were to characterize the vitrified mass and the effects of the hot test on the surrounding bedrock. Glass samples were analyzed for total radionuclide and metal content by standard EPA methods, and leachable radionuclide and metal content using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Product Consistency Test (PCT) methods.

Coel-Roback, B.; Springer, M.; Lowery, P.; Thompson, L.; Huddleston, G.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mercury emissions from a simulated in-situ oil shale retort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In simulated in-situ retorting, lesser amounts of mercury are distributed to the spent shale, shale oil, and water than to the offgas. The mercury release is controlled by the successive volatilization and removal of mercury as the reaction front progresses down the shale bed. Oil-wet shale, enriched in heavy ends, may selectively remove the mercury from the gaseous phase. If nonuniform gas flow occurs in commercial retorts, mercury may be condensed in cool regions of the shale bed behind the reaction front where it may be subsequently leached by groundwaters. In a 50,000 bpd or larger commercial operation, it is likely that mercury will have to be removed from the gas stream to meet air quality standards or emission standards. Existing control technologies under consideration for oil shale plants need to be evaluated to determine their mercury removal efficiency. Mercury levels in retort waters would exceed water quality standards and criteria for discharge to local streams and mercury would have to be removed from these waters before discharge. Additional work is required to determine the fate and form of the mercury in a stack plume and the effect of the oil-wet zone on the removal of mercury from the gas phase. 5 figures, 9 tables.

Fox, J.P.; Duvall, J.J.; Mason, K.K.; McLaughlin, R.D.; Bartke, T.C.; Poulson, R.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

In-Situ Bragg Edge Imaging for Strain and Phase Mapping under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium · In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

178

Mechanics of Nanostructures Probed In-Situ by Coherent X-Ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium · In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

179

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.  

SciTech Connect

The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

Mendel, J.E. (compiler)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

PRFR PILOT LEACHING PLANT-PRELIMINARY PROCESS DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary process design of a PRFR pilot leaching plant, the proposed location of which is in Cell B of Building 3026 at ORNL, is considered. Chemical, physical, and nuclear parameters are investigated to assure safe leaching operations. Nitric acid solvents are used for leaching the uranium and/ or thorium from the sheared spent fuel elements, and the dissolved fuel is sent through a shielded pipeline to the extraction plant for further processing. Recommended materials of construction are 304L stainless steel and 3O9SCb stainless steel, and maintenance is by direct procedures. (auth)

McLain, H.A.

1959-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization techniques, the real time study of property-structure correlations in nanomaterials becomes possible. This dissertation reports the direct observations of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod structures using the in situ TEM nanoindentation tool. The combined in situ movies with quantitative loading-unloading curves reveal the deformation mechanism of the above nanomaterial systems. At room temperature, in situ dynamic deformation studies show that the AZM nanocomposites undergo the deformation mainly through the grain-boundary sliding and rotation of small grains, i.e., ZrO2 grains, and some of the large grains, i.e., MgAl2O4 grains. We observed both plastic and elastic deformations in different sample regions in these multi-phase ceramic nanocomposites at room temperature. Both ex situ (conventional) and in situ nanoindentation were conducted to reveal the deformation of YBCO films from the directions perpendicular and parallel to the twin interfaces. Hardness measured perpendicular to twin interfaces is ~50% and 40% higher than that measured parallel to twin interfaces, by ex situ and in situ, respectively. By using an in situ nanoindentation tool inside TEM, dynamic work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel was directly observed. During stain hardening stage, abundant Lomer-Cottrell (L-C) locks formed both within nanograins and against twin boundaries. Two major mechanisms were identified during interactions between L-C locks and twin boundaries. Quantitative nanoindentation experiments recorded during in situ experiments show an increase of yield strength from 1.64 to 2.29 GPa during multiple loading-unloading cycles. In situ TEM nanoindentation has been conducted to explore the size dependent deformation behavior of two different types (type I: ~ 0.51 of width/length ratio and type II: ~ 088 ratio) of AZO nanorods. During the indentation on type I nanord structure, annihilation of defects has been observed which is caused by limitation of the defect activities by relatively small size of the width. On the other hand, type II nanorod shows dislocation activities which enhanced the grain rotation under the external force applied on more isotropic direction through type II nanorod.

Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

187

Pressure Acid Leaching Vanadium from Stone coal - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vanadium extraction from stone-coal was investigated by pressure acid ... The results show that with the leaching time for 3~4h, temperature at 150?, sulfuric acid consumption of 25%~30%, ... Calcium Reductants – A historical review.

188

Acid Leaching of Nickel Laterites with Jarosite Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Acid Leaching of Nickel Laterites with Jarosite Precipitation ... shortly after the development of the jarosite process for iron control in zinc refining. ... The Recycling of Cobalt from Alloy Scrap, Spent Batteries or Catalysts and ...

189

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium reduction in uranium mine sediment. Appl Environspp. can be stimulated in uranium mine sediments (Suzuki et

Hwang, Chiachi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mine, Michigan, Ontonagon Whitedelph Mine, Idaho, Bonner Co.Woodrat Mountain Kyanite Prospect, Idaho,Idaho Co.

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

HEPA filter leaching concept validation trials at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The enclosed report documents six New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) HEPA filter leaching trials conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant using a filter leaching system to validate the filter leaching treatment concept. The test results show that a modified filter leaching system will be able to successfully remove both hazardous and radiological constituents to RCRA disposal levels. Based on the success of the filter leach trials, the existing leaching system will be modified to provide a safe, simple, effective, and operationally flexible filter leaching system.

Chakravartty, A.C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

194

Volumetric In Situ Electrical Heating: An Unexploited Electrotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of electrical energy to heat large volumes of earth in place ("in situ") offers significant advantages over conventional in situ heat-transfer methods. For example, where properly applied, the near-wellbore application of electrical energy can triple flow rates from heavy-oil wells for an incremental operational cost of only a few dollars per barrel. The electrically enhanced oil recovery (EEOR) single-well stimulation method produces 15 barrels of oil for every barrel of oil consumed at the electrical power plant. The EEOR process can be used in concert with other enhanced oil recovery systems to reduce air pollution and to provide a market for excess electrical power generation capacity. other applications of the EEOR technology include the in situ decontamination of hazardous waste spills and the disinfection of hospital wastes.

Bridges, J. E.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

196

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

197

Talvivaara Nickel Mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In full production the annual nickel production will be approximately 50,000tpa. In addition, the mine will also produce zinc, copper and cobalt.Talvivaara will ...

198

Labor and Safety: Mines and Mining Safety (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains labor regulations pertaining specifically to coal mine workers. The law establishes the Indiana Mining Board. The Board's duties include: collecting and distributing...

199

Coal Mining Tax Credit (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Mining Tax Credit provides an income or insurance premium tax credit of $2.00 per ton of coal mined, produced or extracted on each ton of coal mined in Arkansas in a tax year. An...

200

Electrochemical cell for in-situ x-ray characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell suitable for in-situ XRD analysis is presented. Qualitative information such as phase formation and phase stability can be easily monitored using the in-situ cell design. Quantitative information such as lattice parameters and kinetic behavior is also straightforward. Analysis of the LiMn&sub2;O&sub4; spinel using this cell design shows that the lattice undergoes two major structural shrinkages at approx. 4.0 V and approx. 4.07 V during charging. These shrinkages correlate well with the two electrochemical waves observed and indicate the likelihood of two separate redox processes which charging and discharging.

Doughty, D.H.; Ingersoll, D.; Rodriguez, M.A.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mining of Minerals and Ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...of mining with respect to metal price, metal demand forecast, ore processing and extraction costs, and the socioeconomic as well as environmental impact of the mining

202

Coal Mine Safety Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act is the primary legislation pertaining to coal mine safety in Virginia. It contains information on safety rules, safety standards and required certifications for mine workers, prohibited...

203

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Reducing the environmental impact of uranium in-situ recovery.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This session will explore the current technical approaches to reducing the environmental effects of uranium ISR in comparison to the historical environmental impact of uranium mining to demonstrate advances in this controversial subject.

Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Simmons, Ardyth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

European coal mining technology  

SciTech Connect

Most new developments in mechanized longwall coal technology have been pioneered by European mines and equipment manufacturers. But ironically, the most successful adaptations of European-inspired longwalling systems have occurred in North America, Australia, South Africa and elsewhere, enabling those mines to achieve even greater productivity and cost-effective utilization than the Europeans enjoy. This anomaly has little to do with mining talents, but arises instead from a pair of factors: 1) the extremely difficult mining and geological conditions of European coal basins; and 2) the profound differences between the management style and operating routines of the largely state-owned mines of Europe and the privately-owned, profit oriented mining companies abroad. Nevertheless, Europe continues to lead the way in new developments, driven by the chemistry of tough mining conditions and the commitments of its national mining industries to invest in new technology. As a third ingredient, the supra-national European Economic Community (EEC) plays an important role in promoting and funding new developments through its various agencies. A recent EEC information symposium on new methods of coal winning at Luxembourg focused on state-of-the-art longwall technology. Thus a look at current Euopean RandD programs yields pointers as to what the international coal industry may expect in the future.

Wyllie, B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Mining partially annotated images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the problem of mining partially annotated images. We first define what the problem of mining partially annotated images is, and argue that in many real-world applications annotated images are typically partially annotated and ... Keywords: image annotation completion and prediction, partially annotated training set, semi-supervised learning

Zhongang Qi; Ming Yang; Zhongfei (Mark) Zhang; Zhengyou Zhang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

RETORT ABANDONMENT -- ISSUES AND RESEARCH NEEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management In Oil Shale Mining, Golder Associates,R. D. , IIDisposal of oil Shale Ash,1I Quarterly of theLeached from In Situ Spent Shale, Ph.D. Dissertation,

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements  

SciTech Connect

SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

Fossil Energy Research

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Miniaturized Redox Potential Probe for In Situ Environmental Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43026 The need for accurate, robust in situ microscale monitoring of oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP-contained microelectrodes that can be used in the environment, such as at Superfund sites, to monitor ORP in contaminated for ORP measurements. The electrochemical performance of these ORP electrodes was fully characterized

Papautsky, Ian

211

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Accelerated oil shale in-situ research: a national program  

SciTech Connect

Development of a viable in-situ technology offers the potential of both significant environmental advantages and an increase in the amount of recoverable resources. The program described in this report is directed specifically toward research needed to overcome the technical obstacles that have retarded the development of in-situ processes. The program goal is to develop, by 1980, several commercially viable technologies for the in-situ production of shale oil. National in scope, the program is expected to be undertaken with private funds in part with joint Federal/private financing and, where neither is feasible, wholly with Federal funds. The Federal Government would provide overall program management to ensure that all parts of this highly interrelated program move forward harmoniously. Although emphasis is directed toward the oil shales of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, research would also be initiated on the oil shale deposits that underlie much of the Eastern United States. A number of feasible in-situ technologies would be tested in various oil shale resource types.

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

In-situ visualization for global hybrid simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petascale simulations have become mission critical in diverse areas of science and engineering. Knowledge discovery from such simulations remains a major challenge and is becoming more urgent as the march towards ultra-scale computing with millions of ... Keywords: high performance computing, in-situ data analysis and visualization, modeling and simulation

H. Karimabadi; B. Loring; P. O'Leary; A. Majumdar; M. Tatineni; B. Geveci

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

In Situ Data Biases and Recent Ocean Heat Content Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two significant instrument biases have been identified in the in situ profile data used to estimate globally integrated upper-ocean heat content. A large cold bias was discovered in a small fraction of Argo floats along with a smaller but more ...

Josh K. Willis; John M. Lyman; Gregory C. Johnson; John Gilson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

In situ oxidation of ultrathin silver films on Ni(111)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of silver films of one- and two-monolayer thicknesses on the Ni(111) surface was investigated by low-energy electron microscopy at temperatures of 500 and 600 K. Additionally, intensity--voltage curves were measured in situ during oxidation ...

A. Meyer; J. I. Flege; S. D. Senanayake; B. Kaemena; R. E. Rettew; F. M. Alamgir; J. Falta

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing (ISESM) is a treatment technology that has been demonstrated and deployed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile organic volatile organic (VOCs). The technology has been developed by industry and has been demonstrated with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology and the Office of Environmental Restoration.

None

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bioprocessing of sweet sorghum with in situ-produced enzymes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enzyme-assisted ensiling (ENLAC), using in situ-produced enzymes from Gliocladium sp. TUB-F-498, preserved 80% of the sugar content of sweet sorghum, and facilitated its extraction by countercurrent diffusion. The in situ enzyme was produced on the extracted sweet sorghum pulp by an 8-d solid substrate fermentation (SSF) with a yield of 4.6 cellulose and 400 IU/g dry wt xylanase. Two percent of the fermented substrate had cellulose and xylanase levels equivalent or superior to levels found in the commercial enzymes Celluclast and Viscozyme Novo at the 0.025% application level in ENLAC. The in situ-production of enzymes on recyclable substrates may reduce bioprocessing costs significantly. In this ENLAC process, the cost of the in situ enzymes is estimated to be about $0.12/metric ton (MT) substrate, compared to $9.5/metric ton for the commercial enzymes, a cost reduction of nearly 80-fold. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Tengerdy, R.P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Szakacs, G. [Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary); Sipocz, J. [Pannon Agrarian Univ., Mosonmagyarovar (Hungary)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

PRB mines mature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Study of radionuclide leaching from the residues of K Basin sludge dissolution  

SciTech Connect

The sludges remaining in the K Basins after removal of the spent N Reactor nuclear fuel will be conditioned for disposal. After conditioning, an acid-insoluble residue will remain that may require further leaching to properly condition it for disposal. This document presents a literature study to identify and recommend one or more chemical leaching treatments for laboratory testing, based on the likely compositions of the residues. The processes identified are a nitric acid cerate leach, a silver-catalyzed persulfate leach, a nitric hydrofluoric acid leach, an oxalic citric acid reactor decontamination leach, a nitric hydrochloric acid leach, a ammonium fluoride nitrate leach, and a HEOPA formate dehydesulfoxylate leach. All processes except the last two are recommended for testing in that order.

