Sample records for in-situ decommissioning isd

  1. In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

  2. In-Situ Decommissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination.  The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both...

  3. DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

  4. TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private sector, universities or other agencies are expected to have greater expertise will be accomplished through an open, competitive solicitation process. Several areas will require joint efforts from the two classes of resources.

  5. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  7. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  8. Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

  9. NEW MATERIALS DEVELOPED TO MEET REGULATORY AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m{sup 3} (250,000 yd{sup 3}) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker exposure to radioactive or hazardous contamination exceeding Principal Threat Source Material levels; (2) Minimize human and ecological exposure to unacceptable risk associated with radiological and hazardous constituents that are or may be present; (3) Prevent to the extent practicable the migration of radioactive or hazardous contaminants from the closed facility to the groundwater so that concentrations in groundwater do not exceed regulatory standards; (4) Eliminate or control all routes of human exposure to radiological and chemical contamination; and (5) Prevent animal intruder exposure to radioactive and hazardous contamination.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

  11. FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY, IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF THE P AND R REACTORS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musall, J.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    SRS recently completed an approximately three year effort to decommission two SRS reactors: P-Reactor (Building 105-P) and R-Reactor (Building 105-R). Completed in December 2011, the concurrent decommissionings marked the completion of two relatively complex and difficult facility disposition projects at the SRS. Buildings 105-P and 105-R began operating as production reactors in the early 1950s with the mission of producing weapons material (e.g., tritium and plutonium-239). The 'P' Reactor and was shutdown in 1991 while the 'R' Reactor and was shutdown in 1964. In the intervening period between shutdown and deactivation & decommissioning (D&D), Buildings 105-P and 105-R saw limited use (e.g., storage of excess heavy water and depleted uranium oxide). For Building 105-P, deactivation was initiated in April 2007 and was essentially complete by June 2010. For Building 105-R, deactivation was initiated in August 2008 and was essentially complete by September 2010. For both buildings, the primary objective of deactivation was to remove/mitigate hazards associated with the remaining hazardous materials, and thus prepare the buildings for in-situ decommissioning. Deactivation removed the following hazardous materials to the extent practical: combustibles/flammables, residual heavy water, acids, friable asbestos (as needed to protect workers performing deactivation and decommissioning), miscellaneous chemicals, lead/brass components, Freon(reg sign), oils, mercury/PCB containing components, mold and some radiologically-contaminated equipment. In addition to the removal of hazardous materials, deactivation included the removal of hazardous energy, exterior metallic components (representing an immediate fall hazard), and historical artifacts along with the evaporation of water from the two Disassembly Basins. Finally, so as to facilitate occupancy during the subsequent in-situ decommissioning, deactivation implemented repairs to the buildings and provided temporary power.

  12. In-situ determination of radionuclide levels in facilities to be decommissioned using the allowable residual contamination level method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, R.J.; Haggard, D.L.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study resulted in verification of a direct and two alternate indirect techniques for making in-situ determinations of {sup 90}Sr and other radionuclide levels in a Hanford facility to be decommissioned that was evaluated using the Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method. The ARCL method is used to determine the extent of decontamination that will be required before a facility can be decommissioned. A sump in the 1608F Building was chosen for the feasibility study. Hanford decommissioning personnel had previously taken 79 concrete and surface scale samples from the building to be analyzed by radiochemical analysis. The results of the radiochemical analyses compare favorably with the values derived by the in-situ methods presented in this report. Results obtained using a portable spectrometer and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were both very close to the radiochemistry results. Surface {sup 90}Sr levels detected on the sump floor were 550 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the spectrometer system and 780 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the TLD data. This compares favorably with the levels determined by radiochemical analyses (i.e., 230 to 730 pCi/cm{sup 2}). Surface {sup 90}Sr levels detected on the sump wall ranged between 10 and 80 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the spectrometer system, compared with a conservative 200 pCi/cm{sup 2} using the TLD data. The radiochemical results ranged between 19 and 77 pCi/cm{sup 2} for the four samples taken from the wall at indeterminate locations. 17 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  14. SPRING ISD CATEE 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Windsor, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING ISD CATEE 2014 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Benchmarking results ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Annual energy...,871,387 • 2011-2012 $8,088,599 savings $3,615,835 • 2012-2013 $7,418,636 savings $4,285,798 • 2013-2014 $7,393,010 savings $4,311,424 • Total savings over last 5 years $16,855,588 ESL-KT-14-11-05 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas...

  15. Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings...

  16. Collimated in-situ gamma spectrometry: A new method for fast clearance measurements of large areas or buildings structures of nuclear facilities under decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummel, L.; Guglhoer, P. [TUV Bavaria, Munich (Germany)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basing on a 40% p-type HPGe-detector with a shielding of approximately 50 g CM-2 for disturbing radiation from the side, the prototype of a collimated in-situ gamma spectrometer was developed, constructed, and calibrated, the collimator was optimized concerning mass (portability) and sharp transition between {open_quotes}field of view{close_quotes} and the area which should be faded out. Because of the complicated calibration procedure, two complete independent methods were used to reach high reliability. The device is completely battery operated and able to measure the activity on vertical and horizontal areas by averaging over at least 0.4 m{sup 2} up to more than 10 m{sup 2}. The equipment was used in nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication facilities, and fuel reprocessing plants in Germany and France to check mass- or surface-specific activities on outdoor grounds and inside the buildings in restricted areas. Cross-checks by complete scrabbled and analyzed surface contaminated concrete, which was measured before with the prototype, show an agreement better than 30%. Compared with traditional Methods, the conclusions that can be drawn from in-situ measurements are more representative than drawing and analyzing samples. Unlike measuring with contamination monitors, in-situ gamma spectrometry is nuclide specific and integrating over nuclides migrated into the surface.

  17. Decommissioning Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Decommissioning Handbook is a technical guide for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the removal of the radioactive and, for practical reasons, hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. This handbook identifies and technologies and techniques that will accomplish these objectives. The emphasis in this handbook is on characterization; waste treatment; decontamination; dismantling, segmenting, demolition; and remote technologies. Other aspects that are discussed in some detail include the regulations governing decommissioning, worker and environmental protection, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials. The handbook describes in general terms the overall decommissioning project, including planning, cost estimating, and operating practices that would ease preparation of the Decommissioning Plan and the decommissioning itself. The reader is referred to other documents for more detailed information. This Decommissioning Handbook has been prepared by Enserch Environmental Corporation for the US Department of Energy and is a complete restructuring of the original handbook developed in 1980 by Nuclear Energy Services. The significant changes between the two documents are the addition of current and the deletion of obsolete technologies and the addition of chapters on project planning and the Decommissioning Plan, regulatory requirements, characterization, remote technology, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials.

  18. Supercomputer decommissioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    submit Roadrunner supercomputer: Rest in pieces Decommissioning a classified computer into hardware "mulch." May 1, 2013 The Roadrunner supercomputer broke the petaflop...

  19. Decommissioning Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

  20. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  1. Supercomputer decommissioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. .Energy8 CareerSupercomputer decommissioning

  2. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field applicability. In: Bioremediation Field Experience, (Art. In: Applied Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons. (C. D. 1993. In situ bioremediation: basis and practices. In:

  3. In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartment of EnergyEnergy John

  4. Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon |1999Energy- FORTechnologyDepartment of

  5. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

  6. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

  7. Decommissioning at AWE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

  8. Harvesting the Rain, An Overview of the Rainwater Collection Systems at McKinney ISD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreppler, S.; Estes, J. M.; Dupont, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the planning and design phases at four elementary schools in McKinney ISD. By harvesting the rainwater from the roof of the building and channeling this water into six oncampus storage tanks, enough rainwater can be collected to flush the toilets and irrigate...

  9. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  10. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  11. Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

  12. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  13. INTERNATIONAL DECOMMISSIONING SYMPOSIUM 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of IDS 2000 was to deliver a world-class conference on applicable global environmental issues. The objective of this conference was to publicize environmental progress of individual countries, to provide a forum for technology developer and problem-holder interaction, to facilitate environmental and technology discussions between the commercial and financial communities, and to accommodate information and education exchange between governments, industries, universities, and scientists. The scope of this project included the planning and execution of an international conference on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and the providing of a business forum for vendors and participants sufficient to attract service providers, technology developers, and the business and financial communities. These groups, when working together with attendees from regulatory organizations and government decision-maker groups, provide an opportunity to more effectively and efficiently expedite the decommissioning projects.

  14. Decommissioning Implementation Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces an enormous task in the disposition of the nation's excess facilities. Many of these facilities are large and complex and contain potentially hazardous substances. As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase which ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life-cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

  15. International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

  16. Recordkeeping in the decommissioning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L. E.

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US, there are two sets of key decommissioning records clearly identified -- those that are essential for planning the D and D of a facility and then those that are the result of the decommissioning process itself. In some cases, the regulatory authorities require and in others advise the licensees of the records that may be useful or which are required to be kept from the decommissioning. In the remainder of the paper, the author attempts to highlight some important aspects of decommissioning recordkeeping.

  17. Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority...

  18. 13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    , including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility attenuation. 1 Introduction A patent for in situ bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline

  19. In situ measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  20. Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard H. Meservey

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

  1. In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

  2. Characterization Methodology for Decommissioning Low and Intermediate Level Fissile Nuclide Contaminated Buried Soils and Process Piping Using Photon Counting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan L

    2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon GEANT4 GEometry ANd Tracking Monte Carlo Code GWD Giga-Watt Days HDP Hematite Decommissioning Project HEU Highly Enriched Uranium IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency ILW Intermediate Level Waste ISOCs In-Situ Object... Field Measured LaBr Overlay on MCNP Spectra for HEU ................................. 44 3 Code System and Software Summary .................................................................. 52 4 Dimensions of the Canberra Industries Model IPROL-1...

  3. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  4. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Demmer

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

  5. Money Related Decommissioning and Funding Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Lynne S. [Detroit Edison Company, 6400 N. Dixie Highway, Newport, Michigan 48162 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    'Money makes the world go round', as the song says. It definitely influences decommissioning decision-making and financial assurance for future decommissioning. This paper will address two money-related decommissioning topics. The first is the evaluation of whether to continue or to halt decommissioning activities at Fermi 1. The second is maintaining adequacy of financial assurance for future decommissioning of operating plants. Decommissioning costs considerable money and costs are often higher than originally estimated. If costs increase significantly and decommissioning is not well funded, decommissioning activities may be deferred. Several decommissioning projects have been deferred when decision-makers determined future spending is preferable than current spending, or when costs have risen significantly. Decommissioning activity timing is being reevaluated for the Fermi 1 project. Assumptions for waste cost-escalation significantly impact the decision being made this year on the Fermi 1 decommissioning project. They also have a major impact on the estimated costs for decommissioning currently operating plants. Adequately funding full decommissioning during plant operation will ensure that the users who receive the benefit pay the full price of the nuclear-generated electricity. Funding throughout operation also will better ensure that money is available following shutdown to allow decommissioning to be conducted without need for additional funds.

  6. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  7. Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

  8. Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services Communication & Engagement International Programs Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy...

  9. Decommissioning of DR 1 Final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lessons learned 43 9 Clearance of materials, building and surrounding area 44 9.1 Clearance criteria 44 9Decommissioning of DR 1 Final report DD-18(EN) rev.1 Document approved by the nuclear regulatory authorities Danish Decommissioning, Roskilde January 2006 #12;Author: Kurt Lauridsen Title: Decommissioning

  10. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  11. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peyton, Brent M. (Kennewick, WA); Truex, Michael J. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  12. STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L. W.; Buckley, J.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process.

  13. Assessment of foreign decommissioning technology with potential application to US decommissioning needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decommissioning technology developments that may represent significant improvements over decommissioning technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign decommissioning technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of decommissioning literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in decommissioning costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs.

  14. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  15. Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning Huosheng Hu and Liam Cragg to aid in decommissioning nuclear plants that have been used to process or store nuclear materials. Scope potential applications to nuclear plant decommissioning, namely Nanotechnology, Telepresence

  16. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  17. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

  18. Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of...

  19. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in...

  20. Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 19-22, 2010, an independent expert panel of scientists and engineers met to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Savannah River National Laboratory in developing a technical...

  1. DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOEElectricEssential

  2. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  3. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Battery Research. Abstract: The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details...

  4. Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

  5. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

  6. Joint Computer Science/Statistics Colloquia In-situ ComputingIn-situ Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Fall 2011 Joint Computer Science/Statistics Colloquia In-situ ComputingIn-situ Computing My work the Sprowls Award for best dissertation in Computer Science. This lecture was made possible in part Department of Computer Science #12;

  7. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  8. In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater · Intrinsic BR vs. Engineered BR Anaerobic Bioremediation (1) Background · Anaerobic conditions most likely

  9. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore »this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  10. Designing decommissioning into new reactor designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.; CHMM, Ph.D. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed some three or four decades ago. Recently, the nuclear power has seen a worldwide resurgence and many new advanced reactor designs are either on the market or nearing design completion. Most of these designs are evolutionary in nature and build on the existing and proven technologies. They also incorporate many improvements and take advantage of the substantial operating experience. Nevertheless, by and large, the main factors driving the design of new reactors are the safety features, safeguards considerations, and the economic factors. With a large decommissioning experience that already exists in the nuclear industry, and with average decommissioning costs at around six hundred million dollars for each reactor in today's dollars, it is necessary that decommissioning factors also be considered as a part of the early design effort. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, it is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. (authors)

  11. Pipeline Decommissioning Trial AWE Berkshire UK - 13619

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, Kieran [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Paper details the implementation of a 'Decommissioning Trial' to assess the feasibility of decommissioning the redundant pipeline operated by AWE located in Berkshire UK. The paper also presents the tool box of decommissioning techniques that were developed during the decommissioning trial. Constructed in the 1950's and operated until 2005, AWE used a pipeline for the authorised discharge of treated effluent. Now redundant, the pipeline is under a care and surveillance regime awaiting decommissioning. The pipeline is some 18.5 km in length and extends from AWE site to the River Thames. Along its route the pipeline passes along and under several major roads, railway lines and rivers as well as travelling through woodland, agricultural land and residential areas. Currently under care and surveillance AWE is considering a number of options for decommissioning the pipeline. One option is to remove the pipeline. In order to assist option evaluation and assess the feasibility of removing the pipeline a decommissioning trial was undertaken and sections of the pipeline were removed within the AWE site. The objectives of the decommissioning trial were to: - Demonstrate to stakeholders that the pipeline can be removed safely, securely and cleanly - Develop a 'tool box' of methods that could be deployed to remove the pipeline - Replicate the conditions and environments encountered along the route of the pipeline The onsite trial was also designed to replicate the physical prevailing conditions and constraints encountered along the remainder of its route i.e. working along a narrow corridor, working in close proximity to roads, working in proximity to above ground and underground services (e.g. Gas, Water, Electricity). By undertaking the decommissioning trial AWE have successfully demonstrated the pipeline can be decommissioned in a safe, secure and clean manor and have developed a tool box of decommissioning techniques. The tool box of includes; - Hot tapping - a method of breaching the pipe while maintaining containment to remove residual liquids, - Crimp and shear - remote crimping, cutting and handling of pipe using the excavator - Pipe jacking - a way of removing pipes avoiding excavations and causing minimal disturbance and disruption. The details of the decommissioning trial design, the techniques employed, their application and effectiveness are discussed and evaluated here in. (authors)

  12. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  14. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  15. Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced in situ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced in situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials Presentation given...

