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1

In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

3

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

4

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

5

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

6

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

7

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of the "DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) projects at DOE facilities. As current and projected budgets for the EM program indicate reduced and flat funding profiles for the foreseeable future, the potential exists for this institutional knowledge to be lost as the ramp-down of project staffing commences with the cessation of ARRA. EM's Office of Deactivation & Decommissioning and Facility Engineering

9

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

10

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning In situ decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a contaminated facility. At present, ISD is not recognized or addressed in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Office of Environmental Management (EM) lexicon; however, ISD is not a revolutionary concept. Since the 1970s, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recognized the option of entombing a facility as a decommissioning option. Permanent entombment of a radioactively contaminated facility as a decommissioning option has been completed for one facility at the Idaho National Laboratory and is currently planned at a limited number of selected DOE facilities. The

11

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

12

Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332  

SciTech Connect

Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

14

EM-20 ISD Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Experience & Lessons Learned Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of D&D and FE, EM-13 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Project Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................... vii 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background ................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................... 2

15

FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY, IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF THE P AND R REACTORS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

SRS recently completed an approximately three year effort to decommission two SRS reactors: P-Reactor (Building 105-P) and R-Reactor (Building 105-R). Completed in December 2011, the concurrent decommissionings marked the completion of two relatively complex and difficult facility disposition projects at the SRS. Buildings 105-P and 105-R began operating as production reactors in the early 1950s with the mission of producing weapons material (e.g., tritium and plutonium-239). The 'P' Reactor and was shutdown in 1991 while the 'R' Reactor and was shutdown in 1964. In the intervening period between shutdown and deactivation & decommissioning (D&D), Buildings 105-P and 105-R saw limited use (e.g., storage of excess heavy water and depleted uranium oxide). For Building 105-P, deactivation was initiated in April 2007 and was essentially complete by June 2010. For Building 105-R, deactivation was initiated in August 2008 and was essentially complete by September 2010. For both buildings, the primary objective of deactivation was to remove/mitigate hazards associated with the remaining hazardous materials, and thus prepare the buildings for in-situ decommissioning. Deactivation removed the following hazardous materials to the extent practical: combustibles/flammables, residual heavy water, acids, friable asbestos (as needed to protect workers performing deactivation and decommissioning), miscellaneous chemicals, lead/brass components, Freon(reg sign), oils, mercury/PCB containing components, mold and some radiologically-contaminated equipment. In addition to the removal of hazardous materials, deactivation included the removal of hazardous energy, exterior metallic components (representing an immediate fall hazard), and historical artifacts along with the evaporation of water from the two Disassembly Basins. Finally, so as to facilitate occupancy during the subsequent in-situ decommissioning, deactivation implemented repairs to the buildings and provided temporary power.

Musall, J.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissionin...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

"DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ...

17

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioning Implementation Guide. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine approaches to improve the decommissioning process. The study focused on quantifying productivity of decommissioning physical activities and identifying how productivity is affected by specific working conditions. The decommissioning benchmarking results are the foundation for several distinct products:

18

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Handbook dgappendices.pdf...

19

Decommissioning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

20

Decommissioning handbook  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Remote Access to Brookhaven, Information Services Division (ISD),  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISD Homepage ISD Homepage Site Details ISD Staff Remote Access Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Remote Access to Brookhaven External BNL users who need internet access to the internal ISD website which includes the Research Library, Records Management, Publications and Technical Editing must have a Virtual Private Network (VPN) account to connect to the BNL Internal Campus Network. This account can be setup by the Accounts Management Office. Available Options Remote Access Policy Broad-Band Connection: must use VPN with a CryptoCard Token Anti-Virus Procedures All Windows PCs should be running one of Brookhaven's official anti-virus software packages when connecting remotely to the BNL Internal Campus Network. Anti-Virus procedures are an important component of BNL's host-based security architecture. Anti-Virus software is the component of this architecture that provides a protection mechanism against malicious code. Malicious codes are programs, such as Trojan horses or viruses, that run on a host system without the authorization of the system user. These codes typically come from e-mail attachments, or can be downloaded along with programs from the Internet, or through an infected floppy disk. Properly installed anti-virus software can minimize these vulnerabilities.

22

Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project & Identifier Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Deployment In-Situ Decommissioning: SR09171 SRS Area Closure Projects: PBS SR-0040 3-D models of the R reactor building and P reactor vessel were delivered to SRS Area Closure Projects Page 1 of 2 Tech Fact Sheet Savannah River Site South Carolina 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Challenge Planning for the safe and controlled deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of highly contaminated nuclear facilities requires that engineers and managers fully understand the work space in which personnel and equipment will operate. It also requires that they effectively communicate safety concerns and work sequences to the personnel who will perform the work. This crucial knowledge is conveyed in

24

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

25

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures On October 19-22, 2010, an independent expert panel of scientists and engineers met to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Savannah River National Laboratory in developing a technical report that recommends the best sensing and concrete technologies for monitoring and isolating contaminants within highly-radioactive nuclear structures in the DOE in situ decommissioning program. This document identifies the recommendations of the panel for shortand long-term objectives needed to develop a remote monitoring network for the C Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ

26

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures On October 19-22, 2010, an independent expert panel of scientists and engineers met to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Savannah River National Laboratory in developing a technical report that recommends the best sensing and concrete technologies for monitoring and isolating contaminants within highly-radioactive nuclear structures in the DOE in situ decommissioning program. This document identifies the recommendations of the panel for shortand long-term objectives needed to develop a remote monitoring network for the C Reactor Building at the Savannah River Site. Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ

27

Continuous Improvement in the Leander ISD: A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Culture and Core Values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Educational Administration CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN THE LEANDER ISD: A QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CULTURE AND CORE... Committee Members, David A. Erlandson Mario S. Torres Lynn M. Burlbaw Head of Department, Fredrick M. Nafukho August 2010 Major Subject: Educational Administration iii ABSTRACT Continuous Improvement in the Leander ISD: A Quantitative...

Robinson, Joe E.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the organization of the decommissioning project; decommissioning operations concept; safety and environmental assessment; information and guidance for the DOC; work breakdown structure; decommissioning operation schedule; decommissiong operations estimate; and training requirements.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

30

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Shippingport Station decommissioning project decommission plan  

SciTech Connect

This volume consists of the following appendices: long-lead-time activities, technical baseline, assessment of one-price removal of reactor vessel and internals by barge, final environmental impact statement (this forms the bulk of this volume), and record of the decision to decommission Shippingport. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Decommissioning at AWE  

SciTech Connect

AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings, structures, foundations, equipment, and utilities; surface reclamation of contaminated area including operating areas, roads, wellfields, and surface impoundments; groundwater restoration in mining areas; radiological surveying and environmental monitoring; and long-term radiation and

34

Harvesting the Rain, An Overview of the Rainwater Collection Systems at McKinney ISD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the planning and design phases at four elementary schools in McKinney ISD. By harvesting the rainwater from the roof of the building and channeling this water into six oncampus storage tanks, enough rainwater can be collected to flush the toilets and irrigate...

Schreppler, S.; Estes, J. M.; Dupont, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

37

Safely Decommission about how we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and make them available to low- income communities, individuals, and community non-profit organizations to information technologies among low-income and disadvantaged groups. #12; Safely Decommission Your PCs Learn more about how we can help you effectively decommission

Blanchette, Robert A.

38

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Adams, G.A.; Bowen, W.C.; Cromer, P.M.; Cwynar, J.C.; Jacoby, W.R.; Woodsum, H.G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Decommissioning Implementation Guide  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces an enormous task in the disposition of the nation's excess facilities. Many of these facilities are large and complex and contain potentially hazardous substances. As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase which ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life-cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

In situ measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

Lord, D.E.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

45

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

In situ mercury stabilization  

SciTech Connect

BNL Royalty Project Internal Status Report. The funds from the allotment of royalty income were used to experimentally explore feasibility of related, potential new techniques based on the Environmental Sciences Department successful technology licensed for the ex situ treatment of mercury. Specifically, this work is exploring the concept of using Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) in an in situ application to stabilize and/or remove mercury (Hg) from surficial soil. Patent disclosure forms have been filed for this process. Soil was artificially spiked with 500 ppm Hg and a series of experiments were set up in which SPC rods were placed in the center of a mass of this soil. Some experiments were conducted at 20 C and others at 50 C. After times ranging from 11 to 24 days, these experiments were opened, photographed and the soil was sampled from discrete locations in the containers. The soil and SPC samples were analyzed for Fe and Hg by x-ray fluorescence. The Hg profile in the soil was significantly altered, with concentrations along the outer edge of the soil reduced by as much as 80% from the starting concentration. Conversely, closer to the treatment rod containing SPC, concentrations of Hg were significantly increased over the original concentration. Preliminary results for elevated temperature sample are shown graphically in Figure 2. Apparently the Hg had migrated toward the SPC and reacted with sulfur to form Hg S. This appears to be a reaction between gaseous phases of both S and Hg, with Hg having a greater vapor pressure. The concentration of low solubility HgS (i.e., low leaching properties) developed within 11 days at 50 C and 21 days at 20 C, confirming the potential of this concept.

Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Adams, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Laser in situ monitoring of combustion processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several examples of laser in situ monitoring of combustion processes are presented. Using a frequency modulated 13CO2 waveguide laser, in situ concentrations of...

Arnold, A; Becker, H; Hemberger, R; Hentschel, W; Ketterle, W; Kollner, M; Meienburg, W; Monkhouse, P; Neckel, H; Schafer, M; Schindler, K P; Sick, V; Suntz, R; Wolfrum, J

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L. W.; Buckley, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Triplex in-situ hybridization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

Fresco, Jacques R. (Princeton, NJ); Johnson, Marion D. (East Windsor, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

51

Holographic in situ stress measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Stress-relief data have been obtained from our initial field deployment of the stressmeter in a horizontal borehole in an oil shale mine. These data establish the viability of holographic interferometry for deducing the level of in situ stress in boreholes......

Jay D. Bass; Douglas Schmitt; Thomas J. Ahrens

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Program. Objectives for the reactor were fulfilled by 1966, and the Nebraska Public Power District decommissioned and dismantled the facility between 1967 and 1969. Facility...

54

Noise canceling in-situ detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

Walsh, David O.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel.

Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

11/30/2006 -3:00 pm -4:30 pm Room:San Polo -3404 (ISD Campus) Autodesk MapGuide Techniques: Working with Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/30/2006 - 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm Room:San Polo - 3404 (ISD Campus) Autodesk MapGuide® Techniques: Working with Resources The Resource Database and XML Resource documents are a fundamental part of Autodesk Autodesk MapGuide Enterprise application developers how to make the most of these concepts in their own

Ahmad, Sajjad

60

11/30/2006 -5:00 pm -6:30 pm Room:San Polo -3404 (ISD Campus) Autodesk MapGuide Techniques: Sharable Mark-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/30/2006 - 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Room:San Polo - 3404 (ISD Campus) Autodesk MapGuide® Techniques industries. This course provides an in-depth look at Autodesk MapGuide Enterprise techniques and APIs-up will be demonstrated while an examination of the code behind the sample will show Autodesk MapGuide Enterprise

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

In situ measurements of neutron multiplying systems  

SciTech Connect

Historical and recent examples of the application of in situ measurements to provide knowledge for specific operations and general criticality safety guidance are reviewed. The importance of the American National Standard, Safety in Conducting Subcritical Neutron-Multiplication Measurements In Situ, ANSI/ANS-8.6, 1988 is discussed. Examples of possible future applications of in-situ measurements are provided. 4 refs., 4 figs.

McLaughlin, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect

The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EMs Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D...

65

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Redeeming features of in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect

In situ combustion remains the most tantalizing enhanced oil recovery method. It has been tested extensively - in over 150 field tests - in both heavy and light oil reservoirs. What we have learned from this experience is that in situ combustion works under most conditions, but the nature of the problems is such that it is seldom profitable. Also, looking at many previous in situ combustion tests, steam injection, and even waterflooding, would have been a better choice. Yet in situ combustion has unique features not found in any other EOR method. These must be weighed against its shortcomings to evaluate a potential application. This paper discusses the redeeming features of in situ combustion, in particular the reservoir conditions under which in situ combustion may be superior to other EOR methods are outlined. All variations of in situ combustion - forward, reverse, wet, dry - as well as combinations with other EOR methods are considered. The conclusions is that in situ combustion still has a place, and its future application would depend on research on certain crucial aspects of the process.

Farouq Ali, S.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

68

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Scanned_Agreement.pdf Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste

69

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet This Question and Answer (Q&A) Sheet discusses the use of removal authority in the conduct of decommissioning activities, consistent with the Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (May 22, 1995), and the accompanying Decommissioning Implementation Guide . The Policy and Guide establish the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is consistent with CERCLA statutory requirements, as well as CERCLA regulatory requirements found in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and applicable

70

In situ bioremediation in Europe  

SciTech Connect

Site remediation activity in Europe is increasing, even if not at the forced pace of the US. Although there is a better understanding of the benefits of bioremediation than of other approaches, especially about in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, relatively few projects have been carried out full-scale in Europe or in the US. Some engineering companies and large industrial companies in Europe are investigating bioremediation and biotreatment technologies, in some cases to solve their internal waste problems. Technologies related to the application of microorganisms to the soil, release of nutrients into the soil, and enhancement of microbial decontamination are being tested through various additives such as surfactants, ion exchange resins, limestone, or dolomite. New equipment has been developed for crushing and mixing or injecting and sparging the microorganisms, as have new reactor technologies (e.g., rotating aerator reactors, biometal sludge reactors, and special mobile containers for simultaneous storage, transportation, and biodegradation of contaminated soil). Some work has also been done with immobilized enzymes to support and restore enzymatic activities related to partial or total xenobiotic decontamination. Finally, some major programs funded by public and private institutions confirm that increasing numbers of firms have a working interest in bioremediation.

