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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

2

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

3

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

4

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

5

ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

6

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

7

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

8

ARM - Field Campaign - In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,CloudgovCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

9

AEROSOL DIRECT RADIATIVE EFFECTS OVER THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC, NORTHWEST PACIFIC, AND NORTH INDIAN OCEANS: ESTIMATES BASED ON IN-SITU CHEMICAL AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSOL DIRECT RADIATIVE EFFECTS OVER THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC, NORTHWEST PACIFIC, AND NORTH INDIAN OCEANS: ESTIMATES BASED ON IN-SITU CHEMICAL AND OPTICAL MEASUREMENTS AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELING radiation, changing cloud properties and altering precipitation. The largest uncertainty in the radiative

10

The importance of in-situ-stress profiles in hydraulic-fracturing applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ stresses define the local forces acting on lithologic layers in the subsurface. Knowledge of these stresses is important in drilling, wellbore-stability, and, especially, hydraulic-fracturing applications. The measurement of in-situ stress is not straightforward and, therefore, often goes unmeasured. As such, one often assumes values of in-situ stress or estimate in-situ stresses from logging parameters. This article illustrates the importance of in-situ-stress estimates as they relate to hydraulic fracturing and outlines several techniques for estimating in-situ-stress magnitudes.

Hopkins, C.W. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States). Houston Div.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

12

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

Sheridan, Jennifer

13

IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE SIZE AND DENSITY OF TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The organic haze produced from complex CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogs, or tholins, for CH{sub 4} concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are higher than the measured densities of our tholins.

Hoerst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of mixing layer heights inferred from radiosonde, wind profiler, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler, and in-situ aircraft data during the Texas 2000 air quality study in Houston, TX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mixing layer (ML) heights inferred from radiosondes, wind profilers, airborne lidar, airborne microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and in-situ aircraft data were compared during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study in the Houston area...

Smith, Christina Lynn

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

16

The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 deg. C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

Huthwelker, T.; Zelenay, V.; Birrer, M.; Krepelova, A.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Tzvetkov, G. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Vernooij, M. G. C. [Environmental Mineralogy, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 6, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

Ferrare, R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. This Raman lidar system is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols (Goldsmith et al., 1998). These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. We have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) (Feltz et al., 1998; Turner et al., 1999). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

FERRARE,R.A.

2000-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measurements of aerosol vertical profiles and optical properties during INDOEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markowicz,5 James R. Campbell,6 James D. Spinhirne,7 Howard R. Gordon,2 and James E. Johnson3 Received 5 field phase. Measurements were made from two platforms: the NOAA ship R/V Ronald H. Brown. Markowicz, J. R. Campbell, J. D. Spinhirne, H. R. Gordon, and J. E. Johnson, Measurements of aerosol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A numerically based design procedure for buried high-density polyethylene profile-wall pipes buried in fine-grained in-situ soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NUMERICALLY BASED DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR BURIED HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE PROFILE-WALL PIPES BURIEU IN FINE-GRAINED IN-SITU SOILS A Thesis by FREDERICK ALLEN BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AtkM University in partial... and content by: Ro t L. ytton Chair n of Comm ' tee) Larr 'J ynolds (Me ) Lou' J. ompson (Ne ber) T. J. Hirsch (Head of Department) December 1984 ABSTRACT A Numerically Based Design Procedure for Buried High-Density Polyethylene Profile-Wall Pipes...

Brown, Frederick Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Experimental and analytical study to model temperature profiles and stoichiometry in oxygen-enriched in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 1.1 Heat of combustion as a function of the H/C ratio, FHC, of the fuel and the CO/CO2 ratio in the produced gases?????????????. ???3 Fig. 2.1 Temperature and saturation profiles and the various zones formed during dry... available to maintain a constant rate propagation of the front through the combustion tube, and on the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO2) in the produced gases. As can be noted in Fig. 1.1, the heat of combustion increases as the CO/CO2...

Rodriguez, Jose Ramon

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ćngström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ćlesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16 FOR PrimaryDelegations, andRoutePriorities for

25

In situ mercury stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BNL Royalty Project Internal Status Report. The funds from the allotment of royalty income were used to experimentally explore feasibility of related, potential new techniques based on the Environmental Sciences Department successful technology licensed for the ex situ treatment of mercury. Specifically, this work is exploring the concept of using Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) in an in situ application to stabilize and/or remove mercury (Hg) from surficial soil. Patent disclosure forms have been filed for this process. Soil was artificially spiked with 500 ppm Hg and a series of experiments were set up in which SPC rods were placed in the center of a mass of this soil. Some experiments were conducted at 20 C and others at 50 C. After times ranging from 11 to 24 days, these experiments were opened, photographed and the soil was sampled from discrete locations in the containers. The soil and SPC samples were analyzed for Fe and Hg by x-ray fluorescence. The Hg profile in the soil was significantly altered, with concentrations along the outer edge of the soil reduced by as much as 80% from the starting concentration. Conversely, closer to the treatment rod containing SPC, concentrations of Hg were significantly increased over the original concentration. Preliminary results for elevated temperature sample are shown graphically in Figure 2. Apparently the Hg had migrated toward the SPC and reacted with sulfur to form Hg S. This appears to be a reaction between gaseous phases of both S and Hg, with Hg having a greater vapor pressure. The concentration of low solubility HgS (i.e., low leaching properties) developed within 11 days at 50 C and 21 days at 20 C, confirming the potential of this concept.

Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Adams, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

In-Situ Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination.  The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both...

27

2.1 RAMAN LIDAR PROFILING OF WATER VAPOR AND AEROSOLS OVER THE ARM SGP SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors with the use of narrowband (~0.4 nm bandpass) filters, reduces the background skylight and, therefore

28

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bioaugmentation of Groundwater ............................ 2589 5 Intrinsic Bioremediation and Modeling attenuation. 1 Introduction A patent for in situ bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation T. C. Hazen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

Hazen, Terry

30

Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

In situ measurement system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

Lord, D.E.

1980-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

In Situ Nuclear Characterization Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To be able to evolve microstructure with a prescribed in situ process, an effective measurement infrastructure must exist. This interdisciplinary infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with in situ sensor technology. This paper discusses the essential elements in an effective infrastructure.

James A. Smith; J. Rory Kennedy

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

aerosols | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols aerosols Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate material for...

36

Triplex in-situ hybridization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods for detecting in situ the presence of a target sequence in a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment, which comprises: a) contacting in situ under conditions suitable for hybridization a substantially double-stranded nucleic acid segment with a detectable third strand, said third strand being capable of hybridizing to at least a portion of the target sequence to form a triple-stranded structure, if said target sequence is present; and b) detecting whether hybridization between the third strand and the target sequence has occured.

Fresco, Jacques R. (Princeton, NJ); Johnson, Marion D. (East Windsor, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Monitoring simultaneously the growth of nanoparticles and aggregates by in situ ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering can provide information about primary particles and aggregates from a single scattering experiment. This technique is applied in situ to flame aerosol reactors for monitoring simultaneously the primary particle and aggregate growth dynamics of oxide nanoparticles in a flame. This was enabled through the use of a third generation synchrotron source (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne IL, USA) using specialized scattering instrumentation at the UNICAT facility which is capable of simultaneously measuring nanoscales to microscales (1 nm to 1 {mu}m). More specifically, the evolution of primary-particle diameter, mass-fractal dimension, geometric standard deviation, silica volume fraction, number concentration, radius of gyration of the aggregate, and number of primary particles per aggregate are measured along the flame axis for two different premixed flames. All these particle characteristics were derived from a single and nonintrusive measurement technique. Flame temperature profiles were measured in the presence of particles by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermophoretic sampling was used to visualize particle growth with height above the burner as well as in the radial direction.