  17. Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Abstract: A...

  18. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA Aptamers and Graphene Oxide Nanosheets. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA...

  19. In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural Evolution of Nanostructured SiliconCarbon Anode for In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition...

  20. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes...

  1. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based...

  2. Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing...

  3. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ manipulation technologies subprogram plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified.

  4. Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dam, A. S.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

  5. Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, 1995 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes strategies for the decontamination and decommissioning of gaseous diffusion plants. Progress in remedial action activities are discussed.

  6. Proceedings: EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop at Dounreay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI international workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. EPRI initiated this continuing workshop series to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies utilized in the decommissioning of nuclear power plants and facilities. The information presented will help individual utilities assess the benefits of the various programs, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

  7. Mound's decommissioning experience, tooling, and techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, A.B.; Davis, W.P.; Elswick, T.C.; Garner, J.M.; Geichman, J.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monsanto Research Corporation (MRC), which operates Mound for the Department of Energy (DOE), has been decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities since 1949. We are currently decommissioning three plutonium-238 contaminated facilities (approximately 50,000 ft/sup 2/) that contained 1100 linear ft of gloveboxes; 900 linear ft of conveyor housing; 2650 linear ft of dual underground liquid waste lines; and associated contaminated piping, services, equipment, structures, and soil. As of June 1982, over 29,000 Ci of plutonium-238 have been removed in waste and scrap residues. As a result of the current and previous decommissioning projects, valuable experience has been gained in tooling and techniques. Special techniques have been developed in planning, exposure control, contamination control, equipment removal, structural decontamination, and waste packaging.

  8. Maintaining Quality in a Decommissioning Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attas, Michael [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, R0E 1L0 (Canada)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is Canada's largest nuclear decommissioning project to date. This research laboratory has operated for forty years since it was set up in 1963 in eastern Manitoba as the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, complete with 60 MW(Th) test reactor, hot cells, particle accelerators, and multiple large-scale research programs. Returning the site to almost complete green state will require several decades of steady work in combination with periods of storage-with-surveillance. In this paper our approach to maintaining quality during the long decommissioning period is explained. In this context, 'quality' includes both regulatory aspects (compliance with required standards) and business aspects (meeting the customers' needs and exceeding their expectations). Both aspects are discussed, including examples and lessons learned. The five years of development and implementation of a quality assurance program for decommissioning the WL site have led to a number of lessons learned. Many of these are also relevant to other decommissioning projects, in Canada and elsewhere: - Early discussions with the regulator can save time and effort later in the process; - An iterative process in developing documentation allows for steady improvements and input throughout the process; - Consistent 2-way communication with staff regarding the benefits of a quality program assists greatly in adoption of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-level management must lead in promoting quality; - Field trials of procedures ('beta testing') ensures they are easy to use as well as useful. Success in decommissioning the Whiteshell Laboratories depends on the successful implementation of a rigorous quality program. This will help to ensure both safety and efficiency of all activities on site, from planning through execution and reporting. The many aspects of maintaining this program will continue to occupy quality practitioners in AECL, reaping steady benefits to AECL and to its customers, the people of Canada.

  9. In-situ vitrification of waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  10. Project specific selection of decommissioning techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, B.G.; Wehner, E.L. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany). Nuclear Technology Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three decommissioning projects with quite different contamination characteristics were terminated with the requested result of freely released rooms for dismantled buildings under supervision of the responsible authorities. The examples show that control areas with different kinds of contamination and different equipment can be decommissioned with reasonable effort. The specific selection of decontamination methods and measurement techniques optimizes the performance of the project and lowers the amount of primary and secondary active waste. The careful planning of radiation protection measures ensures the safe work within the foreseen time schedule.

  11. IN SITU XRAY DIFFRACTION (IXD) SCIENTIFIC SCOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    . IXD will continue and enhance research programs in materials science (battery, catalysts, functional characterization of materials · Timeresolved in situ XRD measurements in the subminute time scale to study phase characterization of catalytic systems as they evolve in time with a changing chemical environment is a high

  12. In situ measurement of strain during electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of electrodeposited films is the strain induced by the electrodeposition process. In this communication the authors report a new optical fiber interferometer-based technique for the in situ measurement of strain during electrodeposition. The measurement system is shown.

  13. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

  14. University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

  15. BGRR and HFBR Decommissioning Chuck Armitage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Operated 1950 ­ 1968 Decommissioning actions completed: · Fuel removed (1972) · Primary air cooling fans in the pile ­ the majority of the activity produces low energy beta radiation #12;7 Remote Graphite Removal Equipment #12;8 Remote Manipulator for Graphite Removal #12;9 Contamination Control Enclosure (CCE) #12

  16. DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP).

  17. Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie [IAEA, Vienna and NECSA (South Africa)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate.

  18. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  19. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~Mathematical Hodel for In-Situ Shale Retorting," in SecondBriefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, Lawrence Livermore

  20. NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

  1. SY101 in situ viscometer instrument system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, K.L.; Stokes, T.I.; Vagelatos, N.

    1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the design and description of the in situ viscometer, developed for the hydrogen mitigation project.

  2. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  3. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

  4. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

  5. Fuzzy systems modeling of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solve n ts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris; Hazen, Terry C.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale demonstration of in situ bioremediation of chlorinatedfor in situ TCE bioremediation, Submitted to Environmentalin support of the in situ bioremediation demonstration at

  6. INL - NNL an International Technology Collaboration Case Study - Advanced Fogging Technologies for Decommissioning - 13463

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banford, Anthony; Edwards, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE(United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE(United Kingdom); Demmer, Rick; Rankin, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401(United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401(United States); Hastings, Jeremy [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International collaboration and partnerships have become a reality as markets continue to globalize. This is the case in nuclear sector where over recent years partnerships commonly form to bid for capital projects internationally in the increasingly contractorized world and international consortia regularly bid and lead Management and Operations (M and O) / Parent Body Organization (PBO) site management contracts. International collaboration can also benefit research and technology development. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) are internationally recognized organizations delivering leading science and technology development programmes both nationally and internationally. The Laboratories are actively collaborating in several areas with benefits to both the laboratories and their customers. Recent collaborations have focused on fuel cycle separations, systems engineering supporting waste management and decommissioning, the use of misting for decontamination and in-situ waste characterisation. This paper focuses on a case study illustrating how integration of two technologies developed on different sides of the Atlantic are being integrated through international collaboration to address real decommissioning challenges using fogging technology. (authors)

  7. Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License Applications Final Washington, DC 20555-0001 #12;NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License OF A STANDARD REVIEW PLAN (NUREG­1569) FOR STAFF REVIEWS FOR IN SITU LEACH URANIUM EXTRACTION LICENSE

  8. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  9. Assessment of doses and and environmental contamination from decommissioning of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of doses and and environmental contamination from decommissioning of the nuclear contamination from decommissioning of thecontamination from decommissioning of the nuclear facilities - 6 December 2002 #12;PresentationPresentation · Assessment of activity inventory in the nuclear

  10. Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

  11. Decommissioning nuclear power plants - the wave of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, F.S. Jr. [Raytheon Engineers and Contractors, Cumberland City, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the project controls developed in the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Considerations are given to the contaminated piping and equipment that have to be removed and the spent and used fuel that has to be disposed of. The storage issue is of primary concern here. The cost control aspects and the dynamics of decommissioning are discussed. The effects of decommissioning laws on the construction and engineering firms are mentioned. 5 refs.

  12. P2 integration into conduct of decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Lindley, R.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last five years, the D and D Program at the ANL-East site has completed decommissioning of three facilities. Currently, decommissioning of two facilities continues at the site with completion of the JANUS Reactor scheduled for September 1997 and completion of the CP-5 Reactor scheduled for late in CY 1999. In the course of this work, certain waste minimization pollution prevention (WMin/P2) activities have been integrated into all these projects. In most cases, the P2 aspects were key components of the operations that made the best use of available project resources to complete the work safely, within the budget and on or ahead of schedule. This paper will highlight those WMin/P2 activities found most suitable for these D and D operations. Activities covered will include: re-use of lead bricks from a research reactor for shielding material at an accelerator facility, re-use of a reactor out building structure by the on-site plant services group, and several other smaller scope activities which have also helped heighten WMin/P2 awareness in decommissioning.

  13. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the...

  14. Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms Report................................................................................................................ 8 II.A. Review of California platforms............................................................................. 8 II.A.i Geography of California platforms

  15. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - areva decommissioning strategy Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: fish migration (USFS 2002). Decommissioning roads can include a number of restoration strategies... Effects of Road Decommissioning on Stream Habitat...

  17. Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

  18. EM-20 ISD Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grout Specification This relates to grout strength specifications. The project team's interpretation of a qualitative requirement from the U Plant ROD, specifically the...

  19. EM-20 ISD Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery ActSeriesofDepartment (8-89)

  20. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Arif, Muhammad [NIST

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

  1. Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities

  2. A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

  3. License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

  4. Nuclear Decommissioning and Organisational Reliability: Involving Subcontractors in Collective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Page 1 Nuclear Decommissioning and Organisational Reliability: Involving Subcontractors to the decommissioning. The use of subcontractors is not new; in the nuclear industry it became widespread in the 1990s reliability is at the heart of the safety of at-risk systems. Many studies have been conducted in the nuclear

  5. FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, B; Stephen Chostner, S; Brenda Green, B

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D&D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D&D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4).

  6. Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

  7. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejovic, Igor [DECOM A.S., Jana Bottu, 2. SK-91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Polak, Vincent [STM POWER, a.s., Jana Bottu 2, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  8. DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

  9. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial...

  10. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

  11. Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy A. L. Lipson, R. S. Ginder, and M. C. Hersam, Northwestern University...

  12. NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics systems biology methods are discussed. Citation: Majors PD, JS Mclean, and JC...

  13. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

  14. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental impacts that are unique to in-situ oil shale production, Literature from related areas (reservoir and civil engineering and deep coal

  15. In-Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate in Groundwater and Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Liyan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C.H. Ward, IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE INRespiring Microorganisms. Bioremediation Journal, 1998. 2(Electron Acceptors. Bioremediation Journal, 2009. 13(2): p.

  16. In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials Investigations of electrode interface and architecture...

  17. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  18. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  19. In-situ continuous water analyzing module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid analyzing system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  20. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  1. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert J. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  2. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  3. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  4. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring.

  5. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  6. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  7. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  8. Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanzawa, Tomio [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Ozenji 971, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, 215-0013 (Japan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed.

  9. DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

  10. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  11. An overview of in situ waste treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ technologies are becoming an attractive remedial alternative for eliminating environmental problems. In situ treatments typically reduce risks and costs associated with retrieving, packaging, and storing or disposing-waste and are generally preferred over ex situ treatments. Each in situ technology has specific applications, and, in order to provide the most economical and practical solution to a waste problem, these applications must be understood. This paper presents an overview of thirty different in situ remedial technologies for buried wastes or contaminated soil areas. The objective of this paper is to familiarize those involved in waste remediation activities with available and emerging in situ technologies so that they may consider these options in the remediation of hazardous and/or radioactive waste sites. Several types of in situ technologies are discussed, including biological treatments, containment technologies, physical/chemical treatments, solidification/stabilization technologies, and thermal treatments. Each category of in situ technology is briefly examined in this paper. Specific treatments belonging to these categories are also reviewed. Much of the information on in situ treatment technologies in this paper was obtained directly from vendors and universities and this information has not been verified.

  12. An overview of in situ waste treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, S.; Hyde, R.A.; Piper, R.B.; Roy, M.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ technologies are becoming an attractive remedial alternative for eliminating environmental problems. In situ treatments typically reduce risks and costs associated with retrieving, packaging, and storing or disposing-waste and are generally preferred over ex situ treatments. Each in situ technology has specific applications, and, in order to provide the most economical and practical solution to a waste problem, these applications must be understood. This paper presents an overview of thirty different in situ remedial technologies for buried wastes or contaminated soil areas. The objective of this paper is to familiarize those involved in waste remediation activities with available and emerging in situ technologies so that they may consider these options in the remediation of hazardous and/or radioactive waste sites. Several types of in situ technologies are discussed, including biological treatments, containment technologies, physical/chemical treatments, solidification/stabilization technologies, and thermal treatments. Each category of in situ technology is briefly examined in this paper. Specific treatments belonging to these categories are also reviewed. Much of the information on in situ treatment technologies in this paper was obtained directly from vendors and universities and this information has not been verified.

  13. An in situ calibration for hearing thresholds Robert H. Withnella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    for the accuracy of hearing tests e.g., Voss et al., 2000 . In situ measurement of acoustic signals in the earAn in situ calibration for hearing thresholds Robert H. Withnella Department of Speech and Hearing has historically relied on acoustic calibration in physical assemblies with an input impedance

  14. In situ study of magmatic processes: a new experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is developed mainly to study magmatic processes, as the working pressures and temperatures are appropriate or by in situ spectroscopy (Raman, X-Rays, Infrared...). During the 90's, DACs have been developed to be applied1 In situ study of magmatic processes: a new experimental approach C. GONDÉ1.2 , D. MASSARE1 , H

  15. Some implications of in situ uranium mining technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, C.E.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Cole, R.J.; Keller, D.; Mellinger, P.J.; Wallace, R.W.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology assessment was initiated in March 1979 of the in-situ uranium mining technology. This report explores the impediments to development and deployment of this technology and evaluates the environmental impacts of a generic in-situ facility. The report is divided into the following sections: introduction, technology description, physical environment, institutional and socioeconomic environment, impact assessment, impediments, and conclusions. (DLC)

  16. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype design for construction and test. Significant improvements must be made in fluor-doped fiber performance in order to use the method for in situ monitoring to verify compliance with current EPA drinking water standards. Additional Phase 1 fiber development work should be performed to increase the fluor dopant concentration above 2% until the self-absorption limit is observed. Continued fiber optimization work is expected to improve the sensitivity limits, and will enable application of the detector to verify compliance with the US EPA drinking water standard of 20,000 pico Curies per liter. However, if the need for monitoring higher levels of tritium in water at concentrations greater than 200,000 pico Curies per liter is justified, then prototype development and testing could proceed either as a Phase 2 stand-alone effort or in parallel with continued Phase 1 development work.

  17. Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

  18. Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

  19. pH control with silicates minerals for in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solventsfor in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stations in Switzerland Electron donor Fermentation not detected or stations in Switzerland What is in situ bioremediation? In situ bioremediation (ISB) is a H2 Acetate CO2PCE, TCE Fermentation Volatile organic compounds in groundwater (Switzerland 2009) Source: OFEV 1 g

  20. Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge.