Porta, A. [Battelle Europe, Geneva (CH); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

Dam, A. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Decommissioning of the Iraq former nuclear complex  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A number of sites in Iraq have some degree of radiological contamination and require decommissioning and remediation in order to ensure radiological safety. Many of these sites in Iraq are located at the nuclear research centre at Al Tuwaitha. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors has approved a project to assist the Government of Iraq in the evaluation and decommissioning of former facilities that used radioactive materials. The project is divided into three phases: Phase 1: collect and analyze all available data and conduct training of the Iraqi staff, Phase 2: develop a decommissioning and remediation plan, and Phase 3: implement field activities relating to decommissioning, remediation and site selection suitable for final disposal of waste. Four working groups have been established to complete the Phase 1 work and significant progress has been made in drafting a new nuclear law which will provide the legal basis for the licensing of the decommissioning of the former nuclear complex. Work is also underway to collect and analysis existing date, to prioritize future activities and to develop a waste management strategy. This will be a long-term and costly project. (authors)

Abbas, Mohammed [Ministry of Science and Technology (Iraq); Helou, Tuama; Ahmead, Bushra [Ministry of Environment (Iraq); Al-Atia, Mousa; Al-Mubarak, Mowaffak [Iraqi Radiation Sources Regulatory Authority (Iraq); Danneels, Jeffrey; Cochran, John; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies. Abstract: Protein stable isotope...

75

In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA Aptamers and Graphene Oxide Nanosheets. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA...

76

Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing...

77

Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

78

In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen...

79

West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Phase I Decommissioning - Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement The Department of Energy, West Valley Demonstration Project (DOE-WVDP) and CH2M Hill B&W West Valley (CHBWV) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to create and foster a team environment to successfully complete the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Phase I Decommissioning - Faciltiy Disposition. West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CX-009527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

80

FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-DeactivationDecommissioning.docx Description Deactivation and Decommissioning Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This policy ensures protection of the environment, worker health and public health, provides opportunities for stakeholder involvement, and achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay. Consistent with the jointly issued "Guidance on Accelerating CERCLA Environmental Restoration at Federal Facilities" (August 22, 1994), this decommissioning policy encourages streamlined decision-making. This

82

Offshore decommissioning issues: Deductibility and transferability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dealing with the decommissioning of petroleum installations is a relatively new challenge to most producer countries. It is natural to expect that industry's experience in building platforms is much greater than the one of dismantling them. Even if manifold and varied efforts are underway towards establishing international best practices standards in this sector, countries still enjoy rather extensive discretionary power as they practice a particular national style in the regulation of decommissioning activities in their state's jurisdiction. The present paper offers a broad panorama of this discussion, concentrating mainly on two controversial aspects. The first one analyses the ex-ante deductibility of decommissioning costs as they constitute an ex-post expense. The second discussion refers to the assignment of decommissioning responsibility in the case of transfer of exploration and production rights to new lessees during the project's life. Finally the paper applies concepts commonly used in project financing as well as structures generally used in organising pension funds to develop insights into these discussions.

Virginia Parente; Doneivan Ferreira; Edmilson Moutinho dos Santos; Estanislau Luczynski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results  

SciTech Connect

The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Purpose This Policy establishes the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the conduct of decommissioning projects [1] consistent with CERCLA requirements. This Policy creates a framework for the conduct of decommissioning of DOE facilities and provides guidance to EPA Regions and DOE Operations Offices on the use of CERCLA response authority to decommission such facilities. The principal objectives of this Policy are to ensure that decommissioning

85

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 18820 of 26,764 results. 11 - 18820 of 26,764 results. Page Hiring Reform President Obama's Memorandum dated May 11, 2010, Improving the Federal Recruitment and Hiring Process, is Phase I of the Administration's comprehensive initiative to address major, long-standing... http://energy.gov/hc/employment-and-staffing/hiring-reform Page In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both... http://energy.gov/em/situ-decommissioning Page Veterans Recruitment A variety of employment options are available for Veterans and their families, ranging from posted job announcements and opportunities through special hiring authorities, to employment programs and...

86

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 21680 of 28,560 results. 71 - 21680 of 28,560 results. Page In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both... http://energy.gov/em/situ-decommissioning Download Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act A study recently released shows the $1.6 billion the Savannah River Site (SRS) received from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had a positive economic impact on the adjacent five... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/study-shows-significant-economic-impact-recovery-act Download Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) & Wastren Advantage, Inc. (WAI) Partnering Agreement For The Transuranic Waste Processing Program

87

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on In-situ identity fraud owners. The reasons that in-situ identity fraud is widespread are: v People tend to choose "yes" when make in-situ identity fraud easy in other ways, as they can be physically accessed by acquaintances

Chen, Sheng-Wei

88

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

93

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

94

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

95

GRR/Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 43 CFR 3263.10-3263.15: Well Abandonment Geothermal Resources Operational Order No.3 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative State and federal laws have specific requirements for the decommissioning process. 20.1 to 20.2 - Will a Geothermal Well be Abandoned?

96

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work space, which would give managers and supervisors a more powerful tool for planning and communicating safety issues and work sequences to personnel executing the physical D&D tasks. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D and Risk Assessment Tools 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D

97

Measurement of in situ hydrate thermodynamic properties  

SciTech Connect

Heat capacities and heats of fusion measured in simulated in situ natural gas hydrates using tetrahydrofuran hydrates in clean sand indicated that sediments significantly affect hydrate formation conditions. These data are required to devise and evaluate methods for producing natural gas from hydrates, a potentially significant energy resource.

Sloan, E.D.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - application decommissioning models Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC... Consultant Report Economic Modeling of Relicensing and Decommissioning Options...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN SITU TOUGHENED SILICON CARBIDE LUTGARD C. DE JONGHE 1,2 ,In Situ Toughened Silicon Carbide Lutgard C. De Jonghe 1,2 ,USA ABSTRACT A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Priorities for In-situ Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements Parameters * Aerosol light absorption coefficient - spectral, including UV, vis, and IR - as f(RH), and at ambient RH * Phase function - or relevant integral properties (how many?) * Ice nuclei * Scattering vs. RH, for RH>90% * CCN, as f(S, D p ) * Size distribution * Chemical composition - for determining climate forcing, vs. radiative effect Calibration * Number concentration * Size and shape * Light absorption reference method Characterization * Accuracy and precision - need well-understood error bars * Algorithm comparisons * Closure studies * Facilities for method testing - aircraft time Methods * Inlets - shattering/splashing - location on airplane - passing efficiency - inletless analyzers/samplers * Packaging - modular/portable "pods" for multiple a/c

104

MCW Laboratory Decommissioning Checklist P.I.:_______________ Date: ___________ LAB DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13 Timeline Tasks Contacts Completed NA 1 month Inventory sends inventory list to appropriate contact Send email to safetyinfo@mcw.edu "Attn: Chemical, and outline appropriate path of decontamination (e.g. needs oil removed prior to disposal, requires surface

105

SPRING ISD CATEE 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 LED lighting-retro commissioning variable speed drives ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ESL... comprehensive Energy Policy Begin charging for refrigerators and lamps Continue installing LED fixtures in targeted areas using shared savings Parking lots, gyms, administration building, corridors Hire McKinstry Begin retro-commissioning facilities...

Windsor, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

SciTech Connect

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1

109

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 11900 of 28,905 results. 91 - 11900 of 28,905 results. Download DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning In situ decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a contaminated facility. At present, ISD is not recognized or addressed in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Office of Environmental... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/doe-environmental-management-strategy-and-experience-situ Download Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary This executive summary provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. http://energy.gov/eere/downloads/assessment-biomass-pelletization-options-greensburg-kansas-executive-summary

112

In-situ thermal testing program strategy  

SciTech Connect

In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Safety analysis for Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project. Vol. 9. Pt. 1. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the safety analysis for the decommissioning project; and permitting plan.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

In Situ NMR Spectroscopy of Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of high-temperature reactions is of potential value for the investigation of catalytic combustion and other high-temperature applications of catalysts such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and steam reforming. ... Two-dimensional (2D) studies of gas exchange within different heat zones of the combustion process provide valuable insights into the gas-phase dynamics. ... This may be the case at the high combustion temperatures, but neither experimental nor theoretical xenon chemical shift data is available in current literature for temperatures above 1000 K. ...

Satyanarayana Anala; Galina E. Pavlovskaya; Prakash Pichumani; Todd J. Dieken; Michael D. Olsen; Thomas Meersmann

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

116

In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect

In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures.

Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Functional Area Qualification Standard Functional Area Qualification Standard Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) DOE-STD-1166-2003 Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics 3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for low-level radioactive and mixed wastes generated by decontaminating and decommissioning activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's General Atomics' Hot Cell Facility would be transported to either a DOE owned facility, such as the Hanford site in Washington, or to a commercial facility, such as Envirocare in Utah, for treatment and/or storage and disposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1995 EA-1053: Finding of No Significant Impact

124

Policy Statement 3, Board Oversight of Department of Energy Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Date: August 19, 1996 Subject Policy Statement on Board oversight of Department of Energy decommissioning activities at defense nuclear facilities. Summary This policy statement describes the decommissioning phase of a DOE defense nuclear facility and identifies the Board's safety oversight responsibilities for decommisioning activities. John T. Conway, Chairman Congress directed the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) to oversee Department of Energy (DOE) practices at defense nuclear facilities that could adversely affect public health and safety during any stage in the life cycle of those facilities, from design, construction, and operation through decommissioning. The Board's objective during decommissioning is identical to its objective during any other phase of a facility's life cycle: to ensure that DOE provides adequate protection of worker and public health and safety at defense nuclear facilities. Congress specifically tasked the Board with reviewing and evaluating:

125

Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

Grossman, Robert J. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES  

SciTech Connect

Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis  

SciTech Connect

The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

THE STUDY OF IN-SITU MARINE PHOTOSYNTHESIS USING A ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE STUDY OF IN-SITU MARINE PHOTOSYNTHESIS USING A LARGE PLASTIC BAG. Any precise study of the processes of phy- toplankton growth and decay...

1999-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

132

In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

133

In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

134

Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Authors: Pal, S., Varghese, R., Deng, Z.,...

135

In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...

136

In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural Evolution of Nanostructured SiliconCarbon Anode for In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural Evolution...

137

In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

138

In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

139

In Situ Characterization of Fatigue Behavior of Electrodes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Annual Merit Review 2010 Objectives * Development of in-situ tool to characterize mechanical degradation (crack initiation, crack growth, particle fracturing, particle...

140

Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361  

SciTech Connect

The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada)] [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada); Daniska, Vladimir [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)] [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

Boing, L.E.

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under Unsaturated Transient Flow Conditions of radioactive wastes at the Hanford site, Washington State. In this study, column experiments were conducted to examine the effect of irrigation schedule on releases of in situ colloids from two Hanford sediments

Perfect, Ed

144

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Dynamic rheology studies of in situ polymerization process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small-amplitude oscillatory shear experiments for in situ polymerization process of polyacrylamide toughened PAM hydro- gels. G 0 1 ? Á and the effective network junction density (N) increased with increased incorporated into PAM hydro- gels by in situ polymerization, and it was found that the C. Zhou :Q. Wu

145

Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

IN-SITU MINING OF PHOSPHATE ORES  

SciTech Connect

Presently the mining of Florida phosphate requires the movement of over a 100-ton of materials (overburden, sand, clay) for every ton of phosphate concentrate recovered. Not only is this energy intensive, but it also causes significant stress on the environment. In 2003, the Department of Energy solicited ideas for innovative mining ideas that could significantly improve the efficiency of mining. An award was made to the University of Florida Engineering Research Center to evaluate the in situ mining of phosphates using an aqueous CO{sub 2} solution. Tests were carried out in a 15.2 cm (6-inch) diameter column, 1.83 meter (6 feet) long at pressures up to 117.2 kg/cm{sup 2} (40 psi). Results to date demonstrate that initially the MgO is leached from the ore and then the phosphate. While the tests are continuing, so far they have not demonstrated P{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations that are economically attractive.

H. El-Shall; R. Stana; A. El-Midany; S. Malekzadah

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Chernobyl NPP decommissioning: Current status and alternatives  

SciTech Connect

After the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986, many contradictory decisions were taken concerning the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) future. The principal source of contradictions was a deadline for a final shutdown of the Chernobyl NPP units. Alterations in a political and socioeconomic environment resulted in the latest decision of the Ukrainian Authorities about 2000 as a deadline for a beginning of the Chernobyl NPP decommissioning. The date seems a sound compromise among the parties concerned. However, in order to meet the data a lot of work should be done. First of all, a decommissioning strategy has to be established. The problem is complicated due to both site-specific aspects and an absence of proven solutions for the RBMK-type reactor decommissioning. In the paper the problem of decommissioning option selection is considered taking into account an influence of the following factors: relevant legislative and regulatory requirements; resources required to carry out decommissioning (man-power, equipment, technologies, waste management infrastructure, etc.); radiological and physical status of the plant, including structural integrity and predictable age and weather effects; impact of planned activities at the destroyed unit 4 and within the 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP; planed use of the site; socio-economic considerations.

Mikolaitchouk, H. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine); Steinberg, N. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Confidentiality Agreement betweenthe Nuclear Decommissioning Authorityin UKand US Department of Energy

152

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready for transport to the on-site landfill. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready

153

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

154

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

155

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning Project Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

156

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D&D project's engineering/design to meet the objectives of the CD milestones. The enhanced rigor in planning and systematic, forward looking approach to engineering/design recommended in this guidance is intended to ensure that the level of detail in technical planning and technical development, integrated with other project aspects such as safety basis modifications, leads to a high confidence that the engineered system as a whole will function as designed. As the level of

157

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A critical review of nuclear power plant decommissioning planning studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past decade there have been at least ten major efforts to perform comprehensive, analytical studies of the complex issues associated with decommissioning civilian nuclear power plants. These planning efforts are reviewed, using the standard framework of technology assessment. In particular, each study is analysed to determine the degree to which formal methods of decision analysis have been employed to evaluate options and make recommendations and the degree to which formal methods of consensus have been employed to engage citizen involvement and promote public acceptance. Not unexpectedly, we find that the greatest strides in decommissioning analyses have been made in forecasting the economic costs of decommissioning to licensees. Comparatively few improvements have been made in the processes used to compare the impacts of alternative technologies more broadly, or to address the legitimate concerns of interested parties more widely.

W.Timothy Lough; K.Preston White Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of In Situ Combustion for Schrader Bluff  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is on the results related to evaluation of in situ combustion processes applied to Schrader Bluff. Initially, overall screening processes were applied to determine which of the EOR methods, were most appropriate for Schrader Bluff. In situ combustion was among the methods considered potentially favorable and was evaluated further. Laboratory scale tube runs were conducted to determine if the kinetic parameters for the crude oil were favorable. Additional sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the recovery potential. Described in this report are the results of the (1) initial screening,(2) experimental tube runs, and (3) simulation sensitivity studies as related to in situ combustion in Schrader Bluff.