Kammler, Hendrik K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Kohls, Douglas J.; Agashe, Nikhil; Ilavsky, Jan [Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, ML F23, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 540 Engineering Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0012 (United States); UNICAT, Advanced Photon Source, Building 438D, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

In situ biofilm coupon device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Noise canceling in-situ detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

Walsh, David O.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent analysis and archival of the data, and the presentation of results in conferences, workshops, and publications. DOE ASR field campaigns supported under this project included - MAX-Mex /MILAGRO (2006) - TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS (2006) - CHAPS (2007) - RACORO (2009) - CARE/CalNex (2010) In addition, data acquired on HSRL airborne field campaigns sponsored by other agencies were used extensively to fulfill the science objectives of this project and the data acquired have been made available to other DOE ASR investigators upon request.

Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

Christian, Allen T. (Tracy, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Livermore, CA); Tucker, James D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EMSL - aerosols  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defects-m...

44

Joint Computer Science/Statistics Colloquia In-situ ComputingIn-situ Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2011 Joint Computer Science/Statistics Colloquia In-situ ComputingIn-situ Computing My work the Sprowls Award for best dissertation in Computer Science. This lecture was made possible in part Department of Computer Science #12;

Mayfield, John

45

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

46

Redeeming features of in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ combustion remains the most tantalizing enhanced oil recovery method. It has been tested extensively - in over 150 field tests - in both heavy and light oil reservoirs. What we have learned from this experience is that in situ combustion works under most conditions, but the nature of the problems is such that it is seldom profitable. Also, looking at many previous in situ combustion tests, steam injection, and even waterflooding, would have been a better choice. Yet in situ combustion has unique features not found in any other EOR method. These must be weighed against its shortcomings to evaluate a potential application. This paper discusses the redeeming features of in situ combustion, in particular the reservoir conditions under which in situ combustion may be superior to other EOR methods are outlined. All variations of in situ combustion - forward, reverse, wet, dry - as well as combinations with other EOR methods are considered. The conclusions is that in situ combustion still has a place, and its future application would depend on research on certain crucial aspects of the process.

Farouq Ali, S.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

AEROSOL DIRECT RADIATIVE EFFECTS OVER THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC, NORTHWEST PACIFIC, AND NORTH INDIAN OCEANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSOL DIRECT RADIATIVE EFFECTS OVER THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC, NORTHWEST PACIFIC, AND NORTH INDIAN OCEANS: ESTIMATES BASED ON IN-SITU CHEMICAL AND OPTICAL MEASUREMENTS AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELING, for United States Government purposes. #12;AEROSOL DIRECT RADIATIVE EFFECTS OVER THE NORTHWEST ATLANTIC

48

In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed.

Mukai, K., E-mail: mukai.kiyofumi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Peterson, B. J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Pandya, S. N.; Sano, R. [The Graduate University for Advance Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Buried telemetry system for in-situ energy extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During an in-situ energy extraction process, a continuous knowledge of the temperature profile through the combustion area is desirable for analysis and control. To provide this data, a telemetry system has been developed that will monitor the thermocouples from beneath the process bed, digitize the data into 12 bit words and store them into memory. Every six hours, the stored data is transmitted laterally through the earth to a receiver outside of the high temperature zone and then sent to the surface by wire where it is stored on magnetic tape and processed and displayed on a Texas Instruments Silent 700 terminal.

Barnes, D. E.; Caffey, T. W.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Regulation of in situ to invasive breast carcinoma transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive carcinoma is a key event in breast tumor progression that is poorly understood. Comparative molecular analysis of tumor epithelial cells from in situ and invasive tumors has failed to identify consistent tumor stage-specific differences. However, the myoepithelial cell layer, present only in DCIS, is a key distinguishing and diagnostic feature. To determine the contribution of non-epithelial cells to tumor progression, we analyzed the role of myoepithelial cells and fibroblasts in the progression of in situ carcinomas using a xenograft model of human DCIS. Progression to invasion was promoted by fibroblasts, but inhibited by normal myoepithelial cells. The invasive tumor cells from these progressed lesions formed DCIS rather than invasive cancers when re-injected into naive mice. Molecular profiles of myoepithelial and epithelial cells isolated from primary normal and cancerous human breast tissue samples corroborated findings obtained in the xenograft model. These results provide the proof of principle that breast tumor progression could occur in the absence of additional genetic alterations and that tumor growth and progression could be controlled by replacement of normal myoepithelial inhibitory signals.

Polyak, Kornelia; Hu, Min; Yao, Jun; Carroll, Danielle K.; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Chen, Haiyan; Carrasco, Daniel; Richardson, Andrea; Violette, Shelia; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Bissell, Mina J.; Schnitt, Stuart; Polyak, Kornelia

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

52

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

53

Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Preparation and in situ Characterization of Surfaces Using Soft-Landing...

54

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons...

55

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissionin...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

"DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ...

56

In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes In-situ characterization and diagnostics of mechanical degradation in electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen...

57

In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage...

58

Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection. Abstract: A...

59

Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling Energy Storage Monitoring System and In-Situ Impedance Measurement Modeling 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

60

In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA Aptamers and Graphene Oxide Nanosheets. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNARNA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based Techniques. Making a Hybrid Microfluidic Platform Compatible for In Situ Imaging by Vacuum-Based...

62

In Situ Effective Diffusion Coefficient Profiles in Live Biofilms Using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219ImprovementsImprovingInIn

63

Ecological Effects and In-situ Detection of Particulate Contaminants in Aqueous Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigates crude oil toxicity as a particulate suspension, suitability of in-situ instrumentation to measure crude oil suspensions, and the applicability of using acoustic backscatter to measure suspended solids and sub-surface oil droplet suspension... and Discussion................................................................... 132 x CHAPTER Page Suspended solids characterization......................................... 132 Acoustic backscatter depth profiles...

Fuller, Christopher Byron

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Investigation of the aerosol-cloud interaction using the WRF framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Simulations with various aerosol profiles demonstrate that the response of precipitation to the increase of aerosol concentrations is non-monotonic. The maximal cloud cover, core updraft, and maximal vertical velocity exhibit similar responses as precipitation...

Li, Guohui

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

66

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

In situ measurement of strain during electrodeposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of electrodeposited films is the strain induced by the electrodeposition process. In this communication the authors report a new optical fiber interferometer-based technique for the in situ measurement of strain during electrodeposition. The measurement system is shown.

Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol retrieval algorithms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the scavenging... site provide retrievals of aerosol, cloud, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic? 12;Key... profiles derived from ground-based and satellite remote...

69

Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN SITU TOUGHENED SILICON CARBIDE LUTGARD C. DE JONGHE 1,2 ,In Situ Toughened Silicon Carbide Lutgard C. De Jonghe 1,2 ,USA ABSTRACT A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~Mathematical Hodel for In-Situ Shale Retorting," in SecondBriefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, Lawrence Livermore