Bechtold, D.B.

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution  

SciTech Connect

Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Brewer, Ken Neal; Pierson, Kenneth Alan; Shackelford, Kimberlee Rene; Kline, Kelli Suzanne

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution  

SciTech Connect

Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

K. Archibald; K. Brewer; K. Kline; K. Pierson; K. Shackelford; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Study on leaching vanadium from roasted residue of stone coal  

SciTech Connect

In China, the total reserves of vanadium, reported as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, in stone coal is 118 Mt (130 million st). Recovering vanadium from such a large resource is very important to China's vanadium industry. The technology now being used to recover vanadium from stone coal has the following two problems in the leaching process: a low recovery of vanadium and high acid consumption. To resolve these problems, a new leaching technology is proposed. The effects of factors such as H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration, liquid-solid ratio, temperature and time, and the types and additions of additives were studied. By adding 1.5% (by weight) CaF2 and leaching the roasted residue of stone coal with 5.4% (by weight) sulfuric acid at 90{sup o}C for 12 hours at a liquid-solid ratio of 2 mL/g, the leaching degree of vanadium reached 83.10%. This proposed leaching technology gives a feasible alternative for the processing of roasting residue of stone coal and can be applied in the comprehensive utilization of stone coal ores in China.

He, D.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, G.; Luo, W.; Ou, L. [Central South University, Changsha (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Solar for Mining Hugh Rudnick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar for Mining Hugh Rudnick Professor Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile #12;Solar Energy in Mining · Solar energy is becoming affordable · Attractive potential use for mining purposes · Must solve the storage requirement to increase its participation worldwide #12;Solar Energy in Mining · Electrical Energy

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

230

The importance of in-situ-stress profiles in hydraulic-fracturing applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ stresses define the local forces acting on lithologic layers in the subsurface. Knowledge of these stresses is important in drilling, wellbore-stability, and, especially, hydraulic-fracturing applications. The measurement of in-situ stress is not straightforward and, therefore, often goes unmeasured. As such, one often assumes values of in-situ stress or estimate in-situ stresses from logging parameters. This article illustrates the importance of in-situ-stress estimates as they relate to hydraulic fracturing and outlines several techniques for estimating in-situ-stress magnitudes.

Hopkins, C.W. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States). Houston Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Leach Hot Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leach Hot Springs Geothermal Project Leach Hot Springs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Leach Hot Springs Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.603888888889°, -117.64805555556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.603888888889,"lon":-117.64805555556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Improvements in Leaching of Gold and Silver from Sulphide Ore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted to increase silver extraction and to reduce the ... Massive Sulfide Deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick.

233

Thermal and thermomechanical data from in situ heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden. Technical Information Report No. 29  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heater experiments were conducted in a granite body adjacent to a recently abandoned iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden, to investigate the response of a hard rock mass to thermal loading. Heating commenced in June, 1978 and lasted for approximately one year. The rock was heavily instrumented to measure the temperature, displacement, and stress fields. Monitoring of the rock response continued for half a year after the heaters were deactivated. In-situ post-experiment calibrations of instrumentation were completed by June 1980. The enormous data base (approximately 50 million measurements), recorded by a computer-based data acquisition system, has now been structured, verified, and converted to engineering units. This report describes the types of data available and the procedures used for data acquisition, transfer, encoding-decoding, reorganization, storage, processing, and verification. Information is given on data structure and format and how potential users can access the computer-readable data.

Chan, T.; Binnall, E.; Nelson, P.; Stolzman, R.; Wan, O.; Weaver, C.; Ang, K.; Braley, J.; McEvoy, M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

IDENTIFYING CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STELLAR HALO FROM ACCRETED, KICKED-OUT, AND IN SITU POPULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a medium-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type giant stars at mid-Galactic latitudes of (30 Degree-Sign fall on the locus defined by the majority of stars in the halo. The chemical abundance trends of the RV outliers suggest that this sample consists predominantly of stars accreted from infalling dwarf galaxies. A smaller fraction of stars in the RV outlier sample may have been formed in the inner Galaxy and subsequently kicked to higher eccentricity orbits, but the sample is not large enough to distinguish conclusively between this interpretation and the alternative that these stars represent the tail of the velocity distribution of the thick disk. Our data do not rule out the possibility that a minority of the sample could have formed from gas in situ on their current orbits. These results are consistent with scenarios where the stellar halo, at least as probed by M giants, arises from multiple formation mechanisms; however, when taken at face value, our results for metal-rich halo giants suggest a much higher proportion to be accreted than found by Carollo et al. and more like the fraction suggested in the analysis by Nissen and Schuster and Schuster et al. We conclude that M giants with large RVs can provide particularly fruitful samples to mine for accreted structures and that some of the velocity sequences may indeed correspond to real physical associations resulting from recent accretion events.

Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Mail Code 5246, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R., E-mail: asheffield@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

Data Warehousing and Data Mining Conference, January 25, 1999, Singapore Data Mining:Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Warehousing and Data Mining Conference, January 25, 1999, Singapore 1 Welcome Data Mining:Data://kais.mines.edu/~xwu/ #12;Data Warehousing and Data Mining Conference, January 25, 1999, Singapore 2 OutlineOutline s Data (supervised, unsupervised, and hybrid) s Problems with data - cleaning, transforming, structuring

Wu, Xindong

236

In situ electrochemical dilatometry of carbide-derived carbons  

SciTech Connect

The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 , which could be described with pore swelling.

Hantel, M M [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | In situ neutron diffraction study of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate The structure of a CO clathrate hydrate has been studied for the first time using high-P low-T neutron diffraction. Clathrate Rietveld analysis shows that lattice parameter a (SII cubic clathrate structure) increases with increasing temperature. CO molecules are positionally disordered and off-centered in both large and small cages. Each large cage is occupied by two CO molecules while each small cage is occupied by one CO. A representative neutron diffraction pattern of SII CO clathrate hydrate. Variation of lattice parameter a of CO SII clathrate hydrate as a function of temperature. A representative neutron diffraction pattern of SII CO clathrate hydrate. Variation of lattice parameter a of CO SII clathrate hydrate as a function of temperature.

238

In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Parametric analysis of in situ retorting options for NOSR 1  

SciTech Connect

A parametric analysis was performed in evaluating the vertical MIS technologies as a function of retort configuration, shale grade, oil yield, costs and resource compatibility. Two basic retorting scenarios were evaluated: MIS retorting alone, and MIS/surface retorting combination. In all cases the raw shale oil was upgraded to produce refinery feedstock grade shale oil. Based on an assessment of the NOSR 1 resource, it is determined that in situ grades of 20 gpt with surface retorting grades of 37.5 gpt can be supported by the resource for the production of 50,000 BPD of shale oil over at least 20 to 25 years plant life. However, based on the current level of development of MIS technology, it is believed 80% in situ retort yields are not possible. It is concluded that the NOSR resource is not configured for current MIS retorting technologies to be a viable alternative to surface retorting technologies.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

In-situ Electrochemical Dilatometry of Carbide-derived Carbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Å. Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 Å, which could be described with pore swelling.

Hantel, M. M.; Presser, V.; Kotz, R.; Gogotsi, Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ArcMine: A GIS extension to support mine reclamation planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new GIS extension, named ArcMine, developed to support reclamation planning in abandoned mining areas. ArcMine provides four tools to (a) assess mine subsidence hazards, (b) estimate the erosion of mine wastes, (c) analyze flow ... Keywords: GIS, Mine reclamation, Mine wastes, Mine water, Reforestation, Subsidence

Sung-Min Kim; Yosoon Choi; Jangwon Suh; Sungchan Oh; Hyeong-Dong Park; Suk-Ho Yoon; Wa-Ra Go

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

245

Indonesian coal mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Strip Mine Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to strip mining of coal and reclamation, review...

247

Algorithms for data mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data of massive size are now available in a wide variety of fields and come with great promise. In theory, these massive data sets allow data mining and exploration on a scale previously unimaginable. However, in practice, ...

Wang, Grant J. (Grant Jenhorn), 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Microcantilever Sensors for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time, in-situ analysis is critical for decision makers in environmental monitoring, but current techniques for monitoring and characterizing radionuclides rely primarily on liquid scintillation counting, ICP-MS, and spectrofluorimetry, which require sample handling and labor intensive lengthy analytical procedures. Other problems that accompany direct sampling include adherence to strict holding times and record maintenance for QA/QC procedures. Remote, automated sensing with direct connection to automated data management is preferred.

Thundat, Thomas G.; Zhiyu Hu; Brown, Gilbert M.; Baohua Gu

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Gas withdrawal from an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

Liquid and gaseous products are recovered from oil shale in an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale by retorting oil shale in the fragmented mass to produce gaseous and liquid products. The liquid products are withdrawn from the retort to a first level in unfragmented formation below the elevation of the bottom boundary of the retort. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the retort to a second level below the elevation of the first level.

Mills, E.A.

1979-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

In Situ Temporary Repair of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on combustion turbine blades and vanes is a critical issue in the power generation industry. Degradation of TBCs occur by the spallation of the ceramic layer — partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) — that resides on the Al2O3-covered MCrAlY bondcoat. In the event of such local failures of the TBC, a quick in-situ technique to repair the coating would be desirable.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center...

253

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

situ oil-shale process waters produced laboratory- scale andAn In Situ Produced Oil Shale Process Water D. S. Farrier,].OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER D. S. Farrier

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NASA investments in in situ technologies and instruments for sample return missions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrument technologies for the in situ exploration of planets are of particular interest for future NASA planetary science missions.12 In situ analysis is complicated because answering specific science questions requires technologies suited to specific ...

Janice L. Buckner; Lisa May

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC ReportOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Schwatzwalder uranium mine and area, Jeffersonof the Section 27 Mine, Ambrosia Lake Uranium district, Newuranium deposits tSims, 1964) Figure 3. Simplified geologic map of the Schwartzwalder Mine

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Iron(II) Oxidation by SO 2 /O 2 in Uranium Leach Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2003 ... Oxidants are added in uranium leaching in acid media to convert iron(II) in solution to iron(III). Iron(III) has an important role in the leaching of ...

260

The utilization of uranium industry technology and relevant chemistry to leach uranium from mixed-waste solids  

SciTech Connect

Methods for the chemical extraction of uranium from a number of refractory uranium-containing minerals found in nature have been in place and employed by the uranium mining and milling industry for nearly half a century. These same methods, in conjunction with the principles of relevant uranium chemistry, have been employed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to chemically leach depleted uranium from mixed-waste sludge and soil. The removal of uranium from what is now classified as mixed waste may result in the reclassification of the waste as hazardous, which may then be delisted. The delisted waste might eventually be disposed of in commercial landfill sites. This paper generally discusses the application of chemical extractive methods to remove depleted uranium from a biodenitrification sludge and a storm sewer soil sediment from the Y-12 weapons plant in Oak Ridge. Some select data obtained from scoping leach tests on these materials are presented along with associated limitations and observations which might be useful to others performing such test work. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring ... of the Chemical Changes and Surface Properties of Carbonated Waste Cement ... Flux for Basic Oxygen Steel Making Using Waste Oxides of Steel Plant ... Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material - A

264

Batch leaching tests: Colloid release and PAH leachability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess leaching potential of contaminants from waste, and to provide a test to classify, hazardous waste. It is a batch leaching test where a waste (such as contaminated soil) and an extraction fluid are agitated for a predetermined time. Since TCLP employs an aggressive mixing technique, it is possible that hydrophobic contaminant-laden colloidal fractions may appear as 'dissolved' constituents. In this study, TCLP was employed to determine the leachability of PAH contamination from a coal tar contaminated site. Generated colloids and the apparent aqueous concentrations of naphthalene and phenanthrene were measured at various mixing times in the extraction fluid. A mathematical model was developed that predicted the apparent aqueous contaminant concentration in the filtrate. This model accounted for the presence of colloids in the filtrate, and quantified contaminant desorption from colloids. The fraction of colloid-bound contaminant was predicted to be negligible for naphthalene. However, phenanthrene was predicted to have a significant fraction of the total contaminant in the colloidal phase, while naphthalene was primarily dissolved. The desorption model and PAH desorption data are presented here to determine the extent of colloid-facilitated desorption during leaching tests.