Sarathi, P.; Strycker, A.; Wang, S.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

164

Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for

MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Water Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea,

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceReactions in Colorado Oil Shale, Lawrence Report UCRL-

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

In Situ Study of Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) Formation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M. J. Bedzyk, "In Situ X-ray Study of the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) Formation on Graphene as a Model Li-ion Battery Anode," Chemistry of Materials, 24(15), 3038 -3043...

169

In situ chemical probing of the electrode-electrolyte interface...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical probing of the electrode-electrolyte interface by ToF-SIMS. In situ chemical probing of the electrode-electrolyte interface by ToF-SIMS. Abstract: A portable vacuum...

170

In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and Reactive Landing of Mass Selected Ions. In Situ Reactivity and TOF SIMS Analysis of Surfaces Prepared by Soft and...

171

In situ Arsenic Remediation in a fractured, alkaline aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ removal of arsenic from ground water used for water supply has been accomplished in circum-neutral ground water containing high dissolved iron concentrations. In contrast, the ground water at our study...

Alan H. Welch; Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; Douglas K. Maurer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 15, 2011 4:00 pm Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Materials For Energy: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Studies for Materials Design and Discovery Stephen K. Streiffer Deputy...

173

Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept Understanding the detailed chemistry of Nox Reduction across the combined LNT+SCR system. deer10crocker.pdf More...

174

SciTech Connect: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Documentation of INL's In Situ Oil Shale Retorting...

175

Romania - 30 years of experience in in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect

Starting with 1963, simultaneous pilot and semi-commercial steam flooding and in situ combustion tests were carried out at Suplacu de Barcau heavy oil field (16{degrees} API). The performance of in situ combustion was by far better and as a result, the entire reservoir was designed to produce by this method, by abandoning the {open_quotes}patterns{close_quotes} concept and introducing the {open_quotes}continuous front{close_quotes} concept. Under primary production, the ultimate recovery factor would have been 9.2%, while an ultimate recovery factor of at least 50% is expected by in situ combustion. In situ combustion was applied on three other major reservoirs: Balaria in 1975, East Videle in 1979, and West Videle in 1980. For those reservoirs, as compared to the average ultimate recovery of about 10% under primary production, an average ultimate recovery of at least 35% is expected by in situ combustion. From an important amount of technological studies and site operations, this paper selects and presents comments and remarks related to the strategy of the field development, the {open_quotes}continuous front{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}patterns{close_quotes} system, production monitoring, difficulties encountered, etc. In situ combustion is economically advantageous if the reservoir is carefully selected and the applied technology is of an adequate quality and suitable for the respective reservoir.

Machedon, V.; Popescu, T.; Paduraru, R. [Research and Design Institute for Oil and Gas, Cimpina (Romania)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Engineering and planning for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

With the publication of NUREG-0586, ''Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities'' in January, 1981 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has put the industry on notice that the termination of operating licenses and the final disposal of physical facilities will require the early consideration of several options and approaches and the preparation of comprehensive engineering and planning documents for the selected option at the end of useful life. This paper opens with a discussion of the options available and the principal aspects of decommissioning. The major emphasis of the composition is the nature of documents, the general approach to be followed, and special considerations to be taken into account when performing the detailed engineering and planning for decommissioning, as the end of life approaches and actual physical disposal is imminent. The author's main point of reference is on-going work by Burns and Roe, with Nuclear Energy Services, under contract to the Department of Energy's Richland Office, to perform the engineering and planning for the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Pennsylvania.

Gans, G.M. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

178

In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect

The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Grand vision for future ESRL Carbon Cycle Effort Contribution to GEOSS In situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand vision for future ESRL Carbon Cycle Effort · Contribution to GEOSS ­ In situ GHG monitoring (~weekly) NOAA Tall Tower Partner regional networks #12;Hypothetical Future GEOSS In Situ GHG NetworkHypothetical Future GEOSS In Situ GHG Network #12;Hypothetical Future GEOSS In Situ GHG NetworkHypothetical Future

180

Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting  

SciTech Connect

To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.

Riga, Celia V., E-mail: c.riga@imperial.ac.uk; Bicknell, Colin D. [Imperial College Healthcare, St Mary's Hospital, Regional Vascular Unit (United Kingdom); Wallace, Daniel [Hansen Medical (United States); Hamady, Mohamad; Cheshire, Nicholas [Imperial College Healthcare, St Mary's Hospital, Regional Vascular Unit (United Kingdom)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research  

SciTech Connect

The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

Mehdi, Beata L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gu, Meng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parent, Lucas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xu, WU [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Nasybulin, Eduard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Chen, Xilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Pinghong [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; Welch, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Abellan, Patricia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Evans, James E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Browning, Nigel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation & Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Savannah River Site imploded the 455-foot-tall K Reactor Cooling Tower in May 2010. The project was completed safely and contributed 36.5 square miles to the site's total footprint reduction. On August 3, 2013, contractors and the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management successfully completed the explosive demolition of the K-1206-F Fire Water Tower, which for 54 years had been used for fire water supply at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The 382 foot tall, 400,000-gallon water tower tank was drained and isolated from the fire water system prior to the estimated 100-ton steel structure being

183

Decontamination and Decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is dedicated to the safe and cost effective D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. There is currently a backlog of more than 7,000 contaminated US Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Added to this are 110 licensed commercial nuclear power reactors operated by utilities learning to cope with deregulation and an aging infrastructure that supports the commercial nuclear power industry, as well as medical and other uses of radioactive materials. With this volume it becomes easy to understand the importance of addressing the unique issues and objectives associated with the D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. This photobriefing book summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning projects and activities either completed or continuing at the ANL-E site during the year.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements  

SciTech Connect

SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

Fossil Energy Research

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Field Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slide 7 · Linear Potentiometer Fixture ­ Welded steel frame ­ Designed for flexible positioning ­ BoltedField Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie and Fastener Behavior Justin Grassé, David Lange 2012 Joint Rail Conference Philadelphia, PA 17-19 April 2012 #12;Field Testing

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

188

In situ long-term monitoring system for radioactive contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......74074, USA A long-term in situ subsurface...locations around a waste site, are allowed...high-level liquid waste in 177 underground storage tanks, 2100 metric...or stored solid waste and more than...are remediated, long-term monitoring of......

D. M. Klein; E. G. Yukihara; S. W. S. McKeever; J. S. Durham; M. S. Akselrod

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

192

In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

A New Life Adaptive Reuse and Redevelopment of Decommissioned Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My study analyzed the challenges and opportunities faced in the historic preservation and adaptive reuse of decommissioned commercial nuclear power plants. While operating, these plants (more)

Farrow, Elizabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

196

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authorityfor exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste.

197

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

198

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

199

Additive manufacturing for in situ repair of osteochondral defects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tissue engineering holds great promise for injury repair and replacement of defective body parts. While a number of techniques exist for creating living biological constructs in vitro, none have been demonstrated for in situ repair. Using novel geometric feedback-based approaches and through development of appropriate printing-material combinations, we demonstrate the in situ repair of both chondral and osteochondral defects that mimic naturally occurring pathologies. A calf femur was mounted in a custom jig and held within a robocasting-based additive manufacturing (AM) system. Two defects were induced: one a cartilage-only representation of a grade IV chondral lesion and the other a two-material bone and cartilage fracture of the femoral condyle. Alginate hydrogel was used for the repair of cartilage; a novel formulation of demineralized bone matrix was used for bone repair. Repair prints for both defects had mean surface errors less than 0.1 mm. For the chondral defect, 42.8 2.6% of the surface points had errors that were within a clinically acceptable error range; however, with 1 mm path planning shift, an estimated ~75% of surface points could likely fall within the benchmark envelope. For the osteochondral defect, 83.6 2.7% of surface points had errors that were within clinically acceptable limits. In addition to implications for minimally invasive AM-based clinical treatments, these proof-of-concept prints are some of the only in situ demonstrations to-date, wherein the substrate geometry was unknown a priori. The work presented herein demonstrates in situ AM, suggests potential biomedical applications and also explores in situ-specific issues, including geometric feedback, material selection and novel path planning techniques.

Daniel L Cohen; Jeffrey I Lipton; Lawrence J Bonassar; Hod Lipson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The importance of in-situ-stress profiles in hydraulic-fracturing applications  

SciTech Connect

In-situ stresses define the local forces acting on lithologic layers in the subsurface. Knowledge of these stresses is important in drilling, wellbore-stability, and, especially, hydraulic-fracturing applications. The measurement of in-situ stress is not straightforward and, therefore, often goes unmeasured. As such, one often assumes values of in-situ stress or estimate in-situ stresses from logging parameters. This article illustrates the importance of in-situ-stress estimates as they relate to hydraulic fracturing and outlines several techniques for estimating in-situ-stress magnitudes.

Hopkins, C.W. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States). Houston Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

SciTech Connect

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

SciTech Connect: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting - A Systems Dynamics...

203

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned in-situ oil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

...33 10. In-situ shale-oil resources of some world oil-shale deposits... in 33 countries are estimated at 409 billion tons of in-situ shale oil,...

205

In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR...

206

Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on Laboratory Column Test Data. Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on...

207

Performance of a Microfluidic Device for In Situ ToF-SIMS Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of a Microfluidic Device for In Situ ToF-SIMS Analysis of Selected Organic Molecules at Aqueous Surfaces. Performance of a Microfluidic Device for In Situ ToF-SIMS...

208

Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of in-situ stress distribution within reservoir sandstones and the surrounding formations is recognized as one of the most important factors in the design and analysis of hydraulic fractures. In-situ stress contrast between layers of rock...

Gongora, Cesar Augusto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced in-situ techniques Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USA ABSTRACT We describe efforts to integrate in-situ sensing, space-borne sensing... satellite information and in-situ weather and river gauging information are all inputs to...

210

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | In situ neutron diffraction study of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate The structure of a CO clathrate hydrate has been studied for the first time using high-P low-T neutron diffraction. Clathrate Rietveld analysis shows that lattice parameter a (SII cubic clathrate structure) increases with increasing temperature. CO molecules are positionally disordered and off-centered in both large and small cages. Each large cage is occupied by two CO molecules while each small cage is occupied by one CO. A representative neutron diffraction pattern of SII CO clathrate hydrate. Variation of lattice parameter a of CO SII clathrate hydrate as a function of temperature. A representative neutron diffraction pattern of SII CO clathrate hydrate. Variation of lattice parameter a of CO SII clathrate hydrate as a function of temperature.

211

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

212

DOE cost-shared in situ combustion projects revisited  

SciTech Connect

As part of its enhanced oil recovery (EOR) program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations sponsored several cost-shared in situ combustion projects in the 1960s and 1970s. The goal of these projects was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of in situ combustion as a thermal oil recovery technique and provide information in the public domain as a means of reducing the risks associated with these high cost ventures. This study reviewed specific features of the cost-shared demonstration and experimental projects, and examined the causes that led to their success or failure. The failed projects were compared with the successful projects under similar settings to further document why these projects failed. The lessons learned were detailed.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

SciTech Connect

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Is Entombment an Acceptable Option for Decommissioning? An International Perspective - 13488  

SciTech Connect

Selection of a decommissioning strategy is one of the key steps in the preparation for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other facilities using radioactive material. Approaches being implemented or considered by Member States include immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. Other options or slight modifications of these strategies are also possible. Entombment has been identified in the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards as one of the three basic decommissioning strategies and has been defined as a decommissioning strategy by which radioactive contaminants are encased in a structurally long lived material until radioactivity decays to a level permitting the unrestricted release of the facility, or release with restrictions imposed by the regulatory body. Although all three strategies have been considered, in principle, applicable to all facilities, their application to some facilities may not be appropriate owing to political concerns, safety or environmental requirements, technical considerations, local conditions or financial considerations. The IAEA is currently revising the decommissioning Safety Standards and one of the issues widely discussed has been the applicability of entombment in the context of decommissioning and its general objective to enable removal of regulatory control from the decommissioned facility. The IAEA recently established a consultancy to collect and discuss experience and lessons learned from entombment projects, to identify regulatory requirements and expectations for applying entombment as a decommissioning option strategy, in compliance with the internationally agreed standards. (authors)

Belencan, Helen [US Department of Energy (United States)] [US Department of Energy (United States); Nys, Vincent [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium)] [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium); Guskov, Andrey [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States)] [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States); Francois, Patrice [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)] [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France); Watson, Bruce [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)] [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Ljubenov, Vladan [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

219

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shipping port Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

220

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nanomaterials Taylor J. Woehl a,n , Katherine L. Jungjohann a , James E. Evans b,c , Ilke Arslan a,c , William D, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Available online 27 July 2012 Keywords: in situ TEM in situ STEM in situ fluid in situ liquid a b s t r a c t Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid

Ristenpart, William

222

Regulation of In Situ to Invasive Breast CarcinomaTransition  

SciTech Connect

The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

Hu, Min; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen,Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Bissell, Mina; Violette,Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition  

SciTech Connect

The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities. It assists users in gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge and information within the D&D community. This approach assists in reducing the need to rediscover the knowledge of the past while capturing the new knowledge and experiences gained during

225

Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ upgrading of oil using hydrogen donors is a new process. In particular, very little research has been conducted with respect to in-situ oil upgrading using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion. Several papers describe the use of metal...

Huseynzade, Samir

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

In situ electric fields causing electro-stimulation from conductor contact of charged human  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......evolution of in situ electric fields in anatomically...the resultant in situ electric fields from a charged...Then, computed in situ electric fields were compared...magnitude of a capacitive discharge is much milder if the...object rather than an arc to the finger tip. Thus......

Toshihiro Nagai; Akimasa Hirata

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect

As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Calcite dissolution: an in situ study in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect

The results of an in situ study of calcite dissolution in the Panama Basin indicate that the rate of dissolution in the water column increases suddenly below a water depth of about 2800 meters. This coincides with the depth at which the calcium carbonate content of surface sediments begins to decrease rapidly or the sedimentary lysocline. Since this level of increased dissolution both in the water column and on the sea floor does not appear to be related to the transition from supersaturation to undersaturation with respect to carbonate, there may be a kinetic origin for the lysocline in this region.

Thunell, R.C. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia); Keir, R.S.; Honjo, S.

1981-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

A molecular beam epitaxy facility for in situ neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect

A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) facility has been built to enable in situ neutron scattering measurements during growth of epitaxial layers. While retaining the full capabilities of a research MBE chamber, this facility has been optimized for polarized neutron reflectometry measurements. Optimization includes a compact lightweight portable design, a neutron window, controllable magnetic field, deposition across a large 76 mm diameter sample with exceptional flux uniformity, and sample temperatures continuously controllable from 38 to 1375 K. A load lock chamber allows for sample insertion, storage of up to 4 samples, and docking with other facilities. The design and performance of this chamber are described here.