  1. Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

  2. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  3. Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

  4. Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

  5. The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

  6. Development of decontamination techniques for decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikura, T.; Miwa, T.; Onozawa, T.; Ohtsuka, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Components Dept.; Ishigure, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and System Science

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NUPEC has been developing various techniques to safely and efficiently decommission large commercial nuclear power plants. The development work, referred to as the verification tests, has been performed since 1982. The verification tests on decontamination techniques have focused on the reduction of both occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste volume. Experiments on various decontamination methods have been carried out. Prospects of applying efficient decontamination techniques to commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning are bright due to the experimental results.

  7. The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

  8. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic in situ bioremediation of TCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection on in situ bioremediation of a trichloroethylene-Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of theFull-scale in situ bioremediation demonstration (methane

  9. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

  10. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  11. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference low-level waste burial ground. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: Reference site details; Waste inventory details; Radiation dose methodology; Environmental surveillance and records maintenance details; Payments needed to finance decommissioning; Site/waste stabilization decommissioning activity details; Waste relocation decommissioning activity details; Cost assessment details; Radiological safety details.

  12. Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada)] [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada); Daniska, Vladimir [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)] [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

  13. An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.

    1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

  14. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray...

  15. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape...

  16. In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High...

  17. In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High...

  18. In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abia, Thomas Sunday

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil...

  19. Controlled Manipulation and in Situ Mechanical Measurement of Single Co

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Controlled Manipulation and in Situ Mechanical Measurement of Single Co Nanowire with a Laser bubble is used to manipulate individual Co nanowires. The short- lived ( manipulation, nanowire bending, Young's modulus, cavitation bubble A pplications of nanowires in many

  20. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Forsterite Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg2SiO4) for 24 hr with wet scCO2 at 50°C and 180 atm, using...

  1. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  2. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  3. Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Water Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea,

  4. CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persoff, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceReactions in Colorado Oil Shale, Lawrence Report UCRL-

  5. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | In situ neutron diffraction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In situ neutron diffraction study of CO clathrate hydrate The structure of a CO clathrate hydrate has been studied for the first time using high-P low-T neutron diffraction....

  6. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  7. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  8. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Richard J. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  9. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

  10. Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices and technologies

  11. System for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  12. Method for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carman, M. Leslie (San Ramon, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Roseville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  13. Application of Mobile Agents to Robust Teleoperation of Internet Robots in Nuclear Decommissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Application of Mobile Agents to Robust Teleoperation of Internet Robots in Nuclear Decommissioning, Colchester, Essex, C04 3SQ, U.K. Email: {lmcrag, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Abstract­ Nuclear decommissioning involves a substantial increase in decommissioning globally as a large number of nuclear facilities are due to reach

  14. ADVANTAGES, DISADVANTAGES, AND LESSONS LEARNED FROM MULTI-REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, M.R.; Nielson, R.R.; Trevino, R.A.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the Reactor Interim Safe Storage (ISS) Project within the decommissioning projects at the Hanford Site and reviews the lessons learned from performing four large reactor decommissioning projects sequentially. The advantages and disadvantages of this multi-reactor decommissioning project are highlighted.

  15. Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

  16. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  17. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  18. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meng, Shirley Ying [Univ. of California-San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  19. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, D.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning Buildings 3 and 4 South at Technical Area 21, Los Alamos National Laboratory, involves the decontamination, dismantlement, and demolition of two enriched-uranium processing buildings containing process equipment and ductwork holdup. The Laboratory has adopted two successful management strategies to implement this project: Rather than characterize an entire site, upfront, investigators use the ``observational approach,`` in which they collect only enough data to begin decommissioning activities and then determine appropriate procedures for further characterization as the work progresses. Project leaders augment work packages with task hazard analyses to fully define specific tasks and inform workers of hazards; all daily work activities are governed by specific work procedures and hazard analyses.

  20. Internationally Standardized Cost Item Definitions for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucien Teunckens; Kurt Pflugrad; Candace Chan-Sands; Ted Lazo

    2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) have agreed to jointly prepare and publish a standardized list of cost items and related definitions for decommissioning projects. Such a standardized list would facilitate communication, promote uniformity, and avoid inconsistency or contradiction of results or conclusions of cost evaluations for decommissioning projects carried out for specific purposes by different groups. Additionally, a standardized structure would also be a useful tool for more effective cost management. This paper describes actual work and result thus far.

  1. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for

  2. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdi, Beata L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gu, Meng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parent, Lucas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Xu, WU [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Nasybulin, Eduard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Chen, Xilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Xu, Pinghong [University of California, Davis] [University of California, Davis; Welch, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Abellan, Patricia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Chongmin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Evans, James E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Browning, Nigel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  3. In-situ bioremediation drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan describes the design and construction of proposed wells and outlines the characterization activities to be performed in support of the In Situ Bioremediation Task for FY 1994. The purpose of the well-design is to facilitate implementation and monitoring of in situ biodegradation of CCl{sub 4} in ground water. However, the wells will also be used to characterize the geology, hydrology, microbiology, and contaminant distribution, which will all feed into the design of the technology. Implementation and design of this remediation demonstration technology will be described separately in an integrated test plan.

  4. Improving Ion Implanter Productivity with In-situ Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Steve [ATMI Inc., 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury CT (United States); Perry, Alfred [Analog Devices, 804 Woburn Street, Wilmington, MA (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion source lifetime is generally a critical factor in overall implanter productivity. However, extended ion source life only provides value in a manufacturing environment if the ion beam remains stable. As an ion source ages, apertures and insulators become coated with conductive dopant residues which cause beam instabilities, resulting in implant stoppages. These stoppages create failures and/or assists which are logged in the implanter's data files. Analog Devices has recently evaluated in-situ ion source cleaning based on use of xenon difluoride chemistry. The paper will describe how the in-situ cleaning decreased logged failures/assists, resulting in increased implanter productivity.

  5. Decommissioning Project of Bohunice A1 NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Moravek, J.; Spirko, M.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The first (pilot) nuclear power plant A1 in the Slovak Republic, situated on Jaslovske Bohunice site (60 km from Bratislava) with the capacity of 143 MWel, was commissioned in 1972 and was running with interruptions till 1977. A KS 150 reactor (HWGCR) with natural uranium as fuel, D2O as moderator and gaseous CO2 as coolant was installed in the A1 plant. Outlet steam from primary reactor coolant system with the temperature of 410 C was led to 6 modules of steam generators and from there to turbine generators. Refueling was carried out on-line at plant full power. The first serious incident associated with refueling occurred in 1976 when a locking mechanism at a fuel assembly failed. The core was not damaged during that incident and following a reconstruction of the damaged technology channel, the plant continued in operation. However, serious problems were occurring with the integrity of steam generators (CO2 gas on primary side, water and steam on secondary side) when the plant had to be shut down frequently due to failures and subsequent repairs. The second serious accident occurred in 1977 when a fuel assembly was overheated with a subsequent release of D2O into gas cooling circuit due to a human failure in the course of replacement of a fuel assembly. Subsequent rapid increase in humidity of the primary system resulted in damages of fuel elements in the core and the primary system was contaminated by fission products. In-reactor structures had been damaged, too. Activity had penetrated also into certain parts of the secondary system via leaking steam generators. Radiation situation in the course of both events on the plant site and around it had been below the level of limits specified. Based on a technical and economical justification of the demanding character of equipment repairs for the restoration of plant operation, and also due to a decision made not to continue with further construction of gas cooled reactors in Czechoslovakia, a decision was made in 1977 to terminate plant operation. The decision on the A1 plant decommissioning was issued in 1979.

  6. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference large irradiator and reference sealed sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffner, D.R.; Villelgas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to examine the decommissioning of large radioactive irradiators and their respective facilities, and a broad spectrum of sealed radioactive sources and their respective devices. Conceptual decommissioning activities are identified, and the technology, safety, and costs (in early 1993 dollars) associated with decommissioning the reference large irradiator and sealed source facilities are evaluated. The study provides bases and background data for possible future NRC rulemaking regarding decommissioning, for evaluation of the reasonableness of planned decommissioning actions, and for determining if adequate funds are reserved by the licensees for decommissioning of their large irradiator or sealed source facilities. Another purpose of this study is to provide background and information to assist licensees in planning and carrying out the decommissioning of their sealed radioactive sources and respective facilities.

  7. Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

  8. www.abdn.ac.uk/aie Decommissioning Special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    ONTENTS 3/5 Cutting edge technology 6/7 Decommissioning ­ a legal overview 8/9 The man with two hats 10 Wire Cutting Systems, which act a bit like band saws but with a diamond coated wire, are vulnerable to jamming due to compression between the cut faces. Hydraulic Shears as seen in some of the footage from

  9. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst] [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  10. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  11. In-situ combustion in hydrocarbon-bearing formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garthoffner, E.H.

    1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of simulating production in a formation bearing heavy oil or tar, comprising injecting into the formation colloidal particles of metallic magnesium and causing the magnesium to be ignited, thereafter to be exothermally reacted with water in-situ, whereby exothermally to produce magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen gas in the formation.

  12. Autocatalytic models describing ruminal in situ digestion J Van Milgen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Autocatalytic models describing ruminal in situ digestion J Van Milgen INRA, Station de Recherche sur la Nutrition des Herbivores, Theix, 63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France Digestion of particulate avail- ability. Although microbes can be considered the cause of digestion, they are also the result

  13. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  14. Original article In situ and in vitro ruminal starch degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article In situ and in vitro ruminal starch degradation of untreated and formaldehyde (Received 28 August 1996; accepted 27 March 1997) Summary ― Ruminal starch degradation of untreated degradability was higher for wheat than for maize (82.1vs 52.3%), for untreated cereals than for cereals treated

  15. Exploring In-Situ Sensing Irregularity in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae-Shik

    Exploring In-Situ Sensing Irregularity in Wireless Sensor Networks Joengmin Hwang, Tian He Introduction Wireless sensor networks are envisioned to support vari- ety of applications such as military network systems. Compared to the diversified solutions pro- duced for communication among sensor nodes

  16. In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapin, Sergey

    Chapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei Lapin and Rex Westbrook 1.1 Background Recently, a method for removing contaminants from soil (several as follows. Over a period of several weeks, electrical energy is introduced to the contaminated soil using

  17. In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Swygenhoven, Helena, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch; Van Petegem, Steven

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

  18. In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations OG&E Ground Source Heat Exchange Study Richard are connected to ground source heat pumps to cool and heat homes. The TRT study is the first part of a larger exchanges heat with the surrounding soil or rock. The double U-tube layout (Figure 2) is connected so

  19. Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of BTEX-Contaminated Groundwater by Combined Injection of Nitrate. Introduction Remediation by natural attenuation (RNA) is the preferred method (1) for addressing groundwater, at siteswherethenaturalgroundwaterflowisveryslow,intrinsic biodegradation processes can be limited by the rate at which the groundwater supplies

  20. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  1. Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

  2. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, B.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); [USDOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards, Washington, DC (United States). Systems Analysis and Standards Div.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

  3. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR...

  4. ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, E.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC ReportOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

  5. ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, E.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

  6. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

  7. Method for enhanced longevity of in situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carman, M.L.; Taylor, R.T.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is disclosed for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method is presented for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system is also disclosed for in situ field water remediation. 31 figs.

  8. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Chiachi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similaritiescontaminated sediments after bioremediation to submicromolarM. (2001). Current bioremediation practice and perspective.

  9. Final report: In situ radio frequency heating demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarosch, T.R.; Beleski, R.J.; Faust, D.

    1994-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ radio frequency heating was performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the US Department of Energy-Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration. The objective of the demonstration was to investigate the effectiveness of in situ radio frequency (RF) heating as an enhancement to vacuum extraction of residual solvents (primarily trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) held in vadose zone clay deposits. Conventional soil vacuum extraction techniques are mass transfer limited because of the low permeabilities of the clays. By selectively heating the clays to temperatures at or above 100{degrees}C, the release or transport of the solvent vapors will be enhanced as a result of several factors including an increase in the contaminant vapor pressure and diffusivity and an increase in the effective permeability of the formation with the release of water vapor.

  10. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB) is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation. This process (ISB) involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of the VOCs. This process is effective for remediation of soils and ground water contaminated with VOCs both above and below the water table. A full-scale demonstration of ISB was conducted as part of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration: VOCs in Soils and Ground Water at Nonarid Sites. This demonstration was performed at the Savannah River Site from February 1992 to April 1993.

  11. In situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Daqiang, E-mail: dq80jiang@126.com; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Jiang; Zheng, Yanjun

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composites were fabricated. • The transformation temperature was affected by the mixing Ti:Ni atomic ratios. • The NiTi component became micron-scale lamella after forging and rolling. • The composite exhibited high strength and high damping capacity. - Abstract: This paper reports on the creation of a series of in situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composites with controllable transformation temperatures based on the pseudo-binary hypereutectic transformation of NiTi–Nb system. The composite constituent morphology was controlled by forging and rolling. It is found that the thickness of the NiTi lamella in the composite reached micron level after the hot-forging and cold-rolling. The NiTi/Nb(Ti) composite exhibited high damping capacity as well as high yield strength.

  12. In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

  13. In situ electrochemical dilatometry of carbide-derived carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantel, M M [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 , which could be described with pore swelling.

  14. In-situ Electrochemical Dilatometry of Carbide-derived Carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantel, M. M.; Presser, V.; Kotz, R.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Å. Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 Å, which could be described with pore swelling.

  15. Deploying in situ bioremediation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, M.J.; Johnson, C.D.; Newcomer, D.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Hooker, B.S.; Peyton, B.M.; Skeen, R.S.; Chilakapati, A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative in-situ bioremediation technology was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to destroy nitrate and carbon tetrachloride (CC1{sub 4}) in the Hanford ground water. The goal of this in-situ treatment process is to stimulate native microorganisms to degrade nitrate and CCl{sub 4}. Nutrient solutions are distributed in the contaminated aquifer to create a biological treatment zone. This technology is being demonstrated at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site to provide the design, operating, and cost information needed to assess its effectiveness in contaminated ground water. The process design and field operations for demonstration of this technology are influenced by the physical, chemical, and microbiological properties observed at the site. A description of the technology is presented including the well network design, nutrient injection equipment, and means for controlling the hydraulics and microbial reactions of the treatment process.

  16. Accelerated Decontamination and Decommissioning at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, M.C.; Douglas, L.M.; Marske, S.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has over 100 facilities that have been declared surplus and are scheduled to be decommissioned. In addition to these surplus facilities, there is a significant number of facilities that are currently being shut down, deactivated, and transferred to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) program. In the last year, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, have developed and implemented an initiative to accelerate the D&D work at the Hanford Site. The strategy associated with accelerated D&D is to reduce the number of surplus facilities, eliminate potential safety hazards, demonstrate meaningful cleanup progress, and recycle materials for other uses. This initiative has been extremely successful and has resulted in the safe demolition of 13 facilities in fiscal year (FY) 1993. In addition, four facilities have been completed in FY 1994 and demolition of several other facilities is currently underway.