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

In-Situ Calibration for Feedwater Flow Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the approval by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of the Appendix K power up-rates, it has become important to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow. Failure to meet documented requirements can now more easily lead to plant operations above their analyzed safety limits. Thus, the objective of flow instrumentation used in Appendix K up-rates, becomes one of providing precise measurements of the feedwater mass flow that will not allow the plant to be overpowered, but will still assure that maximum licensed thermal output is achieved. The NRC has licensed two technologies that meet these standards. Both are based on ultrasonic measurements of the flow. The first of these technologies, which is referred to as transit-time, relies on the measurement of differences in time for multiple ultrasonic beams to pass up and downstream in the fluid stream. These measurements are then coupled with a numerical integration scheme to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile due to upstream flow disturbances. This technology is implemented using a spool piece that is inserted into the feedwater pipe. The second technology relies on the measurement of the velocity of eddies within the fluid using a numerical process called cross-correlation. This technology is implemented by attaching the ultrasonic flow meter to the external surface of the pipe. Because of the ease in installation, for atypical situations, distortions in the velocity profile can be accounted for by attaching a second ultrasonic flow meter to the same pipe or multiple meters to a similar piping configuration, where the flow is fully developed. The additional meter readings are then used for the calibration of the initial set-up. Thus, it becomes possible to provide an in-situ calibration under actual operating conditions that requires no extrapolation of laboratory calibrations to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile. This paper will focus on the cross-correlation method of flow measurement, starting with the theoretical bases for the velocity profile correction factor and its reliance on only the Reynolds number to produce an accurate measurement of the flow, when the flow is fully developed. The method of laboratory calibration and the verification of these calibrations under actual plant operating conditions will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of how this technology is being used today to support the Appendix K up-rates. Various examples will be presented of piping configurations, where in-situ calibrations have or will be used to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow at a specific location. (authors)

Peyvan, David [Entergy Nuclear Generating Company (United States); Gurevich, Yuri [Advanced Measurement and Analysis Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); French, Charles T. [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SY101 in situ viscometer instrument system design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the design and description of the in situ viscometer, developed for the hydrogen mitigation project.

Pearce, K.L.; Stokes, T.I.; Vagelatos, N.

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License Applications Final Washington, DC 20555-0001 #12;NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License OF A STANDARD REVIEW PLAN (NUREG­1569) FOR STAFF REVIEWS FOR IN SITU LEACH URANIUM EXTRACTION LICENSE

77

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell performance requires effective water management. To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operations. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells, with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) properties. High resolution neutron radiography was used to image fuel cells during a variety of conditions. The effect of specific operating conditions, including flow direction (co-flow or counter-flow) was examined. Counter-flow operation was found to result in higher water content than co-flow operation, which correlates to lower membrane resistivity. A variety of cells were used to quantify the membrane water in situ during exposure to saturated gases, during fuel cell operation, and during hydrogen pump operation. The quantitative results show lower membrane water content than previous results suggested.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, Daniel S [NIST; Jacobson, David L [NIST; Arif, Muhammad [NIST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

Grossman, Robert J. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

In-situ continuous water monitoring system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

Grossman, R.J.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced Martensitic Transformation in a CuZnAI Shape Memory Alloy. In Situ Photoelectron Emission Microscopy of a Thermally Induced...

89

In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

90

In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy Density Li-Air Batteries In Situ Characterizations of New Battery Materials and the Studies of High Energy...

91

In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of...

92

Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept M. Crocker, V. Easterling, J. Wang University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research M....

93

NMR bioreactor development for live in-situ microbial functional...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in-situ microbial metabolomics analysis and its complementariness with functional genomics systems biology methods are discussed. Citation: Majors PD, JS Mclean, and JC...

94

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings...

95

In Situ Field Testing of Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

J. Wang

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

Thapa, B.B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype design for construction and test. Significant improvements must be made in fluor-doped fiber performance in order to use the method for in situ monitoring to verify compliance with current EPA drinking water standards. Additional Phase 1 fiber development work should be performed to increase the fluor dopant concentration above 2% until the self-absorption limit is observed. Continued fiber optimization work is expected to improve the sensitivity limits, and will enable application of the detector to verify compliance with the US EPA drinking water standard of 20,000 pico Curies per liter. However, if the need for monitoring higher levels of tritium in water at concentrations greater than 200,000 pico Curies per liter is justified, then prototype development and testing could proceed either as a Phase 2 stand-alone effort or in parallel with continued Phase 1 development work.

J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Dynamic rheology studies of in situ polymerization process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

small-amplitude oscillatory shear experiments for in situ polymerization process of polyacrylamide toughened PAM hydro- gels. G 0 1 � Á and the effective network junction density (N) increased with increased incorporated into PAM hydro- gels by in situ polymerization, and it was found that the C. Zhou :Q. Wu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under Unsaturated Transient Flow Conditions of radioactive wastes at the Hanford site, Washington State. In this study, column experiments were conducted to examine the effect of irrigation schedule on releases of in situ colloids from two Hanford sediments

Perfect, Ed

102

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

pH control with silicates minerals for in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solventsfor in situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stations in Switzerland Electron donor Fermentation not detected or stations in Switzerland What is in situ bioremediation? In situ bioremediation (ISB) is a H2 Acetate CO2PCE, TCE Fermentation Volatile organic compounds in groundwater (Switzerland 2009) Source: OFEV 1 g

105

MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

In situ atomic force microscopy imaging of electroprecipitated nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ atomic force microscopy images of nickel hydrous oxide films electrodeposited on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in alkaline electrolytes have shown that a stepwise oxidation leads to irreversible formation of wide crevices throughout the material. Upon subsequent stepwise reduction, the gaps close leaving a hairline type crack which follows the profile of the crevice. These potential induced structural rearrangements have been attributed to stresses induced by differences in the densities of the nickel hydrous oxide in the two oxidation states. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Chen, R.; Mo, Y.; Scherson, D.A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

Preliminary Results of in-situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point07.06 Agenda 2006Uptake Properties from the

109

Sensitivity of Clear-Sky Diffuse Radiation to In Situ Aerosol Scattering Parameters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating theDepartment

110

Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of In Situ Combustion for Schrader Bluff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is on the results related to evaluation of in situ combustion processes applied to Schrader Bluff. Initially, overall screening processes were applied to determine which of the EOR methods, were most appropriate for Schrader Bluff. In situ combustion was among the methods considered potentially favorable and was evaluated further. Laboratory scale tube runs were conducted to determine if the kinetic parameters for the crude oil were favorable. Additional sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the recovery potential. Described in this report are the results of the (1) initial screening,(2) experimental tube runs, and (3) simulation sensitivity studies as related to in situ combustion in Schrader Bluff.

Sarathi, P.; Strycker, A.; Wang, S.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Aerosol Data Sources and Their Roles within PARAGON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We briefly but systematically review major sources of aerosol data, emphasizing suites of measurements that seem most likely to contribute to assessments of global aerosol climate forcing. The strengths and limitations of existing satellite, surface, and aircraft remote-sensing systems are described, along with those of direct sampling networks and ship-based stations. It is evident that an enormous number of aerosol-related observations have been made, on a wide range of spatial and temporal sampling scales, and that many of the key gaps in this collection of data could be filled by technologies that either exist or are expected in the near future. Emphasis must be given to combining remote sensing, in situ, active and passive observations, and integrating them with aerosol chemical transport models, in order to create a more complete environmental picture having sufficient detail to address current climate-forcing questions. The Progressive Aerosol Retrieval and Assimilation Global Observing Network (PARAGON) initiative would provide an organizational framework to meet this goal.

Kahn, Ralph A.; Ogren, J. A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Bosenberg, Jens; Charlson, Robert J.; Diner, David J.; Holben, B. N.; Menzies, Robert T.; Miller, Mark A.; Seinfeld, John H.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept Understanding the detailed chemistry of Nox Reduction across the combined LNT+SCR system. deer10crocker.pdf More...

117

Control Strategies for Abandoned in situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented elt the TUJelfth Oil Shale Synlposittnz, Golden,for Abandoned In Situ Oil Shale Retorts P. Persoll and ]. P.Water Pollution of Spent Oil Shale Residues, EDB Lea,

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceReactions in Colorado Oil Shale, Lawrence Report UCRL-

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Forsterite Carbonation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

We employed in situ mid-infrared spectroscopy to follow the reaction of a model silicate mineral (forsterite, Mg2SiO4) for 24 hr with wet scCO2 at 50°C and 180 atm, using...