Dura, J. A.; LaRock, J. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Dr. MS 6102, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 6102 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ physical/chemical treatment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites: Applicability, developing status, and research needs  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was established in June 1991 to facilitate the development and implementation of in situ remediation technologies for environmental restoration within the DOE complex. Within the ISR IP, four subareas of research have been identified: (1) in situ containment, (2) in situ physical/chemical treatment (ISPCT), (3) in situ bioremediation, and (4) subsurface manipulation/electrokinetics. Although set out as individual focus areas, these four are interrelated, and successful developments in one will often necessitate successful developments in another. In situ remediation technologies are increasingly being sought for environmental restoration due to the potential advantages that in situ technologies can offer as opposed to more traditional ex situ technologies. These advantages include limited site disruption, lower cost, reduced worker exposure, and treatment at depth under structures. While in situ remediation technologies can offer great advantages, many technology gaps exist in their application. This document presents an overview of ISPCT technologies and describes their applicability to DOE-complex needs, their development status, and relevant ongoing research. It also highlights research needs that the ISR IP should consider when making funding decisions.

Siegrist, R.L.; Gates, D.D.; West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Donaldson, T.L.; Webb, O.F.; Corder, S.L.; Dickerson, K.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

In situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: A facile chemical precipitation method is reported for effective in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. Display Omitted Highlights: ? It is a facile and effective method for deposition of HA on GR nanosheets. ? It avoids the use of harmful reducing agents like hydrazine, NaBH{sub 4} etc. ? GR nanosheets were produced using bio-compatible, ethylenediamine. ? The graphitic structure of synthesized GR nanosheets was high ordered. ? The ratio of Ca to P in HA was 1.64, which is close to ratio in natural bone. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure.

Neelgund, Gururaj M. [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Oki, Aderemi, E-mail: aroki@pvamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Luo, Zhiping [Microscopy and Imaging Center and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)] [Microscopy and Imaging Center and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

In situ characterization of AIPO-14 using synchrotron powder diffraction.  

SciTech Connect

The separation of propane/propylene mixtures is an important yet difficult industrial process that can be accomplished by a pressure swing adsorption process using AlPO-14 as the adsorbent. Although the AlPO-14 structure has been studied with different techniques, the detailed structure under conditions of the adsorption process has not been clarified. We have used synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and an in situ reactor system to obtain detailed structural information of AlPO-14 with the Rietvield method. Molecular modeling using the structural data allowed determination of the diffusion path of propylene in AlPO-14. The design of the in situ reactor system allows different chemicals to be loaded and the system to be heated and pressurized up to 90 psi with various gases or liquids. For this work, AlPO-14 powder was loaded into a 1 mm capillary tube and attached to the cell. Diffraction scans were collected during treatments in nitrogen, propane and propylene at various temperatures up to 300 C and various pressures up to 90 psig. A selected region of the x-ray diffraction patterns under different experimental conditions is shown in Fig.1. The diffraction patterns for AlPO-14 in nitrogen and propane are very similar, whereas the pattern in propylene changes considerably suggesting structure changes caused by adsorption of propylene into the pores.

Yang, N.; Greenlay, N.; Karapetrova, J.; Zschack, P.; Gatter, M.; Wilson, S.; Broach, R. W.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); UOP

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

In situ vitrification of soil from the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Contamination associated with seepage basins and other underground structures at US Department of Energy sites may be effectively remediated by application of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology. In situ vitrification converts contaminated soil and buried wastes into a glass and crystalline block, similar to obsidian commingled with crystalline phases. Two bench-scale tests performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in September 1989 demonstrated the feasibility of applying ISV to seepage basin soils at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The two tests were performed on soils spiked with heavy metal and organic contaminants as well as stable radioactive simulants. These soils contain extremely low concentrations of alkali fluxes such as sodium and potassium oxides, which are necessary charge carriers for the ISV process. Tests performed on the low flux-containing soil indicate the soil can be vitrified with special application of the ISV process. Tests showed the hazardous and radioactive simulants were successfully bound in the vitrified product and the organics were mostly destroyed. Additional larger scale testing and evaluation are recommended to further study the feasibility of treating contaminated SRS soil by the ISV process. 13 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

Campbell, B.E.; Buelt, J.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

242

EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants 89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE's Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 23, 2012

243

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for exchange of information concerning management of...

246

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its...

247

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the Department of Energy of the United States and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and northern Ireland for exchange of...

248

Five-Year Technology Development Strategic Plan Targets EMs Decommissioning Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, D.C. Leaders from EM headquarters and field offices and the UKs Sellafield nuclear site gathered recently to discuss developing technologies needed to address decommissioning challenges across the Cold War cleanup program.

249

Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

251

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

A. B. Culp

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

In Situ Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Electrochemical Cells: Batteries, Supercapacitors, and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Electrochemical Cells: Batteries, Supercapacitors, and Fuel Cells ... In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. ... In situ NMR studies on fuel cells (FCs) have focused on probing the chemical reactions at the electrodes and the fate of fuels such as methanol during FC operation. ...

Frdric Blanc; Michal Leskes; Clare P. Grey

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

An analysis of decommissioning costs for the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility  

SciTech Connect

A decommissioning cost analysis for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility was made. AFRRI is not at this time suggesting that the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility be decommissioned. This report was prepared to be in compliance with paragraph 50.33 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations which requires the assurance of availability of future decommissioning funding. The planned method of decommissioning is the immediate decontamination of the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor site to allow for restoration of the site to full public access - this is called DECON. The cost of DECON for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility in 1990 dollars is estimated to be $3,200,000. The anticipated ancillary costs of facility site demobilization and spent fuel shipment is an additional $600,000. Thus the total cost of terminating reactor operations at AFRRI will be about $3,800,000. The primary basis for this cost estimate is a study of the decommissioning costs of a similar reactor facility that was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as provided in USNRC publication NUREG/CR-1756. The data in this study were adapted to reflect the decommissioning requirements of the AFRRI TRIGA. (author)

Forsbacka, Matt [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548  

SciTech Connect

The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, Prof. Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moore, Tom [OmniProbe, Inc.; Magel, Greg [OmniProbe, Inc.; Hartfield, Cheryl [OmniProbe, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

In situ combustion - from pilot to commercial application  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, there are at least 14 active commercial in-situ combustion (ISC) projects worldwide. A review of these projects is carried out in order to emphasize the important factors which contributed to the success of the processes. The success of the developing an ISC pilot into a commercial ISC project is strongly connected with two factors: (a) starting the operation from the uppermost part of the structure and extending the process downwards and (b) application of the line drive well configuration instead of patterns, whenever is possible. An effective, peripheral line drive operation requires pool utilization. The most challenging phase towards commercialization of an ISC project is the field pilot design, implementation and evaluation. This paper is focused on the advantages of locating ISC pilot at the upper zone of the reservoir, due to the need for a full scale integration of the pilot with the subsequent semi- and commercial development of the process.

Turta, A. [Petroleum Recovery Institute, Alberta (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Conditions of realization of superwet in-situ combustion  

SciTech Connect

In in-situ combustion adding water to the air considerably improves the characteristics of the process: the combustible fuel concentration is reduced, the steam plateau ahead of the combustion front increases, less oxidizer is required to displace the oil, and the thermal wave has a higher propagation velocity. In wet combustion the temperature in the combustion zone reaches approx. 500/sup 0/C. In superwet combustion it depends on the reservoir pressure and may be 200-300/sup 0/C. It is not known in advance whether the heat of combustion will suffice to sustain the thermal wave, and if it does suffice, what will be the maximum values of the water-air ratio for the process. This paper attempts to construct a mathematical model of the superwet combustion process.

Bokserman, A.A.; Stepanov, V.P.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy  

SciTech Connect

In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality.

Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

In situ Measurement of Robot Motor Electrical Constants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor torque constant is an important parameter in modeling and controlling a robot axis. In practice this parameter can vary considerably from the manufacturer's specification, if available, and this makes it desirable to characterise individual motors. Traditional techniques require that the motor be removed from the robot for testing, or that an elaborate technique involving weights and pulleys be employed. This paper describes a novel method for measuring the torque constant of robot servo motors in situ and is based on the equivalence of motor torque and back EMF constants. It requires a very simple experimental procedure, utilizes existing axis position sensors, and eliminates effects due to static friction and joint cross coupling. A straightforward extension to this approach can provide a measurement of motor armature impedance. Experimental results obtained for a Puma 560 are discussed and compared with other published results. 1 Introduction A large number of existing robot m...

Peter I. Corke

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas Turbine Reheat Using In-Situ Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) is developing in-situ reheat (fuel injection via airfoil injection) as a means for increasing cycle efficiency and power output, with possibly reduced emissions. This report discusses engineering cycle evaluations on various reheat approaches, using GateCycle and ChemCad software simulations of typical F-class and G-class engines, modified for alternative reheat cycles. The conclusion that vane 1 reheat offers the most advantageous design agrees with the conclusions of the detailed chemical kinetics (Task 2) as verified by high temperature testing (Task 3) and Blade path CFD (Task 1) tasks. The second choice design option (vane 2 reheat after vane 1 reheat) is also validated in all tasks. A conceptual design and next recommended development tasks are presented.

R.A. Newby; D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'  

SciTech Connect

Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

In situ Oxidation of Ultrathin Silver Films on Ni(111)  

SciTech Connect

Oxidation of silver films of one- and two-monolayer thicknesses on the Ni(111) surface was investigated by low-energy electron microscopy at temperatures of 500 and 600 K. Additionally, intensity-voltage curves were measured in situ during oxidation to reveal the local film structure on a nanometer scale. At both temperatures, we find that exposure to molecular oxygen leads to the destabilization of the Ag film with subsequent relocation of the silver atoms to small few-layer-thick silver patches and concurrent evolution of NiO(111) regions. Subsequent exposure of the oxidized surface to ethylene initiates the transformation of bilayer islands back into monolayer islands, demonstrating at least partial reversibility of the silver relocation process at 600 K.

A Meyer; I Flege; S Senanayake; B Kaemena; R Rettew; F Alamgir; J Falta

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

270

In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Simulating the in situ condensation process of solar prominences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prominences in the solar corona are hundredfold cooler and denser than their surroundings, with a total mass of 1.e13 up to 1.e15 g. Here we report on the first comprehensive simulations of three-dimensional, thermally and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux ropes, where in situ condensation to a prominence happens due to radiative losses. After a gradual thermodynamic adjustment, we witness a phase where runaway cooling happens while counter-streaming shearing flows drain off mass along helical field lines. After this drainage, a prominence-like condensation resides in concave upward field regions, and this prominence retains its overall characteristics for more than two hours. While condensing, the prominence establishes a prominence-corona transition region, where magnetic field-aligned thermal conduction is operative during the runaway cooling. The prominence structure represents a force-balanced state in a helical flux rope. The simulated condensation demonstrates a right-bearing barb, as a remnant ...

Xia, Chun; Antolin, Patrick; Porth, Oliver

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir`s oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir's oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction.

Emamzadah, S.

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF FIGURES Areal extent of oil shale deposits in the Greencommercial in~situ oil shale facility. Possible alternativefor pyrolysis of oil shale Figure 7. Establishment of

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered (more)

Wei, Guanghua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thermal expansion of manganese dioxide using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal expansion behaviour of manganese dioxide, an important battery material, is reported using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction between 298 and 673 K.

Dose, W.M.

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

In-Situ MVA of CO2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In-Situ MVA of CO 2 Sequestration Using Smart Field Technology Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology...

280

New IR Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensor for in Situ Measurements of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work the development and validation of a new MIR fiber-optic physicochemical sensor system for the continuous in situ analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) in...

Krska, R; Taga, K; Kellner, R

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D&D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D&D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and/or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D&D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination.

Neal A. Yancey

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the dismantling waste plays an important role for the time needed for the dismantling phase and thus is critical to the decommissioning cost. An efficient and thorough process for inventorying, characterization and categorization of the waste provides a sound basis for the planning process. As part of comprehensive decommissioning studies for Nordic NPPs, Westinghouse has developed the decommissioning inventories that have been used for estimations of the duration of specific work packages and the corresponding costs. As part of creating the design basis for a national repository for decommissioning waste, the total production of different categories of waste packages has also been predicted. Studsvik has developed a risk based concept for categorization and handling of the generated waste using six different categories with a span from extremely small risk for radiological contamination to high level waste. The two companies have recently joined their skills in the area of decommissioning on selected market in a consortium named 'ndcon' to further strengthen the proposed process. Depending on the risk for radiological contamination or the radiological properties and other properties of importance for waste management, treatment routes are proposed with well-defined and proven methods for on-site or off-site treatment, activity determination and conditioning. The system is based on a graded approach philosophy aiming for high confidence and sustainability, aiming for re-use and recycling where found applicable. The objective is to establish a process where all dismantled material has a pre-determined treatment route. These routes should through measurements, categorization, treatment, conditioning, intermediate storage and final disposal be designed to provide a steady, un-disturbed flow of material to avoid interruptions. Bottle-necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

286

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

This report documents activities of decontamination and decommissioning at ORNL. Topics discussed include general problems, waste types, containment, robotics automation and decontamination processes.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

Ebadian, M.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

In Situ Hydrocarbon Degradation by Indigenous Nearshore Bacterial Populations  

SciTech Connect

Potential episodic hydrocarbon inputs associated with oil mining and transportation together with chronic introduction of hydrocarbons via urban runoff into the relatively pristine coastal Florida waters poses a significant threat to Florida's fragile marine environment. It is therefore important to understand the extent to which indigenous bacterial populations are able to degrade hydrocarbon compounds and also determine factors that could potentially control and promote the rate at which these compounds are broken down in situ. Previous controlled laboratory experiments carried out by our research group demonstrated that separately both photo-oxidation and cometabolism stimulate bacterial hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected from a chronically petroleum contaminated site in Bayboro Bay, Florida. Additionally, we also demonstrated that stable carbon and radiocarbon abundances of respired CO{sub 2} could be used to trace in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations at this same site. This current proposal had two main objectives: (a) to evaluate the cumulative impact of cometabolism and photo-oxidation on hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected the same site in Bayboro Bay, Florida and (b) to determine if in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations this site could be traced using natural radiocarbon and stable carbon abundances of assimilated bacterial carbon. Funds were used for 2 years of full support for one ESI Ph.D. student, April Croxton. To address our first objective a series of closed system bacterial incubations were carried out using photo-oxidized petroleum and pinfish (i.e. cometabolite). Bacterial production of CO{sub 2} was used as the indicator of hydrocarbon degradation and {delta}{sup 13}C analysis of the resultant CO{sub 2} was used to evaluate the source of the respired CO{sub 2} (i.e. petroleum hydrocarbons or the pinfish cometabolite). Results from these time series experiments demonstrated that short-term exposure of petroleum to UV light enhanced hydrocarbon degradation by 48% over that observed for non-photo-oxidized petroleum. Despite the greater bio-availability of the photo-oxidized over the non-photo-oxidized petroleum, an initial lag in CO{sub 2} production was observed indicating potential phototoxicity of the photo- by-products. {delta}{sup 13}C analysis and mass balance calculations reveal that co-metabolism with pinfish resulted in increased hydrocarbon degradation for both photo-oxidized and non-photo-oxidized petroleum each by over 100%. These results demonstrate the cumulative effect of photo-oxidation and co-metabolism on petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial populations indigenous to systems chronically impacted by hydrocarbon input. To address the second objective of this proposal bacterial concentrates were collected from Bayboro Harbor in April 2001 for nucleic acid extraction and subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance analyses. Unfortunately, however, all of these samples were lost due to a faulty compressor in our -70 freezer. The freezer was subsequently repaired and samples were again collected from Bayboro Harbor in June 2002 and again December 2002. Several attempts were made to extract the nucleic acid samples--however, the student was not able to successfully extract and an adequate amount of uncontaminated nucleic acid samples for subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance measurements of the bacterial carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry (i.e. require at least 50 {micro}g carbon for AMS measurement). Consequently, we were not able to address the second objective of this proposed work.