  17. Carbon-14 Bioassay for Decommissioning of Hanford Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Watson, David J.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The old production reactors at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for 14C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with 14C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S 14C anticipated to be encountered. However the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of 14C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay.

  18. Decommissioning a 60-m-tall exhaust stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, R.L.; Speer, D.R. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Strontium Semiworks Complex, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, is nearing completion. This facility operated as a pilot plant from 1949 to 1967 to develop fuel reprocessing technology and a method for separating strontium from high-level liquid wastes. Contamination of the facility from these operations was extensive. One of the major activities completed was the decommissioning of the plant exhaust stack. Demolition of the stack was accomplished using explosives. This required decontamination of the stack interior to minimize the release of airborne contamination. Radiation levels in the stack prior to cleaning ranged from 2.5 to 90 mGy/h as measured along the stack centerline. Decontamination was accomplished by sandblasting, using equipment specially designed and fabricated to allow the work to be performed remotely.

  19. Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Microcantilever Sensors for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Zhiyu Hu; Brown, Gilbert M.; Baohua Gu

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time, in-situ analysis is critical for decision makers in environmental monitoring, but current techniques for monitoring and characterizing radionuclides rely primarily on liquid scintillation counting, ICP-MS, and spectrofluorimetry, which require sample handling and labor intensive lengthy analytical procedures. Other problems that accompany direct sampling include adherence to strict holding times and record maintenance for QA/QC procedures. Remote, automated sensing with direct connection to automated data management is preferred.

  1. Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

  2. Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huseynzade, Samir

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ upgrading of oil using hydrogen donors is a new process. In particular, very little research has been conducted with respect to in-situ oil upgrading using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion. Several papers describe the use of metal...

  3. Reducing the influence of microphone errors on in-situ ground impedance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    Reducing the influence of microphone errors on in- situ ground impedance measurements Roland Kruse. Keywords: Ground impedance; In-situ impedance measurement PACS 43.58.Bh #12;Introduction The acoustical. This problem is not specific to in-situ measurements but also applies to impedance tube measurements [9]. Two

  4. Effect and minimization of errors in in-situ ground impedance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    Effect and minimization of errors in in-situ ground impedance measurements Roland Kruse, Volker method is a procedure to measure the surface impedance of grounds in-situ. In this article, the influence. #12;Keywords: Ground impedance; In-situ impedance measurement PACS 43.58.Bh Introduction The surface

  5. Applications of in-situ measurement techniques of absorption Volker Mellert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    techniques to measure sound absorption or the acoustic surface impedance in-situ is given and an applicationApplications of in-situ measurement techniques of absorption Volker Mellert1 , Christian Nocke2. Abstract Two in-situ measurement techniques for sound absorption are compared, a subtraction technique

  6. Application of the two-microphone method for in-situ ground impedance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    Application of the two-microphone method for in-situ ground impedance measurements Roland Kruse is a convenient and well- known procedure to measure the surface impedance in-situ. Its proposed implementation-processing. Keywords: Ground impedance; In-situ impedance measurement; ANSI S1.18 PACS 43.58.Bh Introduction

  7. In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater using a Multi-Objective Parallel Evolutionary Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater using a Multi-Objective Parallel technology like in situ bioremediation, system optimization is not straightforward. In this study, a general). One such technology, in situ bioremediation, makes use of indigenous microorganisms. Fo

  8. Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

  9. Reactor Decommissioning - Balancing Remote and Manual Activities - 12159

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Matt [S.A. Technology (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors come in a wide variety of styles, size, and ages. However, during decommissioned one issue they all share is the balancing of remotely and manually activities. For the majority of tasks there is a desire to use manual methods because remote working can be slower, more expensive, and less reliable. However, because of the unique hazards of nuclear reactors some level of remote activity will be necessary to provide adequate safety to workers and properly managed and designed it does not need to be difficult nor expensive. The balance of remote versus manual work can also affect the amount and types of waste that is generated. S.A.Technology (SAT) has worked on a number of reactor decommissioning projects over the last two decades and has a range of experience with projects using remote methods to those relying primarily on manual activities. This has created a set of lessons learned and best practices on how to balance the need for remote handling and manual operations. Finding a balance between remote and manual operations on reactor decommissioning can be difficult but by following certain broad guidelines it is possible to have a very successfully decommissioning. It is important to have an integrated team that includes remote handling experts and that this team plans the work using characterization efforts that are efficient and realistic. The equipment need to be simple, robust and flexible and supported by an on-site team committed to adapting to day-to-day challenges. Also, the waste strategy needs to incorporate the challenges of remote activities in its planning. (authors)

  10. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

  11. In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

  12. A summary of lessons learned at the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crimi, F.P.; Mullee, G.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the lessons learned from a management perspective during decommissioning. The lessons learned are presented in a chronological sequence during the life of the project up to the present time. The careful analysis of the lessons learned and the implementation of corresponding actions have contributed toward improving the effectiveness of decommissioning as time progresses. The lessons learned should be helpful in planning future decommissioning projects.

  13. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  14. The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jungjoon; Ahn, Sangmyeon; Choi, Kyungwoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Juyub [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)] [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As of 2012, 23 units of nuclear power plants are in operation, but there is no experience of permanent shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plant in Korea. It is realized that, since late 1990's, improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s safety standards. And it is known that now IAEA prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities, its title is the Safe Decommissioning of Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework for decommissioning should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became also important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we identify the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is to be established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. After dealing with it, it is expected that the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Mayaguez (Puerto Rico) facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.K.; Freemerman, R.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 6, 1987 the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the final phase of the decontamination and decommissioning of the nuclear and reactor facilities at the Center for Energy and Environmental Research (CEER), in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Bechtel National, Inc., was made the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) contractor. The goal of the project was to enable DOE to proceed with release of the CEER facility for use by the University of Puerto Rico, who was the operator. This presentation describes that project and lesson learned during its progress. The CEER facility was established in 1957 as the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center, a part of the Atoms for Peace Program. It was a nuclear training and research institution with emphasis on the needs of Latin America. It originally consisted of a 1-megawatt Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), support facilities and research laboratories. After eleven years of operation the MTR was shutdown and defueled. A 2-megawatt TRIGA reactor was installed in 1972 and operated until 1976, when it woo was shutdown. Other radioactive facilities at the center included a 10-watt homogeneous L-77 training reactor, a natural uranium graphite-moderated subcritical assembly, a 200KV particle accelerator, and a 15,000 Ci Co-60 irradiation facility. Support facilities included radiochemistry laboratories, counting rooms and two hot cells. As the emphasis shifted to non-nuclear energy technology a name change resulted in the CEER designation, and plans were started for the decontamination and decommissioning effort.

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunter, David B.; Burwinkle, T. W.; Cannon, T. R.; Ford, M. K.; Holder, Jr., L.; Clotfelter, O. K.; Faulkner, R. L.; Smith, D. L.; Wooten, H. O.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

  17. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  18. Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Roberts

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

  19. Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

  20. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  1. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  2. Role of decommissioning plan and its progress for the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakaria, Norasalwa, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Mustafa, Muhammad Khairul Ariff, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Anuar, Abul Adli, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Idris, Hairul Nizam, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ba'an, Rohyiza, E-mail: norasalwa@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Malaysian nuclear research reactor, the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor, reached its first criticality in 1982, and since then, it has been serving for more than 30 years for training, radioisotope production and research purposes. Realizing the age and the need for its decommissioning sometime in the future, a ground basis of assessment and an elaborative project management need to be established, covering the entire process from termination of reactor operation to the establishment of final status, documented as the Decommissioning Plan. At international level, IAEA recognizes the absence of Decommissioning Plan as one of the factors hampering progress in decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the world. Throughout the years, IAEA has taken initiatives and drawn out projects in promoting progress in decommissioning programmes, like CIDER, DACCORD and R2D2P, for which Malaysia is participating in these projects. This paper highlights the concept of Decommissioning plan and its significances to the Agency. It will also address the progress, way forward and challenges faced in developing the Decommissioning Plan for the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor. The efforts in the establishment of this plan helps to provide continual national contribution at the international level, as well as meeting the regulatory requirement, if need be. The existing license for the operation of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor does not impose a requirement for a decommissioning plan; however, the renewal of license may call for a decommissioning plan to be submitted for approval in future.

  3. EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

  4. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  5. Lessons Learned from the Application of Bulk Characterization to Individual Containers on the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory - 12056

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneitel, Terri [US DOE, Brookhaven Site Office (United States); Rocco, Diane [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When conducting environmental cleanup or decommissioning projects, characterization of the material to be removed is often performed when the material is in-situ. The actual demolition or excavation and removal of the material can result in individual containers that vary significantly from the original bulk characterization profile. This variance, if not detected, can result in individual containers exceeding Department of Transportation regulations or waste disposal site acceptance criteria. Bulk waste characterization processes were performed to initially characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) graphite pile and this information was utilized to characterize all of the containers of graphite. When the last waste container was generated containing graphite dust from the bottom of the pile, but no solid graphite blocks, the material contents were significantly different in composition from the bulk waste characterization. This error resulted in exceedance of the disposal site waste acceptance criteria. Brookhaven Science Associates initiated an in-depth investigation to identify the root causes of this failure and to develop appropriate corrective actions. The lessons learned at BNL have applicability to other cleanup and demolition projects which characterize their wastes in bulk or in-situ and then extend that characterization to individual containers. (authors)

  6. Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities: First lessons Learned from UP1, Marcoule, France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Boya, Didier [AREVA, AREVA NC Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); CEA, Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 1997, UP1, Marcoule Fuel reprocessing facility, dissolved its last spent Fuel rod. Final shutdown and stage 1 decommissioning began immediately after, under the supervision of CODEM , a consortium composed of The French Atomic Energy Commission, COGEMA, France fuel Cycle Company and EDF, the French Electricity Utility. The goal of the decommissioning program was to achieve stage 2 decommissioning , as per IAEA standards, within a period of about 15 years. 10 years later, a significant amount of decontamination and decommissioning works has been conducted with success. The contractual structure under which the program was launched has been profoundly modified, and the capacity of The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and AREVA NC to complete full decommissioning programs has been confirmed. In the present document, we propose to examine the main aspects involved in the management of such decommissioning programs, and highlight, with significant examples, the main lessons learnt. In conclusion: As of 2007, UP1 decommissioning program proves to be a success. The choice of early decommissioning, the partnership launched between the French Atomic Energy Commission as owner of the site and decommissioning fund, with AREVA NC as operator and main contractor of the decommissioning works has been a success. The French Atomic Energy commission organized a contractual framework ensuring optimal safety conditions and work completion, while AREVA NC gained a unique experience at balancing the various aspects involved in the conduction of complete decommissioning programs. Although such a framework may not be applicable to all situations and facilities, it provides a positive example of a partnership combining institutional regulations and industrial efficiency.

  7. Blasting technology for modified in-situ oil shale retorts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricketts, T.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occidental Oil Shale, Inc., an equal partner with Tenneco Shale Oil Company in the Cathedral Bluffs Shale Oil Company, has spent since 1972 developing and demonstrating its modified in situ oil shale process at its Logan Wash mine near Debeque, Colorado. The Occidental modified in situ process consists of first mining out a limited amount of rock from within an underground retort volume to allow the explosive expansion of the surrounding rock into the mined void volumes. The explosive expansion forms a large underground rubble bed contained within a retort chamber which must contain a fairly uniform particle size distribution and void redistribution to provide reasonable oil recovery during subsequent in situ processing operations. The processing involves first igniting the top of the rubble pile and then injecting air into the top of the retort to drive the combustion front downward through the entire rubblized volume. The oil is continuously collected at the bottom of the retort during the processing. Two side-by-side commercial-sized retorts, Retorts 7 and 8, have recently been constructed at the Logan Wash mine using newly developed horizontal free-face blasting technology. Retorts 7 and 8 were blasted in February and April of 1981, respectively, each using nearly 550,000 lbs. of explosives in ANFO equivalent loaded within nearly 550 blastholes for each retort. The resulting rubble beds were about 230-ft high with cross-sections of approximately 27,225 ft/sup 2/. The blasting principles used to construct these commercial-sized retorts and the rubblization results are described in detail in this paper.

  8. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  9. Technology status report: In situ vitrification applied to buried wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bates, S.O. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansen, J.E. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a technical status report on In Situ Vitrification (ISV) as applied to buried waste; the report takes both technical and institutional concerns into perspective. The ISV process involves electrically melting such contaminated solid media as soil, sediment, sludge, and mill tailings. The resultant product is a high-quality glass-and-crystalline waste form that possesses high resistance to corrosion and leaching and is capable of long-term environmental exposure without significant degradation. The process also significantly reduces the volume of the treated solid media due to the removal of pore spaces in the soil.

  10. Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

  11. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  12. Simulations of in situ air stripping demonstration at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, B.A.; Rosenberg, N.D.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Viswanathan, H.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the performance of the in situ air stripping technology demonstrated at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration (SRID) site. This technology is a combination of air injection below the water table and vacuum extraction in the vadose zone, using a pair of horizontal wells. Our approach is based on the construction of a site-specific numerical model using the FEHM flow and transport code. We use the model as a tool to investigate improvements to performance, to improve the prediction of the performance of this technology over longer periods of time and at different sites, and to compare performance with other remediation technologies.

  13. In-situ measurement of skin friction and point bearing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehmet, Joseph Don

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I M ? S IT U ME~c S UBEME6'T OF SKIN FRICTION PHD POINT BEARIiiG A Thesis JOS'- P':i QOij' REAMS T Suhmitted to th Gradua. e Colloa of Texas ASM Univer "it@ ln oar i! al f ul fl11ment of the requi ri ment for tha ~loc ~ ec of NP STE!3...-Situ Measurement of Skin Friction and Point Bearing (January 1970) Joseph D . Rehmet, B. S . , Texas A&M University Supervised by: Dr. Harry M. Coyle Field tests are made using several in-situ testing devices and limiting values of skin friction and point...

  14. In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

  15. Buried telemetry system for in-situ energy extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, D. E.; Caffey, T. W.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During an in-situ energy extraction process, a continuous knowledge of the temperature profile through the combustion area is desirable for analysis and control. To provide this data, a telemetry system has been developed that will monitor the thermocouples from beneath the process bed, digitize the data into 12 bit words and store them into memory. Every six hours, the stored data is transmitted laterally through the earth to a receiver outside of the high temperature zone and then sent to the surface by wire where it is stored on magnetic tape and processed and displayed on a Texas Instruments Silent 700 terminal.