120

High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

In situ soil reclamation by air stripping and sludge uptake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robin L. Autenrieth. A laboratory scale study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of an in-situ soil reclamation technique combining physical and biological processes. The methodology involves soil stripping of volatile... 3. Incineranon 4. Deep Well Injection B. Purpose of Remediation C. Objectives of the study II LlTERATURE REVIEW A. In-situ Techniques 1. Chemical Reactions 2, Biological Treatment 3. Air Stripping . 4. Thermal Treatment B. On...

Carden?osa-Mendoza, Mauricio

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Romania - 30 years of experience in in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Starting with 1963, simultaneous pilot and semi-commercial steam flooding and in situ combustion tests were carried out at Suplacu de Barcau heavy oil field (16{degrees} API). The performance of in situ combustion was by far better and as a result, the entire reservoir was designed to produce by this method, by abandoning the {open_quotes}patterns{close_quotes} concept and introducing the {open_quotes}continuous front{close_quotes} concept. Under primary production, the ultimate recovery factor would have been 9.2%, while an ultimate recovery factor of at least 50% is expected by in situ combustion. In situ combustion was applied on three other major reservoirs: Balaria in 1975, East Videle in 1979, and West Videle in 1980. For those reservoirs, as compared to the average ultimate recovery of about 10% under primary production, an average ultimate recovery of at least 35% is expected by in situ combustion. From an important amount of technological studies and site operations, this paper selects and presents comments and remarks related to the strategy of the field development, the {open_quotes}continuous front{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}patterns{close_quotes} system, production monitoring, difficulties encountered, etc. In situ combustion is economically advantageous if the reservoir is carefully selected and the applied technology is of an adequate quality and suitable for the respective reservoir.

Machedon, V.; Popescu, T.; Paduraru, R. [Research and Design Institute for Oil and Gas, Cimpina (Romania)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

Mccomiskey, Allison

124

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modal aerosol dynamics modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? - The waste generated in the processing of images/photos contains silver. Silver is a toxic heavy metal the product. Propellants are often flammable and/or toxic. Therefore, never store aerosol cans near ignition of this pamphlet. -Carefully transfer the old paint thinner from the one gallon closable can to the 30 gallon metal

Jia, Songtao

128

Aerosol sampling and characterization in the developing US oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol sampling and characterization studies of workplace air were conducted at four demonstration-scale oil shale facilities located in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. These facilities consisted of an underground mining/aboveground retorting facility, two modified in situ retorting facilities with associated underground mining, and a true in situ retorting facility. Emphasis was placed on study of the retorting phase of operation at these facilities. Aerosol samples were collected on filter media by high volume air samplers, low volume portable sampling pumps with or without cyclone pre-separators, and cascade impactors. Samples were analyzed to determine total and respirable dust concentrations, particle size distributions, free silica content, total benzene or cyclohexane extractables, and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Total and respirable dust were observed to range from very low to very high concentrations, with significant free silica content. Measurable levels of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also observed at each of the facilities.

Hargis, K.M.; Tillery, M.I.; Gonzales, M.; Garcia, L.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1123 Laboratory FAX (916) 752-4107 Standard Operating Procedures Technical Information Document TI 201A #12;TI 201.................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.0 Weekly Maintenance ProceduresIMPROVE Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual February 10, 1997 Air Quality Group Crocker Nuclear

Fischer, Emily V.

130

Improving Ion Implanter Productivity with In-situ Cleaning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion source lifetime is generally a critical factor in overall implanter productivity. However, extended ion source life only provides value in a manufacturing environment if the ion beam remains stable. As an ion source ages, apertures and insulators become coated with conductive dopant residues which cause beam instabilities, resulting in implant stoppages. These stoppages create failures and/or assists which are logged in the implanter's data files. Analog Devices has recently evaluated in-situ ion source cleaning based on use of xenon difluoride chemistry. The paper will describe how the in-situ cleaning decreased logged failures/assists, resulting in increased implanter productivity.

Bishop, Steve [ATMI Inc., 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury CT (United States); Perry, Alfred [Analog Devices, 804 Woburn Street, Wilmington, MA (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxides and their tailored structures are at the heart of electrochemical energy storage technologies and advances in understanding and controlling the dynamic behaviors in the complex oxides, particularly at the interfaces, during electrochemical processes will catalyze creative design concepts for new materials with enhanced and better-understood properties. Such knowledge is not accessible without new analytical tools. New innovative experimental techniques are needed for understanding the chemistry and structure of the bulk and interfaces, more importantly how they change with electrochemical processes in situ. Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used extensively to study electrode materials ex situ and is one of the most powerful tools to obtain structural, morphological, and compositional information at nanometer scale by combining imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy, e.g., EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry) and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry (EELS). Determining the composition/structure evolution upon electrochemical cycling at the bulk and interfaces can be addressed by new electron microscopy technique with which one can observe, at the nanometer scale and in situ, the dynamic phenomena in the electrode materials. In electrochemical systems, for instance in a lithium ion battery (LIB), materials operate under conditions that are far from equilibrium, so that the materials studied ex situ may not capture the processes that occur in situ in a working battery. In situ electrochemical operation in the ultra-high vacuum column of a TEM has been pursued by two major strategies. In one strategy, a 'nano-battery' can be fabricated from an all-solid-state thin film battery using a focused ion beam (FIB). The electrolyte is either polymer based or ceramic based without any liquid component. As shown in Fig. 1a, the interfaces between the active electrode material/electrolyte can be clearly observed with TEM imaging, in contrast to the composite electrodes/electrolyte interfaces in conventional lithium ion batteries, depicted in Fig.1b, where quantitative interface characterization is extremely difficult if not impossible. A second strategy involves organic electrolyte, though this approach more closely resembles the actual operation conditions of a LIB, the extreme volatility In Situ Analytical Electron Microscopy for Probing Nanoscale Electrochemistry by Ying Shirley Meng, Thomas McGilvray, Ming-Che Yang, Danijel Gostovic, Feng Wang, Dongli Zeng, Yimei Zhu, and Jason Graetz of the organic electrolytes present significant challenges for designing an in situ cell that is suitable for the vacuum environment of the TEM. Significant progress has been made in the past few years on the development of in situ electron microscopy for probing nanoscale electrochemistry. In 2008, Brazier et al. reported the first cross-section observation of an all solid-state lithium ion nano-battery by TEM. In this study the FIB was used to make a 'nano-battery,' from an all solid-state battery prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In situ TEM observations were not possible at that time due to several key challenges such as the lack of a suitable biasing sample holder and vacuum transfer of sample. In 2010, Yamamoto et al. successfully observed changes of electric potential in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery in situ with electron holography (EH). The 2D potential distribution resulting from movement of lithium ions near the positive-electrode/electrolyte interface was quantified. More recently Huang et al. and Wang et al. reported the in situ observations of the electrochemical lithiation of a single SnO{sub 2} nanowire electrode in two different in situ setups. In their approach, a vacuum compatible ionic liquid is used as the electrolyte, eliminating the need for complicated membrane sealing to prevent the evaporation of carbonate based organic electrolyte into the TEM column. One main limitation of this approach is that EELS spectral imaging is not possible due to the high plasmon signal of the ionic li

Graetz J.; Meng, Y.S.; McGilvray, T.; Yang, M.-C.; Gostovic, D.; Wang, F.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst] [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as follows. Over a period of several weeks, electrical energy is introduced to the contaminated soil usingChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei Lapin and Rex Westbrook 1.1 Background Recently, a method for removing contaminants from soil (several

Lapin, Sergey

136

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

Van Swygenhoven, Helena, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch; Van Petegem, Steven

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Field Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 7 · Linear Potentiometer Fixture ­ Welded steel frame ­ Designed for flexible positioning ­ BoltedField Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie and Fastener Behavior Justin Grassé, David Lange 2012 Joint Rail Conference Philadelphia, PA 17-19 April 2012 #12;Field Testing