Cherrier, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada Scientific in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada By Angela P. Paul, Douglas K. Maurer, Kenneth G.G., and Welch, A.H., 2010, In-situ arsenic remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, west-central Nevada: U

290

In situ tetrazole ligand synthesis leading to a microporous cadmiumorganic framework for selective ion sensingw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ tetrazole ligand synthesis leading to a microporous cadmium­organic framework for selective published as an Advance Article on the web 28th July 2009 DOI: 10.1039/b907783a In situ tetrazole ligand-methyl-1H-tetrazole)} that exhibits a high-sensitivity sensing function with respect to nitrite in both

Li, Jing

291

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization Sanja Tepavcevic, Seth B-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. 1. Introduction Hybrid solar cells have been developed

Sibener, Steven

292

In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1. C. Singhal, K. Kendall, High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell - Fundamentals, Design, Denmark antonin.faes@epfl.ch Keywords: In situ ETEM, nickel oxide, reduction, RedOx, SOFC Solid Oxide Fuel

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

293

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A... UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by SAMIR HUSEYNZADE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Huseynzade, Samir

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

295

In situ measurement of the hydraulic diffusivity of the active Chelungpu Fault, Taiwan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1. Boreholes of the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project [6] The pair of boreholes used for this experiment shaking in the regions of large slip if the fault was sufficiently sealed. We investigate in situ in situ on an active large-scale fault. Hydraulic tests in deep bore- holes intersecting the Nojima fault

296

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field...and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface...oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate...populations to in situ uranium bioremediation. Uranium...serious threat to human health and the natural environment...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Single-molecule transistor fabrication by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-molecule transistor fabrication by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly J of single-molecule transistors by self-aligned lithography and in situ molecular assembly. Ultrathin metal fabrication of electrodes that can be bridged by a single molecule remains a significant challenge

Hone, James

298

An in Situ ATR-FTIR Investigation of Sulfate Bonding Mechanisms on Goethite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in Situ ATR-FTIR Investigation of Sulfate Bonding Mechanisms on Goethite Derek Peak,1 Robert G of sulfate adsorption on goethite was investi- gated in situ using attenuated total reflectance Fourier.0. It was determined that sulfate forms both outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexes on goethite at pH less

Sparks, Donald L.

299

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

In-Situ Calibration for Feedwater Flow Measurement  

SciTech Connect

With the approval by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of the Appendix K power up-rates, it has become important to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow. Failure to meet documented requirements can now more easily lead to plant operations above their analyzed safety limits. Thus, the objective of flow instrumentation used in Appendix K up-rates, becomes one of providing precise measurements of the feedwater mass flow that will not allow the plant to be overpowered, but will still assure that maximum licensed thermal output is achieved. The NRC has licensed two technologies that meet these standards. Both are based on ultrasonic measurements of the flow. The first of these technologies, which is referred to as transit-time, relies on the measurement of differences in time for multiple ultrasonic beams to pass up and downstream in the fluid stream. These measurements are then coupled with a numerical integration scheme to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile due to upstream flow disturbances. This technology is implemented using a spool piece that is inserted into the feedwater pipe. The second technology relies on the measurement of the velocity of eddies within the fluid using a numerical process called cross-correlation. This technology is implemented by attaching the ultrasonic flow meter to the external surface of the pipe. Because of the ease in installation, for atypical situations, distortions in the velocity profile can be accounted for by attaching a second ultrasonic flow meter to the same pipe or multiple meters to a similar piping configuration, where the flow is fully developed. The additional meter readings are then used for the calibration of the initial set-up. Thus, it becomes possible to provide an in-situ calibration under actual operating conditions that requires no extrapolation of laboratory calibrations to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile. This paper will focus on the cross-correlation method of flow measurement, starting with the theoretical bases for the velocity profile correction factor and its reliance on only the Reynolds number to produce an accurate measurement of the flow, when the flow is fully developed. The method of laboratory calibration and the verification of these calibrations under actual plant operating conditions will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of how this technology is being used today to support the Appendix K up-rates. Various examples will be presented of piping configurations, where in-situ calibrations have or will be used to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow at a specific location. (authors)

Peyvan, David [Entergy Nuclear Generating Company (United States); Gurevich, Yuri [Advanced Measurement and Analysis Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); French, Charles T. [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474  

SciTech Connect

The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the waste-forms generated throughout the various decommissioning campaigns. The use of low force compaction for insulation and soft wastes provided a simple, robust and cost effective solution as did the direct encapsulation of LLW steel components in the later stages of reactor decommissioning. Progress through early campaigns was good, often bettering the baseline schedule, especially when undertaking the repetitive tasks seen during Neutron Shield and Graphite Core decommissioning, once the operators had become experienced with the equipment, though delays became more pronounced, mainly as a result of increased failures due to the age and maintainability of the RDM and associated equipment. Extensive delays came about as a result of the unsupported insulation falling away from the pressure vessel during removal and the inability of the ventilation system to manage the sub micron particulate generated during IPOPI cutting operations, though the in house development of revised and new methodologies ultimately led to the successful completion of PV and I removal. In a programme spanning over 12 years, the decommissioning of the reactor pressure vessel and core led to the production 110 ILW and 75 LLW WAGR boxes, with 20 LLW ISO freight containers of primary reactor wastes, resulting in an overall packaged volume of approximately 2500 cubic metres containing the estimated 460 cubic metres of the reactor structure. (authors)

Halliwell, Chris [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Annual report FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

In-situ combustion project at Bartlett, Kansas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As part of an ongoing research program for enhanced oil recovery, the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, US Department of Energy, is in the process of developing petroleum-recovery techcniques for shallow, low-productivity, heavy-oil deposits in southeastern Kansas, southwestern Missouri and northeastern Oklahoma. Personnel at BETC designed and conducted an in-situ combustion experiment on the Link Lease in Labette County, near Bartlett, Kansas. The Nelson-McNeil calculation method was used to calculate oil recovery and predict production time for a 1.25 acre inverted five-spot. Two attempts to ignite the formation are described. The well completion methods, hydraulic fracturing, injection of air, workovers, production techniques, and well-monitoring methods of the process are described. Production results are shown for both combustion attempts. The progression of the burn and the final extent of the burn front were evaluated by the following methods: (1) controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique (CSAMT), (2) thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), (3) burn-front model, (4)geophysical log analysis, and (5) computer model study. 26 figures, 8 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Spence, K.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The engineering properties of CASS made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that are difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of wave interactions with the microstructure. To address the inspection needs, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious effects of the coarse-grained microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam will require knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detecting flaws. The goal of improving the reliability and effectiveness of ultrasonic inspection of CASS specimens can therefore potentially be achieved by first characterizing the microstructure of the component. The characterization of CASS microstructure must be done in-situ, to enable dynamic selection and optimization of the ultrasonic inspection technique. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two consistent microstructures-equiaxed-grain material and columnar-grain material.

Anderson, Michael T.; Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Mathews, Royce; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roberts, Kamandi C.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) was commonly used in selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems for corrosion resistance and enhanced durability in service. CASS materials are generally coarse-grained and elastically anisotropic in nature, and are consequently difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of ultrasonic wave interactions with the coarse-grain microstructures. To address the inspection needs for these materials, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being developed. However, to enhance the probability of detecting flaws, knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material may be required. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic backscatter measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date from laboratory experiments demonstrate the potential of these measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two homogeneous microstructuresequiaxed-grain material or columnar-grain material. Measurements on mixed or banded microstructures also show correlation with the estimated volume-fraction of columnar grains in the material. However, several operational issues will need to be addressed prior to applying this method for in-situ characterization of CASS microstructure.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Watson, Bruce E.; Mathews, Royce; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

Hershcovitch, A; Brennan, J M; Chawla, A; Fischer, W; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W; Todd, R; Custer, A; Erickson, M; Jamshidi, N; Kobrin, P; Laping, R; Poole, H J; Jimenez, J M; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Yin-Vallgren, C; Sochugov, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

In situ feldspar dissolution rates in an aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ silicate dissolution rates within the saturated Navajo sandstone, at Black Mesa, Arizona were determined from elemental fluxes in the aquifer. The mass transfer between groundwater and mineral matrix along flow paths was calculated from inverse mass balance modeling. The reaction time is bound by 14C-based travel time. BET surface areas were measured with N2 gas adsorption. Dissolution rates for K-feldspar and plagioclase are 10?19 and 10?16 mol (feldspar) m?2 s?1, respectively, which are ?105 times slower than laboratory experiment-derived rates under similar pH and temperature but at far from equilibrium conditions. The rates obtained in this study are consistent with the slower field rates found in numerous watershed and soil profile studies. However, these rates are from saturated aquifers, overcoming some concerns on estimated rates from unsaturated systems. The Navajo sandstone is a quartz-sandstone with a relatively simple and well-studied hydrogeology, groundwater geochemistry, and lithology, a large number of groundwater analyses and 14C groundwater ages, groundwater residence times up to ?37 ky, groundwater pH from ?8 to 10, and temperature from ?15 to 35C.

Chen Zhu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396  

SciTech Connect

Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DECOMMISSIONING OF THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES OF VKTA AT THE ROSSENDORF RESEARCH SITE  

SciTech Connect

VKTA decommissioned the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation protection and runs an accredited laboratory for environmental and radionuclide analytics. The Rossendorf research site is located east of the city of Dresden. The period from 1982 to about 1997 was mainly characterized by obtaining the necessary licenses for decommissioning and developing a new infrastructure (i.e. waste treatment facility, interim storages for fissile material and waste, clearance monitoring facility). The decommissioning work has been in progress since that time. The decommissioning projects are concentrated on three complexes: (1) the reactors and a fuel development and testing facility, (2) the radioisotope production facilities, and (3) the former liquid and solid waste storage facilities. The status of decommissioning progress and treatment of the residues will be demonstrated. Finally an outlook will be given on the future tasks of VKTA based on the ''Conception VKTA 2000 plus'', which was confirmed by the Saxonian government last year.

U. Helwig, W. Boessert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target  

SciTech Connect

A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by ?-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from ?-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and ?-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

Latge, C.; Henry, J. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-DTN, 13108 Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France); Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Gessi, A. [ENEA, Brasimone (Italy); Guertin, A. [CNRS, Subatech, Nantes (France); Konstantinovic, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Lindau, R. [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maloy, S. [DOE-LANL, Los Alamos (United States); Saito, S. [JAEA, Tokai (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU-HCET to evaluate a technology integration--shot blasting technology and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which are decontamination and sensor technology, respectively.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC Core-Shell Nanoparticles for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Storage. In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings...

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321

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

322

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

323

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Thberge, Valrie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Qubec, L'Htel-Dieu de Qubec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschnes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschnes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Qubec, Hpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affili l'Universit de Montral, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Degradation of Bimetallic Model Electrocatalysts ___ an in situ XAS Study  

SciTech Connect

One of the major challenges in the development of clean energy fuel cells is the performance degradation of the electrocatalyst, which, apart from poisoning effects, can suffer from corrosion due to its exposure to a harsh environment under high potentials. In this communication, we demonstrate how interactions of Pt with a transition metal support affect not only, as commonly intended, the catalytic activity, but also the reactivity of Pt towards oxide formation or dissolution. We use two well-defined single-crystal model systems, Pt/Rh(111) and Pt/Au(111) and a unique x-ray spectroscopy technique with enhanced energy resolution to monitor the potential-dependent oxidation state of Pt, and find two markedly different oxidation mechanisms on the two different substrates. This information can be of great significance for future design of more active and more stable catalysts. We have studied the potential-induced degradation of Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on Rh(111) and Au(111) single-crystal substrates. The anodic formation of Pt oxides was monitored using in situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection x-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS). Although Pt was deposited on both substrates in a three-dimensional island growth mode, we observed remarkable differences during oxide formation that can only be understood in terms of strong Pt-substrate interactions throughout the Pt islands. Anodic polarization of Pt/Rh(111) up to +1.6 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) leads to formation an incompletely oxidized passive layer, whereas formation of PtO2 and partial Pt dissolution is observed for Pt/Au(111).

Friebel, Daniel

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

326

TESTING IN SITU ASSEMBLY WITH THE KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATE SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

We present a Monte Carlo model for the structure of low-mass (total mass <25 M{sub ?}) planetary systems that form by the in situ gravitational assembly of planetary embryos into final planets. Our model includes distributions of mass, eccentricity, inclination, and period spacing that are based on the simulation of a disk of 20 M{sub ?}, forming planets around a solar-mass star, and assuming a power-law surface density distribution that drops with distance a as ? a {sup 1.5}. The output of the Monte Carlo model is then subjected to the selection effects that mimic the observations of a transiting planet search such as that performed by the Kepler satellite. The resulting comparison of the output to the properties of the observed sample yields an encouraging agreement in terms of the relative frequencies of multiple-planet systems and the distribution of the mutual inclinations when moderate tidal circularization is taken into account. The broad features of the period distribution and radius distribution can also be matched within this framework, although the model underpredicts the distribution of small period ratios. This likely indicates that some dissipation is still required in the formation process. The most striking deviation between the model and observations is in the ratio of single to multiple systems in that there are roughly 50% more single-planet candidates observed than are produced in any model population. This suggests that some systems must suffer additional attrition to reduce the number of planets or increase the range of inclinations.