Bergendahl, J. [Worcester Polytechnique Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING / APRIL 2001 / 359 PERFORMANCE AND LEACHING ASSESSMENT OF FLOWABLE SLURRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common core binder systems using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test method) investigated leaching potential of foun- dry by-products material using both the TCLP and American Foundrymen, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium, showed elemental concentration at or below

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

267

PERFORMANCE AND LEACHING ASSESSMENT OF FLOWABLE SLURRY By Tarun R. Naik1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test method. The test data showed the presence of a wide- dry by-products material using both the TCLP and American Foundrymen's Society (APS) leachate test), evaluated leach- ate characteristics of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

268

Actinide leaching from waste glass: air-equilibrated versus deaerated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leach tests were conducted in aerated and deaerated solutions using glass containing /sup 239/Pu, /sup 237/Np and /sup 238/U, at temperatures of 25 and 75/sup 0/C and in deionized water, 0.03M NaHCO/sub 3/ and WIPP B salt brine for periods up to 341 days. Neptunium leaching was decreased by factors of 10 to 100 (depending on leach time) in the deaerated solutions at 75/sup 0/C. Plutonium leaching decreased by factors of 3 to 5 due to deaeration, but only in the deionized water leachate at 25/sup 0/C. Uranium leaching in salt brine and deionized water at 25/sup 0/C was decreased by factors of 2 to 5 in deaerated solutions. Time and temperature dependencies were also observed for the leaching of the actinides during the course of this work. After the first leach interval (2 days), the time dependent release curve for Pu was essentially flat or decreasing under all conditions, and maximum Pu solution concentration (at 25/sup 0/C), as implied by release in aerated leachate, agrees with independent solubility data. The low /sup 239/Pu releases observed in leach solutions are consistent with accumulation of /sup 239/Pu on the leached glass surface. The amounts of uranium and neptunium leached increased with time under most conditions. For Pu leaching, temperature has a small effect in deaerated leachates and negative effect in aerated leachates. Neptunium leaching generally increase with temperature under aerated conditions, but not in proportion to increases of matrix element leaching. In deaerated leachates, Np leaching decreases with temperature. Uranium leaching increases with temperature under aerated and deaerated conditions but not in proportion to matrix element increases. 4 figures, 6 tables.

Peters, R.D.; Diamond, H.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A model for fast web mining prototyping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web mining is a computation intensive task, even after the mining tool itself has been developed. Most mining software are developed ad-hoc and usually are not scalable nor reused for other mining tasks. The objective of this paper is to present a model ... Keywords: model, prototyping, web mining, web mining applications

Álvaro Pereira; Ricardo Baeza-Yates; Nivio Ziviani; Jesús Bisbal

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil (sand) media for generating a subsurface iron oxide-based reactive barrier that could immobilize arsenic (As) and other dissolved metals in groundwater. A simple in situ arsenic treatment process was successfully developed for treating contaminated rural groundwater using iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Using imbibition flow, the system facilitated the dispersive transport of ferrous iron (Fe2+) and oxidant solutions in porous sand to generate an overlaying blanket where the Fe2+ was oxidized and precipitated onto the surface as ferric oxide. The iron oxide (FeOx) emplacement process was significantly affected by (1) the initial surface area and surface-bound iron content of the sand, (2) the pH and solubility of the coating reagents, (3) the stability of the oxidant solution, and (4) the chemical injection schedule. In contrast to conventional excavate-and-fill treatment technologies, this technique could be used to in situ replace a fresh iron oxide blanket on the sand and rejuvenate its treatment capacity for additional arsenic removal. Several bench-scale experiments revealed that the resultant IOCS could treat arsenic-laden groundwater for extended periods of time before approaching its effective life cycle. The adsorption capacity for As(III) and As(V) was influenced by (1) the amount of iron oxide accumulated on the sand surface, (2) the system pH, and (3) competition for adsorption sites from other groundwater constituents such as silicon (Si) and total dissolved solids (TDS). Although the IOCS could be replenished several times before exhaustion, the life cycle of the FeOx reactive barrier may be limited by the gradual loss of hydraulic conductivity induced by the imminent reduction of pore space over time.

Abia, Thomas Sunday

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Montana Coal Mining Code (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Labor and Industry is authorized to adopt rules pertaining to safety standards for all coal mines in the state. The Code requires coal mine operators to make an accurate map or...

272

Computational aspects of data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade has witnessed an impressive growth of Data Mining through algorithms and applications. Despite the advances, a computational theory of Data Mining is still largely outstanding. This paper discusses some aspects relevant to computation ...

Flaviu Adrian M?rginean

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method for in situ gasification of a subterranean coal bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of the present invention relates to providing controlled directional bores in subterranean earth formations, especially coal beds for facilitating in situ gasification operations. Boreholes penetrating the coal beds are interconnected by laser-drilled bores disposed in various arrays at selected angles to the major permeability direction in the coal bed. These laser-drilled bores are enlarged by fracturing prior to the gasification of the coal bed to facilitate the establishing of combustion zones of selected configurations in the coal bed for maximizing the efficiency of the gasification operation.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1977-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

In-situ laser retorting of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale formations were retorted in-situ and gaseous hydrocarbon products recovered by drilling two or more wells into an oil shale formation. After fracturing a region of oil shale formation by directing a high energy laser beam into one of the wells and focussing the laser beam into a region of oil shale formation from a laser optical system, compressed gas was forced into the well which supports combustion in the flame front ignited by laser beam, thereby retorting the oil shale and recovering gaseous hydrocarbon products which permeate through the fractured oil shale from one of the auxiliary wells.

Bloomfield, H.S.

1977-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nanocrystallization in a shear band: An in situ investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preferential nanocrystal formation in shear bands that occurred upon applying a tensile strain on an Al-rich metallic glass has been analyzed in situ in a transmission electron microscope as a function of time after the shear band initiation and as a function of local heating. The results indicate the presence of a transient period before nanocrystal formation sets in, as well as the necessity of thermal activation and further show that nanocrystals developed only within the shear bands. These results support models that explain nanocrystal formation in shear bands based on an increased local mobility.

Wilde, G.; Roesner, H. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

BUREAU OF MINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mines to conduct mineral surveys on U.S. Bureau of Land Management administered land designated as Wilderness Study Areas " •.. to determine the mineral values, if any, that may be present...." Results must be made available to the public and be submitted to the President and the Congress. This report presents the results of a Bureau of Mines mineral survey of a portion of the Clan Alpine Mountains Wilderness Study Area (NV-030-l02), Churchill County, NV. This open-file report will be summarized in a joint report published by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data were gathered and interpreted by Bureau of Mines personnel from Western Field Operations Center, E. 360 Third Avenue, Spokane, WA 99202. The report has been edited by members of the Branch of Mineral Land Assessment at the field center and

Mineral L; Assessmen Tf; Jerry E. Olson; Donald P. Hodel; Robert C. Horton; Director Preface

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions.

Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analytical mass leaching model for contaminated soil and soil stabilized waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model for evaluating mass leaching from contaminated soil or soil stabilized waste is presented. The model is based on mass transport due to advection, dispersion, and retardation and can be used to evaluate the suitability and/or efficiency of soil washing solutions based on the results of column leaching studies. The model differs from more traditional models for column leaching studies in that the analysis is based on the cumulative mass of leachate instead of leachate concentration. A cumulative mass basis for leaching eliminates the requirement for determination of instantaneous effluent concentrations in the more traditional column leaching approach thereby allowing for the collection of relatively large effluent volumes. The cumulative masses of three heavy metals -- Cd, Pb, and Zn -- leached from two specimens of soil mixed with fly ash are analyzed with the mass leaching model to illustrate application and limitation of the model.

Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Glade, M.J. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The lighting of underground mines  

SciTech Connect

This book describes mine lighting problems. It is intended as a textbook on mine lighting knowledge, a reference book for people needing information on the subject, and as a design guide for mine personnel who lack specific training in lighting principles.

Trotter, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mining ideas from textual information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This approach introduces idea mining as process of extracting new and useful ideas from unstructured text. We use an idea definition from technique philosophy and we focus on ideas that can be used to solve technological problems. The rationale for the ... Keywords: Idea mining, Technology, Text classification, Text mining

Dirk Thorleuchter; Dirk Van den Poel; Anita Prinzie

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

From data to knowledge mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most past approaches to data mining have been based on association rules. However, the simple application of association rules usually only changes the user's problem from dealing with millions of data points to dealing with thousands of rules. Although ... Keywords: Data Mining, Knowledge Cohesion, Ontology, Sense Making, Text Mining

Ana cristina Bicharra garcia; Inhauma Ferraz; Adriana s. Vivacqua

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Methane ignition catalyzed by in situ generated palladium nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic ignition of methane over the surfaces of freely-suspended and in situ generated palladium nanoparticles was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were conducted in a laminar flow reactor. The palladium precursor was a compound (Pd(THD){sub 2}, THD: 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) dissolved in toluene and injected into the flow reactor as a fine aerosol, along with a methane-oxygen-nitrogen mixture. For experimental conditions chosen in this study, non-catalytic, homogeneous ignition was observed at a furnace temperature of {proportional_to}1123 K, whereas ignition of the same mixture with the precursor was found to be {proportional_to}973 K. In situ production of Pd/PdO nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning mobility, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of particles collected at the reactor exit. The catalyst particle size distribution was log-normal. Depending on the precursor loading, the median diameter ranged from 10 to 30 nm. The mechanism behind catalytic ignition was examined using a combined gas-phase and gas-surface reaction model. Simulation results match the experiments closely and suggest that palladium nanocatalyst significantly shortens the ignition delay times of methane-air mixtures over a wide range of conditions. (author)

Shimizu, T.; Abid, A.D.; Poskrebyshev, G.; Wang, H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Nabity, J.; Engel, J.; Yu, J. [TDA Research, Inc., 12345 W. 52nd Ave, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 (United States); Wickham, D. [Reaction Systems, LLC, 19039 E. Plaza Drive, Suite 290, Parker, CO 80134 (United States); Van Devener, B.; Anderson, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Williams, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Mail Stop RZA, 1950 Fifth Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chemically assisted in situ recovery of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project was to investigate the feasibility of the chemically assisted in situ retort method for recovering shale oil from Colorado oil shale. The chemically assisted in situ procedure uses hydrogen chloride (HCl), steam (H{sub 2}O), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at moderate pressure to recovery shale oil from Colorado oil shale at temperatures substantially lower than those required for the thermal decomposition of kerogen. The process had been previously examined under static, reaction-equilibrium conditions, and had been shown to achieve significant shale oil recoveries from powdered oil shale. The purpose of this research project was to determine if these results were applicable to a dynamic experiment, and achieve penetration into and recovery of shale oil from solid oil shale. Much was learned about how to perform these experiments. Corrosion, chemical stability, and temperature stability problems were discovered and overcome. Engineering and design problems were discovered and overcome. High recovery (90% of estimated Fischer Assay) was observed in one experiment. Significant recovery (30% of estimated Fischer Assay) was also observed in another experiment. Minor amounts of freed organics were observed in two more experiments. Penetration and breakthrough of solid cores was observed in six experiments.

Ramierz, W.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Single Molecule Techniques for Advanced in situ Hybridization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most significant achievements of modern science is completion of the human genome sequence, completed in the year 2000. Despite this monumental accomplishment, researchers have only begun to understand the relationships between this three-billion-nucleotide genetic code and the regulation and control of gene and protein expression within each of the millions of different types of highly specialized cells. Several methodologies have been developed for the analysis of gene and protein expression in situ, yet despite these advancements, the pace of such analyses is extremely limited. Because information regarding the precise timing and location of gene expression is a crucial component in the discovery of new pharmacological agents for the treatment of disease, there is an enormous incentive to develop technologies that accelerate the analytical process. Here we report on the use of plasmon resonant particles as advanced probes for in situ hybridization. These probes are used for the detection of low levels of gene-probe response and demonstrate a detection method that enables precise, simultaneous localization within a cell of the points of expression of multiple genes or proteins in a single sample.

Hollars, C W; Stubbs, L; Carlson, K; Lu, X; Wehri, E

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

286

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford Tank C-106 sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale washing and caustic leaching test performed on sludge from Hanford Tank C-106. The purpose of this test was to determine the behavior of important sludge components when subjected to washing with dilute or concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions. The results of this laboratory-scale test were used to support the design of a bench-scale washing and leaching process used to prepare several hundred grams of high-level waste solids for vitrification tests to be done by private contractors. The laboratory-scale test was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1996 as part of the Hanford privatization effort. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS; EM-30).

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Hoopes, F.V.; Steele, R.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

LEACHING OF TITANIUM FROM MONOSODIUM TITANATE AND MODIFIED MST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a fouled coalescer and pre-filters from Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) operations showed evidence of Ti containing solids. Based on these results a series of tests were planned to examine the extent of Ti leaching from monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) in various solutions. The solutions tested included a series of salt solutions with varying free hydroxide concentrations, two sodium hydroxide concentrations, 9 wt % and 15 wt %, nitric and oxalic acid solutions. Overall, the amount of Ti leached from the MST and mMST was much greater in the acid solutions compared to the sodium hydroxide or salt solutions, which is consistent with the expected trend. The leaching data also showed that increasing hydroxide concentration, whether pure NaOH solution used for filter cleaning in ARP or the waste salt solution, increased the amount of Ti leached from both the MST and mMST. For the respective nominal contact times with the MST solids - for filter cleaning or the normal filter operation, the dissolved Ti concentrations are comparable suggesting either cause may contribute to the increased Ti fouling on the MCU coalescers. Tests showed that Ti containing solids could be precipitated from solution after the addition of scrub acid and a decrease in temperature similar to expected in MCU operations. FTIR analysis of these solids showed some similarity to the solids observed on the fouled coalescer and pre-filters. Although only a cursory study, this information suggests that the practice of increasing free hydroxide in feed solutions to MCU as a mitigation to aluminosilicate formation may be offset by the impact of formation of Ti solids in the overall process. Additional consideration of this finding from MCU and SWPF operation is warranted.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydraulic mining method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic mining method includes drilling a vertical borehole into a pitched mineral vein and a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by a fluid jet stream and the resulting slurry flows down the footwall borehole into the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly therethrough to the surface.