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

139

In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations OG&E Ground Source Heat Exchange Study Richard are connected to ground source heat pumps to cool and heat homes. The TRT study is the first part of a larger exchanges heat with the surrounding soil or rock. The double U-tube layout (Figure 2) is connected so

140

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

In-situ physical properties measurements using crosswell acoustic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crosswell acoustic surveys enable the in-situ measurements of elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, porosity, and apparent seismic Q of gas-bearing low-permeability formations represented at the Department of Energy Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) site near Rifle, Colorado. These measurements, except for Q, are compared with laboratory measurements on core taken from the same depths at which the crosswell measurements are made. Seismic Q determined in situ is compared to average values for sandstone. Porosity was determined from crosswell data using the empirical relationship between acoustic velocity, porosity, and effective pressure developed by Domenico. Domenico, S.N., ''Rock Lithology and Porosity Determination from Shear and compressional Wave Velocity,'' Geophysics, Vol. 49, No. 9, Aug. 1984, pp. 1188-1195. In-situ porosities are significantly greater than the core-derived values. Sources of the discrepancy may arise from (i) the underestimation of porosity that can result when Boyle's Law measurements are made on low-permeability core and (ii) the application of Dominico's relationship, which is developed for clean sands, to the mixed sandstone and shale lithologies represented at the MWX site. Values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio derived from crosswell measurements are comparable to values obtained from core. Apparent seismic Q measured in situ between wells is lower than Q measured on core and clearly shows the heterogeneity of sandstone deposited in a fluvial environment. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, P.A.; Albright, J.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Autocatalytic models describing ruminal in situ digestion J Van Milgen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autocatalytic models describing ruminal in situ digestion J Van Milgen INRA, Station de Recherche sur la Nutrition des Herbivores, Theix, 63122 Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France Digestion of particulate avail- ability. Although microbes can be considered the cause of digestion, they are also the result

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

143

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

144

5, 79658026, 2005 Simulating aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and sizeACPD 5, 7965­8026, 2005 Simulating aerosol microphysics with ECHAM/MADE A. Lauer et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Aerosol engineering: design and stability of aerosol reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study of the performance of aerosol reactors is presented. The goals of this study are (1) to identify the appropriate reactor types (batch, CSTR, and tubular) for production of aerosol with specific properties (for example, uniform size particles, high aerosol surface area, etc.) and (2) to investigate the effect of various process parameters on product aerosol characteristics and on the stability of operation of aerosol reactors. In all the reactors considered, the aerosol dynamics were detemined by chemical reaction, nucleation, and aerosol growth in the free molecule regime in the absence of coagulation at isothermal conditions. Formulation of the aerosol dynamics in terms of moments of the aerosol size distribution facilitated the numerical solution of the resulting systems of ordinary or partial differential equations. The stability characteristics of a continuous stirred tank aerosol reactor (CSTAR) were investigated since experimental data in the literature indicate that under certain conditions this reactor exhibits oscillatory behavior with respect to product aerosol concentration and size distribution.

Pratsinis, S.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A model simulation of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. The authors` model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO{sub 2} emissions. The large amounts of SO{sub 2} (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reached their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 {mu}m approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion. 57 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Zhao, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turco, R.P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Toon, O.B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office R&D Pathways: In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis The in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis pathway involves rapidly heating biomass with a catalyst to create bio-oils,...

149

In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR...

150

Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on Laboratory Column Test Data. Development of a Field Design for In Situ Gaseous Treatment of Sediment Based on...

151

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC ReportOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

153

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERCOf Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Water B.A. Ossio, J.P.

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned in-situ oil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

...33 10. In-situ shale-oil resources of some world oil-shale deposits... in 33 countries are estimated at 409 billion tons of in-situ shale oil,...

155

Experimental Study of In Situ Combustion with Tetralin and Metallic Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental studies showed the feasibility of adding metallic catalysts and tetralin for the upgrade and increased recovery of heavy oil during the in situ combustion process. Further experimental studies also showed the applicability of in situ...

Palmer-Ikuku, Emuobonuvie

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

In situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composites were fabricated. • The transformation temperature was affected by the mixing Ti:Ni atomic ratios. • The NiTi component became micron-scale lamella after forging and rolling. • The composite exhibited high strength and high damping capacity. - Abstract: This paper reports on the creation of a series of in situ NiTi/Nb(Ti) composites with controllable transformation temperatures based on the pseudo-binary hypereutectic transformation of NiTi–Nb system. The composite constituent morphology was controlled by forging and rolling. It is found that the thickness of the NiTi lamella in the composite reached micron level after the hot-forging and cold-rolling. The NiTi/Nb(Ti) composite exhibited high damping capacity as well as high yield strength.

Jiang, Daqiang, E-mail: dq80jiang@126.com; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Jiang; Zheng, Yanjun

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruńa, Héctor D; Muller, David A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Heavy oil recovery by in-situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy-oil fields contain considerable reserves which have hardly been exploited to date. One of the techniques well suited for the recovery of these resources is in situ combustion. The research done is illustrated by the laboratory and field results obtained for the Romanian fields of Suplacu de Barcau and Balaria. Production by in situ combustion is in the industrial stage at Suplacu de Barcau, and the combustion project at Balaria is being expanded. The performances of these tests are given in the form of the amounts of air injected and oil produced as well as their ratio (AOR), the amount of gas produced and the composition of this gas. These production data coupled with various measurements (temperature in the production wells, thickness burned, etc.) can be used to follow the process and to control it. Their interpretation also is useful for evaluating sweep efficiency and recovery. 14 references.

Gadelle, C.P.; Burger, J.G.; Bardon, C.; Machedon, V.; Carcoana, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

In situ electrochemical dilatometry of carbide-derived carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 , which could be described with pore swelling.

Hantel, M M [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

In-situ Electrochemical Dilatometry of Carbide-derived Carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Ć. Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 Ć, which could be described with pore swelling.

Hantel, M. M.; Presser, V.; Kotz, R.; Gogotsi, Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE cost-shared in situ combustion projects revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its enhanced oil recovery (EOR) program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations sponsored several cost-shared in situ combustion projects in the 1960s and 1970s. The goal of these projects was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of in situ combustion as a thermal oil recovery technique and provide information in the public domain as a means of reducing the risks associated with these high cost ventures. This study reviewed specific features of the cost-shared demonstration and experimental projects, and examined the causes that led to their success or failure. The failed projects were compared with the successful projects under similar settings to further document why these projects failed. The lessons learned were detailed.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Final report: In situ radio frequency heating demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ radio frequency heating was performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the US Department of Energy-Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration. The objective of the demonstration was to investigate the effectiveness of in situ radio frequency (RF) heating as an enhancement to vacuum extraction of residual solvents (primarily trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene) held in vadose zone clay deposits. Conventional soil vacuum extraction techniques are mass transfer limited because of the low permeabilities of the clays. By selectively heating the clays to temperatures at or above 100{degrees}C, the release or transport of the solvent vapors will be enhanced as a result of several factors including an increase in the contaminant vapor pressure and diffusivity and an increase in the effective permeability of the formation with the release of water vapor.

Jarosch, T.R.; Beleski, R.J.; Faust, D.

1994-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of microstructure anisotropy on the deformation of MAX polycrystals studied by in-situ compression combined with neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ compression tests combined with neutron diffraction were performed on Ti{sub 2}AlN MAX polycrystals with lamellar anisotropic microstructure: the diffraction peak evolution (position and profile) with applied stress reveals that lamellar grains parallel to compression axis remain elastic while lamellar grains perpendicular to compression plastify, both families being subjected to strong variations of heterogeneous strains (types II and III). We demonstrate that this behavior originates from the complex response of the very anisotropic lamellar microstructure and explains the observation of reversible hysteretic loops when cycling MAX polycrystals even in the elastic regime.