Hansen, Brad M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Murray, Norm, E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: murray@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Chapter 22 - Whole Algal Biomass In situ Transesterification to Fatty Acid Methyl Esters as Biofuel Feedstocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter addresses the yield of lipids quantified as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, and the acid catalyst hydrochloric acid providing a consistently high level of conversion to FAME. The discussion is accompanied by a link to the large-scale application of this process as a whole biomass conversion pathway. Microalgae-focused lipid technologies for biofuel applications, renewable and biodiesel fuel properties are described along with in situ transesterification of oleaginous algal biomass, choice of catalyst for in situ whole biomass transesterification, and the analytical characterization of lipid content in algal biomass using in situ transesterification.

Lieve M.L. Laurens

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Decommissioning of TA-21-153, a /sup 227/Ac contaminated old filter building  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust air filter building contaminated with /sup 227/Ac was decommissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1978. The building was constructed in the late 1940s to clean exhaust air from several buildings at TA-21, DP Site. It was in service until March 1970. The project involved preliminary decontamination, dismantling the building, and burying the debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. This report presents the details on the decommissioning procedures, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Decontamination and decommissioning of building 889 at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Rocky Flats site, the building 889 decommissioning project was the first large-scale decommissioning project of a radiologically contaminated facility at Rocky Flats. The scope consisted of removal of all equipment and utility systems from the interior of the building, decontamination of interior building surfaces, and the demolition of the facility to ground level. Details of the project management plan, including schedule, engineering, cost, characterization methodologies, decontamination techniques, radiological control requirements, and demolition methods, are provided in this article. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Dorr, K.A. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States); Hickman, M.E.; Henderson, B.J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States); Sexton, R.J. [Scientific Ecology Group, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing January 2013. [1] In situ test of hydraulic fracturing (HF) provides the only way to observe in situ of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core

335

Rosetta lander in situ characterization of a comet nucleus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rosetta is one of the cornerstone missions within the science program Horizon 2000 of the European Space Agency (ESA). Its objective is the characterization of comet Wirtanen, which will be reached after 9 years of cruise in the year 2012. As comets are believed to be the most primitive bodies in our planetary system, having preserved material from the early stages of its formation, the Rosetta mission shall result in a better understanding of the formation of the solar system. The Rosetta Lander, part of the Rosetta payload, is contributed to the mission by an international consortium of research institutes. It will perform in situ measurements on the surface of the comet nucleus. The science objectives of the Rosetta Lander can be comprised by: determination of the composition of cometary near surface matter: bulk elemental abundances, isotopes, minerals, ices, carbonaceous compounds, organics volatiles -in dependance on time and insolation. measurement of physical parameters mechanical strength, density, sound speed, electrical permittivity, heat conductivity and temperature. investigation of topology, surface structure including colour and albedo, near surface structure (strategraphy) and internal structure. the comets interaction with solar wind. The payload of the Rosetta Lander consists of nine instruments with a total mass of about 20kg. The Rosetta Lander system with an overall mass of about 85kg consists of a light weight structure of carbonfibre material, solar cells to provide power, a thermal control system securing operation without the use of radiactive heaters, a telecommunications system, using the orbiter as relay to Earth and a central computer, serving all subsystems and the payload. The lander will be ejected from the main spacecraft after selection of an adequate landing area from an orbit, about 15km above the surface of the nucleus. The actual descent strategy is highly depending on the (yet unknown) physical parameters of P/Wirtanen (like mass, shape and rotation period). Thus, a flexible landing concept, which allows the setting of the landing parameters interactively during the mission is required. Landing will take place on a tripod that includes a device that dissipates most of the impact energy and allows rotation of the main structure. At impact, a hold-down thruster and the shot of an anchoring harpoon will avoid rebound from the surface.

K. Wittmann; B. Feuerbacher; S. Ulamec; H. Rosenbauer; J.P. Bibring; D. Moura; R. Mugnuolo; S. diPippo; K. Szego; G. Haerendel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Laser in situ keratomileusis in United States Naval aviators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) as well as higher-order aberrometric changes in a population of active-duty United States Naval aviators. Setting Navy Refractive Surgery Centers, San Diego, California, and Portsmouth, Virginia, USA. Design Prospective noncomparative 2-site study. Methods In this study of femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided LASIK, 3 groups were differentiated according to the refractive status: myopia, mixed astigmatism, and hyperopia. Uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities, refraction, mesopic low-contrast CDVA, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and patient satisfaction were evaluated during a 3-month follow-up. Results The study enrolled, treated, and included for analysis 548 eyes with myopia, 60 eyes with mixed astigmatism, and 25 eyes with hyperopia. The UDVA was 20/20 or better in 98.3% of eyes with myopia and mixed astigmatism at all postoperative visits and in 95.7% of hyperopic eyes 3months postoperatively. The gain in CDVA was 1 or more lines in 39.2%, 41.1%, and 30.4% of myopic, mixed astigmatic and hyperopic eyes, respectively. Loss of 2 lines of CDVA after surgery occurred in 2 myopic eyes (0.4%). At 3 months, a mean change of +0.03 ?m 0.10(SD) and +0.05 0.08 ?m was observed in higher-order root mean square and primary spherical aberration, respectively. Of the patients, 95.9% said they believed that LASIK had helped their effectiveness as Naval aviators and 99.6% would recommend the same treatment to others. Conclusion Femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided LASIK was an efficacious and safe option for refractive correction in Naval aviators, enabling a quick return to flight status. Financial Disclosure Drs. Tanzer and Schallhorn are consultants to Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. Noauthor has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

David J. Tanzer; Tyson Brunstetter; Richard Zeber; Elizabeth Hofmeister; Sandor Kaupp; Neil Kelly; Myah Mirzaoff; William Sray; Mitch Brown; Steven Schallhorn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fracture Permeability and In Situ Stress in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and hydraulic fracturing stress measurements conducted in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate the relationship between reservoir permeability and the contemporary in situ stress field. Data from wells drilled into productive and nonproductive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively

338

In Situ Delta-13 CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Australia In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.J. Francey and C.E. Allison CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research, Private Bag No. 1, Mordialloc, Victoria, Australia 3195 Period of Record 1982-1993 Methods Air samples are collected during baseline condition episodes at a frequency of around one sample per week. Baseline conditions are characterized by wind direction in the sector 190-280°, condensation nucleus concentration below 600 cm3, and steady, continuous CO2 concentrations (variation + 0.2 ppmv per hour). The Cape Grim in situ extraction line is based on 3 high-efficiency glass U-tube traps with internal cooling coils. A vacuum pump draws air from either the 10 m or 70 m intakes, and sampling

339

A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered data is either missing or obviously erroneous. The methodology is able...

Wei, Guanghua

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stabilization of Spent Oil Shales, EPA-600/'7-'78- 021, Feb.Impact Analysis for an Oil Shale Complex at Parachute Creek,from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Routine application of the in situ soil analysis technique by the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Using a technique developed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for field spectrometry, the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL) has routinely performed in situ soil measurements in the vicinity of five nuclear power stations for more than a decade. As a special research endeavor, several locations at the FURNAS Angra 1 site in Brazil having high natural backgrounds were also measured in 1987. The technical basis of the technique, a comparison of soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil analyses from the same sites, the advantages and disadvantages of the in situ methodology, and the evolution of the portable equipment utilized at YAEL for the field measurements are presented in this paper.

Murray, J.C.; McCurdy, D.E.; Laurenzo, E.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for...

343

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511522 In situ Raman spectroscopy of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511­522 In situ Raman spectroscopy. In this situation, a low energy excitation (e.g. visible light) is needed to excite an electron to a neighboring

Nabben, Reinhard

344

Extraction and comparison of gene expression patterns from 2D RNA in situ hybridization images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for low signal/strong lighting effects, the significance...larger computational cost. Imaging in situ hybridizations...the overall position, lighting conditions and focal...consistent staining/lighting) and small datasets...mutual information. Medical Imaging 1998: Image......

Daniel L. Mace; Nicole Varnado; Weiping Zhang; Erwin Frise; Uwe Ohler

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Verification of Supercooled Cloud Water Forecasts with In Situ Aircraft Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ measurements of temperature (Ta), horizontal wind speed (V), dewpoint (Td), total water content (TWC), and cloud and supercooled cloud water (SCW) events, made during 50 flights from three research field programs, have been compared to ...

Hong Guan; Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedingsof the 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~OF MODIFIED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS J. P. Fox and P.

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

In-situ measurements of surface tension-driven shape recovery in a metallic glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new technique, involving nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy at high temperature under an inert atmosphere, is used to study deformation of a Pt-based metallic glass. As temperature is increased into ...

Schuh, Christopher A.

351

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4, 19'70, p. 89. 24. C-b Shale Oil Venture: Hydrology, MinePiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsofrom a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

In-situ ellipsometry: Identification of surface terminations during GaN growth , T. Schmidtling1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 In-situ ellipsometry: Identification of surface terminations during GaN growth C. Cobet1 , T SE, one is not limited to any special bulk or surface symmetry for optical characterisation. In PAMBE

Feenstra, Randall

355

In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

Yu, Hongxu

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...VI) bioremediation. FIG. 1. Stratigraphy of borehole logs. Borehole logs collected from the in situ treatment plot installed...geochemical gradients that could be attributed in large part to the manner in which acetate was distributed...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

In situ SEM and ToF-SIMS analysis of IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEM and ToF-SIMS analysis of IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles at aqueous surfaces. In situ SEM and ToF-SIMS analysis of IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles at aqueous surfaces....

359

Phylum Arthropods Study Material: Demodex folliculorum. 2 slides: section in situ, whole mount.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phylum Arthropods Study Material: Demodex folliculorum. 2 slides: section in situ, whole mount. Sarcoptes scabei. 1 slide, wholemount. Dermanyssus gallinae. 1 slide, wholenount. Argas persicus. 1 slide, wholemount. Dermacentor andersoni. 1 slide, wholemount. Amblyomma americana. 1 slide, wholemount

Schluter, Dolph

360

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A nanofluidic device for single molecule studies with in situ control of environmental solution conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an approach to study the in situ conformational response of single biomolecules such as DNA to a change in environmental solution conditions. These conditions are, for example, the composition of the buffer or ...

Zhang, Ce

362

The Hadley circulation: assessing NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and sparse in-situ estimates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?We present a comparison of the zonal mean meridional circulations derived from monthly in situ data (i.e. radiosondes and ship reports) and from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis product. To facilitate the interpretat...

D. E. Waliser; Zhixiong Shi; J. R. Lanzante; A. H. Oort

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Turbines Using Wireless, Passive, Ceramic Sensors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Online, In Situ Monitoring of Combustion Turbines Using Wireless, Passive, Ceramic Sensors Description The United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to strengthening America's energy security. Central to this mission is to increase the percentage of domestic fuels used to provide for the Nation's energy needs. To this end, DOE-NETL is supporting projects to develop technologies that will improve the efficiency, cost, and environmental performance

364

Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August. 1978 Major Subject: Geology RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

Ledger, Ernest Broughton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Field versus laboratory characterization of clay deposits for use as in situ municipal landfill liners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Aa? University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of . KASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Major Subject: Geology FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Approved as to style...

Wechsler, Sharon Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Impact of Lack of Consistent Free Release Standards on Decommissioning Projects and Costs  

SciTech Connect

While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for a long time, there are no regulatory mechanisms in place for the release of solid bulk materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from the operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from the decommissioning of a nuclear site. Decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant generates large quantities of solid bulk materials such as concrete, metal, and demolition debris. Disposition of such materials has a large impact on the overall decommissioning cost. Yet, there are no clear and cost-effective alternatives for the disposal of these materials from a regulatory perspective. This paper discusses the methodologies for clearance of solid materials1, their applicability to the disposition of bulk materials, and the impact of lack of consistent free release standards on the decommissioning projects and costs.

Devgun, J. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan (D&D) was developed as a concept for progressing from the final actions of the Disposal Phase, through the Decontamination and Decommissioning Phase, and into the initiation of the Long-Term Monitoring Phase. This plan was written in a manner that coincides with many of the requirements specified in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive Waste Management; ASTM El 167 87, Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations; and other documents listed in Attachment 3 of the D&D Plan. However, this conceptual plan does not meet all of the requirements necessary for a Decontamination and Decommissioning plan necessary for submission to the U.S. Congress in accordance with the Land Withdrawal Act (P.L. 102-579). A complete D&D plan that will meet the requirements of all of these documents and of the Land Withdrawal Act will be prepared and submitted to Congress by October 1997.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division, now Washington TRU Solutions LLC

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC, and steelhead trout on the West Coast of the United States. PacifiCorp's 169-megawatt Klamath Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Project is the only thorough, objective and transparent assessment tool that analyzes the cost

369

EIS-0364: Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), on proposed decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.

370

An evaluation of the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is to suggest an evaluation method on the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The parameters of evaluation are performance impacts, site-specific impacts, safety impacts, and cost impacts. The evaluation model was provided and applied for dismantling of a steam generator.