Huffman, L.H.; Knoke, G.S.

1984-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

291

In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Zhao, Hequan (State College, PA)

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. In addition to kinetic modeling and experimental task, CFD modeling (by Texas A&M) of airfoil injection and its effects on blade aerodynamics and turbine performance. This report discusses validation of the model against single-vane combustion test data from Siemens Westinghouse, and parametric studies of injection reheat in a modern turbine. The best location for injection is at the trailing edge of the inlet guide vane. Combustion is incomplete at trailing edges of subsequent vanes. Recommendations for further development are presented.

T.E. Lippert; D.M. Bachovchin

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. This report discusses engineering cycle evaluations on various reheat approaches, using GateCycle and ChemCad software simulations of typical F-class and G-class engines, modified for alternative reheat cycles. The conclusion that vane 1 reheat offers the most advantageous design agrees with the conclusions of the detailed chemical kinetics (Task 2) as verified by high temperature testing (Task 3) and Blade path CFD (Task 1) tasks. The second choice design option (vane 2 reheat after vane 1 reheat) is also validated in all tasks. A conceptual design and next recommended development tasks are presented.

R.A. Newby; D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Zinc electrode shape change. 1; In situ monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on zinc electrode shape change, the redistribution of zinc material over the electrode during repeated cycling, identified as one of the main life-limiting factors for alkaline nickel oxide/zinc secondary batteries. To investigate this phenomenon in situ, a radiotracer, {sup 65}Zn, is incorporated in the battery and its movement monitored during repeated cycling of the battery. The changes in the distribution of {sup 65}Zn over the electrode during battery operation are attributed to the displacement of radioactive zincate ions via the battery electrolyte. It is shown that the spatial distribution of {sup 65}Zn offers a reliable indication for the zinc material distribution over the electrode, provided an electrode with uniformly specific radioactivity is used in the measurements. Radiotracer experiments using zinc electrodes containing 2 weight percent HgO as an additive and uniformly labeled with {sup 203}Hg, have revealed that during battery cycling no substantial net transport of mercury species occurs.

Visschev, W.; Barendrecht, E.; Einerhand, R.E.F.; deGoeij, J.J.M. (Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (NL))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An evaluation of in-situ bioremediation processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was the primary focus in the initial application of in-situ bioremediation which, from its development in the 1970s, has grown to become one of the most promising technologies for the degradation of a wide variety of organic contaminants. The degradation of contaminants in subsurface soils is the current new focus of the technology. While the need for improvements in the technology does exist, the indisputable fact remains that this technology is by far the least expensive and that it has the capability to provide long term reduced levels of contaminants or long term complete remediation of contaminated sites. The aim of this paper is to disclose pertinent information related to current conditions and current feelings in the area of new research, novel applications, new government regulations, and an overview of new topics on the horizon that relate to the overall technology.

Cole, L.L. [Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (United States); Rashidi, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Programs Directorate

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, Prof. Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moore, Tom [OmniProbe, Inc.; Magel, Greg [OmniProbe, Inc.; Hartfield, Cheryl [OmniProbe, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Numerical modeling of a true in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical model has been developed to simulate the true in situ retorting process. The retort is assumed to be a low-porosity fractured bed composed of large seams of competent shale separated at intervals by open fractures. Kerogen and carbonate decomposition and char, oil, and gas combustion, as well as other reactions, are considered. In contrast to the results of rubbled-bed models, the retorting of seams thicker than one meter is characterized by incomplete retorting and significant oil combustion (10 to 40% of that retorted). The amount of shale retorted can, however, be maximized by proper control of air and steam injection rates, with the injected gas being optimally 40 to 50% steam. The oil available for recovery from a two meter seam can then be, for example, as high as 50% of Fischer Assay.

Tyner, C.E.; Hommert, P.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sweep efficiency modeling of modified in-situ retorts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple two-dimensional flow model is used to illustrate the effects of different porosity and permeability distributions and retort geometries on sweep efficiency during modified in-situ oil shale retorting. Results of these case studies, two emphasizing different retort geometries and porosity distributions and one a study of nonuniform flow around a single, large block, are presented. The most interesting is a simulation of the flow field and resultant retort front movement for Occidental Petroleum Company Retort 5. A porosity/permeability distribution was chosen based on reported tracer data. The results of the model calculation indicate a sweep efficiency of about 55%. From these data an estimate can be made of the amount of oil degradation from burning, cracking, and coking. 17 figures.

Gregg, M.L.; Campbell, J.H.

1980-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

309

Improved hybrid solar cells via in situ UV-polymerization.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One approach for making inexpensive inorganic-organic hybrid photovoltaic (PV) cells is to fill highly ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) arrays with solid organic hole conductors such as conjugated polymers. Here, a new in situ UV polymerization method for growing polythiophene (UV-PT) inside TiO{sub 2} NTs is presented and compared to the conventional approach of infiltrating NTs with pre-synthesized polymer. A nanotubular TiO{sub 2} substrate is immersed in a 2,5-diiodothiophene (DIT) monomer precursor solution and then irradiated with UV light. The selective UV photodissociation of the C-I bond produces monomer radicals with intact {pi}-ring structure that further produce longer oligothiophene/PT molecules. Complete photoluminescence quenching upon UV irradiation suggests coupling between radicals created from DIT and at the TiO{sub 2} surface via a charge transfer complex. Coupling with the TiO{sub 2} surface improves UV-PT crystallinity and {pi}-{pi} stacking; flat photocurrent values show that charge recombination during hole transport through the polymer is negligible. A non-ideal, backside-illuminated setup under illumination of 620-nm light yields a photocurrent density of {approx} 5 {micro}A cm{sup -2} - surprisingly much stronger than with comparable devices fabricated with polymer synthesized ex situ. Since in this backside architecture setup we illuminate the cell through the Ag top electrode, there is a possibility for Ag plasmon-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples the conjugated polymer to the TiO{sub 2} surface, the absorption of sunlight can be improved and the charge carrier mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced.

Tepavcevic, S.; Darling, S. B.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Rajh, T.; Sibener, S. J.; Univ. of Chicago

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Depth enhancement techniques for the in situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

In-situ vitrification (ISV) is a process by which electrical energy is supplied to a soil/waste matrix. The resulting Joule heat raises the temperature of the soil/waste matrix, producing a pool of molten soil. Since its inception, there have been many successful applications of the technology to both staged and actual waste sites. However, there has been some difficulty in extending the attainable treatment melt depth to levels greater than 5 m. Results obtained from application of two novel approaches for extending the ultimate treatment depth attainable with in-situ vitrification (ISV) are presented. In the first, the electrode design is modified to concentrate the Joule heat energy delivered to the soil/waste matrix in the lower region of the target melt zone. This electrode design has been dubbed the hot-tip electrode. Results obtained from both computational and experimental investigations of this design concept indicate that some benefit toward ISV depth enhancement was realized with these hot-tip electrodes. A second, alternative approach to extending process depth with ISV involves initiating the melt at depth and propagating it in either vertical direction (e.g., downward, upward, or both) to treat the target waste zone. A series of engineering-scale experiments have been conducted to assess the benefits of this approach. The results from these tests indicate that ISV may be effectively initiated and sustained using this subsurface start-up technique. A survey of these experiments and the associated results are presented herein, together with brief discussion of some considerations regarding setup and implementation of this subsurface start-up technique.

Lowery, P.S.; Luey, J.; Seiler, D.K.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Timmerman, C.L. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator In Situ Pressure Test Guidelines, Revision 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information in this document provides guidance for the performance of in situ pressure testing of steam generator tubes. In situ pressure testing refers to hydrostatic pressure tests performed on installed tubing in the field. Such testing is considered a direct means of evaluating tube structural and leakage integrity. In situ pressure testing can be used to support condition monitoring of steam generator tube integrity.This is a required document for a steam generator program developed ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

In-Situ Tensile Stress Determination of an AA7xxx Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ Synthesis of Al/TiC Composites by Combustion Reaction in an Al Melt · Increased Production and Quality with Reduced Operating Costs and Emissions in ...

313

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Porous NiO-YSZ Composite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In-Situ Neutron Diffraction Study of Porous NiO-YSZ Composite ... Gas Turbines of the Future: Hydrogen and Oxy-Combustion Environments.

314

In-Situ Synthesis of Shape Memory Alloy-Nitinol by Laser Direct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Shape Memory Alloys. Presentation Title, In-Situ Synthesis of Shape Memory ...

315

In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity modeling of ?-Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study uses a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity modeling to elucidate the deformation mechanisms active in ?-Uranium.

316

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion) and the oil shale reserves near Rock Springs,homogeneous reserve of an in situ oil-shale process water

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Platform Towards In Situ Stress/Strain Measurement in Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis demonstrates the design, fabrication and testing of a platform for in situ stress/strain measurement in lithium ion battery electrodes. The platform - consisting… (more)

Baron, Sergio Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

In-situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-Ray Synchrotron Tomography of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local measurements of da/dN were possible with the 3D data sets obtained from tomography. In situ measurements of crack opening displacement (COD) were ...

319

In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy--A probe of cathode materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 Authors Deb, Aniruddha, and Elton J. Cairns Journal Fluid Phase Equilibria Volume 241 Pagination 4-19 Keywords absorption-fine-structure, in situ electrochemistry,...

320

Method and Apparatus for In-Situ Real Time Characterization of ...  

Method and Apparatus for In-Situ Real Time Characterization of Energy Storage and Energy Conversion Devices Idaho National Laboratory. Contact INL ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Soil Contaminated by Benzene ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... In-Situ Chemical Oxidation of Soil Contaminated by Benzene, Lead and Cadmium by Marcia Bragato and Jorge Alberto Soares Tenorio ...

322

CPT-Based Probabilistic and Deterministic Assessment of In Situ Seismic Soil Liquefaction Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / AUGUST 2006 / 1049sands. ” Proc. , In Situ ’86, ASCE, New York, 281–302. Seed,AND GEOENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING © ASCE / AUGUST 2006 / 1051

Moss, Robb E.S.; Seed, Raymond B; Kayen, Robert E.; Stewart, Jonathan P; Der Kiureghian, Armen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Experimental Study of In Situ Combustion with Tetralin and Metallic Catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experimental studies showed the feasibility of adding metallic catalysts and tetralin for the upgrade and increased recovery of heavy oil during the in situ combustion… (more)

Palmer-Ikuku, Emuobonuvie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

(Al 2 O 3 -Al 3 Nb)/Al Composite Materials by In-situ Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sequence of the in-situ reaction was confirmed by DTA, DSC, XRD ... for Space Propulsion System, Nozzle and Combustion Chamber Application in Japan.

325

Optimization of in-situ combustion| Maximizing production and reducing CO2 footprint.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The in-situ combustion (ISC) process is an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method that utilizes fuel in place to upgrade and displace the hydrocarbons in… (more)

Liu, Zhenshuo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Heavy metals content in acid mine drainage at abandoned and active mining area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted at former Barite Mine Tasik Chini and former iron mine Sungai Lembing in Pahang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Coal mining technology, economics and policy - 1984  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on US coal mines. Topics considered at the conference included coal preparation, fine coal and refuse dewatering, flotation, coal transport, storage, environmental controls, wetlands, farmland reclamation, acid rain, longwall mining, mine monitoring systems, occupational safety, training, surface mining, underground mining, water resources development, and the US export policy.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mining Electrification: Data Collection of Battery Operated Mining Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mining industry has used electrically powered equipment for decades. However, problems related to battery charging and changing have prevented purchase and use of electric equipment in some sectors of the industry. Currently, mines use "conventional" chargers that have long charge times and that decrease optimal use of battery-powered equipment. The batteries most commonly used in underground mining operations are 128 volts, a range not yet adopted by fast-charge battery technology. Developing and in...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE IMPACT OF A URANIUM MINING SITE ON THE STREAM SEDIMENTS (CRUCEA MINE, ROMANIA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE IMPACT OF A URANIUM MINING SITE ON THE STREAM SEDIMENTS (CRUCEA MINE, ROMANIA) Petrescu L. 1 methods were used to evaluate the impact of uranium mine dumps on the stream sedi- ments from Crucea uranium mine show that the impact of Crucea mine on water quality downstream of mining area

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

NUMERICAL MODELING TO ASSESS POSSIBLE INFLUENCE OF THE MINE OPENINGS ON FAR-FIELD IN SITU STRESS MEASUREMENTS AT STRIPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and B. Hamison, 1981. "Hydraulic Fracturing and Overcoringdetermined by hydraulic fracturing) and vertical profiles.analysis on the hydraulic fracturing experimental data (Doe

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NUMERICAL MODELING TO ASSESS POSSIBLE INFLUENCE OF THE MINE OPENINGS ON FAR-FIELD IN SITU STRESS MEASUREMENTS AT STRIPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and/or the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company. AnyEnergy, or the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company. Refer -through the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company (SKBF), and

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Influence of MgO and C/A and Cooling System on Alumina Leaching ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on alumina leaching property of calcium aluminate slag were investigated by ... The Control of Fluoride Concentration in ET? Alüminyum Bayer Refinery Liquor.