Guitton, A.; Joulain, A.; Thilly, L., E-mail: ludovic.thilly@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, 86962 Futuroscope (France); Van Petegem, S.; Tromas, C.; Van Swygenhoven, H. [Materials Science and Simulations, NUM/ASQ, CH5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electrostatics and radioactive aerosol behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive aerosols differ from their nonradioactive counterparts by their ability to charge themselves by emitting charged particles during the radioactive decay process. Evidence that electrostatics, including this charging process, can affect the transport of the aerosols was summarized previously. Charge distributions and the mean charge for a monodisperse radioactive aerosol have been considered in detail. The principal results of theory to calculate charge distributions on a aerosol with a size distribution, changes to Brownian coagulation rates for an aerosol in a reactor containment, and possible changes to aerosol deposition resulting from the charging will be presented. The main purpose of the work has been to improve calculations of aerosol behavior in reactor containments, but behavior in less ionizing environments will be affected more strongly, and some problems remain to be solved in performing reliable calculations.

Clement, C.F.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microcantilever Sensors for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time, in-situ analysis is critical for decision makers in environmental monitoring, but current techniques for monitoring and characterizing radionuclides rely primarily on liquid scintillation counting, ICP-MS, and spectrofluorimetry, which require sample handling and labor intensive lengthy analytical procedures. Other problems that accompany direct sampling include adherence to strict holding times and record maintenance for QA/QC procedures. Remote, automated sensing with direct connection to automated data management is preferred.

Thundat, Thomas G.; Zhiyu Hu; Brown, Gilbert M.; Baohua Gu

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Plasmas du systme solaire: complexit et diagnostic in situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasmas du systÚme solaire: complexité et diagnostic in situ Nicole Meyer-Vernet Observatoire de Paris nicole.meyer@obspm.fr http://calys.obspm.fr/~meyer journée Plasmas à l'UPMC 21 Novembre 2005 Plasmas du systÚme solaire : formation 10 6 K 5800 K Couronne solaireCouronne solaire (détail) TRACE - Nov

Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

167

Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

aerosols and climate : uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

172

In situ stabilized carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites Jiahua Zhu,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanofibers (CNFs) suspended epoxy resin nanocomposites and the corresponding polymer nanocompositesIn situ stabilized carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites Jiahua Zhu,a Suying Wei in situ react with epoxy monomers. This in situ reaction favors the CNFs dispersion and improves

Guo, John Zhanhu

173

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-situ upgrading of oil using hydrogen donors is a new process. In particular, very little research has been conducted with respect to in-situ oil upgrading using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion. Several papers describe the use of metal...

Huseynzade, Samir

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Two-level, horizontal free face mining system for in situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for forming an in-situ oil shale retort within a retort site in a subterranean formation containing oil shale, such an in-situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed within upper, lower and side boundaries of an in-situ oil shale retort site.

Cha, C.Y.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT Interpreting scattered in-situ produced cosmogenic nuclide depth-profile data1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bourlès 4 , L. Benedetti 4 ,4 H. Nazari 5 , M. Foroutan 1,2,5 5 6 7 1- UPMC Univ Paris 06, ISTEP, UMR 7193

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Ab initio structure search and in situ 7Li NMR studies of discharge products in the Li-S battery system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of discharge and most of the intermediate polysulfides are retained inside the cathode matrix.8 Lowe et al. also used in situ XRD and coupled it with absorption spectroscopy to show that a limited number of polysulfide intermediates are involved... to correctly describe the system, which includes the activity of the solvent. However, the suggested discharge profile for a pure solid-state cathode (Figure 1c) could explain the mechanisms observed for Li?S batteries that utilize ceramic and even polymer...

See, Kimberly A.; Leskes, Michal; Griffin, John M.; Britto, Sylvia; Matthews, Peter D.; Emly, Alexandra; Van der Ven, Anton; Wright, Dominic S.; Morris, Andrew J.; Grey, Clare P.; Seshadri, Ram

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Experimental study of nuclear workplace aerosol samplers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW Aerosol Losses in an Inlet . Aerosol Losses in a Transport System Aerosol Losses in CAMs Critical Flow Venturi 8 13 15 16 EXPERIMENT PROCEDURE 18 CAM Evaluation Consideration FAS Evaluation Consideration Test Protocol Mixing... Chamber Setup High Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Low Speed Aerosol Wind Tunnel Setup Critical Flow Venturi 18 19 21 22 24 25 27 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Page 28 Aerosol Penetration through Transport Systems and CAM Areal Uniformity Deposits...

Parulian, Antony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

Technology status report: In situ vitrification applied to buried wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a technical status report on In Situ Vitrification (ISV) as applied to buried waste; the report takes both technical and institutional concerns into perspective. The ISV process involves electrically melting such contaminated solid media as soil, sediment, sludge, and mill tailings. The resultant product is a high-quality glass-and-crystalline waste form that possesses high resistance to corrosion and leaching and is capable of long-term environmental exposure without significant degradation. The process also significantly reduces the volume of the treated solid media due to the removal of pore spaces in the soil.

Thompson, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bates, S.O. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansen, J.E. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

In Situ Study of Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) Formation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planning experimentalPetroleumornl.govIn Situ

184

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219ImprovementsImprovingInIn Situ

185

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

Influence of sky radiance measurement errors on inversion-retrieved aerosol properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote sensing of the atmospheric aerosol is a well-established technique that is currently used for routine monitoring of this atmospheric component, both from ground-based and satellite. The AERONET program, initiated in the 90's, is the most extended network and the data provided are currently used by a wide community of users for aerosol characterization, satellite and model validation and synergetic use with other instrumentation (lidar, in-situ, etc.). Aerosol properties are derived within the network from measurements made by ground-based Sun-sky scanning radiometers. Sky radiances are acquired in two geometries: almucantar and principal plane. Discrepancies in the products obtained following both geometries have been observed and the main aim of this work is to determine if they could be justified by measurement errors. Three systematic errors have been analyzed in order to quantify the effects on the inversion-derived aerosol properties: calibration, pointing accuracy and finite field of view. Simulations have shown that typical uncertainty in the analyzed quantities (5% in calibration, 0.2 Degree-Sign in pointing and 1.2 Degree-Sign field of view) yields to errors in the retrieved parameters that vary depending on the aerosol type and geometry. While calibration and pointing errors have relevant impact on the products, the finite field of view does not produce notable differences.

Torres, B.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Bennouna, Y. S.; Fuertes, D.; Gonzalez, R.; Frutos, A. M. de [Atmospheric Optics Group (GOA), University of Valladolid, Valladolid (Spain); Berjon, A. J. [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Meteorological State Agency of Spain (AEMET), Sta. Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Dubovik, O.; Goloub, P.; Podvin, T.; Blarel, L. [Laboratory of Atmospheric Optics, Universite Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

188

Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

189

In Situ Community Control of the Stability of Bioreduced Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-well sediment incubators Direct estimation of reoxidation rates is difficult under field conditions. We have designed and are fabricating in-well sediment incubators for use in conducting a series of in situ experiments that will enable direct measurement of U(IV) removal rates from pre-reduced sediments with specific microbial and mineralogic amendments. By comparing U(IV) loss rates with different DIRB and SRB populations we will be able to clearly determine the relative impact of sulfate reducers vs. Fe reducers. The approach we propose also makes it possible to assess actual in situ conditions during the experiment and to directly observe reoxidation (or bioreduction) end points after the field experiment is completed without drilling. Finally, the production of in-well sediment incubators is relatively inexpensive and could ultimately become an alternative to field-scale electron donor amendment experiments as a means of assessing site response to bioremediation and long-term stability of both biostimulated and naturally bioattenuated sites.