KwanSeong Jeong; ByungSeon Choi; Jeikwon Moon; Dongjun Hyun; JongHwan Lee; IkJune Kim; GeunHo Kim; JaeSeok Seo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site  

SciTech Connect

As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Decommissioning and Dismantling of the Floating Maintenance Base 'Lepse' - 13316  

SciTech Connect

The Lepse was built in Russia in 1934 and commissioned as a dry cargo ship. In 1961 she was re-equipped for use as a nuclear service ship (NSS), specifically a floating maintenance base (FMB), to support the operation of the civilian nuclear fleet (ice-breakers) of the USSR. In 1988 Lepse was taken out of service and in 1990 she was re-classified as a 'berth connected ship', located at a berth near the port of Murmansk under the ownership of Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Atomflot. Lepse has special storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SFA) that have been used to store several hundred SFAs for nearly 40 years. High and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is also present in the spent nuclear fuel assembly storage channels, in special tanks and also in the SFA cooling circuit. Many of the SFAs stored in Lepse are classified as damaged and cannot be removed using standard procedures. The removal of the SFA and LRW from the Lepse storage facilities is a hazardous task and requires specially designed tools, equipment and an infrastructure in which these can be deployed safely. Lepse is a significant environmental hazard in the North West of Russia. Storing spent nuclear fuel and high-level liquid radioactive waste on board Lepse in the current conditions is not acceptable with respect to Russian Federation health, safety and environmental standards and with international best practice. The approved concept design for the removal of the SFA and LRW and dismantling of Lepse requires that the ship be transported to Nerpa shipyard where specialist infrastructure will be constructed and equipment installed. One of the main complexities of the Project lies within the number of interested stakeholders involved in the Project. The Lepse project has been high focus on the international stage for many years with previous international efforts failing to make significant progress towards the objective of decommissioning Lepse. The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP) approved an internationally funded project to identify and prioritise nuclear and environmental hazards in NW Russia. Within this project the Lepse was recognised as being one of the highest nuclear hazards in NW Russia. Removal of SNF, SRW and LRW from Lepse requires innovative design and development of bespoke equipment. The main drivers of the NDEP Donors are first to safely transport Lepse in 2012 from her current berth close to the local population in Murmansk to the nominated dismantling shipyard, and secondly to raise Lepse from the water in 2013 onto the slip-way at the dismantling shipyard. A description is provided of the approach and progress towards preparing the Lepse for the removal of SFAs and other radioactive waste, to decontaminate and then dismantle the vessel under international donor funding. (authors)

Field, D.; Mizen, K. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)] [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

D.F. Nickelson; D.K. Jorgensen; J.J. Jessmore; R.A. Hyde; R.K. Farnsworth

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energys Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOEs Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

Jorgensen, Douglas Kay; Nickelson, David Frank; Nickelson, Reva Anne; Farnsworth, Richard Kent; Jessmore, James Joseph

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141  

SciTech Connect

The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The History of Cranfills Gap ISD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of study, however, was framed to present the rural Texas school from an organizational development point of view. The rural school is remembered by former students, teachers and administrators within the context of county, state and national changes...

Rudd, Charla J

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1483 DOE/EA-1483 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois March 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office Argonne Area Office Argonne, Illinois Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois Table of Contents Acronyms....................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Background ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Facility History ........................................................................................................1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

383

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High rock temperatures, a high degree of fracturing, high tectonic stresses, and low permeability are the combination of qualities that define an ideal candidate-Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir. The Coso Geothermal Field is an area where fluid temperatures exceeding 300°C have been measured at depths less than 10,000 feet and the reservoir is both highly fractured and tectonically stressed. Some of the wells within this portion of the reservoir are relatively impermeable,

384

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride at a former grain storage facility in Missouri March 26, 2013 At a former grain storage facility in Missouri, EVS has initiated a pilot test of an innovative treatment using amended zero-valent iron to achieve in situ chemical reduction of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations above regulatory levels in soil and groundwater (at 8-89 ft below ground level [BGL]) are confined to a small area of the former facility, on property that is now a county fairground. At present, the contamination poses no known risks to fairgrounds workers or visitors. The deep bedrock aquifers in the area are at minimal risk of contamination. The areas targeted for treatment in the pilot test are localized

385

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.110.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of 2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-02 October 2012 September 7, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's (the Department) Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2011, and have issued our report thereon dated September 7, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Department's internal control

387

Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

In Situ Hydrogenation of Amorphous Silicon Prepared by Thermal Decomposition of Disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers with thicknesses of 90-600 ? grown by thermal decomposition of disilane were treated with rf hydrogen plasma just after deposition at the same temperature (430-440?C). During this process (referred to as in situ hydrogenation), atomic hydrogen passivates defects, and the effective thickness of this passivated layer is estimated to be 220 ?. Atomic hydrogen also induces structural relaxation of the Si network even in a-Si:H deposited at high temperature (>400?C) while the change of bonded hydrogen content is rather small in in situ hydrogenation.

Mitsuyuki Yamanaka; Yutaka Hayashi; Isao Sakata

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

O'Brien, Kevin C. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA); Morse, Jeffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Buckley, Steven R. (Modesto, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Wilson, Keith B. (San Ramon, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Pile design predictions in sand and gravel using in situ tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1983 Ma]or Sub]ect: Civil Engineering PILE DESIGN PREDICTIONS IN SAND AND GRAVEL USING IN SITU TESTS A Thesis by LINDA GRUBBS HUFF Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle Chairman of Committee syne A. Du lap Member Chri opher C... Committee: Dr. Harry M. Coyle The pressuremeter, cone penetrometer and standard penetration tests are in situ tests which are being performed more frequently in recent years to obtain soil parameters used in the design of pile foundations. New design...

Huff, Linda Grubbs

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The displacement of oil from porous media by in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MEDIA BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by JOHN T. CORCORAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AgcM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... f970 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING TIRE DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MEDIA BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis JOHN T. CORCORAN Approved as to style and content by: (C i man of Committee) ( em er (Hea. d of Department (Member) December...

Corcoran, John Thomas

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Characterization of Texas lignite and numerical modeling of its in-situ gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ITS IN-SITU GASIFICATION A Thesis by YIH-JY WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geophysics CHARACTERIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ITS IN-SITU GASIFICATION A Thesis by YIH-JY WANG Approved as to style and content by: James E. Russell (Chairman of Committee) M. Caputo...

Wang, Yih-Jy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1  

SciTech Connect

To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

Hu, Jian Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines  

SciTech Connect

A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

Slobodskyy, T. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Zentrum fuer Mikrostrukturforschung, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Schroth, P.; Grigoriev, D.; Minkevich, A. A.; Baumbach, T. [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M. [Institute for Applied Physics/DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Energy Research and Physical Technologies, Technical University Clausthal, Am Stollen 19B, 38640 Goslar (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device  

SciTech Connect

The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed.

Mukai, K., E-mail: mukai.kiyofumi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Peterson, B. J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Pandya, S. N.; Sano, R. [The Graduate University for Advance Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Decommissioning and Demolition of a Redundant UK Research Facility at AWE Aldermaston - 12453  

SciTech Connect

The redundant two-storey brick built research facility on the AWE Site at Aldermaston, UK is in the closing stages of decommissioning and demolition. The facility was used for a variety of purposes up to 1995 predominately involving the use of alpha-emitting isotopes. The two main areas of alpha-based contamination have been decommissioned with the removal of hot -boxes and fume cupboards on the ground floor and HEPA filter units and ventilation equipment on the first floor. Many of these activities were undertaken using both airline fed suits, (supplied via a free standing mobile unit), and full face respirators. Asbestos materials were located and cleared from the first floor by specialist contractor. All sections of active drain running from the building to the site active effluent disposal system were removed early in the program using established techniques with specialist monitoring equipment used to provide confidence in the data required for disposal of the decommissioning debris. In particular a dedicated High Resolution Gamma Spectrometer (radioactive materials scanning unit) was utilized to categorise waste drums and wrapped packages. The building has been decommissioned and the monitoring and sampling of the structure was completed in November 2011 - the results demonstrating that the building was clear of contamination in accordance with UK clearance and exemption requirements. The demolition plan was developed and implemented in December with site excavation of foundations and site clearance currently ongoing in preparation for final site backfill activities and project close. A number of useful lessons have been learnt during the operations and are set out at the rear of the main text. (authors)

Pritchard, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Joint US/Russian study on the development of a decommissioning strategy plan for RBMK-1000 unit No. 1 at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this joint U.S./Russian study was to develop a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable strategy for decommissioning Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit No. 1 as a representative first-generation RBMK-1000 reactor. The ultimate goal in developing the decommissioning strategy was to select the most suitable decommissioning alternative and end state, taking into account the socioeconomic conditions, the regulatory environment, and decommissioning experience in Russia. This study was performed by a group of Russian and American experts led by Kurchatov Institute for the Russian efforts and by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. efforts and for the overall project.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, respectively--together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentra- tion

Boss, Emmanuel S.

408

Solubilization and Purification of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Water by in Situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solubilization and Purification of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Water by in Situ Radical into bundles that aggregate into tangled networks. Dissolution of SWNT in water, which is important because contained 68 mg of SWNT-PSS in 100 mL of water. A detailed procedure is in the Supporting Information

Resasco, Daniel

409

Direct in Situ Observation of Synergism between Cellulolytic Enzymes during the Biodegradation of Crystalline Cellulose Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct in Situ Observation of Synergism between Cellulolytic Enzymes during the Biodegradation types of T. reesei cellulolytic enzymes TrCel6A, TrCel7A, and TrCel7Band their mixtures. TrCel6A and Tr. When acting alone on native cellulose fibers, each of the three enzymes is incapable of significant

Dutcher, John

410

An in situ method for the study of strain broadening using synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A tensionometer for in situ powder diffraction studies of foils under stress has been constructed and used in a copper foil on beamline 2.3 of the Daresbury SRS. Both peak asymmetry and broadening were observed which was interpreted as being due to a cellular structure with cell walls and cell interiors possessing high and low dislocation densities.

Tang, C.C.

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook 1 Shan-situ identity fraud incidents, which occur when the attackers use the same devices and IP addresses significant efforts to prevent identity fraud and protect users' privacy. For example, Facebook records

Chen, Sheng-Wei

412

Acid Diversion in Carbonate Reservoirs Using Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diversion in carbonates is more difficult than in sandstones because of the ability of acid to significantly increase the permeability in carbonates as it reacts in the pore spaces and flow channels of matrix. In-situ gelled acids that are based...

Gomaa, Ahmed Mohamed Mohamed

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluation of a New Liquid Breaker for Polymer Based In-Situ Gelled Acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A solid breaker is used to reduce the viscosity of the gel at pH range of 4-5 for in-situ gelled acids with Zr4 cross-linkers utilize. However, the literature survey confirmed that solid breakers caused a premature reduction in the fluid viscosity...

Aksoy, Gamze

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

Studying the Breaking Mechanism of Polymer-Based In-Situ Gelled Acids using Solid Breaker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ gelled acids that are based on polymers have been used in the field for several years as an acid diversion agent. These acids should not cause permanent formation damage, and should clean-up rapidly and completely when the well is put back...

Tian, Zhida

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

In situ characterization of soil properties using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data set had a total clay content root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of 61 g kg-1 and 41 g kg-1 for the field-moist and air-dried in situ cores, respectively. The organic C validation data set had a RMSD of 5.8 g kg-1 and 4.6 g kg-1 for the field...

Waiser, Travis Heath

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Current Oil Sands Technologies: Surface Mining and In Situ Applications ... efficiency - gas turbine ?GT ... The studied uncertainties include, (1) uncertainty in emissions factors for petroleum substitutes, (2) uncertainties resulting from poor knowledge of the amt. of remaining conventional petroleum, and (3) uncertainties about the amt. of prodn. of petroleum substitutes from natural gas and coal feedstocks. ...

Joule A. Bergerson; Oyeshola Kofoworola; Alex D. Charpentier; Sylvia Sleep; Heather L. MacLean

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction A.E. FINAN, K. MIU, A.C. KADAK Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Nuclear Science the technical aspects and the economics of utilizing nuclear reactors to provide the energy needed

418

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

Martin, Randall

419

The determination of the in situ structure by nuclear spin contrast variation  

SciTech Connect

Polarized neutron scattering from polarized nuclear spins in hydrogenous substances opens a new way of contrast variation. The enhanced contrast due to proton spin polarization was used for the in situ structure determination of tRNA of the functional complex of the E.coli ribosome.

Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht (Germany); Nierhaus, K.H. [Max-Planch-Institut fuer Molekulare Genetik, Berlin (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Chitosan-mediated in situ biomolecule assembly in completely packaged microfluidic devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chitosan-mediated in situ biomolecule assembly in completely packaged microfluidic devices Jung Jin biomolecule assembly at readily addressable sites in microfluidic channels after complete fabrication and packaging of the microfluidic device. Aminopolysaccharide chitosan's pH responsive and chemically reactive

Rubloff, Gary W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ decommissioning isd" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Towards an Autonomous Space In-situ Marine Sensorweb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Towards an Autonomous Space In-situ Marine Sensorweb S. Chien, J. Doubleday, D. Tran, D. Thompson, G. Mahoney, Y. Chao, R. Castano Jet Propulsion ongoing efforts to integrate and coordinate space and marine assets to enable autonomous response

Schaffer, Steven

422

In Situ Data Biases and Recent Ocean Heat Content Variability* JOSH K. WILLIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Situ Data Biases and Recent Ocean Heat Content Variability* JOSH K. WILLIS Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California JOHN M. LYMAN NOAA/Pacific Marine GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, Washington JOHN GILSON Scripps

Johnson, Gregory C.

423

Experimental Study of In Situ Combustion with Decalin and Metallic Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a hydrogen donor and a catalyst for upgrading and increasing oil recovery during in situ combustion is a known and proven technique. Based on research conducted on this process, it is clear that widespread practice in industry is the usage...

Mateshov, Dauren

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Engineering issue study of triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ flying height testing technology is becoming more and more important in sliderdisk interaction analysis and manufacturing quality control of disk drives and head-related components. Triple harmonic method is a quite promising choice for in situ flying height analysis, compared with other in situ methods reported up to now. This paper reports results of investigations on engineering issues of applying triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis. The paper reports results of analysis on the effects of various testing conditions on flying height testing repeatability and accuracy. Results suggest that working at reasonable high channel density and working on the ratio between third and first harmonics will be an advantage in terms of both flying height testing sensitivity and testing repeatability. Comparing with media thickness effect, the gap-length variation among different heads will be important if it is to study flying height difference among different heads and the testing is at high channel density. Also, it is suggested to work at AC erased track, in order to reduce the non-linearity caused by hard transition.

Yipin Zhou; Bo Liu; Lewei Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Nondestructive In Situ Identification of Crystal Orientation of Anisotropic ZnO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nondestructive In Situ Identification of Crystal Orientation of Anisotropic ZnO Nanostructures to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical proper- ties compared to their bulk counterparts.1 4 Important, a fast, unambiguous, and nondestructive technique for identification of the crystalline orientation

Wang, Zhong L.

426

In Situ Characterization ofNitrospira-Like Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacteria Active in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calculated by the plotting software based on a sigmoidal curve fit model. Error bars indicate 1 standard...of cell aggregates, organic polymers, and cavities may also apply...Rath H.-P. Koops J. Flood R. Amann In situ analysis...