333

Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of Black Shale without Reagent. Author(s), Zhigan Deng. On-Site Speaker ...

334

D3: Heap Acid Leaching of Uranium Ore-Application of Fractional ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, MS&T'12 Poster Session. Presentation Title, D3: Heap Acid Leaching of ...

335

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk ...

336

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminuman increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration.The concentration of uranium continually increased over 59

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Al-Cr -2007-1 February 1, 2007 Aluminum and Chromium Leaching ...  

Al-Cr -2007-1 February 1, 2007 Aluminum and Chromium Leaching Workshop Atlanta, GA January 23 – 24, 2007 Crowne Plaza – Airport Feedback Questionnaire

338

Recovery of Nickel from Leaching Liquor of Printed Circuit Board by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP -TCLP · Mechanical Recycling of Electronic Wastes for Materials Recovery.

339

Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Leaching Toxicity of Pb and Ba Containing in Cathode Ray Tube Glasses by SEP-TCLP. Author(s), Mengjun Chen, Fu-Shen Zhang, Jianxin  ...

340

Evaluation of Leaching Protocols for the Testing of Coal Combustion Byproducts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Beneficial reuse of coal combustion byproducts requires an evaluation of metal leaching potential. Reuse of high carbon fly ash in highway embankment construction was evaluated… (more)

Becker, Jason Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co. White Pine Mine, Michigan, Ontonagon Whitedelph Mine,tholeitic lavas of northern Michigan, J. Petrology, v. 13,the Ahmeek Quadrangle, Michigan, U.S. Geol. Survey map GQ-

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mining Your Brain For Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, WORLD GOLD. Presentation Title, Mining Your Brain For Safety: A New Approach To Utilizing Your Best ...

343

Hungarian Mining and Metallurgical (OMBKE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORGANIZATION. Members work in six different sections within the Society. These are: Mining (coal and minerals); Oil and gas; Iron and steel; Nonferrous metals ...

344

Treatment of acid mine lakes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mining of lignite in Lusatia has a long history of over 100 years. The extracted brown coal is utilized to generate electricity in three large… (more)

Schipek, Mandy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

346

Influence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for different options), the power of solar emissions can reach 60-400 W/cm2. The spacecraft would be protectedInfluence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations A. Hassanein Argonne National document. #12;Influence of Solar-Probe Inherent Atmosphere on In-Situ Observations A. Hassanein*, A. I

Harilal, S. S.

347

Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion Authors Abu believed to cause fuel formation for in-situ combustion have been studied and modeled. A thin, packed bed the approach of a combustion front. Analysis of gases produced from the reaction cell revealed that pyrolysis

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

348

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed and T. Detman2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed S. Watari1 and T. Detman2 1 Communications shock observa- tions. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6±0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization Sanja Tepavcevic, Seth B-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. 1. Introduction Hybrid solar cells have been developed

Sibener, Steven

351

In situ X-ray diffraction study of thin film Ir/Si solid state reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solid state reaction between a thin (30nm) Ir film and different Si substrates (p-type Si(100), n- and p-type Si(111), silicon on insulator (SOI) and polycrystalline Si) was studied using a combination of in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ ... Keywords: Ir, NiSi, Si, XRD

W. Knaepen; J. Demeulemeester; D. Deduytsche; J. L. Jordan-Sweet; A. Vantomme; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; C. Detavernier; C. Lavoie

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

On-demand unstructured mesh translation for reducing memory pressure during in situ analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When coupling two different mesh-based codes, for example with in situ analytics, the typical strategy is to explicitly copy data (deep copy) from one implementation to another, doing translation in the process. This is necessary because codes usually ... Keywords: computational meshes, in situ analysis, lazy evaluation, unstructured grids

Jonathan Woodring, James Ahrens, Timothy J. Tautges, Tom Peterka, Venkatram Vishwanath, Berk Geveci

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Waterflood improvement in the Permian Basin: Impact of in-situ-stress evaluations  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated in-situ-stress magnitudes and directions to support waterflood improvement programs in McElroy field and North Westbrook Unit. In-situ-stress and hydraulic-fracture directions coincided with directional floodwater effects. This information contributed to successful waterflood realignment programs.

Nolen-Hoeksema, R.C.; Avasthi, J.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Pape, W.C. (West Australian Petroleum Pty. Ltd., Perth (Australia)); El Rabaa, A.W. (Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Characterization and Optimization Using In Situ and Ex Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summary of this report is that: in situ SE gives insight into growth mechanisms and accurate layer thickness; (2) ex situ SE measures completed device structures to determine integrated optical properties; and (3) the combination of in situ and ex situ SE provides a powerful method for pinpointing the effects of processing changes in actual SHJ devices and guiding optimization.

Levi, D.; Iwaniczko, E.; Page, M.; Branz, H.; Wang T.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

357

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

LOST CREEK ISR, LLC, LOST CREEK IN SITU RECOVERY FACILITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (NRC) staff and representatives of Lost Creek ISR, LLC (LCI) was held to discuss LCI’s application for a license to construct and operate a uranium in situ recovery facility (ISR) in Wyoming. The NRC staff had completed its review of LCI’s application and prepared an internal draft of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER). The conference call was held as a follow-up to the conference call between the NRC and LCI on September 25, 2009 (ML093130083) to discuss open issues that NRC staff identified in preparing the draft SER. A summary of the meeting is enclosed. Within 30 days of receipt of this letter, please either provide the information identified in the meeting summary or inform us of the date you expect to provide the information. At this point in the review process, NRC staff has presented all open issues to LCI regarding the Lost Creek facility SER. The staff previously provided written discussions of incomplete responses and open issues on April 23, 2009 and November 9, 2009. The staff is therefore curtailing any further work until resolution of the open issues. Note that a delay in providing information may result in a delay in NRC staff’s completion of the SER. If you have any questions regarding this letter or the enclosed meeting summary, please contact me at (301) 415-6142, or by email at

Mr. Wayne; W. Heili

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

In-situ combustion project at Bartlett, Kansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing research program for enhanced oil recovery, the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy, is in the process of developing petroleum-recovery techcniques for shallow, low-productivity, heavy-oil deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri and northeastern Oklahoma. Personnel at BETC designed and conducted an in-situ combustion experiment on the Link Lease in Labette County, near Bartlett, Kansas. The Nelson-McNeil calculation method was used to calculate oil recovery and predict production time for a 1.25 acre inverted five-spot. Two attempts to ignite the formation are described. The well completion methods, hydraulic fracturing, injection of air, workovers, production techniques, and well-monitoring methods of the process are described. Production results are shown for both combustion attempts. The progression of the burn and the final extent of the burn front were evaluated by the following methods: (1) controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique (CSAMT), (2) thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), (3) burn-front model, (4)geophysical log analysis, and (5) computer model study. 26 figures, 8 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Spence, K.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of the "DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) projects at DOE facilities. As current and projected budgets for the EM program indicate reduced and flat funding profiles for the foreseeable future, the potential exists for this institutional knowledge to be lost as the ramp-down of project staffing commences with the cessation of ARRA. EM's Office of Deactivation & Decommissioning and Facility Engineering

364

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures On October 19-22, 2010, an independent expert panel of scientists and engineers met to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Savannah River National Laboratory in developing a technical report that recommends the best sensing and concrete technologies for monitoring and isolating contaminants within highly-radioactive nuclear structures in the DOE in situ decommissioning program. This document identifies the recommendations of the panel for shortand long-term objectives needed to develop a remote monitoring network for the C Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ

365

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures On October 19-22, 2010, an independent expert panel of scientists and engineers met to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Savannah River National Laboratory in developing a technical report that recommends the best sensing and concrete technologies for monitoring and isolating contaminants within highly-radioactive nuclear structures in the DOE in situ decommissioning program. This document identifies the recommendations of the panel for shortand long-term objectives needed to develop a remote monitoring network for the C Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ

366

In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Annual report FY 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Canonsburg residues. [UMTRA project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is considering several methods for carrying out remedial actions in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at the site of an inactive uranium-processing mill. The main objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of in-situ stabilization as the remedial action. In-situ stabilization is an alternative to site decontamination and offsite disposal. The problems associated with offsite hauling of large quantities of contaminated material and with the location and development of a new disposal site could be avoided by the implementation of an in-situ stabilization concept. In addition, the in-situ approach would be more cost-effective than offsite disposal. This study will establish that a technically feasible and implementable in-situ stabilization concept can be developed that meets regulatory requirements and is cost effective. This study in no way commits the DOE to implement any specific actions described herein. 11 refs., 30 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Proceedings, 26th international conference on ground control in mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following topic headings: multiple-seam mining, surface subsidence, coal pillar, bunker and roadway/entry supports, mine design and highwall mining, longwall, roof bolting, stone and hardrock mining, rock mechanics and mine seal.

Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G. (and others) (eds.)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Is there a grand challenge or X-prize for data mining?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This panel will discuss possible exciting and motivating Grand Challenge problems for Data Mining, focusing on bioinformatics, multimedia mining, link mining, text mining, and web mining. Keywords: X-prize, bioinformatics, data mining, grand challenge, image mining, link mining, multimedia mining, text mining, video mining, web mining

Gregory Piatetsky-Shapiro; Robert Grossman; Chabane Djeraba; Ronen Feldman; Lise Getoor; Mohammed Zaki

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Glossary of Mining & Metallurgical Terms, 1881  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 18, 1981... or two other sources, to serve as an appendix to a new work on mining ... AIME, the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum ...

371

Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) Eligibility Agricultural...

372

MINES CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WORKING WITH HYPERLINKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-page: http://inside.mines.edu/~msimoes and http://aceps.mines.edu Citation Profile (Scholar Google): http://scholar.google.com

373

Coal mining technology: theory and practice  

SciTech Connect

This book is intended for use in teaching coal-mine design to undergraduate mining engineering students. The preliminary chapters cover the geology of coal, coal statistics (classification, distribution, resources etc.), exploration and mine planning and development. Auxiliary operations such as ventilation, drainage and ground control are considered in some detail before the chapters on conventional, continuous, longwall and shortwall mining. Haulage and electric power in mines are included, as are chapters on surface mining, mine drainage, communication and lighting. Ten case-studies of underground mining systems are discussed. 70 references.

Stefanko, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modelling and simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cement-based materials: Interactions between damage and leaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of the durability of cement-based materials, which could be employed in underground structures for nuclear waste disposal, requires accounting for deterioration factors, such as chemical attacks and damage, and for the interactions between these phenomena. The objective of the present paper consists in investigating the long-term behaviour of cementitious materials by simulating their response to chemical and mechanical solicitations. In a companion paper (Stora et al., submitted to Cem. Concr. Res. 2008), the implementation of a multi-scale homogenization model into an integration platform has allowed for evaluating the evolution of the mineral composition, diffusive and elastic properties inside a concrete material subjected to leaching. To complete this previous work, an orthotropic micromechanical damage model is presently developed and incorporated in this numerical platform to estimate the mechanical and diffusive properties of damaged cement-based materials. Simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cementitious materials are performed with the tool thus obtained and compared with available experiments. The numerical results are insightful about the interactions between damage and chemical deteriorations.

Stora, E., E-mail: stora@univ-mlv.f [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Bary, B. [Atomic Energy Commission, CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/Laboratoire d'Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); He, Q.-C. [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire de Modelisation et Simulation Multiechelle, FRE3160 CNRS, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Deville, E.; Montarnal, P. [CEA Saclay DEN/DANS/DM2S/SFME/MTMS, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Summary of the oil shale fragmentation program at Anvil Points Mine, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

During 1981 and 1982, an extensive oil shale fragmentation research program was conducted at the Anvil Points Mine near Rifle, Colorado. The primary goals were to investigate factors involved for adequate fragmentation of oil shale and to evaluate the feasibility of using the modified in situ retort (MIS) method for recovery of oil from oil shale. The test program included single-deck, single-borehole tests to obtain basic fragmentation data; multiple-borehole, multiple-deck explosive tests to evaluate practical aspects for developing an in situ retort; and the development of a variety of instrumentation techniques to diagnose the blasting event. This paper will present an outline of the field program, the type of instrumentation used, some typical results from the instrumentation, and a discussion of explosive engineering problems encountered over the course of the program. 4 references, 21 figures, 1 table.

Dick, R.D.; Young, C.; Fourney, W.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effects of in-situ oil-shale retorting on water quality near Rock Springs, Wyoming, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Experimental in-situ retorting techniques (methods of extracting shale oil without mining) were used from 1969 to 1979 by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) at a test area near Rock Springs in southwestern Wyoming. The retorting experiments at site 9 have produced elevated concentrations of some contaminants in the ground water. During 1988 and 1989, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, conducted a site characterization study to evaluate the chemical contamination of ground water at the site. Water samples from 34 wells were analyzed; more than 70 identifiable organic compounds were detected using a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analytical methods. This report provides information that can be used to evaluate possible remedial action for the site. Remediation techniques that may be applicable include those techniques based on removing the contaminants from the aquifer and those based on immobilizing the contaminants. Before a technique is selected, the risks associated with the remedial action (including the no-action alternative) need to be assessed, and the criteria to be used for decisions regarding aquifer restoration need to be defined. 31 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Lindner-Lunsford, J.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Plafcan, M.; Lowham, H.W.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

An Intelligent Evaluation Model Based on the LEACH Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to introduce some key parameters for the tracking application in wireless sensor networks. In this work the LEACH protocol with J-sim simulation tool has been implemented, and consequently some useful trade-off analysis results among ... Keywords: J-sim, LEACH, EDCR, Evaluation Model

Ning Cao; Russell Higgs; Gregory M. P. O'Hare

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Water as a leaching medium for hydrolysis of sorghum in anaerobic digestion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of using water to leach hydrolysis products from sorghum used as an anaerobic digestion feedstock. The pH of the leachate had no effect on the cumulative COD measured in the leachate. Milling the sorghum with a three roll mill prior to leaching appeared to slightly increase the hydrolysis of structural carbohydrates in the sorghum.