White, David C.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Chemically assisted in situ recovery of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the research project was to investigate the feasibility of the chemically assisted in situ retort method for recovering shale oil from Colorado oil shale. The chemically assisted in situ procedure uses hydrogen chloride (HCl), steam (H{sub 2}O), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at moderate pressure to recovery shale oil from Colorado oil shale at temperatures substantially lower than those required for the thermal decomposition of kerogen. The process had been previously examined under static, reaction-equilibrium conditions, and had been shown to achieve significant shale oil recoveries from powdered oil shale. The purpose of this research project was to determine if these results were applicable to a dynamic experiment, and achieve penetration into and recovery of shale oil from solid oil shale. Much was learned about how to perform these experiments. Corrosion, chemical stability, and temperature stability problems were discovered and overcome. Engineering and design problems were discovered and overcome. High recovery (90% of estimated Fischer Assay) was observed in one experiment. Significant recovery (30% of estimated Fischer Assay) was also observed in another experiment. Minor amounts of freed organics were observed in two more experiments. Penetration and breakthrough of solid cores was observed in six experiments.

Ramierz, W.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

PARAGON - An Integrated Approach for Characterizing Aerosol Climate Impacts and Environmental Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosols exert myriad influences on the Earth?s environment and climate and on human health. The complexity of aerosol-related processes requires that information gathered to improve our understanding of climate change must originate from multiple sources, and that effective strategies for data integration need to be established. Currently, the aerosol community lacks the necessary tools and infrastructure to reap maximum scientific benefit from a vast array of observed and modeled data. Spatial and temporal sampling differences among a diverse set of sensors, nonuniform data qualities, aerosol mesoscale variabilities, and difficulties in separating cloud effects are some of the challenges that need to be addressed. A sustained, long-term program also requires maintaining consistently well-understood accuracies as measurement approaches evolve and improve. Achieving a comprehensive understanding of how aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative processes impact the Earth system can only be achieved through a multidisciplinary, interagency, and international initiative capable of dealing with these issues. A systematic approach, capitalizing on modern measurement and modeling techniques, geospatial statistics methodologies, and high-performance information technologies can provide the necessary machinery to support this objective. We outline a framework for integrating and interpreting observations and models and establishing an accurate, consistent and cohesive long-term record, following a strategy whereby information and tools of progressively greater sophistication are incorporated as problems of increasing complexity are tackled. This concept is named the Progressive Aerosol Retrieval and Assimilation Global Observing Network (PARAGON). To encompass the breadth of effort required, we present a set of recommendations dealing with data interoperability, integration, synergy, summarization and mining, model evaluation, calibration and validation, augmentation of surface and in situ measurements, advances in passive and active remote sensing, and design of satellite missions. Without an initiative of this nature, the scientific and policy communities will continue to struggle with understanding the quantitative impact of complex aerosol processes on regional and global climate change and air quality.

Diner, David J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Bosenberg, Jens; Braverman, Amy J.; Charlson, Robert J.; Collins, William D.; Davies, Roger; Holben, B. N.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Martonchik, John V.; Menzies, Robert T.; Miller, Mark A.; Ogren, J. A.; Penner, Joyce E.; Rasch, P; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Torres, Omar; Travis, Larry D.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Yu, Bin

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Spectro-Microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (June 27-29, 2010), when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter) increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30%) was larger than at the CARES urban site (10%) and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro-microscopic measurements will allow for a comprehensive evaluation of aerosol process models used in climate research.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Rodel, Tobias; Kelly, Stephen T.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Carroll, Gregory; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

6, 75197562, 2006 Simulating aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particle number concentration and aerosol size-distribution. The model takes into account sulfate (SO4. This model system enables explicit simulations of the particle number concentration and size-distribution of aerosol dynamical processes (nucleation, condensation, coagulation) is evaluated by comparison

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. (Royal Free Hospital, London (England))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Nearby Supernova Factory Ozone + Aerosol + Rayleigh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rayleigh + Aerosol Extinction monitor filter Auxiliary Camera CCD Spectrograph picko ff mirror Umbra

198

In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

In situ formation of phosphate barriers in soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactive barriers and methods for making reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil ontaminants including actinides and heavy metals. The barrier includes phosphate, and techniques are disclosed for forming specifically apatite barriers. The method includes injecting dilute reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source such as a waste drum to achieve complete or partial encapsulation of the waste. Controlled temperature and pH facilitates rapid formation of apatite, for example, where dilute aqueous calcium chloride and dilute aqueous sodium phosphate are the selected reagents. Mixing of reagents to form precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline, diesel, and jet range blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

In situ combustion - from pilot to commercial application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, there are at least 14 active commercial in-situ combustion (ISC) projects worldwide. A review of these projects is carried out in order to emphasize the important factors which contributed to the success of the processes. The success of the developing an ISC pilot into a commercial ISC project is strongly connected with two factors: (a) starting the operation from the uppermost part of the structure and extending the process downwards and (b) application of the line drive well configuration instead of patterns, whenever is possible. An effective, peripheral line drive operation requires pool utilization. The most challenging phase towards commercialization of an ISC project is the field pilot design, implementation and evaluation. This paper is focused on the advantages of locating ISC pilot at the upper zone of the reservoir, due to the need for a full scale integration of the pilot with the subsequent semi- and commercial development of the process.

Turta, A. [Petroleum Recovery Institute, Alberta (Canada)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Conditions of realization of superwet in-situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In in-situ combustion adding water to the air considerably improves the characteristics of the process: the combustible fuel concentration is reduced, the steam plateau ahead of the combustion front increases, less oxidizer is required to displace the oil, and the thermal wave has a higher propagation velocity. In wet combustion the temperature in the combustion zone reaches approx. 500/sup 0/C. In superwet combustion it depends on the reservoir pressure and may be 200-300/sup 0/C. It is not known in advance whether the heat of combustion will suffice to sustain the thermal wave, and if it does suffice, what will be the maximum values of the water-air ratio for the process. This paper attempts to construct a mathematical model of the superwet combustion process.

Bokserman, A.A.; Stepanov, V.P.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA); Zhao, Hequan (State College, PA)

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYLACTIC ACID COLLOIDS FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater contamination is a widespread problem. As human activities generate chemical wastes, we seek quick, yet not always environmentally friendly, ways to dispose of them. Often, chemicals are dumped into waste containers and buried. Unfortunately, these chemicals may spill or leak, seep deeper into the ground, and eventually reach groundwater. Chlorinated organic solvents such as trichloroethene, tetrachloroethane, and chloroform are common contaminants in groundwater [1]. These solvents originate from chemical spills, tank leaks, and waste disposal practices [2]. Such contaminants are harmful to humans, and need to be removed to restore clean groundwater. There are two types of methods to clean chemically contaminated soil and groundwater: ex situ and in situ. Both types have advantages and disadvantages. In situ remediation avoids the cost of removing the contaminated material and has a lower risk of worker exposure to the contaminants. One in situ technique that shows promise is remediation, which uses microorganisms to anaerobically degrade contaminants. In bioremediation in situ, the microorganisms that are already present in the ground utilize nutrients that are injected into the ground to metabolize the contaminants into nonhazardous materials. The nutrients serve as a carbon source for the microbes. Though this method has been used with some success, there have been problems with too rapid release of nutrients to the microbes. In these cases, the microbes multiplied too rapidly and caused biofouling. This can occur when the nutrient content of the bioremediation solution is too high, as when lactate or lactic acid is the nutrient. Lactic acid is typically produced in carbohydrate matter by fermentation, and is used mainly in the food and pharmaceutical industries [3]. Because it has been found difficult to uniformly distribute lactate solutions in a contaminated area due to biofouling, it was suggested that polylactic acid, in colloidal form, be used instead. Polylactic acid (PLA) is a polymer of lactic acid, C3H6O3 [3]. PLA is used in medicine and agriculture. In medicine, PLA is used in sutures because it degrades within the body after the incision has healed. In agriculture, PLA is used in combination with polyglycolic acid for the release of chemicals [4]. We expect PLA to degrade in the ground at a rate that allows bioremediation to occur as intended. Currently, bioremediation of chlorinated solvents involves injecting nutrient containing solvents into the ground to induce the expected activity of the microbes. The solution must have a proper amount of nutrients for the microbes to metabolize so that they can continue to degrade the contaminants. If too much nutrient is available, and the microbes multiply too fast and clog the injection point, the solution may not reach the area where the contaminants are. One way to slowly release the nutrients for bioremediation is to package them as colloids. Colloids are particles that are less than one micrometer in size, with surface chemical properties that allow them to remain suspended in water and, therefore, to travel with water. Our research addresses the problem of packaging nutrients as colloids to support bioremediation.