Holger Daims; Jeppe L. Nielsen; Per H. Nielsen; Karl-Heinz Schleifer; Michael Wagner

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility Jrmy. Nosa,1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility control Jérémy. Nosa,1, 2 , Vincent Lagneaub,1 , Valérie Langlaisc,2 a PhD student, jeremy.nos@areva.com, jeremyTech ­ Centre de Géosciences, 35 rue St. Honoré, 77305 Fontainebleau Cedex, France 2 AREVA NC ­ Business Unit

Boyer, Edmond

428

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors Primary for the rest of the western basin of Lake Erie. We propose to deploy environmental sensors at these sites. The first sensor is a fluorescence-based detector of phycocyanin, a pigment found predominantly

429

In situ doping control of the surface of high-temperature superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS In situ doping control of the surface of high-temperature superconductors M. A. HOSSAIN1 to systematic studies of high- temperature superconductors, such as creating new electron- doped superconductors.1038/nphys998 Central to the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity is the evolution

Michelson, David G.

430

Development of a Microfluidic Device for Synthesis of Lipid Bi-Layer In-Situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and result in unstable bi-layers having a short lifetime. In this investigation a novel microfluidic device and a method for artificial synthesis of lipid bi-layer in-situ are explored. In the proposed method, lipid trapped at an aperture on a Teflon sheet...

Banneyake, Bm U.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ prepared Mg­Cu alloy and surface defects. The maximal hydrogen storage contents of Mg­Cu alloy nanoparticles can reach 2.05 ? 0. Introduction The storage of hydrogen gas is presently accomplished with the stainless steel cylinders under

Cao, Guozhong

432

Towards Autonomous Robotic In-Situ Assembly on Unstructured Construction Sites Using Monocular Vision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards Autonomous Robotic In-Situ Assembly on Unstructured Construction Sites Using Monocular and implemented algorithms that address these challenges and enable autonomous robotic assembly of freeform-vision-based pose estimation, the designed algorithms enable a mobile robotic manipulator to: 1) autonomously

Kamat, Vineet R.

433

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean ... Upon power up, the instrument will sequentially execute all commands in the current method until termination by lack of further commands or power interruption. ... The SEAS instrument was connected to a CTD and a PAR sensor, powered on deck, and lowered to 30 m depth. ...

Lori R. Adornato; Eric A. Kaltenbacher; Danielle R. Greenhow; Robert H. Byrne

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN-SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a wind turbine, including turbine blades, tower, gears, generator bearings etc. [2]. However, due to highDEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN- SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Abington, Cambridge, CB21 6AL, UK bic@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is crucial to maintain wind turbine blades

Boyer, Edmond

435

In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater using a Multi-Objective Parallel Evolutionary Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizontal flow treatment wells (HFTWs) with in situ biodegradation is an innovative approach with the potential to remediate perchlorate- contaminated groundwater. A model has been developed that combines in the natural environment. The perchlorate problem is exacerbated because remediation of perchlorate

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

436

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATOR OF IN-SITU COMBUSTION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Accurate simulation of in-situ combustion processes is computationally very challenging because the spatial and temporal scales over which the combustion process takes place are very small. In this sixth quarter of our DoE funded research, we continued the development of our new simulation tool which is based on an efficient Cartesian Adaptive Mesh Refinement technique. This methodology allows much higher grid densities to be used near typical fronts than current simulators. We improved the upscaling strategy on these grids, and derived an effective way to generate upscaled permeabilities that preserve local fluxes. We have started more in-depth research into splitting methods for stiff PDEs such as those found in in-situ combustion simulation. We will report on these new developments extensively in the next quarterly report. This quarterly report, we focus on experimental work. On the experimental side, we have fleshed out a mechanism of improved in-situ combustion with aqueous metallic salts using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the transport phenomenon of such additives through porous media. Based on the observations from SEM analysis, we propose cation exchange of metallic salts with clay as a mechanism to create activated sites that enhance combustion reactions between oil and oxygen. Moreover, the empirical ranking of the success of metallic ions as catalytic additives for in-situ combustion is interpreted as originating from three factors: cation replacing power, distribution of metallic additive adsorption sites, and cation catalytic power for oxidation and cracking of hydrocarbon.

Margot Gerritsen; Anthony R. Kovscek

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Underwater in situ measurements of radionuclides in selected submarine groundwater springs, Mediterranean Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......degassing of radon from seawater or in situ methods, e.g...38.5 (salinity of ambient seawater) just a few meters above the...orientation E-W to NE-SW, and seawater intrusion into coastal aquifers...autonomous data acquisition and data storage. The power unit filters and......

C. Tsabaris; J. Scholten; A. P. Karageorgis; J.-F. Comanducci; D. Georgopoulos; L. Liong Wee Kwong; D. L. Patiris; E. Papathanassiou

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The minimum-mass extrasolar nebula: in situ formation of close-in super-Earths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Kepler-10b Kepler-10b is a rocky super-Earth of mass M...significant H component, but that its flat transmission spectrum arises...stars should lack close-in rocky super-Earths The in situ formation...concentrated with small k 2 0.05 A rocky planet with an extended H atmosphere......

Eugene Chiang; Gregory Laughlin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multiple, distant (401) in situ observations of a magnetic cloud and a corotating interaction region complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ejections (CMEs) were observed at the Sun; the energy densities of the solar wind, both magnetic as well Space Sciences Laboratory, University of Berkeley, Berkeley, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history report a comprehensive analysis of in situ observations made by Wind and the STEREO probes (STA, STB

California at Berkeley, University of

440

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Zijiang Yang-temporal monitoring of environmental and ecosystems processes. WiSARDNet is a complete distributed sensing system. These features, combined with an energy-efficient hardware/software architecture and network protocol stack

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441

Atmospheric and seeing forecast: WRF model validation with in situ measurements at ORM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......orographic data to initialize WRF. 6 CONCLUSION For the first time, the WRF model, coupled with the...used to forecast not only local meteorological parameters...relative humidity and wind speed at ground level...simultaneous forecasts, the WRF-in situ instrument agreement......

C. Giordano; J. Vernin; H. Vzquez Rami; C. Muoz-Tun; A. M. Varela; H. Trinquet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs RG Ramirez, N Garcia and energy to small ruminants in northeastern Mexico (Ramirez et al, 1993, J Appl Anim Res, 3, 113 (DM) and crude protein (CP) of 13 commonly available native forbs. Forbs evaluated were Coldenia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

443

Ecological Effects and In-situ Detection of Particulate Contaminants in Aqueous Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigates crude oil toxicity as a particulate suspension, suitability of in-situ instrumentation to measure crude oil suspensions, and the applicability of using acoustic backscatter to measure suspended solids and sub-surface oil droplet suspension... and Discussion................................................................... 132 x CHAPTER Page Suspended solids characterization......................................... 132 Acoustic backscatter depth profiles...

Fuller, Christopher Byron

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tracking the catalyzed growth process of nanowires by in situ x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity.4­7 Silicon nanowires have also found application in solar cells, both as ab- sorber OF NANOSTRUCTURES Gold-catalyzed silicon nanowires were grown in an x-ray furnace so that in situ x-ray diffraction-type furnace attached to a Pana- lytical X'Pert PRO diffractometer. The temperature of the furnace

Wang, Zhong L.

445

Whole Mount Drosophila Embryo In Situ Hybridization with RNA probes Leslie Vosshall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Whole Mount Drosophila Embryo In Situ Hybridization with RNA probes 2/5/2001 Leslie Vosshall DAY. 11. Equilibrate in Hybridization buffer by incubating in 1:1 PTw: Hybridization buffer, 10 minutes. Do not nutate--allow embryos to settle. 12. Remove 1:1 and replace with Hybridization buffer

446

WoodPolymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood­Polymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood Yong-Feng Li in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). ABSTRACT: Wood­polymer composites (WPCs) were prepared from poplar wood (P. ussuriensis Komarov) in a two-step procedure. Maleic anhydride (MAN) was first dis

447

In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function Zhi Xu of the most promising applications of carbon nanotubes CNTs for flat panel displays1 and highly coherent field-emission studies on carbon nanotube field emission took the work function as a constant e.g., 5 eV . Actually

Wang, Zhong L.

449

In situ imaging of field emission from individual carbon nanotubes and their structural damage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ imaging of field emission from individual carbon nanotubes and their structural damage; accepted for publication 27 November 2001 Field emission of individual carbon nanotubes was observed found to exhibit very low turn-on field and superior field emission performance. Carbon nanotubes grow

Wang, Zhong L.

450

In situ measurements of stress evolution in silicon thin films during  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In situ measurements of stress evolution in silicon thin films during In situ measurements of stress evolution in silicon thin films during electrochemical lithiation and delithiation Title In situ measurements of stress evolution in silicon thin films during electrochemical lithiation and delithiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sethuraman, Vijay A., Michael J. Chon, Maxwell Shimshak, Venkat Srinivasan, and Pradeep R. Guduru Journal Journal of Power Sources Volume 195 Start Page 5062 Issue 15 Pagination 5062-5066 Date Published 08/2010 Keywords In situ stress measurement, Lithium-ion battery, Mechanical dissipation, Multi-beam optical sensor (MOS), Open-circuit relaxation, Silicon anode Abstract We report in situ measurements of stress evolution in a silicon thin-film electrode during electrochemical lithiation and delithiation by using the multi-beam optical sensor (MOS) technique. Upon lithiation, due to substrate constraint, the silicon electrode initially undergoes elastic deformation, resulting in rapid rise of compressive stress. The electrode begins to deform plastically at a compressive stress of ca. -1.75 GPa; subsequent lithiation results in continued plastic strain, dissipating mechanical energy. Upon delithiation, the electrode first undergoes elastic straining in the opposite direction, leading to a tensile stress of ca. 1 GPa; subsequently, it deforms plastically during the rest of delithiation. The plastic flow stress evolves continuously with lithium concentration. Thus, mechanical energy is dissipated in plastic deformation during both lithiation and delithiation, and it can be calculated from the stress measurements; we show that it is comparable to the polarization loss. Upon current interruption, both the film stress and the electrode potential relax with similar time constants, suggesting that stress contributes significantly to the chemical potential of lithiated silicon.

451

Nanoparticle technology for heavy oil in-situ upgrading and recovery enhancement: Opportunities and challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With more than 170 billion barrels of estimated oil sands reserves in Canada, Canada has the third largest oil reserves in the world. However, more than 80% of oil sands reserves are located deep underground and could not be accessed by surface mining. Nonetheless, a number of in-situ recovery methods have been developed to extract heavy oil and bitumen from deep reservoirs. Once produced, bitumen is transferred to upgraders converting low quality oil to synthetic crude oil. However, in the present context, heavy oil and bitumen exploitation process is not just high-energy and water intensive, but also it has significant environmental footprints as it produces significant amount of gaseous emissions and wastewater. In addition, the level of contaminants in bitumen requires special equipment, and has also environmental repercussions. Recently, nanotechnology has emerged as an alternative technology for in-situ heavy oil upgrading and recovery enhancement. Nanoparticle catalysts (nanocatalysts) are one of the important examples on nanotechnology applications. Nanocatalysts portray unique catalytic and sorption properties due to their exceptionally high surface area-to-volume ratio and active surface sites. In-situ catalytic conversion or upgrading of heavy oil with the aid of multi-metallic nanocatalysts is a promising cost effective and environmentally friendly technology for production of high quality oils that meet pipeline and refinery specifications. Further, nanoparticles could be employed as inhibitors for preventing or delaying asphaltene precipitation and subsequently enhance oil recovery. Nevertheless, as with any new technologies, there are a number of challenges facing the employment of nanoparticles for in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery enhancement. The main goal of this article is to provide an overview of nanoparticle technology usage for enhancing the in-situ catalytic upgrading and recovery processes of crude oil. Furthermore, the article sheds lights on the advantages of employment of nanoparticles in heavy oil industry and addresses some of the limitations and challenges facing this new technology.

Rohallah Hashemi; Nashaat N. Nassar; Pedro Pereira Almao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

EM-54 Technology Development In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites as well as wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety and the environment, and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations by 2019. EM-50 is charged with developing new technologies that are safer, more effective and less expensive than current methods. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (the subject of this report) is part of EM-541, the Environmental Restoration Research and Development Division of EM-54. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: Significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces; in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP tends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

REFERENCES CITED IN: Draft Technical Report: Considerations Related to Post-Closure Monitoring Of Uranium In-Situ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2008, Cogema Mining, Inc, and Petrotek Engineering Corp. ML081060131. http://www.wise- uranium://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/ Crow Butte 2000. Mine Unit 1 Restoration Report, Crow Butte Uranium Project. Submitted to NRC January Of Uranium In-Situ Leach/In-Situ Recovery (ISL/ISR) Sites. How to obtain the references: Most

454

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

455

Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure, and Relation to Physical Forcing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure. Arlington, VA 22203-1995 TITLE: Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation of Research and Sponsored Programs #12;Abstract Nearbed optical and acoustical properties in coastal waters

Boss, Emmanuel S.

456

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other Halogenated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other, California 94305-4020 Enhanced in-situ transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was observed under anoxic Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)with one or two carbon atoms are widely used as solvents, degreasing

Semprini, Lewis

457

ESTABLISHING FINAL END STATE FOR A RETIRED NUCLEAR WEAPONS PRODUCTION REACTOR; COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAKEHOLDERS, REGULATORS AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy nuclear facility located along the Savannah River (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950s, utilizing five production reactors. In the early 1990s all SRS production reactor operations were terminated. The first reactor closure end state declaration was recently institutionalized in a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Early Action Record of Decision. The decision for the final closure of the 318,000 square foot 105-P Reactor was determined to be in situ decommissioning (ISD). ISD is an acceptable and cost effective alternative to off-site disposal for the reactor building, which will allow for consolidation of remedial action wastes generated from other cleanup activities within the P Area. ISD is considered protective by the regulators, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), public and stakeholders as waste materials are stabilized/immobilized, and radioactivity is allowed to naturally decay, thus preventing future exposure to the environment. Stakeholder buy-in was critical in the upfront planning in order to achieve this monumental final decision. Numerous public meetings and workshops were held in two different states (covering a 200 mile radius) with stakeholder and SRS Citizens Advisory Board participation. These meetings were conducted over an eight month period as the end state decision making progressed. Information provided to the public evolved from workshop to workshop as data became available and public input from the public meetings were gathered. ISD is being considered for the balance of the four SRS reactors and other hardened facilities such as the chemical processing canyons.

Bergren, C

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design  

SciTech Connect

Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

Dev, H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm/sup 2/), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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