Egg, R.; Coble, C.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Web Mining – the Ontology Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The World Wide Web today provides users access to extremely large number of Web sites many of which contain information of education and commercial values. Due to the unstructured and semi-structured nature of Web pages and the design idiosyncrasy of Web sites, it is a challenging task to develop digital libraries for organizing and managing digital content from the Web. Web mining research, in its last 10 years, has on the other hand made significant progress in categorizing and extracting content from the Web. In this paper, we represent ontology as a set of concepts and their inter-relationships relevant to some knowledge domain. The knowledge provided by ontology is extremely useful in defining the structure and scope for mining Web content. We will therefore review Web mining and describe the ontology approach to Web mining. The application of these Web mining techniques to digital library systems will also be discussed.

Ee-peng Lim; Aixin Sun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measuring mine roof bolt strains  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

Steblay, Bernard J. (Lakewood, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

In Situ Sensors for the Chemical Industry- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The project focused on analytical techniques that can be applied in situ. The innovative component of this project is the focus on achieving a significant breakthrough in two of the three primary Process Analytical (PA) fields. PA measurements can roughly be broken down into: ? Single component measurements, ? Multiple component measurements and ? Multiple component isomer analysis. This project targeted single component measurements and multiple component measurements with two basic technologies, and to move these measurements to the process, achieving many of the process control needs. During the project the following achievements were made: ? Development of a low cost Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) Analyzer system for measurement of 1) Oxygen in process and combustion applications, 2) part per million (ppm) H2O impurities in aggressive service, 3) ppm CO in large scale combustion systems. This product is now commercially available ? Development of a process pathlength enhanced (high sensitivity) Laser Based Analyzer for measurement of product impurities. This product is now commercially available. ? Development of signal processing methods to eliminate measurement errors in complex and changing backgrounds (critical to chemical industry measurements). This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. ? Development of signal processing methods to allow multi-component measurements in complex chemical streams. This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. ? Development of process interface designs to allow in-situ application of TDL technology in aggressive (corrosive, high temperature, high pressure) commonly found in chemical processes. This development is incorporated in the commercially available ASI TDL analyzer. ? Field proving of 3 laser-based analyzer systems in process control and combustion applications at Dow Chemical. Laser based analyzers have been available for >5yrs, however significant product price/performance issues have minimized their applicability in the chemical industry. In order to take advantage of the promise of this technology a number of technology advances were required, within price limits for market acceptance. This project significantly advanced the state of TDL technology for application in chemical industry applications. With these advances a commercially available product now exists that has already achieved market success and is installed in critical applications. The ability to make fast, sensitive and accurate measurements inside the chemical processes is now delivering improved process control, energy efficiency and emissions control within the U.S. Chemical Industry. Despite the success we enjoyed for the laser-based sensors, there were significant technical barriers for the solid-state sensors. With exception of a generic close-coupled extractive housing and electronics interface, there were significant issues with all of the solid-state sensor devices we sought to develop and test. Ultimately, these issues were roadblocks that prevented further development and testing. The fundamental limitations of available sensor materials that we identified, formulated and tested were overwhelming. This situation forced our team to cancel these portions of the project and focus our resources on laser-based sensor techniques. The barriers of material compatibility, sensitivity, speed of response, chemical interferences, etc. are surmountable in the field of solid-state sensors. Inability to address any single one of these attributes will prevent wide-implementation into this market. This situation is plainly evident by the lack of such devices in the online analyzer market (for petrochemicals).

Tate, J.D.; Knittel, Trevor

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ground water control for an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of particles containing oil shale. An open base of operation is excavated in the formation above the retort site, and an access drift is excavated to the bottom of the retort site. Formation is explosively expanded to form the fragmented mass between the access drift and an elevation spaced below the bottom of the base of operation, leaving a horizontal sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the top of the fragmented mass and the bottom of the base of operation. The sill pillar provides a safe base of operation above the fragmented mass from which to control retorting operations. A plurality of blasting holes used in explosively expanding the formation extend from the base of operation, through the sill pillar, and open into the top of the fragmented mass. Trenches are formed in the base of operation for collecting ground water which enters the base of operation prior to and during retorting operations, and collected ground water is withdrawn from the base of operation. Casings can be placed in the blasting holes and adapted for controlling gas flow through the fragmented mass during retorting operations. The casings extend above the floor of the base of operation to inhibit flow of ground water through the blasting holes into the fragmented mass, and other blasting holes not having such casings are sealed. After retorting is completed, the floor of the base of operation can be covered with a layer of concrete and/or the blasting holes can be sealed with concrete to inhibit leakage of ground water into treated oil shale particles in the fragmented mass.

Ridley, R.D.

1979-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

Friebel, Daniel

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING WORKSHOP REPORT  

SciTech Connect

In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private sector, universities or other agencies are expected to have greater expertise will be accomplished through an open, competitive solicitation process. Several areas will require joint efforts from the two classes of resources.

Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cold cap subsidence for in situ vitrification and electrodes therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode for use in in situ vitrification of soil comprises a molybdenum rod received within a conductive sleeve or collar formed of graphite. Electrodes of this type are placed on either side of a region containing buried waste material and an electric current is passed therebetween for vitrifying the soil between the electrodes. The graphite collar enhances the thermal conductivity of the electrode, bringing heat to the surface, and preventing the formation of a cold cap of material above the ground surface. The annulus between the molybdenum rod electrode and the graphite collar is filled with a conductive ceramic powder of a type that sinters upon the molybdenum rod, protecting the same from oxidation as the graphite material is consumed, or a metal powder which liquifies at operating temperatures. The molybdenum rod in the former case may be coated with an oxidation protectant, e.g. of molybdenum disilicide. As insulative blanket is suitably placed on the surface of the soil during processing to promote subsidence by allowing off-gassing and reducing surface heat loss. In other embodiments, connection to vitrification electrodes is provided below ground level to avoid loss of connection due to electrodes deterioration, or a sacrificial electrode may be employed when operation is started. Outboard electrodes can be utilized to square up the vitrified area. Further, the center of the molybdenum rod can be made hollow and filled with a powdered metal, such as copper, which liquifies at operating temperatures. In one embodiment, the molybdenum rod and the graphite collar are physically joined at the bottom.

Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Carter, John G. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); FitzPatrick, Vincent F. (Richland, WA); Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA); Morgan, William C. (Richland, WA); Oma, Kenton H. (Richland, WA); Timmerman, Craig L. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

In situ enhanced soil mixing. Innovative technology summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Situ Enhanced Soil Mixing (ISESM) is a treatment technology that has been demonstrated and deployed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The technology has been developed by industry and has been demonstrated with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Science and Technology and the Office of Environmental Restoration. The technology is particularly suited to shallow applications, above the water table, but can be used at greater depths. ISESM technologies demonstrated for this project include: (1) Soil mixing with vapor extraction combined with ambient air injection. [Contaminated soil is mixed with ambient air to vaporize volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The mixing auger is moved up and down to assist in removal of contaminated vapors. The vapors are collected in a shroud covering the treatment area and run through a treatment unit containing a carbon filter or a catalytic oxidation unit with a wet scrubber system and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter.] (2) soil mixing with vapor extraction combined with hot air injection [This process is the same as the ambient air injection except that hot air or steam is injected.] (3) soil mixing with hydrogen peroxide injection [Contaminated soil is mixed with ambient air that contains a mist of diluted hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) solution. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution chemically oxidizes the VOCs to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water.] (4) soil mixing with grout injection for solidification/stabilization [Contaminated soil is mixed as a cement grout is injected under pressure to solidify and immobilize the contaminated soil in a concrete-like form.] The soils are mixed with a single-blade auger or with a combination of augers ranging in diameter from 3 to 12 feet.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

In-Situ Characterization of Underwater Radioactive Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental requirement underpinning safe clean-up technologies for legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ponds, pools and wet silos is the ability to characterize the radioactive waste form prior to retrieval. The corrosion products resulting from the long term underwater storage of spent nuclear fuel, reactor components and reprocessing debris present a major hazard to facility decontamination and decommissioning in terms of their radioactive content and physical / chemical reactivity. The ability to perform in-situ underwater non-destructive characterization of sludge and debris in a safe and cost-effective manner offers significant benefits over traditional destructive sampling methods. Several techniques are available for underwater measurements including (i) Gross gamma counting, (ii) Low-, Medium- and High- Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy, (iii) Passive neutron counting and (iv) Active Neutron Interrogation. The optimum technique depends on (i) the radioactive inventory (ii) mechanical access restrictions for deployment of the detection equipment, interrogation sources etc. (iii) the integrity of plant records and (iv) the extent to which Acceptable Knowledge which may be used for 'fingerprinting' the radioactive contents to a marker nuclide. Prior deployments of underwater SNF characterization equipment around the world have been reviewed with respect to recent developments in gamma and neutron detection technologies, digital electronics advancements, data transfer techniques, remote operation capabilities and improved field ruggedization. Modeling and experimental work has been performed to determine the capabilities, performance envelope and operational limitations of the future generation of non-destructive underwater sludge characterization techniques. Recommendations are given on the optimal design of systems and procedures to provide an acceptable level of confidence in the characterization of residual sludge content of legacy wet storage facilities such that retrieval and repackaging of SNF sludges may proceed safely and efficiently with support of the regulators and the public. (author)

Simpson, A.P.; Clapham, M.J.; Swinson, B. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The removal of mercury from solid mixed waste using chemical leaching processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to evaluate chemical leaching as a technique to treat soils, sediments, and glass contaminated with either elemental mercury or a combination of several mercury species. Potassium iodide/iodine solutions were investigated as chemical leaching agents for contaminated soils and sediments. Clean, synthetic soil material and surrogate storm sewer sediments contaminated with mercury were treated with KI/I{sub 2} solutions. It was observed that these leaching solutions could reduce the mercury concentration in soil and sediments by 99.8%. Evaluation of selected posttreatment sediment samples revealed that leachable mercury levels in the treated solids exceeded RCRA requirements. The results of these studies suggest that KI/I{sub 2} leaching is a treatment process that can be used to remove large quantities of mercury from contaminated soils and sediments and may be the only treatment required if treatment goals are established on Hg residual concentrations in solid matrices. Fluorescent bulbs were used to simulate mercury contaminated glass mixed waste. To achieve mercury contamination levels similar to those found in larger bulbs such as those used in DOE facilities a small amount of Hg was added to the crushed bulbs. The most effective agents for leaching mercury from the crushed fluorescent bulbs were KI/I{sub 2}, NaOCl, and NaBr + acid. Radionuclide surrogates were added to both the EPA synthetic soil material and the crushed fluorescent bulbs to determine the fate of radionuclides following chemical leaching with the leaching agents determined to be the most promising. These experiments revealed that although over 98% of the dosed mercury solubilized and was found in the leaching solution, no Cerium was measured in the posttreatment leaching solution. This finding suggest that Uranium, for which Ce was used as a surrogate, would not solubilize during leaching of mercury contaminated soil or glass.