  16. In situ structural characterization of metal catalysts and materials using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn SituInto

  17. In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: Your link to newsInIn Situ

  18. In-Situ Mercury Remediation - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News Community Connections: YourIn-Situ MVA of CO

  19. In situ Observations of Lithium Dendrite Growth | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the LostDepartment ofParticulateIn situ

  20. Myths and representations in French nuclear history: The impact on decommissioning safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Myths and representations in French nuclear history: The impact on decommissioning safety C. Martin. The decommissioning of many operational plants (whether because nuclear power is being withdrawn, or because plants accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant has shown that in many countries the debate on the withdrawal

  1. Is Entombment an Acceptable Option for Decommissioning? An International Perspective - 13488

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belencan, Helen [US Department of Energy (United States)] [US Department of Energy (United States); Nys, Vincent [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium)] [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium); Guskov, Andrey [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States)] [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States); Francois, Patrice [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)] [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France); Watson, Bruce [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)] [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Ljubenov, Vladan [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selection of a decommissioning strategy is one of the key steps in the preparation for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other facilities using radioactive material. Approaches being implemented or considered by Member States include immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. Other options or slight modifications of these strategies are also possible. Entombment has been identified in the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards as one of the three basic decommissioning strategies and has been defined as a decommissioning strategy by which radioactive contaminants are encased in a structurally long lived material until radioactivity decays to a level permitting the unrestricted release of the facility, or release with restrictions imposed by the regulatory body. Although all three strategies have been considered, in principle, applicable to all facilities, their application to some facilities may not be appropriate owing to political concerns, safety or environmental requirements, technical considerations, local conditions or financial considerations. The IAEA is currently revising the decommissioning Safety Standards and one of the issues widely discussed has been the applicability of entombment in the context of decommissioning and its general objective to enable removal of regulatory control from the decommissioned facility. The IAEA recently established a consultancy to collect and discuss experience and lessons learned from entombment projects, to identify regulatory requirements and expectations for applying entombment as a decommissioning option strategy, in compliance with the internationally agreed standards. (authors)

  2. Erosion at Decommissioned Road-Stream Crossings: Case Studies from Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the dominant process and incorporate any lessons learned into future projects. Sites were also intentionally53 Erosion at Decommissioned Road-Stream Crossings: Case Studies from Three Northern California-treatment erosion was observed for 41 decommissioned road stream crossings in three northern California watersheds

  3. EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

  4. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

  5. Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin prepared for decommissioning. This study, conducted between 2010 and 2012, is focused on the Phénix nuclear in the context of nuclear decommissioning. This article does not aim to present the results of the study, i

  6. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Thomas [LVI Services Inc. (United States); DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt [Enercon Services, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  7. Remote machine engineering applications for nuclear facilities decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toto, G.; Wyle, H.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and decommissioning of a nuclear facility require the application of techniques that protect the worker and the enviroment from radiological contamination and radiation. Remotely operated portable robotic arms, machines, and devices can be applied. The use of advanced systems should enhance the productivity, safety, and cost facets of the efforts; remote automatic tooling and systems may be used on any job where job hazard and other factors justify application. Many problems based on costs, enviromental impact, health, waste generation, and political issues may be mitigated by use of remotely operated machines. The work that man can not do or should not do will have to be done by machines.

  8. Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, W.F.; Speer, D.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SYNOPSIS The strontium Semiworks Pilot Fuel Reprocessing Plant at the Hanford Site in Washington State was decommissioned by a combination of dismantlement and entombment. The facility contained 9600 Ci of Sr-90 and 10 Ci of plutonium. Process cells were entombed in place. The above-grade portion of one cell with 1.5-m- (5-ft-) thick walls and ceilings was demolished by means of expanding grout. A contaminated stack was remotely sandblasted and felled by explosives. The entombed structures were covered with a 4.6-m- (15-ft-) thick engineered earthen barrier. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. In Situ Community Control of the Stability of Bioreduced Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, David C.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-well sediment incubators Direct estimation of reoxidation rates is difficult under field conditions. We have designed and are fabricating in-well sediment incubators for use in conducting a series of in situ experiments that will enable direct measurement of U(IV) removal rates from pre-reduced sediments with specific microbial and mineralogic amendments. By comparing U(IV) loss rates with different DIRB and SRB populations we will be able to clearly determine the relative impact of sulfate reducers vs. Fe reducers. The approach we propose also makes it possible to assess actual in situ conditions during the experiment and to directly observe reoxidation (or bioreduction) end points after the field experiment is completed without drilling. Finally, the production of in-well sediment incubators is relatively inexpensive and could ultimately become an alternative to field-scale electron donor amendment experiments as a means of assessing site response to bioremediation and long-term stability of both biostimulated and naturally bioattenuated sites.

  11. Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  13. Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Lessons Learned in Decommissioning of NPP A-1 After Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prazska, M.; Rezbarik, J.; Majersky, D.; Sekely, S.; Solcanyi, S.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of the NPP A-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice is encountered with great variation of the problems connected primarily with the high radiation fields and the high activity of the contaminated materials. Decontamination of the contaminated objects and the thorough radiological protection of decontamination workers are therefore the tasks of top priority. The successful realization of these jobs is based on the experience, good working practice and the utilization of all proven methods together with the newly developed ones. Since 1996, AllDeco Ltd. has applied the decontamination methods and processes in a wide scale in the decommissioning and dismantling of the NPP A-1 in the cooperation with SE-VYZ Inc. The monitoring of the radiation situation and the investigation of the type and character of the radioactive waste were first steps in the decontamination of all objects. For this works, remote controlled mechanical manipulators and remote controlled electrical carriage equipped with instruments recording the levels of dose rates and with telemetric data transmission system were used. The recorded data were used for the modeling and 3D visualization of the radiation fields and for following planning and preparation of the decontamination projects or ''working programs'' based on the ALARA principle. The minimization of the radioactive waste was also taken into consideration. A lot of time and energy was spent on the preparation and training of the staff including non-active trials of planned procedures. The gained experience was evaluated and lessons learned were given in the final reports.

  15. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR • the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

  16. Combining In-Situ Buffer-Layer-Assisted-Growth with Scanning...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capability Development Proposals Combining In Situ Buffer-Layer-Assisted-Growth with Scanning Probe Microscopy for Formation and Study of Supported Model Catalysts Project start...

  17. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, K.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    associated with bioremediation of uranium to submicromolarGenes during in Situ Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminatedduring subsurface bioremediation Kenneth H. Williams 1* ,

  18. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High...

  19. CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amy, Gary L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF FIGURES Areal extent of oil shale deposits in the Greencommercial in~·situ oil shale facility. Possible alternativefor pyrolysis of oil shale Figure 7. Establishment of

  20. In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

  1. Apparatus for in situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham Jr., Samuel

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled.

  2. NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

  3. In situ vitrification model development and implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.; Hagrman, D.L.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Analysis Package being developed at the INEL to provide analytical support for (ISV) safety analysis and treatment performance predictions. Mathematical models and features which comprise this analysis package are presented and the proposed approach to model development and implementation is outlined. The objective of this document is two fold: to define preliminary design information and modeling objectives so that ISV modeling personnel can effectively modify existing models and formulate new models which are consistent with the objectives of the ISV treatability study and to provide sufficient technical information for internal and external reviewers to detect any shortcomings in model development and implementation plans. 27 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  5. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  6. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  8. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

  9. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

  10. In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  11. Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Zhao, Hequan (State College, PA)

    2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

  12. In situ formation of phosphate barriers in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive barriers and methods for making reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil ontaminants including actinides and heavy metals. The barrier includes phosphate, and techniques are disclosed for forming specifically apatite barriers. The method includes injecting dilute reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source such as a waste drum to achieve complete or partial encapsulation of the waste. Controlled temperature and pH facilitates rapid formation of apatite, for example, where dilute aqueous calcium chloride and dilute aqueous sodium phosphate are the selected reagents. Mixing of reagents to form precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  13. In-situ scanning probe microscopy of electrodeposited nickel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James J.; Dibble, Dean C.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance characteristics and material properties such as stress, microstructure, and composition of nickel coatings and electroformed components can be controlled over a wide range by the addition of small amounts of surface-active compounds to the electroplating bath. Saccharin is one compound that is widely utilized for its ability to reduce tensile stress and refine grain size in electrodeposited nickel. While the effects of saccharin on nickel electrodeposition have been studied by many authors in the past, there is still uncertainty over saccharin's mechanisms of incorporation, stress reduction, and grain refinement. In-situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a tool that can be used to directly image the nucleation and growth of thin nickel films at nanometer length scales to help elucidate saccharin's role in the development and evolution of grain structure. In this study, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques are used to investigate the effects of saccharin on the morphological evolution of thin nickel films. By observing mono-atomic height nickel island growth with and without saccharin present we conclude that saccharin has little effect on the nickel surface mobility during deposition at low overpotentials where the growth occurs in a layer-by-layer mode. Saccharin was imaged on Au(l11) terraces as condensed patches without resolved packing structure. AFM measurements of the roughness evolution of nickel films up to 1200 nm thick on polycrystalline gold indicate that saccharin initially increases the roughness and surface skewness of the deposit that at greater thickness becomes smoother than films deposited without saccharin. Faceting of the deposit morphology decreases as saccharin concentration increases even for the thinnest films that have 3-D growth.

  14. TWRS privatization: Phase I monitoring well engineering study and decommissioning plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.A.

    1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study evaluates all well owners and users, the status or intended use of each well, regulatory programs, and any future well needs or special purpose use for wells within the TWRS Privatization Phase I demonstration area. Based on the evaluation, the study recommends retaining 11 of the 21 total wells within the demonstration area and decommissioning four wells prior to construction activities per the Well Decommissioning Plan (WHC-SD-EN-AP-161, Rev. 0, Appendix I). Six wells were previously decommissioned.

  15. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D D Program.

  16. CPP-603 Chloride Removal System Decontamination and Decommissioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, C.L.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603 (annex) Chloride Removal System (CRS) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The CRS was used for removing Chloride ions and other contaminants that were suspended in the waters of the underwater fuel storage basins in the CPP-603 Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility (FRSF) from 1975 to 1981. The Environmental Checklist and related documents, facility characterization, decision analysis`, and D&D plans` were prepared in 1991. Physical D&D activities were begun in mid summer of 1992 and were completed by the end of November 1992. All process equipment and electrical equipment were removed from the annex following accepted asbestos and radiological contamination removal practices. The D&D activities were performed in a manner such that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) occurred.

  17. An In-Situ Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Detecting Gaseous VOCs in Unsaturated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    An In-Situ Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Detecting Gaseous VOCs in Unsaturated Soils and will be ultimately equipped with water content, temperature, and pressure sensors. The proposed system is designed knowledge, an in-situ IMS for detection of subsurface gaseous VOCs has not been previously developed. VOCs

  18. Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huseynzade, Samir

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A... UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by SAMIR HUSEYNZADE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  19. Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion Authors Abu believed to cause fuel formation for in-situ combustion have been studied and modeled. A thin, packed bed the approach of a combustion front. Analysis of gases produced from the reaction cell revealed that pyrolysis

  20. FULL FIELD STRESS MEASUREMENT FOR IN SITU STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF AIRFRAME COMPONENTS AND REPAIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FULL FIELD STRESS MEASUREMENT FOR IN SITU STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF AIRFRAME COMPONENTS to structural health monitoring however is problematic. The reasons are manifold but a key one is that strain detector to furnish a basis for in situ structural health monitoring. It first covers some preliminaries

  1. Pushpull tests evaluating in situ aerobic cometabolism of ethylene, propylene, and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Push­pull tests evaluating in situ aerobic cometabolism of ethylene, propylene, and cis-1 17 November 2005 Abstract In situ aerobic cometabolic transformations of ethylene, propylene, and cis and combinations of propane, dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, ethylene, propylene, c-DCE, and TCE into existing

  2. CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE 117. Use of in situ Fiber-Optic Raman Spectroscopy to Replace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE 117. Use of in situ Fiber-Optic Raman Spectroscopy to Replace Calorimetry. Abstract A method for real time determination of the percent cure of epoxies via in-situ fiber-optic Raman to be reliable to +/- 0.82% in the 40-90% cure range. Key words: Process monitoring, fiber optic, Raman

  3. Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling by Moe Kyaw Thu, Takatoshi Ito, Weiren Lin, Mai-Linh Doan, David Tobindoi:10.2204/iodp.sd.13.06.2011 Progress Reports Introduction Scientific ocean drilling's first in situ

  4. In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice Aleksandr Nesterenok 2011 Available online 8 October 2011 Keywords: Cosmic rays Polar ice Radiocarbon In situ production a b s t r a c t We study interactions of cosmic ray particles with the Earth's atmosphere and polar ice

  5. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: results from in situ soil column experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Mathew R; Dickey, Catherine A; Heal, Kate V; Stidson, Ruth T; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J Neil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments with radioactively-labelled TCA and with irradiated (sterilised) soil columns. Control in situ forest soil columns showed evidence of net export (i.e. in situ production) of TCA, consistent with a net soil TCA production inferred from forest...

  6. Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility Jrmy. Nosa,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Once the uranium is removed, reagent is added to the solution, which is then reinjected. This methodHeterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility control Jérémy Mines, Tour AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense Cedex, France The uranium in situ

  7. Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization Sanja Tepavcevic, Seth B-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. 1. Introduction Hybrid solar cells have been developed

  8. Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function Zhi Xu August 2005; published online 10 October 2005 The field emission properties of individual multiwalled work functions at tips by the in situ transmission electron microscopy method. The field emission

  9. In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    In situ reduction and oxidation of nickel from solid oxide fuel cells in a Titan ETEM A. Faes1, Denmark antonin.faes@epfl.ch Keywords: In situ ETEM, nickel oxide, reduction, RedOx, SOFC Solid Oxide Fuel. C. Singhal, K. Kendall, High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell - Fundamentals, Design

  10. Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

  11. Do amphipods have the same concentration-response to contaminated sediment in situ as in vitro?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeWitt, T.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR (United States). National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab.; Hickey, C.W.; Morrisey, D.J.; Williamson, R.B.; Dam, L. van; Williams, E.K. [National Inst. for Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd., Hamilton (New Zealand); Nipper, M.G. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Roper, D.S. [Electricity Corp. of New Zealand Ltd., Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An underlying assumption of laboratory-based toxicity tests is that the sensitivity of organisms in the laboratory (in vitro) is comparable to that in the field (in situ). The authors tested this assumption by exposing estuarine amphipods (Chaetocorophium cf. lucasi) to a concentration series of cadmium-spiked sediments in vitro and in situ for 10 d. In situ exposures were conducted within plastic-mesh cages on an intertidal mudflat. To characterize exposure, they measured interstitial water cadmium concentrations (IW{sub Cd}), acid volatile sulfide (AVS), and simultaneously extracted Cd (SEM{sub Cd}) at the beginning and end of the exposures. Between day 0 and day 10, AVS decreased in both in vitro and in situ exposures, while IW{sub Cd} levels declined less in vitro than in situ (median 76%). Despite more extreme conditions of temperature and salinity in situ, in vitro and in situ exposures showed comparable survival responses based on SEM{sub Cd}/AVS with the onset of marked mortality above a SEM{sub Cd}/AVS value of about one and minimal survival (< 5%) above a value of two. Based on IW{sub Cd} concentrations, however, sensitivity was significantly greater in vitro. They concluded that, in their tests, amphipod sensitivity in vitro was equal to or greater than its sensitivity in situ.