Gates, D.D.; Chao, K.K.; Cameron, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Weathering and leaching of glass for solar heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to assess the effects of weathering on the transmittance of glass, several old samples were collected from two desert environments for evaluation. The glass obtained by PNL at the Hanford reservation in Washington came from south-facing, vertical windows which were known to be over forty years old. The glass obtained by Sandia from Barstow, California, is estimated to be over twenty years old. To determine the durability of glasses proposed for heliostat mirrors, selected samples were leached in a Soxhlet apparatus and pH 4 and pH 9 buffer solutions. The glass samples produced by the float process are soda-lime-silica glasses, whereas the glass samples produced by the fusion process are aluminosilicate glasses. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Rusin, J. M.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Data Mining and Data Warehousing, July 31, 1999, NUS, Singapore Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Mining and Data Warehousing, July 31, 1999, NUS, Singapore 1 Welcome Data Mining from Large Email: xwu@ kais.mines.edu Home Page: http://kais.mines.edu/~xwu/ #12;Data Mining and Data Warehousing, July 31, 1999, NUS, Singapore 2 Outline s Why Large Databases? s How Large is "Very Large"? s Data

Wu, Xindong

392

Coal mining technology, economics and policy - 1984  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at the American Mining Congress International Coal Show held in 1984. Topics considered at the conference included coal preparation, environmental controls, longwall mining, management, safety, surface mining operations, underground mining operations, and US transportation and export policy.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coal mining technology, economics and policy 1990  

SciTech Connect

The conference began with several presentations on the US coal energy policy and trends in the coal industry, including tax impacts and changes in environmental regulations. Technical topics included diesel exhaust emissions in underground mines; use of wetlands; occupational safety; land reclamation techniques; and advanced technologies for longwall mining, surface mining, and underground mining. Forty-two papers have been indexed separately.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Coal mining technology, economics and policy 1986  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on coal mining and coal preparation. Topics considered at the conference included fluidized-bed combustion, thermal drying, communications, environmental controls, ground subsidence with longwall mining, electric utilities, mine emergency planning, surface mining, dragline failures, rail transport, underground face operations, and remote seam mapping.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Coal mining technology, economics and policy - 1986  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on coal mining. Topics considered at the conference included coal preparation, communications, environmental controls, current regulatory issues regarding ground subsidence with longwall mining, personnel management, equipment manufacturers, engineers, contractors, safety and health aspects of mine emergency planning, surface mining operations, coal transport, underground face operations, and underground service operators.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Interactive mining of high utility patterns over data streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High utility pattern (HUP) mining over data streams has become a challenging research issue in data mining. When a data stream flows through, the old information may not be interesting in the current time period. Therefore, incremental HUP mining is ... Keywords: Data mining, Data streams, High utility pattern mining, Incremental mining, Interactive mining, Knowledge discovery

Chowdhury Farhan Ahmed; Syed Khairuzzaman Tanbeer; Byeong-Soo Jeong; Ho-Jin Choi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Review of Operations Research in Mine Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of operations research to mine planning date back to the 1960s. Since that time, optimization and simulation, in particular, have been applied to both surface and underground mine planning problems, including mine design, long-and short-term ... Keywords: dispatching, equipment selection, literature review, mine design, mine planning, open-pit mining, optimization, production scheduling, simulation, underground mining

Alexandra M. Newman; Enrique Rubio; Rodrigo Caro; Andrés Weintraub; Kelly Eurek

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium  

SciTech Connect

The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

None Available

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

RT in situ PCR detection of MART-1 and TRP-2 mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of melanoma and nevi.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primer Sequences and Sizes of RT-PCR Products Target MART-1and keratinocytic tumors MART-1 RT in situ PCR IHC TRP-2RT in situ PCR IHC Primary melanoma in situ invasive

Itakura, Eijun; Huang, Rong-Rong; Wen, Duan-Ren; Paul, Eberhard; Wünsch, Peter H; Cochran, Alistair J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Differentiating data- and text-mining terminology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a new discipline emerges it usually takes some time and lots of academic discussion before concepts and terms get standardised. Such a new discipline is text mining. In a groundbreaking paper, Untangling text data mining, ... Keywords: IR, KDD, TDM, algorithms, database queries, documentation, full-text retrieval, information retrieval, knowledge creation, knowledge discovery, knowledge management, languages, measurement, metadata, text data mining, text mining, text-mining, theory

Jan H. Kroeze; Machdel C. Matthee; Theo J. D. Bothma

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oil shale mining and the environment. [Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Experimental mining of oil shale, to date, has been conducted only in the shallow Mahogany Zone and has utilized only the room and pillar mining method. The U.S. Bureau of Mines is planning a demonstration mine in the deep, thick oil-shale deposits in Colorado. This study describes the 4 mining concepts that are planned for demonstration and the interrelationship of these concepts and the environment. The environmental aspects of oil-shale development also are discussed.

Rajaram, V.; Kauppila, T.A.; Bolmer, R.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparative Study of Various Formulations of Evaporations from Bare Soil Using In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vajious formulations of surface evaporation are tested against in situ data collected over a plot of loamy bare ground. Numerical simulations lasting seven days are compared with observations of near-surface water content and cumulative ...

J. F. Mahfouf; J. Noilhan

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedingsof the 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

In-situ Tracking of Slip Activation in Bulk Polycrystalline Zirconium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In-situ Tracking of Slip Activation in Bulk Polycrystalline Zirconium. Author(s), J. Lind, S. F. Li, C. M. Hefferan, R. Pokharel, A. D. Rollett, ...

405

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements conducted in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate the relationship between reservoir permeability and the contemporary in situ stress field. Data from wells drilled into productive and nonproductive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively

406

In Situ Delta-13 CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Australia In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.J. Francey and C.E. Allison CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research, Private Bag No. 1, Mordialloc, Victoria, Australia 3195 Period of Record 1982-1993 Methods Air samples are collected during baseline condition episodes at a frequency of around one sample per week. Baseline conditions are characterized by wind direction in the sector 190-280°, condensation nucleus concentration below 600 cm3, and steady, continuous CO2 concentrations (variation + 0.2 ppmv per hour). The Cape Grim in situ extraction line is based on 3 high-efficiency glass U-tube traps with internal cooling coils. A vacuum pump draws air from either the 10 m or 70 m intakes, and sampling

407

Soil Moisture Analyses at ECMWF: Evaluation Using Global Ground-Based In Situ Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ soil moisture from 117 stations across the world and under different biome and climate conditions are used to evaluate two soil moisture products from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)—namely, the operational ...

C. Albergel; P. de Rosnay; G. Balsamo; L. Isaksen; J. Muñoz-Sabater

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Routine application of the in situ soil analysis technique by the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a technique developed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for field spectrometry, the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL) has routinely performed in situ soil measurements in the vicinity of five nuclear power stations for more than a decade. As a special research endeavor, several locations at the FURNAS Angra 1 site in Brazil having high natural backgrounds were also measured in 1987. The technical basis of the technique, a comparison of soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil analyses from the same sites, the advantages and disadvantages of the in situ methodology, and the evolution of the portable equipment utilized at YAEL for the field measurements are presented in this paper.

Murray, J.C.; McCurdy, D.E.; Laurenzo, E.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Comparison of in Situ, Reanalysis, and Satellite Water Budgets over the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ, reanalysis, and satellite-derived datasets, surface and atmospheric water budgets of the Upper Colorado River basin are analyzed. All datasets capture the seasonal cycle for each water budget component. For precipitation, all ...

Rebecca A. Smith; Christian D. Kummerow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

In Situ Observations of Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Properties Using the Counterflow Virtual Impactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a new technique for making in situ measurements of cirrus cloud microphysical properties. Sampling of cirrus clouds was performed using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI). The CVI was used to sample cloud elements larger ...

K. B. Noone; K. J. Noone; J. Heintzenberg; J. Ström; J. A. Ogren

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Photonic Crystal Biosensor with In-Situ Synthesized DNA Probes for Enhanced Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a nearly 8-fold increase in multi-hole defect photonic crystal biosensor response by incorporating in-situ synthesis of DNA probes, as compared to the conventional functionalization method employing pre-synthesized DNA probe immobilization.

Hu, Shuren [Vanderbilt University, Nashville] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Zhao, Y. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL] [ORNL; Weiss, Sharon [Vanderbilt University, Nashville] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Next-Generation Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline for In Situ ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-situ electrical characterization will enable operando study of energy and ... Analysis of Phase Distribution in Thin Surface Layers Comparable to the ... and Computational Modelling Studies of Structural Disorder in Energy Storage Materials.

413

Comparison of In Situ Humidity Data from Aircraft, Dropsonde, and Radiosonde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the Measurement of Tropospheric Humidity (MOTH) Tropic and MOTH Arctic airborne field experiments, comparing a number of in situ humidity measurements. Good agreement is shown between the Total Water Content probe on ...

A. K. Vance; J. P. Taylor; T. J. Hewison; J. Elms

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Apparatus for Pre-stressing Specimens in Torsion for In Situ ...  

Specimens in Torsion for In-situ Passive Fracture Toughness Testing in an Extremely High-pressure Environment of Hydrogen, U.S. Patent Application 12/498,799, ...

415

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Study on the In-Situ Remediation of Cr-Contaminated Soil by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stabilization of Chromium-based Slags with MgO · Study on the EMD Residue and Shale for Preparing Solidification Brick · Study on the In-Situ Remediation of  ...

417

Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

Moore, F.S.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

In Situ Cloud Sensing with Multiple Scattering Lidar: Simulations and Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the spatially inhomogeneous nature of clouds there are large uncertainties in validating remote sensing retrievals of cloud properties with traditional in situ cloud probes, which have sampling volumes measured in liters. This paper ...

K. Franklin Evans; R. Paul Lawson; Pat Zmarzly; Darren O'Connor; Warren J. Wiscombe

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

In Situ, Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that ...

Cziczo, Daniel James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Lagrangian Objective Analysis Technique for Assimilating In Situ Observations with Multiple-Radar-Derived Airflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Lagrangian analysis technique is developed to assimilate in situ boundary layer measurements using multi-Doppler-derived wind fields, providing output fields of water vapor mixing ratio, potential temperature, and virtual potential ...

Conrad L. Ziegler; Michael S. Buban; Erik N. Rasmussen

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization of Spent Oil Shales, EPA-600/'7-'78- 021, Feb.Impact Analysis for an Oil Shale Complex at Parachute Creek,from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~OF MODIFIED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS J. P. Fox and P.

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Exploring power behaviors and trade-offs of in-situ data analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific applications target exascale, challenges related to data and energy are becoming dominating concerns. For example, coupled simulation workflows are increasingly adopting in-situ data processing and analysis techniques to address costs and ...

Marc Gamell, Ivan Rodero, Manish Parashar, Janine C. Bennett, Hemanth Kolla, Jacqueline Chen, Peer-Timo Bremer, Aaditya G. Landge, Attila Gyulassy, Patrick McCormick, Scott Pakin, Valerio Pascucci, Scott Klasky

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Synchrotron SAXS of Reverted Al-4wt.%Cu during In Situ Artificial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu, which is a more stable than the as-quenched condition, was artificially aged in situ while probing with SAXS configured at beam-line X27C at NSLS. Results ...

428

In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2 ... cascades at the early stages of damage development at very low dose (0.01 ...

429

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings ofthe 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryJr. , "Disposal J. spent shale ash in "in situ" retortedInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shale andOil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone the

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

In Situ Cloud Sensing with Multiple Scattering Lidar: Design and Validation of an Airborne Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The in situ cloud lidar is designed to measure cloud volumes of millions of cubic meters to overcome the sampling limitations of traditional cloud probes in inhomogeneous clouds. This technique sends laser pulses horizontally from an aircraft ...

K. Franklin Evans; Darren O’Connor; Pat Zmarzly; R. Paul Lawson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Measurement of Soil Properties in-situ -- Present Methods -- Their Applicability and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft Ground," Proceedings, ASCE Specialty Conference on Per-and Foundations Division, ASCE, Vol. 97, No. SM2, pp. 457-of In-Situ Testing," Proc. ASCE Specialty Conference on In-

Mitchell, J.K.; Guzikowski, Frank; Villet, Willem C.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

In-Situ Oil Combustion: Processes Perpendicular to the Main Gas Flow Direction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since most easy oil has been produced, there is an increased interest in enhanced oil recovery methods, e.g., in-situ oil combustion. Oil combustion in its… (more)

Achterbergh, C.P.W.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Plasticity in W6%Re Revealed by In Situ Laue Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address plasticity in WRe alloys, in-situ Laue micro-compression tests were performed on W-6%Re (w/w) oriented with the compression axis in [238] and ...

437

In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

Leach test methodology for the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental leach studies in the WRIT Program have two primary functions. The first is to determine radionuclide release from waste forms in laboratory environments which attempt to simulate repository conditions. The second is to elucidate leach mechanisms which can ultimately be incorporated into nearfield transport models. The tests have been utilized to generate rates of removal of elements from various waste forms and to provide specimens for surface analysis. Correlation between constituents released to the solution and corresponding solid state profiles is invaluable in the development of a leach mechanism. Several tests methods are employed in our studies which simulate various proposed leach incident scenarios. Static tests include low temperature (below 100/sup 0/C) and high temperature (above 100/sup 0/C) hydrothermal tests. These tests reproduce nonflow or low-flow repository conditions and can be used to compare materials and leach solution effects. The dynamic tests include single-pass, continuous-flow(SPCF) and solution-change (IAA)-type tests in which the leach solutions are changed at specific time intervals. These tests simulate repository conditions of higher flow rates and can also be used to compare materials and leach solution effects under dynamic conditions. The modified IAEA test is somewhat simpler to use than the one-pass flow and gives adequate results for comparative purposes. The static leach test models the condition of near-zero flow in a repository and provides information on element readsorption and solubility limits. The SPCF test is used to study the effects of flowing solutions at velocities that may be anticipated for geologic groundwaters within breached repositories. These two testing methods, coupled with the use of autoclaves, constitute the current thrust of WRIT leach testing.

Bradley, D.J.; McVay, G.L.; Coles, D.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Turbines Using Wireless, Passive, Ceramic Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Turbines Using Wireless, Passive, Ceramic Sensors Description The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to strengthening America's energy security. Central to this mission is to increase the percentage of domestic fuels used to provide for the Nation's energy needs. To this end, DOE-NETL is supporting projects to develop technologies that will improve the efficiency, cost, and environmental performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

442

Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of in-situ stress distribution within reservoir sandstones and the surrounding formations is recognized as one of the most important factors in the design and analysis of hydraulic fractures. In-situ stress contrast between layers of rock ultimately controls the vertical fracture growth and, thus, directly affects fracture length and width. A new correlation model has been developed for estimating in-situ stress distribution within different interlayers. The method correlates values of minimum principal in-situ stress derived from both open-hole log data and cased-hole stress tests and gamma ray readings. The information used during this research project came from the Gas Research Institute (GRI's) Staged Field Experiment (SFE) No. I and No.2 wells. The new parameter correlation developed in this research has been applied to the Travis Peak Formation in East Texas. The advantages of the new correlation are (1) for a routine application, the correlations provide the most useful source of in-situ stress determination in the Travis Peak Formation, (2) the effect of shale has been considered in the correlation model, and (3) the model is easy to use once the lithology of the layer has been identified. This new model can be used to estimate in-situ stress distribution from logs and cores. However, it is important that these estimates be calibrated with actual field measurements of in-situ stress. Once the model correlation model has been calibrated, the petroleum engineer can reduce the cost of developing data sets for conducted reservoir studies by using only logs to estimate the in-situ stress profile.