  12. Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

  13. An in Situ ATR-FTIR Investigation of Sulfate Bonding Mechanisms on Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    An in Situ ATR-FTIR Investigation of Sulfate Bonding Mechanisms on Goethite Derek Peak,1 Robert G of sulfate adsorption on goethite was investi- gated in situ using attenuated total reflectance Fourier.0. It was determined that sulfate forms both outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexes on goethite at pH less

  14. Platform for in situ real-time measurement of protein-induced conformational changes of DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platform for in situ real-time measurement of protein-induced conformational changes of DNA Philipp, 2009) A platform for in situ and real-time measurement of protein- induced conformational changes in ds. The platform can accommodate individual spots of microar- rayed dsDNA on individually controlled

  15. Five-Year Technology Development Strategic Plan Targets EM’s Decommissioning Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Leaders from EM headquarters and field offices and the UK’s Sellafield nuclear site gathered recently to discuss developing technologies needed to address decommissioning challenges across the Cold War cleanup program.

  16. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  17. The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles A. Gentile; Erik Perry; Keith Rule; Michael Williams; Robert Parsells; Michael Viola; James Chrzanowski

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future.

  18. EM Renews Information-Sharing Agreement with United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PHOENIX – EM’s top official this week renewed an agreement between DOE and the U.K.’s Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) that expands the scope of their information sharing.

  19. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

  20. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H. K.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

  1. EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for low-level radioactive and mixed wastes generated by decontaminating and decommissioning activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's...

  2. Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

  3. Decommissioning experience: One-piece removal and transport of a LWR pressure vessel and internals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Closs, J.W. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief historical perspective, this document describes several key events which took place during the decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant. The scope of decommissioning work included: (a) the reactor building, the reactor vessel and the contents of the reactor building; (b) the fuel handling building and its contents; (c) the fuel transfer vault between the reactor building and the fuel handling building.

  4. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  5. In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

  6. The UFA technology for characterization of in situ barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ. Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site characterizations, choices of remedial strategies for site restoration, and performance assessments of chosen strategies all require knowledge of the transport properties for subsurface materials, such as hydraulic conductivities, diffusion coefficients, sorption properties, and in situ recharge rates. Unsaturated conditions in the vadose zone are especially difficult to investigate because of the extreme variability in the transport properties of geologic materials as a function of water content. A new technique, the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA), was developed to rapidly attain hydraulic steady-state in all porous/fractured media, including multicomponent/multiphase systems. The larger driving forces obtainable with centrifugation techniques are combined with precision fluid flow through a rotating seal. Hydraulic steady state is achieved in a period of hours to days, instead of months to years, depending on the target water content and intrinsic permeability of the material. Barrier materials such as bentonite slurries, chemical barriers, cements, and asphalt concretes can be rapidly run in the UFA prior to emplacement to fine-tune formulations and identify any site-specific or substrate-specific problems that could not be identified without actual field testing.

  7. Method for in-situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham Jr., Samuel

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled. A method of removing carbon contaminants from a substrate surface that is housed within a vacuum chamber is also disclosed. The method employs activated gaseous species that react with the carbon contaminants to form carbon containing gaseous byproducts.

  8. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

  9. Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

  10. In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

  11. In Situ TEM Observation of Dislocation Evolutionin Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. F. HE; 1 M. A. KIRK; Argonne National Laboratory; J. Gan; T. R. ALLEN

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of polycrystalline UO2 (with average grain size of about 5 lm) irradiated with Kr ions at 600C and 800C was conducted to understand the radiation-induced dislocation evolution under the influence of grain boundaries. The dislocation evolution in the grain interior of polycrystalline UO2 was similar under Kr irradiation at different ion energies and temperatures. As expected, it was characterized by the nucleation and growth of dislocation loops at low irradiation doses, followed by transformation to extended dislocation lines and tangles at high doses. For the first time, a dislocation-denuded zone was observed near a grain boundary in the 1-MeV Kr-irradiated UO2 sample at 800C. The denuded zone in the vicinity of grain boundary was not found when the irradiation temperature was at 600C. The suppression of dislocation loop formation near the boundary is likely due to the enhanced interstitial diffusion toward grain boundary at the high temperature.

  12. In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

  13. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolbert, R.R.; Jandrasits, W.G.

    1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitting is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  14. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolbert, Ronald R. (McKees Rocks, PA); Jandrasits, Walter G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitg is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  15. In-situ corrosivity monitoring of military hardware environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwala, V.S. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, MD (United States). Aircraft Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to monitor corrosive conditions (environments) for military equipment was developed. The concept is based on the electrochemical principles of galvanic corrosion. It consisted of a novel thin film device (interdigitized bimetallic strips on a kapton polymer) which was galvanically coupled or short circuited through a zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) and interfaced to a custom design data acquisition system called Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS). The sensor`s unique design allowed the use of any metal as the active element or anode to form the galvanic couple, which enhanced sensor`s versatility and usefulness in almost any application. In most applications Cd-Au sensor was used. For in-situ corrosivity monitoring sensors were installed in the interior of the aircraft, hidden structures, avionics bays, and embedded under coatings and sealants. The test sites included: military bases, aircraft carrier flight decks, marine atmosphere and operational aircraft and weapons storage areas. The results show a significant correlation between the output of the sensors and the corrosive conditions present, and may become a basis for condition based maintenance of military hardware in the future.

  16. In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

  17. In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

    2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

  18. Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

  19. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

  20. In-situ coal-gasification data look promising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a report given at the 6th Underground Coal Conversion Symposium (Afton, Oklahoma 1980), the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal-gasification experiments Oil Gas J. 77 sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute and directed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory demonstrated the feasibility of in-situ coal conversion and featured the use of a directionally drilled channel to connect the injection and production wells rather than the reverse-burn ordinarily used to produce the connecting channel. In the test, 2816 cu m of coal weighing (APPROX) 4200 tons was consumed, with (APPROX) 18% of the product gas escaping through the overburden or elsewhere. When air injection was used, the average heating value was 217 Btu/std cu ft. The average thermal efficiency of the burn was 65%, and the average gas composition was 35% hydrogen, 5% methane, 11% carbon monoxide, and 44% carbon dioxide. Subsidence occurred after completion of the test. The Uniwell gasification method, scheduled for use in the final experiment in the Deep-1 series of underground coal-gasification tests in Wyoming, seeks to prevent subsidence by use of concentric pipes which are inserted into the vertical well to control the combustion zone. Underground coal-gasification prospects and the mechanics of subsidence are discussed.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

  2. Empirical design charts against earthquake-induced liquefaction in cohesionless soils based on in-situ tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menendez, Jose Rafael

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available methods to predict the liquefaction susceptibility of cohesionless soils are based either in empirical charts (in-situ test) or laboratory tests. In-situ tests are a valuable source of information; especially in cohesionless soils, due...

  3. In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC Core-Shell Nanoparticles for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Storage. In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings...

  4. In-situ measurement of ground impedances Von der Fakultt fr Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften der Carl von Ossietzky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    In-situ measurement of ground impedances Von der Fakultät für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften .............................................................................................22 Summary: In-situ impedance measurement.Definitions..........................................................................................................................11 VI.Surface impedance measurement methods

  5. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in situ test, however, block joints were not pre-sealed.swelling and seal the joints between bentonite blocks. In

  6. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  7. Application of Robotics in Decommissioning and Decontamination - 12536

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banford, Anthony; Kuo, Jeffrey A. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Bowen, R.A. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Szilagyi, Andrew; Kirk, Paula [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities is a significant challenge worldwide and one which is growing in size as more plants reach the end of their operational lives. The strategy chosen for individual projects varies from the hands-on approach with significant manual intervention using traditional demolition equipment at one extreme to bespoke highly engineered robotic solutions at the other. The degree of manual intervention is limited by the hazards and risks involved, and in some plants are unacceptable. Robotic remote engineering is often viewed as more expensive and less reliable than manual approaches, with significant lead times and capital expenditure. However, advances in robotics and automation in other industries offer potential benefits for future decommissioning activities, with the high probability of reducing worker exposure and other safety risks as well as reducing the schedule and costs required to complete these activities. Some nuclear decommissioning tasks and facility environments are so hazardous that they can only be accomplished by exclusive use of robotic and remote intervention. Less hazardous tasks can be accomplished by manual intervention and the use of PPE. However, PPE greatly decreases worker productivity and still exposes the worker to both risk and dose making remote operation preferable to achieve ALARP. Before remote operations can be widely accepted and deployed, there are some economic and technological challenges that must be addressed. These challenges will require long term investment commitments in order for technology to be: - Specifically developed for nuclear applications; - At a sufficient TRL for practical deployment; - Readily available as a COTS. Tremendous opportunities exist to reduce cost and schedule and improve safety in D and D activities through the use of robotic and/or tele-operated systems. - Increasing the level of remote intervention reduces the risk and dose to an operator. Better environmental information identifies hazards, which can be assessed, managed and mitigated. - Tele-autonomous control in a congested unstructured environment is more reliable compared to a human operator. Advances in Human Machine Interfaces contribute to reliability and task optimization. Use of standardized dexterous manipulators and COTS, including standardized communication protocols reduces project time scales. - The technologies identified, if developed to a sufficient TRL would all contribute to cost reductions. Additionally, optimizing a project's position on a Remote Intervention Scale, a Bespoke Equipment Scale and a Tele-autonomy Scale would provide cost reductions from the start of a project. Of the technologies identified, tele-autonomy is arguably the most significant, because this would provide a fundamental positive change for robotic control in the nuclear industry. The challenge for technology developers is to develop versatile robotic technology that can be economically deployed to a wide range of future D and D projects and industrial sectors. The challenge for facility owners and project managers is to partner with the developers to provide accurate systems requirements and an open and receptive environment for testing and deployment. To facilitate this development and deployment effort, the NNL and DOE have initiated discussions to explore a collaborative R and D program that would accelerate development and support the optimum utilization of resources. (authors)

  8. Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the dismantling waste plays an important role for the time needed for the dismantling phase and thus is critical to the decommissioning cost. An efficient and thorough process for inventorying, characterization and categorization of the waste provides a sound basis for the planning process. As part of comprehensive decommissioning studies for Nordic NPPs, Westinghouse has developed the decommissioning inventories that have been used for estimations of the duration of specific work packages and the corresponding costs. As part of creating the design basis for a national repository for decommissioning waste, the total production of different categories of waste packages has also been predicted. Studsvik has developed a risk based concept for categorization and handling of the generated waste using six different categories with a span from extremely small risk for radiological contamination to high level waste. The two companies have recently joined their skills in the area of decommissioning on selected market in a consortium named 'ndcon' to further strengthen the proposed process. Depending on the risk for radiological contamination or the radiological properties and other properties of importance for waste management, treatment routes are proposed with well-defined and proven methods for on-site or off-site treatment, activity determination and conditioning. The system is based on a graded approach philosophy aiming for high confidence and sustainability, aiming for re-use and recycling where found applicable. The objective is to establish a process where all dismantled material has a pre-determined treatment route. These routes should through measurements, categorization, treatment, conditioning, intermediate storage and final disposal be designed to provide a steady, un-disturbed flow of material to avoid interruptions. Bottle-necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

  9. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The reactors can also have reduced mass over conventional hardware. Over 60% conversion was achieved using a two stage RWGS reactor in which water was removed between stages. Sabatier conversions of greater than 85% were achieved in a single stage system. Since the RWGS is endothermic and the Sabatier is exothermic, by combining the two reactions, heat generated from the Sabatier can be used to fuel the RWGS reaction. A combined Sabatier/RWGS reactor was successfully tested. Both the Sabatier and RWGS reactions generate water. The water will be collected and electrolyzed to produce oxygen and recycle the hydrogen. A microchannel phase separator is also under development to separate liquid water from vapor and other gases in these product streams. This phase separator relies on surface forces, not gravitational effects, to separate the water and is therefore suited to space applications. The specific energy of this device reached values of 1200 to 8000 W/K for water mole fractions of 20 to 70%. The phase separator technology was scaled up in a system to removed water from a cathode effluent of a 5 kW PEM fuel cell. In this case a three channel device can remove 43 mL/min of water in 95 SCFM of air. This exceeded the design requirements of the device. A system model of the microchannel ISPP plant was generated to predict the size, weight and performance for the individual components and use it to optimize the overall system. The microchannel technologies developed for CO2 collection, reaction, and phase separation can be used not only for an ISPP system, but also life support, EVA, and lunar applications. The use of microchannel technologies reduces both mass and volume of the system as well as improving the system efficiency.

  10. Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determination of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing January 2013. [1] In situ test of hydraulic fracturing (HF) provides the only way to observe in situ of stress state in deep subsea formation by combination of hydraulic fracturing in situ test and core

  11. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu [National Institute of Standards and Technology] National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter [Arizona State University] Arizona State University; Adams, James [Arizona State University] Arizona State University

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  12. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  13. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian, E-mail: Kilian.DevlooCasier@Ugent.be; Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  14. In-situ measurements of friction and bearing correlated with instrumented pile tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, George William

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    values, in-situ measurements of tip-only tests, embedded tests, and the corresponding CT values, TABLE 4 SERIES I FRICTION DATA ? PILE I- Ir?MEDIATE STATIC LOAD TEST DEPTH FEET 12. 0 21. 5 30. 0 31. 0 32. 0 40. 5 41. 5 50. 0 60. 5 61. 5... Procedure 20 20 20 21 22 ANALYSIS OF TEST RESULTS General Instrumented Pile Test Data . In-Situ Friction Test Data In-Situ Bearing Test Data . Correlation with Soil Properties 27 27 28 30 41 42 COiNCLUSIOiNS A!ND P...

  15. Pile design predictions in sand and gravel using in situ tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huff, Linda Grubbs

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methods, using in situ test results, are being developed for use in the design of piles in sand. In this study, these in situ tests and the new design methods are used to predict bearing capacity and settlement for both tension and compression loads... OP CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Background for this Study Scope of this Study ~Pa e 1 1 2 THE TEST SITE Location Borings and Tests The Soil 4 4 4 14 IN SITU TEST PROCEDURES AND RESULTS Pressuremeter Test Procedures Pressuremeter Test...

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents activities of decontamination and decommissioning at ORNL. Topics discussed include general problems, waste types, containment, robotics automation and decontamination processes.

  17. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  18. LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  19. Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

  20. UK contractors' experience of management of tritium during decommissioning projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Tommy; Stevens, Keith; Heaney, John [NUKEM Ltd., Kelburn Court, Daten Park, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6TW (United Kingdom); Murray, Alan [Tetronics Limited, 1 Ram Court. Wicklesham Farm, Faringdon. Oxfordshire SN7 7PN (United Kingdom); Warwick, Phil; Croudace, Ian [GAU-Radioalytical, National Oceanography Centre (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper provides an account of the tritium management experience of a UK decommissioning and remediation contracting organisation (NUKEM Limited), supported by a specialist radio-analysis organisation (GAU-Radioanalytical). This experience was gained during the execution of projects which involved the characterisation and remediation of facilities which had previously been used for tritium work and were contaminated with tritium. The emphasis of the paper is on the characterisation (sampling and analysis) of tritium. An account is given of the development of a methodology to improve the accuracy of tritium characterisation. The improved methodology evolved from recognition of the need to minimise tritium losses during sampling, storage, transport and preparation for analysis. These improvements were achieved in a variety of ways, including use of cold and dry sampling techniques in preference to hot or wet ones and freezing relevant samples during storage and transport. The major benefit was an improvement in the accuracy and reliability of the analyses results, essential for proper categorisation, sentencing and future management of tritiated waste. (authors)

  1. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule.

  2. Decommissioning of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment: A technical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Notz, K.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report completes a technical evaluation of decommissioning planning for the former Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, which was shut down in December, 1969. The key issues revolve around the treatment and disposal of some five tons of solid fuel salt which contains over 30 kg of fissionable uranium-233 plus fission products and higher actinides. The chemistry of this material is complicated by the formation of elemental fluorine via a radiolysis reaction under certain conditions. Supporting studies carried out as part of this evaluation include (a) a broad scope analysis of possible options for storage/disposal of the salts, (b) calculation of nuclide decay in future years, (c) technical evaluation of the containment facility and hot cell penetrations, (d) review and update of surveillance and maintenance procedures, (e) measurements of facility groundwater radioactivity and sump pump operation, (f) laboratory studies of the radiolysis reaction, and (g) laboratory studies which resulted in finding a suitable getter for elemental fluorine. In addition, geologic and hydrologic factors of the surrounding area were considered, and also the implications of entombment of the fuel in-place with concrete. The results of this evaluation show that the fuel salt cannot be left in its present form and location permanently. On the other hand, extended storage in its present form is quite acceptable for 20 to 30 years, or even longer. For continued storage in-place, some facility modifications are recommended. 30 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Action Memorandum for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Pinzel

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is documenting the selection of an alternative for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area using a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). The scope of the removal action is limited to TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has assisted the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in identifuomg the most effective method for performing the decommissioning of this structure whose mission has ended. TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is located at Test Area North Technical Support Facility within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The selected alternative consists of demolishing the TAN-607 aboveground structures and components, removing belowground noninert components (e.g. wood products), and removing the radiologically contaminated debris that does not meet remedial action objectives (RAOs), as defined in the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10.

  4. The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Chris [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the waste-forms generated throughout the various decommissioning campaigns. The use of low force compaction for insulation and soft wastes provided a simple, robust and cost effective solution as did the direct encapsulation of LLW steel components in the later stages of reactor decommissioning. Progress through early campaigns was good, often bettering the baseline schedule, especially when undertaking the repetitive tasks seen during Neutron Shield and Graphite Core decommissioning, once the operators had become experienced with the equipment, though delays became more pronounced, mainly as a result of increased failures due to the age and maintainability of the RDM and associated equipment. Extensive delays came about as a result of the unsupported insulation falling away from the pressure vessel during removal and the inability of the ventilation system to manage the sub micron particulate generated during IPOPI cutting operations, though the in house development of revised and new methodologies ultimately led to the successful completion of PV and I removal. In a programme spanning over 12 years, the decommissioning of the reactor pressure vessel and core led to the production 110 ILW and 75 LLW WAGR boxes, with 20 LLW ISO freight containers of primary reactor wastes, resulting in an overall packaged volume of approximately 2500 cubic metres containing the estimated 460 cubic metres of the reactor structure. (authors)

  5. In-situ measurements of surface tension-driven shape recovery in a metallic glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Christopher A.

    A new technique, involving nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy at high temperature under an inert atmosphere, is used to study deformation of a Pt-based metallic glass. As temperature is increased into ...

  6. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: In-Situ Solvothermal Synthesis of Novel High Capacity Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Brookhaven National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about in-situ...

  8. Origin and in situ diversification in Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carranza, Salvador

    Origin and in situ diversification in Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago ELENA GO´ MEZ Ocean, is a case example of an ancient continental fragment, a Correspondence: Elena Go´mez Di´az, Fax

  9. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge drying & inceneration plants 3200 gm/day In-Situ Oiloil shale plant is over four times the allowable mercury emission for mercury ore processing plants and sludge

  10. In Situ, Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cziczo, Daniel James

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that ...

  11. Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

  12. In situ chemical imaging at the sub-biofilm-scale | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Liu, Z Zhu, AE Tucker, WB Chrisler, EA Hill, S Thevuthasan, Y Lin, S Liu, and MJ Marshall. 2014. "In Situ Molecular Imaging of Hydrated Biofilm in a Microfluidic Reactor by...

  13. A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Guanghua

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered data is either missing or obviously erroneous. The methodology is able...

  14. Characterization of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Cu-SSZ-13 NH3 SCR Catalysts: an in situ FTIR Study. Abstract: The adsorption of CO and NO over Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite catalysts, highly active in the selective...

  15. INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrier, D.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9 true in situ oil shale combustion experiment conducted byatmosphere process (combustion) and the oil shale reservesoil-shale process water. This water originates primarily from three sources: combustion,

  16. CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman. George R.

    CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies information about their formation histories and evolution. Combined geochemistry and mineralogy measurements measurement techniques that could provide microscopic mineralogy and isotope geochemistry. We will discuss

  17. Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molloy, R. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning...

  18. Rigorous Simulation Model of Kerogen Pyrolysis for the In-situ Upgrading of Oil Shales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung Jae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is a vast, yet untapped energy source, and the pyrolysis of kerogen in the oil shales releases recoverable hydrocarbons. In this dissertation, we investigate how to increase process efficiency and decrease the costs of in-situ upgrading...

  19. In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial Photosynthesis Monday, June 30, 2014 Plants and other organisms use a process called photosynthesis to produce...

  20. Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements byBerkeley, CA, 94720 ABSTRACT Ge nanocrystals are formed inthe Raman spectra of the Ge nanocrystals in-situ. The

  1. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  2. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL...

  3. IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST...

  4. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511522 In situ Raman spectroscopy of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511­522 In situ Raman spectroscopy. In this situation, a low energy excitation (e.g. visible light) is needed to excite an electron to a neighboring

  5. In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongxu

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

  6. Solvent screening methodology for in situ ABE extractive fermentation H. Gonzlez-Peas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    also be used as a feedstock in petrochemical industry. Therefore, increasing attention has been microorganisms (Ezeji et al 2010), and (c) integration of the fermentation process with in situ primary

  7. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartwig, Zachary Seth

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ( ? 10?min) time scale with ? 1??m depth and ? ...

  8. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings ofthe 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

  9. INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrier, D.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shale andOil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

  10. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone the

  11. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,Particle Size on Retorting Oil in a Controlled~State Retort,residence of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River

  12. Multiscale determination of in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we address the problem of determining in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs using borehole logs and surface seismic reflection data. The dissertation covers four subtopics. The first is the ...

  13. INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrier, D.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

  14. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedingsof the 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

  15. Rigorous Simulation Model of Kerogen Pyrolysis for the In-situ Upgrading of Oil Shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung Jae

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale is a vast, yet untapped energy source, and the pyrolysis of kerogen in the oil shales releases recoverable hydrocarbons. In this dissertation, we investigate how to increase process efficiency and decrease the costs of in-situ upgrading...

  16. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils, which can be used to produce biofuel blendstocks. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast...

  18. In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

  19. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

  20. abandoned in-situ oil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred William 2012-06-07 4 A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: spent shale,...

  1. ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ossio, E.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

  2. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4, 19'70, p. 89. 24. C-b Shale Oil Venture: Hydrology, MinePiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsofrom a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

  3. A new technique for non-intrusive in situ measurements of symbiotic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilan, Micha

    A new technique for non-intrusive in situ measurements of symbiotic photosynthesis Symbiotic algae the Diving-PAM for underwater photosynthetic measurements lies in the method's non-intrusive nature

  4. A nanofluidic device for single molecule studies with in situ control of environmental solution conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ce

    We report an approach to study the in situ conformational response of single biomolecules such as DNA to a change in environmental solution conditions. These conditions are, for example, the composition of the buffer or ...

  5. Parametric study to evaluate benefits of fracture fluid quality control and in-situ stress research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satayapunt, Jeeradete

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to evaluate the benefits of the GRI research using a data set for an "average" well. Results of that study indicated that the money invested in fluid quality control and in-situ stress measurements will yield a positive return on the investment...PARAMETRIC STUDY TO EVALUATE BENEFITS OF FRACTURE FLUID QUALITY CONTROL AND IN-SITU STRESS RESEARCH A Thesis by JEERADETE SATAYAPUNT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  7. An in situ geophone-calibration method for broadband amplitude and phase determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peoples, Christopher James

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN IN SITU GEOPHONE-CALIBRATION METHOD FOR BROADBAND AMPLITUDE AND PHASE DETERMINATION A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JAMES PEOPLES Approved as to style and content by: Steven, Harder (Chair of Committee) Antho F. angi (Member) Robert Beck Clark... (Member) Joe S. Watkins (Head of Department) May 1993 ABSTRACT An In Situ Geophone-Calibration Method for Broadband Amplitude and Phase Determination. (May 1993) Christopher James Peoples, B. S. , University of California, Riverside Chair...

  8. Innovative technology summary report: in situ air stripping using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ air stripping (ISAS) technology was developed to remediate soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISAS employs horizontal wells to inject (sparge) air into the ground water and vacuum extract VOCs from vadose zone soils. The innovation is creation of a system that combines two somewhat innovative technologies, air sparging and horizontal wells, with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  9. In situ air stripping using horizontal wells. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ air stripping employs horizontal wells to inject or sparge air into the ground water and vacuum extract VOC`S from vadose zone soils. The horizontal wells provide better access to the subsurface contamination, and the air sparging eliminates the need for surface ground water treatment systems and treats the subsurface in-situ. A full-scale demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Plant in an area polluted with trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Results are described.

  10. Field versus laboratory characterization of clay deposits for use as in situ municipal landfill liners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Sharon Elizabeth

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Aa? University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of . KASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1990 Major Subject: Geology FIELD VERSUS LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DEPOSITS FOR USE AS IN SITU MUNICIPAL LANDFILL LINERS A Thesis by SHARON ELIZABETH WECHSLER Approved as to style...

  11. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF METHANE PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARAJAN Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering EFFECT OF MET~ PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARA JAN Submitted...

  12. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF METHANE PULSATION ON METHANOTROPHIC BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN AN IN-SITU MODEL AQUIFER A Thesis by RAN JAN NATARAJAN Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University in partial fulfillment... of Department) August 1993 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering ABSTRACT Effect of Methane Pulsation on Methanotrophic Biodegradation of Trichloroethylene in an in-situ Model Aquifer. (August 1993) Ranjan Natarajan, B. E. , P. S. G College...

  13. Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

  14. Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

  15. Decommissioning of a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant at Winfrith Technolgy Centre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengelly, M.G.A. [AEA Technology, Dorchester (United Kingdom)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alpha Materials Laboratory (Building A52) at Winfrith contained a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant which had a capability of producing 10 te/yr of pelleted/compacted fuel and was in operation from 1962 until 1980, when the requirement for this type of fuel in the UK diminished, and the plant became surplus to requirements. A program to develop decommissioning techniques for plutonium plants was started in 1983, addressing the following aspects of alpha plant decommissioning: (1) Re-usable containment systems, (2) Strippable coating technology, (3) Mobile air filtration plant, (4) Size reduction primarily using cold cutting, (5) techniques, (6) Waste packing, and (7) Alpha plant decommissioning methodology. The technology developed has been used to safely and efficiently decommission radioactive plant and equipment including Pu contaminated glove boxes. (63 glove boxes to date) The technology has been widely adopted in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. This paper outlines the general strategies adopted and techniques used for glove box decommissioning in building A52.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this one-year investigation is to perform a technology integration/search, thereby ensuring that the safest and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Issues of worker health and safety are the main concern, followed by cost. Two lines of action were explored: innovative Personal Cooling Systems (PCS) and Personal Monitoring Equipment (PME). PME refers to sensors affixed to the worker that warn of an approaching heat stress condition, thereby preventing it. Three types of cooling systems were investigated: Pre-Chilled or Forced-Air System (PCFA), Umbilical Fluid-Chilled System (UFCS), and Passive Vest System (PVS). Of these, the UFCS leads the way. The PVS or Gel pack vest lagged due to a limited cooling duration. And the PCFA or chilled liquid air supply was cumbersome and required an expensive and complex recharge system. The UFCS in the form of the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) performed exceptionally. The technology uses a chilled liquid circulating undergarment and a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) external pump and ice reservoir. The system is moderately expensive, but the recharge is low-tech and inexpensive enough to offset the cost. There are commercially available PME that can be augmented to meet the DOE's heat stress alleviation need. The technology is costly, in excess of $4,000 per unit. Workers easily ignore the alarm. The benefit to health & safety is indirect so can be overlooked. A PCS is a more justifiable expenditure.

  17. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU-HCET to evaluate a technology integration--shot blasting technology and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which are decontamination and sensor technology, respectively.

  18. Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latge, C.; Henry, J. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-DTN, 13108 Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France); Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Gessi, A. [ENEA, Brasimone (Italy); Guertin, A. [CNRS, Subatech, Nantes (France); Konstantinovic, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Lindau, R. [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maloy, S. [DOE-LANL, Los Alamos (United States); Saito, S. [JAEA, Tokai (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by ?-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from ?-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and ?-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

  19. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

  20. Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

  1. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D&D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D&D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S&M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D&D Program.

  2. Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. L. Reno

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

  3. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  4. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J. [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that {approximately}5,500 m{sup 3} of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste.

  5. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  6. Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Nickelson; D.K. Jorgensen; J.J. Jessmore; R.A. Hyde; R.K. Farnsworth

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

  7. Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Douglas Kay; Nickelson, David Frank; Nickelson, Reva Anne; Farnsworth, Richard Kent; Jessmore, James Joseph

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE’s Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.

  8. Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

  9. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

  10. Numerical simulations in support of the in situ bioremediation demonstration at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, B.J.; Rosenberg, N.D.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the performance of the in situ bioremediation technology demonstrated at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration (SRID) site in 1992--1993. The goal of the technology demonstration was to stimulate naturally occurring methanotrophic bacteria at the SRID site with injection of methane, air and air-phase nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate) such that significant amounts of the chlorinated solvent present in the subsurface would be degraded. Our approach is based on site-specific numerical simulations using the TRAMP computer code. In this report, we discuss the interactions among the physical and biochemical processes involved in in situ bioremediation. We also investigate improvements to technology performance, make predictions regarding the performance of this technology over long periods of time and at different sites, and compare in situ bioremediation with other remediation technologies.