Gongora, Cesar Augusto

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Epitaxial VN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Ar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epitaxial VN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Ar¿ Sputter Etched-welded to a Mo substrate heater. In Situ Preparation: The epitaxial VN 001 layers were grown in a multichamber that has been shown Ref. 1 to produce sharp 1 1 RHEED patterns. The target, a 5-cm-diam water-cooled V disk

Gall, Daniel

444

Pilot Tests of In Situ Reactive Zone Groundwater Remediation for Arsenic Near a Coal Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ groundwater treatment is an alternative to groundwater extraction and above ground treatment. The applicability of this technology is being evaluated for the treatment of dissolved trace elements associated with ash impoundments and landfills. The objective of this work is to demonstrate practical in situ treatment through initial bench testing for technology selection followed by a field pilot test. Laboratory bench test results provided the basis for the field testing; ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

Braymen, S.D.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

446

Ge(Li) low level in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer applications  

SciTech Connect

Currently a Ge(Li) spectrometer is being employed for in-situ measurements of radionuclides contained in soil. This is being done at nuclear reactor sites and in complex radionuclide fields at the Nevada Test Site. The methodology and precision of the in-situ spectrometric technique was previously established for analysis of radionuclides in soil. Application of the technique to gaseous and liquid effluents containing radionuclides has shown a great deal of promise. (auth)

Phelps, P.L.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Roth, S.J.; Huckabay, G.W.; Sawyer, D.L.

1973-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

Proceedings, 27th international conference on ground control in mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered include: coal bumps and rockbursts, surface subsidence, surface mining, mine seals, longwall mining, pillars, roof bolting, rock mechanics and standing supports.

Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G. (and others) (eds.)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

MODELING OF STATIC MINING SUBSIDENCE IN A NONLINEAR MEDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Static Evaluation of Mining Subsidence," Rep. No. LBL-11356,MODELING OF STATIC MINING SUBSIDENCE IN A NONLINEAR MEDIUMMODELING OF STATIC MINING SUBSIDENCE IN A NONLINEAR ~lliDIUM

Ratigan, J.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Opportunities to Reduce Energy and Water Intensity of Mining ... bearing on the value of mining projects and the image of the mining industry; ...

450

Taxonomy-superimposed graph mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New graph structures where node labels are members of hierarchically organized ontologies or taxonomies have become commonplace in different domains, e.g., life sciences. It is a challenging task to mine for frequent patterns in this new graph model ...

Ali Cakmak; Gultekin Ozsoyoglu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mining Conveyor Systems Marketing Kit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These conveyor-systems marketing guidelines are aimed at utility sales and marketing personnel who wish to call on customers who currently mine various minerals, but have limited expertise in the use of conveyor systems.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

Coal Mining Reclamation (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Reclamation Division of the Public Service Commission is tasked with administering the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation. Specific regulations can be found in article 69-05.2 of...

453

School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Chemical Engineering Wide Web address: http://www.mines.edu/ Academic department and division telephone numbers are Chemical fields related to uthe discovery and recovery of the Earth's resources, u their conversion to materials

454

Mining outliers in spatial networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Outlier analysis is an important task in data mining and has attracted much attention in both research and applications. Previous work on outlier detection involves different types of databases such as spatial databases, time series databases, biomedical ...

Wen Jin; Yuelong Jiang; Weining Qian; Anthony K. H. Tung

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Use of Polyphosphate to Decrease Uranium Leaching in Hanford 300 Area Smear Zone Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study is to summarize the laboratory investigations performed to evaluate short- and long-term effects of phosphate treatment on uranium leaching from 300 area smear zone sediments. Column studies were used to compare uranium leaching in phosphate-treated to untreated sediments over a year with multiple stop flow events to evaluate longevity of the uranium leaching rate and mass. A secondary objective was to compare polyphosphate injection, polyphosphate/xanthan injection, and polyphosphate infiltration technologies that deliver phosphate to sediment.

Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

SURVEY OF EXISTING UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN-SITU EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WORKS California 57. Helms Pumped Storage Project Idaho 58.Magnetite Mine Bad Creek Pumped Storage Project HomestakeMt. Hope Hydroelectric pumped Storage Project, Exhibit W,

Wollenberg, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County; Summit County; *Colorado; environmental geology;ridges (''sackung ') in Colorado Radbruch-HaLl, D. H. ;California 29. Atolia District Colorado 30. Black Cloud Mine

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

SEARCH FOR UNDERGROUND OPENINGS FOR IN SITU TEST FACILITIES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index Appendix 1. Sources of Information Rock properties -various sources, and list of mines in crystalline rock whichoz SOURCE EOLOGY INFORMATION MINERALOGY OF HOST ROCKS GULF

Wallenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Mining Association are working in partnership to implement the Mining Industry of the Future strategy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Oil shale mining, processing, uses, and environmental impacts (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1964--Mar 1976. [223 abstracts  

SciTech Connect

Exploration, mining, retorting, chemistry, environmental impacts, and policies relating to oil shale research are covered. Abstracts discuss such things as oil shale air and water pollution control, production of synthetic fuels, use of spent oil shale in road construction, identification of research and development priorities, and in situ recovery of shale oil. (This updated bibliography contains 223 abstracts, 87 of which are new entries to the previous edition.) (GRA)

Hundemann, A.S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminate or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. The objective was to selectively extract uranium using a soil washing/extraction process without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating a secondary waste form that would be difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. One of the soils is from near the Plant 1 storage pad and the other soil was taken from near a waste incinerator used to burn low-level contaminated trash. The third soil was a surface soil from an area formally used as a landfarm for the treatment of spent oils at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The sediment sample was material sampled from a storm sewer sediment trap at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Uranium concentrations in the Fernald soils ranged from 450 to 550 {mu}g U/g of soil while the samples from the Y-12 Plant ranged from 150 to 200 {mu}g U/g of soil.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Elless, M.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Department for Energy Development and Independence Kentucky Administrative Regulation Title 405 chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18 and 20 establish the laws governing coal mining in the state. The Department of Natural Resources under the authority of the Energy and Environment Cabinet is responsible for enforcing these laws and assuring compliance with the 1977 Federal Surface Mining Control Act (SMCRA). The Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement is responsible for inspecting

464

Large mining blasts from the Kursk Mining Region, Russia  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) by seismic means will require identification of seismic sources at magnitude levels where industrial explosions (primarily, mining blasts) may comprise a significant fraction of the total number of events recorded, and may for some countries dominate the seismicity. Thus, data on blasting practice have both political significance for the negotiation of treaties involving seismic monitoring of nuclear tests, and operational applications in terms of establishing monitoring and inspection needs on a mine-by-mine basis. While it is generally accepted that mining explosions contribute to seismicity at lower seismic magnitudes (less than about magnitude 3.5), the rate of mining seismicity as a function of seismic magnitude is unknown for most countries outside the U.S. This results in a large uncertainty when estimating the task of discriminating nuclear explosions from chemical explosions and earthquakes, by seismic means, under a comprehensive nuclear test ban. This uncertainty directly affects estimates of seismic network enhancements required to achieve treaty verification requirements at magnitudes less than about 3.5. 24 refs., 64 figs., 11 tabs.

Leith, W. Adushkin, V.; Spivak, A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Plant Support Engineering: Utility Selective Leaching One-Time Inspection Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective leaching process involves the preferential removal of one of the alloying elements from an alloy material, resulting in a significant reduction in material strength. The most common examples are dezincification (the selective removal of zinc from brass alloys) and graphitization (the selective removal of iron from cast iron). Because selective leaching generally does not result in a change in the dimensions of a component and may occur without visible signs, it can be difficult to detect.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Proceedings, 24th international conference on ground control in mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered: longwall mining; multiple seam mining; pillar/pillar extraction; surface subsidence; roof falls; geology; high horizontal stresses; highwall mining/slope stability; mine/roof support design; roof bolting; and detection of ground conditions.

Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.; Tadolini, S.; Wahab Khair, A.; Heasley, K. (eds.) [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Non-subsidence method for developing an in situ oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect

A non-subsidence method for developing an in situ oil shale retort tract in a subterranean formation containing oil shale includes forming a number of spaced apart rows of in situ oil shale retorts, leaving intervening zones of unfragmented formation between adjacent rows of retorts for supporting the overburden loads without substantial subsidence. Each retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The retorts in each row are separated by gas barriers that provide support for the overburden load above each row of retorts. After retorting, a stabilizing material is introduced into the void spaces in the spent in situ oil shale retorts for increasing the compressive strength of the fragmented masses of spent oil shale particles in the spent in situ retorts. Thereafter, separate rows of in situ oil shale retorts are formed in corresponding intervening zones of unfragmented formation. The retorts in each intervening row are separated by gas barriers that provide partial support for the overburden load above each row of intervening retorts. Separate barriers of unfragmented formation are left between the retorts in each intervening row and adjacent rows of spent retorts. This shifts the overburden load to the spent retorts and to the intervening barriers of unfragmented formation, as well as to the barriers of formation between individual retorts in the intervening rows of retorts, which collectively support overburden loads without substantial subsidence during the operating life of the retorts in the intervening rows.

Hutchins, N.M.

1983-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

469

Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Silicon Mine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mine Mine Jump to: navigation, search Name The Silicon Mine Place Netherlands Sector Solar Product The Silicon Mine (TSM) will produce solar grade polysilicon suitable for the production of wafers or as the base material for the manufacture of solar cells. References The Silicon Mine[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Silicon Mine is a company located in Netherlands . References ↑ "The Silicon Mine" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Silicon_Mine&oldid=352196" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

471

Oil, Gas, and Mining Leases (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section contains rules on oil, gas, and mining leases, and grants authority to the State of Nebraska and local governments to issue leases for oil and gas mining and exploration on their lands.

472

Coal mine methane global review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Dewatering of Ambrosia Lake Mines  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the design of an aquifer depressurisation system using wells at Mt. Taylor Mine, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The concepts discussed should be valid for any shaft of mine in a sandstone aquifer with predominantly matrix permeability. The system uses a number of wells surrounding the mine shaft to reduce the aquifer pressure in the vicinity of the shaft. The effect of various parameters such as number of wells, wellbore diameter, time and well location are considered. It is concluded that, with a properly designed system, the aquifer pressure and water inflow rate to the shaft may be reduced to less than 15% of their potential values in the absence of wells.

Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

2008 Underground/Longwall Mining Buyer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to mines. An index by product category is included.

NONE

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Large-Scale Parallel Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To obtain a challenging internship in data mining, information retrieval on text and image, business intelligence, and statistical modeling.

Chunye Wang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

2009 underground/longwall mining buyer's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The guide lists US companies supplying equipment and services to underground mining operations. An index by product category is included.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Data mining solves tough semiconductor manufacturing problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: data mining, machine learning, manufacturing optimization, neural networks, pattern recognition, rule induction, self organizing maps, semiconductor yield enhancement

Mike Gardner; Jack Bieker

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Uranium Mines and Uranium Mineral Localities Visited Country State/Province County/District Mine Name U Minerals Present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium Mines and Uranium Mineral Localities Visited Country State/Province County/District Mine USA New Mexico Grants Zia Mines Tyuyamunite 1999 USA Arizona Gila Hope Mine Uraninite 2001 USA Arizona Gila Red Bluff Mine Uraninite 2001 USA Wyoming Fremont Congo (Section 16 Mine) Carnotite 2003 USA

479

Overview of the status of treatment and recycle of produced water in in-situ recovery  

SciTech Connect

Conventional, steam-assisted, in situ oil recovery techniques require substantial quantities of reasonably high quality feedwater for steam generation purposes and yield nearly equivalent quantities of brackish, oily produced water. Because of the scarcity of fresh water supplies in many of the oil producing regions, and environmental pressures to explore alternatives to produced water disposal, the successful treatment and reuse of produced water is a major concern with the large scale application of steam stimulation projects. To date, this technology has been developing primarily in the California heavy oil fields and in the Alberta oil sands/ heavy oil areas. This work discusses steam generation methods commonly used in the in situ recovery process, their associated feedwater quality requirements, and emerging steam generation techniques. It reviews the current status of treatment and reuse of produced water in in situ recovery, treatment technologies employed, and areas of future work. 16 references.

Asano, B.H.; Kus, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ leach mining" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High rock temperatures, a high degree of fracturing, high tectonic stresses, and low permeability are the combination of qualities that define an ideal candidate-Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir. The Coso Geothermal Field is an area where fluid temperatures exceeding 300°C have been measured at depths less than 10,000 feet and the reservoir is both highly fractured and tectonically stressed. Some of the wells within this portion of the reservoir are relatively impermeable,

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Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride  

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Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride at a former grain storage facility in Missouri March 26, 2013 At a former grain storage facility in Missouri, EVS has initiated a pilot test of an innovative treatment using amended zero-valent iron to achieve in situ chemical reduction of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations above regulatory levels in soil and groundwater (at 8-89 ft below ground level [BGL]) are confined to a small area of the former facility, on property that is now a county fairground. At present, the contamination poses no known risks to fairgrounds workers or visitors. The deep bedrock aquifers in the area are at minimal risk of contamination. The areas targeted for treatment in the pilot test are localized

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