  11. Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?°C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

  12. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  13. ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC to remove the dams and buy replacement power than the earlier analysis had indicated. The Klamath Project, and steelhead trout on the West Coast of the United States. PacifiCorp's 169-megawatt Klamath Hydroelectric

  14. EIS-0364: Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), on proposed decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.

  15. Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning * W of the torus, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

  16. Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning* W, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

  17. LIST OF DECOMMISSIONING LESSONS-LEARNED IN SUPPORT OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF A STANDARD REVIEW PLAN FOR NEW REACTOR LICENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memorandum To; David B. Matthews; Elmo E. Collins

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staff in the Division of New Reactor Licensing (DNRL) requested assistance from the Division of Waste Management and Environmental Protection (DWMEP) in the development of a standard review plan (SRP) for the licensing of new reactor facilities. Specifically, DNRL staff requested a list of high-level decommissioning lessons-learned that new applicants for a reactor license should address in order to minimize, to the extent practicable, contamination of the facility and the environment, facilitate eventual decommissioning, and minimize, to the extent practicable, the generation of radioactive waste. DWMEP staff met with your staff several times to discuss and clarify the requested input. This requested information is provided in Enclosure 1. I would like to bring to your attention other sources of decommissioning lessons-learned. The list of lessons-learned provided in Enclosure 1 is a subset of a much larger set of decommissioning lessons-learned. DWMEP developed the list in Enclosure 1 by reviewing the lessons-learned described in other documents (Enclosure 2) and selecting those it felt were most significant, based on DWMEP decommissioning experience. Additionally, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has developed decommissioning lessons-learned. DWMEP has not reviewed those lessons-learned because they are considered proprietary information by EPRI. DWMEP staff also developed a comprehensive bibliography of documents containing decommissioning lessons-learned. The bibliography is posted on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s public website. CONTACT: Rafael L. Rodriguez, NMSS/DWMEP

  18. Optimization and sensitivity of a global biogeochemistry ocean model using combined in situ DIC, alkalinity, and phosphate data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Eun Young; Primeau, Francois

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. -H. Peng (2003), Calcium carbonate budget in the Atlanticet al. (2002), In situ calcium carbonate dissolution in theof shallow-depth calcium carbonate dissolution in the ocean,

  19. In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukai, K., E-mail: mukai.kiyofumi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Peterson, B. J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Pandya, S. N.; Sano, R. [The Graduate University for Advance Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed.

  20. Characterization of Texas lignite and numerical modeling of its in-situ gasification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yih-Jy

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Site selection for in-situ gasification projects normally involves application of site screen1ng criteria. Some of these cr1teria were discussed by Russell et al. (1983). Numerical simulation may play an important role in s1te selection...CHARACTERIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE AND NUMERICAL MODELING OF ITS IN-SITU GASIFICATION A Thesis by YIH-JY WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  1. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  2. A laboratory study of oil recovery by in-situ combustion with the addition of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alderman, John H

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A LABORATORY STUDY OF OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION WITH THE ADDITION OF WATER A Thesis by JOHN H. ALDERMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f968 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A LABORATORY STUDY OF OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION WITH THE ADDITION OF WATER A Thesis SOHN H. ALDERMAN Approved as to style and content by: Oz ( h irman of Committee) Member...

  3. The effect of carbon dioxide-oxygen mixtures on oil recovery by in-situ combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Neal Joseph

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-OXYGEN MIXTURES ON OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by NEAL J. BROUSSARD7 JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1970 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-OXYGEN MIXTURES ON OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by NEAL J. BROUSSARD) JR. Approved as to style and content by Chp r an o ommrttee m er...

  4. In-situ measurements of friction and bearing correlated with instrumented pile tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, George William

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee) (Head o Depar me (Member) (Hember) August 1970 ABSTBACT In-Situ measurements of Friction and Bearing Correlated with Instrumented Pile Tests (August 1 gy0 ) George M. Perclue, B. S. , Texas ABN University Superv1sed by: Dr. Harry l1.... Coyle This study involved a ser1es of f1eld tests conducted with a recently developed 1n-situ testing dev1ce. The in-situ test1ng device was used to measure values of skin friction and po1nt bearing taken during so11 sampl1ng operations. The test...

  5. The in-situ effects of soil water potential on Phymatotrichum omnivorum sclerotial formation and germination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Tammy Lynn

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IN-SITU EFFECTS OF SOIL WATER POTENTIAL ON PHPPfA TOTRICHMCY1iVI VORLP1 SCLEROT I AL FORMATION AND GERMINATION A Thesis by TIFF LYNN WHITE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A@1 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Plant Pathology THE IN-SITU EFFECTS OF SOIL WATER POTENTIAL ON PHYLA TOTRICHg1 CYfiVI VOiPLP1 SCLEROT I AL FORMATION AND GERMINAT ION A Thesis by TAMMY LYNN WHITE Approved...

  6. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning.

  7. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  8. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  9. Decommissioning and Dismantling of the Floating Maintenance Base 'Lepse' - 13316

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, D.; Mizen, K. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)] [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lepse was built in Russia in 1934 and commissioned as a dry cargo ship. In 1961 she was re-equipped for use as a nuclear service ship (NSS), specifically a floating maintenance base (FMB), to support the operation of the civilian nuclear fleet (ice-breakers) of the USSR. In 1988 Lepse was taken out of service and in 1990 she was re-classified as a 'berth connected ship', located at a berth near the port of Murmansk under the ownership of Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Atomflot. Lepse has special storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SFA) that have been used to store several hundred SFAs for nearly 40 years. High and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is also present in the spent nuclear fuel assembly storage channels, in special tanks and also in the SFA cooling circuit. Many of the SFAs stored in Lepse are classified as damaged and cannot be removed using standard procedures. The removal of the SFA and LRW from the Lepse storage facilities is a hazardous task and requires specially designed tools, equipment and an infrastructure in which these can be deployed safely. Lepse is a significant environmental hazard in the North West of Russia. Storing spent nuclear fuel and high-level liquid radioactive waste on board Lepse in the current conditions is not acceptable with respect to Russian Federation health, safety and environmental standards and with international best practice. The approved concept design for the removal of the SFA and LRW and dismantling of Lepse requires that the ship be transported to Nerpa shipyard where specialist infrastructure will be constructed and equipment installed. One of the main complexities of the Project lies within the number of interested stakeholders involved in the Project. The Lepse project has been high focus on the international stage for many years with previous international efforts failing to make significant progress towards the objective of decommissioning Lepse. The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP) approved an internationally funded project to identify and prioritise nuclear and environmental hazards in NW Russia. Within this project the Lepse was recognised as being one of the highest nuclear hazards in NW Russia. Removal of SNF, SRW and LRW from Lepse requires innovative design and development of bespoke equipment. The main drivers of the NDEP Donors are first to safely transport Lepse in 2012 from her current berth close to the local population in Murmansk to the nominated dismantling shipyard, and secondly to raise Lepse from the water in 2013 onto the slip-way at the dismantling shipyard. A description is provided of the approach and progress towards preparing the Lepse for the removal of SFAs and other radioactive waste, to decontaminate and then dismantle the vessel under international donor funding. (authors)

  10. WoodPolymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood­Polymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood Yong-Feng Li in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). ABSTRACT: Wood­polymer composites (WPCs) were prepared words: composites; mechanical properties; modifi- cation; monomers; renewable resources INTRODUCTION

  11. 2D-correlation analysis applied to in situ and operando Mssbauer spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    method, Mössbauer spectrocopy, lithium battery, positive electrode materials, LiFePO4, FePO4, olivine The electrochemical reactions of battery materials have been extensively studied by various electrochemical,5], in situ [6] or operando conditions and also for characterization of pristine materials. In some case

  12. POWDER DIFFRACTION BEAMLINE FOR IN SITU STUDIES OF STRUCTURAL AND CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS (IXD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    , the availability of techniques for the real time characterization of catalytic systems as they evolve in time community, such as the user groups conducting studies on batteries, fuel cells, catalysis, high growth and the evolution of stress. In Situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Studies on Li-ion Battery Materials

  13. Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ satellite images the aurora in three different spectral regions. One of the channels of the spectrographic to spectrally discriminate between the proton and electron FUV aurora and to globally map the energetic protons

  14. In situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm in southeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    measurements of electrical current above thunderstorms have been successfully obtained. In this paper, weIn situ measurements of contributions to the global electrical circuit by a thunderstorm and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA b Geomagnetism Program, USGS Denver, CO, USA

  15. Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1 , Arthur Motta1 Laboratory, Argonne, IL 060493, USA INTRODUCTION Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ferritic. EXPERIMENT Material Characterization Prior to Irradiation MA957 ODS alloy (Fe­14Cr­1Ti­0.3Mo­0.25Y2O3

  16. Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook 1 Shan as the victims. Using Facebook as a case study, we show that it is possible to detect such incidents by analyz significant efforts to prevent identity fraud and protect users' privacy. For example, Facebook records

  17. Rduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile combustible oxyde solide dans un Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Réduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile à combustible à oxyde of Denmark (DTU), DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark La technologie commune des piles à combustible à'opération de la pile à haute température (550°C à 1000°C), conduisant à une

  18. In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells D.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane under methane-to-oxygen ratio (Rmix) of 2. Anode-supported fuel cells are investigated regarding

  19. In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell Matt S. Naughton a , Claire E online xxx Keywords: Alkaline fuel cell Gas diffusion electrodes Ag cathode Electrode characterization for direct ethanol fuel cells and as a source for on-demand production of hydrogen in portable applications

  20. Proceedings: In Situ Contaminated Sediment Capping Workshop: Cincinnati, Ohio, May 12-14, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The In Situ Contaminated Sediment Capping Workshop was designed to provide the most current information and bring about consensus in understanding of a technology that offers one of the few options for remediation of contaminated sediments. These electronic proceedings document workshop sessions on various capping issues, such as site assessment; cap suitability, performance, and design; site monitoring; and research and development in capping.

  1. Investigation of the Thermal Decomposition of Triethylgallium Using in situ Raman Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    (TEGa) were followed using in situ Raman spectroscopy measurements in an up-flow, cold-wall CVD reactor an design with ss beads to p ure 1. Schem asurements. dy, the gas p ectroscopy i h numerical ons, which w Ex

  2. Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Technology & Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction A.E. FINAN, K. MIU, A.C. KADAK Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Nuclear Science the technical aspects and the economics of utilizing nuclear reactors to provide the energy needed

  3. In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongxu

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    environment for in situ removal of arsenic. A sand filter with a fresh iron oxide coating can treat thousands of pore volumes of water contaminated with dozens of ppb arsenic before the coating needs to be regenerated. Arsenic breakthrough curves through...

  4. In situ characterization of soil properties using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waiser, Travis Heath

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , organic C, and inorganic C. Water potential did not improve model predictions, nor did it correlate with the VNIR spectra; r2-values were below 0.31. These results show that DRS is an acceptable technique to measure selected soil properties in-situ...

  5. Development of a Microfluidic Device for Synthesis of Lipid Bi-Layer In-Situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banneyake, Bm U.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and result in unstable bi-layers having a short lifetime. In this investigation a novel microfluidic device and a method for artificial synthesis of lipid bi-layer in-situ are explored. In the proposed method, lipid trapped at an aperture on a Teflon sheet...

  6. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braymen, Steven D. (Ames, IA)

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  7. Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gongora, Cesar Augusto

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stress determination in the Travis Peak Formation, (2) the effect of shale has been considered in the correlation model, and (3) the model is easy to use once the lithology of the layer has been identified. This new model can be used to estimate in-situ...

  8. A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Received November 10, 2005; E-mail: quake@stanford.edu Recently microfluidic technologies have emerged microfluidic crystallization devices do not allow the post- crystallization addition of cryoprotectant

  9. ELECTRONIC TEXTILES FOR IN SITU BIOMECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS Tom Martin*, Thurmon Lockhart, Mark Jones, and Josh Edmison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRONIC TEXTILES FOR IN SITU BIOMECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS Tom Martin*, Thurmon Lockhart, Mark textile (e-textile) system capable of assessing a suite of biomechanical measures. Unlike laboratory- based systems, this system would be worn by a soldier and could be used in a range of environmental

  10. Quantification of thermophilic archaea and bacteria in a Nevada hot spring using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    in situ hybridization Abstract Previous studies of high temperature hot springs in Yellowstone National temperatures. The cells, which were concentrated from 300 liters of hot spring water through tangential flow dominate in high-temperature environments such as Yellowstone National Park. However, our study indicates

  11. Influence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    the intense solar heat. For perihelion distances of radius R = 4-10 solar radii, R, (the values proposedInfluence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations A. Hassanein Argonne National or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

  12. WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Zijiang Yang-temporal monitoring of environmental and ecosystems processes. WiSARDNet is a complete distributed sensing system, as well as careful energy management in a weatherproof package, allow high-performance data collection

  13. Spatio-spectral exploration combining in situ and remote measurements David R. Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatio-spectral exploration combining in situ and remote measurements David R. Thompson Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Dr. Pasadena, CA 91109 david.r.thompson important to incorporate science data into rover navigational and science activity planning (Thompson

  14. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in-situ, wireless soil sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    1 A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in-situ, wireless soil sensing Gunjan of impedance spectroscopy. Impedance measurement at multiple frequencies is done by comparing the amplitude impedance of the board in the measurements to minimize the errors. Measurements of both real and imaginary

  15. Flow Measurement with Tangential Paddlewheel Flow Meters: Analysis of Experimental Results and in-situ Diagnostics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, J. B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acquisition system. In this paper new results from calibration efforts in the LoanSTAR program are presented, including the premature drop-out of magnetic-type tangential paddlewheel sensors, as well as several in-situ diagnostic measures for ascertaining...

  16. Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude Darin by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new

  17. Measuring the bioenergetic cost of fish activity in situ using a globally dispersed radiotracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Joseph

    Measuring the bioenergetic cost of fish activity in situ using a globally dispersed radiotracer is an important component of the bioenergetic budget of fish, yet this parameter has rarely been quantified for wild populations. Using a 137 Cs mass balance approach, we estimated the annual bioenergetic budgets

  18. In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs RG Ramirez, N Garcia (DM) and crude protein (CP) of 13 commonly available native forbs. Forbs evaluated were Coldenia. barbigerum (80). Crude protein digestion rate (/h) was highest in P. maculosa (0.17), S. filicaulis (0.12), Z

  19. Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

  20. The feeding behaviour of a deep-sea holothurian, Stichopus tremulus (Gunnerus) based on in situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

    observations and experiments using a Remotely Operated Vehicle Ian R. Hudson*, Benjamin D. Wigham, Paul A September 2003 Abstract Using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to deploy an in situ cage experiment-2380-596-247. E-mail address: irh@soc.soton.ac.uk (I.R. Hudson). www.elsevier.com/locate/jembe Journal