Ashley N. Westbrook

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

In situ vitrification model development and implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Analysis Package being developed at the INEL to provide analytical support for (ISV) safety analysis and treatment performance predictions. Mathematical models and features which comprise this analysis package are presented and the proposed approach to model development and implementation is outlined. The objective of this document is two fold: to define preliminary design information and modeling objectives so that ISV modeling personnel can effectively modify existing models and formulate new models which are consistent with the objectives of the ISV treatability study and to provide sufficient technical information for internal and external reviewers to detect any shortcomings in model development and implementation plans. 27 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.; Hagrman, D.L.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Apparatus for in situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled.

Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham Jr., Samuel

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered… (more)

Wei, Guanghua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced in-situ techniques Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulations Summary: In-Situ Processing and Visualization for Ultrascale Simulations Kwan-Liu Ma, Chaoli Wang, Hongfeng... -scale data problem is to reduce or transform the data...

216

In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High...

217

CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER BY ORGANIC POLLUTANTS LEACHED FROM IN-SITU SPENT SHALE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF FIGURES Areal extent of oil shale deposits in the Greencommercial in~·situ oil shale facility. Possible alternativefor pyrolysis of oil shale Figure 7. Establishment of

Amy, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir`s oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir's oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

In-situ scanning probe microscopy of electrodeposited nickel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance characteristics and material properties such as stress, microstructure, and composition of nickel coatings and electroformed components can be controlled over a wide range by the addition of small amounts of surface-active compounds to the electroplating bath. Saccharin is one compound that is widely utilized for its ability to reduce tensile stress and refine grain size in electrodeposited nickel. While the effects of saccharin on nickel electrodeposition have been studied by many authors in the past, there is still uncertainty over saccharin's mechanisms of incorporation, stress reduction, and grain refinement. In-situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a tool that can be used to directly image the nucleation and growth of thin nickel films at nanometer length scales to help elucidate saccharin's role in the development and evolution of grain structure. In this study, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques are used to investigate the effects of saccharin on the morphological evolution of thin nickel films. By observing mono-atomic height nickel island growth with and without saccharin present we conclude that saccharin has little effect on the nickel surface mobility during deposition at low overpotentials where the growth occurs in a layer-by-layer mode. Saccharin was imaged on Au(l11) terraces as condensed patches without resolved packing structure. AFM measurements of the roughness evolution of nickel films up to 1200 nm thick on polycrystalline gold indicate that saccharin initially increases the roughness and surface skewness of the deposit that at greater thickness becomes smoother than films deposited without saccharin. Faceting of the deposit morphology decreases as saccharin concentration increases even for the thinnest films that have 3-D growth.

Kelly, James J.; Dibble, Dean C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

aerosol particles collected: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saller 2002-05-07 6 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles Materials Science Websites Summary: being clouds...

222

Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 2: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

223

Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 1: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

224

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profile Value-Added Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at cloud base is the most relevant measure of the aerosol that influences droplet formation in clouds. Since the CCN concentration depends on supersaturation, a more general measure of the CCN concentration is the CCN spectrum (values at multiple supersaturations). The CCN spectrum is now measured at the surface at several fixed ARM sites and by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), but is not measured at the cloud base. Rather than rely on expensive aircraft measurements for all studies of aerosol effects on clouds, a way to project CCN measurements at the surface to cloud base is needed. Remote sensing of aerosol extinction provides information about the vertical profile of the aerosol, but cannot be directly related to the CCN concentration because the aerosol extinction is strongly influenced by humidification, particularly near cloud base. Ghan and Collins (2004) and Ghan et al. (2006) propose a method to remove the influence of humidification from the extinction profiles and tie the “dry extinction” retrieval to the surface CCN concentration, thus estimating the CCN profile. This methodology has been implemented as the CCN Profile (CCNPROF) value-added product (VAP).

McFarlane, S; Sivaraman, C; Ghan, S

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

In situ measurements of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial distributions of DDT and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, were measured in the winter and summer of 1997 using an in situ sampling method. The concentrations of DDTs ranged from 0.6 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 1.14 ng/L at eight sampling stations. The spatial distribution patterns of DDTs and PCBs as well as the DDT/PCB concentration ratio in the water column were similar to those found in the sediment, and the vertical profiles of DDTs and PCBs at both sampling seasons exponentially decreased with increasing distance from the sea floor. In addition, the partitioning characteristics of DDTs and selected PCB congeners indicated a tendency of mobilization from sediment to water. All of these findings strongly suggest that contaminated sediments are a main source of DDT and PCB inputs to the water column surrounding the study site.

Zeng, E.Y.; Yu, C.C.; Tran, K. [Southern California Coastal Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)] [Southern California Coastal Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

227

Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Comparison of temperature and humidity profiles with elastic-backscatter lidar data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution analyzes elastic-backscatter lidar data and temperature and humidity profiles from radiosondes acquired in Barcelona in July 1992. Elastic-backscatter lidar data reveal the distribution of aerosols within the volume of atmosphere scanned. By comparing this information with temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere at a similar time, we are able to asses de relationship among aerosol distribution and atmospheric stability or water content, respectively. Comparisons have shown how lidar`s revealed layers of aerosols correspond to atmospheric layers with different stability condition and water content.

Soriano, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Buttler, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Baldasano, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization Sanja Tepavcevic, Seth B-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. 1. Introduction Hybrid solar cells have been developed

Sibener, Steven

230

Upgrading and enhanced recovery of Jobo heavy oil using hydrogen donor under in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A... UPGRADING AND ENHANCED RECOVERY OF JOBO HEAVY OIL USING HYDROGEN DONOR UNDER IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by SAMIR HUSEYNZADE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Huseynzade, Samir

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gas injection to inhibit migration during an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of treating a subsurface formation are described herein. Methods for treating a subsurface treatment area in a formation may include introducing a fluid into the formation from a plurality of wells offset from a treatment area of an in situ heat treatment process to inhibit outward migration of formation fluid from the in situ heat treatment process.

Kuhlman, Myron Ira (Houston, TX); Vinegar; Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Baker, Ralph Sterman (Fitchburg, MA); Heron, Goren (Keene, CA)

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility Jrmy. Nosa,1, 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heterogeneous modeling of the uranium in situ recovery: Kinetic versus solubility control Jérémy Mines, Tour AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense Cedex, France The uranium in situ, into the deposit to selectively dissolve uranium. The solution enriched in uranium is pumped out and processed

Boyer, Edmond

233

Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling by Moe Kyaw Thu, Takatoshi Ito, Weiren Lin, Mai-Linh Doan, David Tobindoi:10.2204/iodp.sd.13.06.2011 Progress Reports Introduction Scientific ocean drilling's first in situ

234

In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ formation of cosmogenic 14 C by cosmic ray nucleons in polar ice Aleksandr Nesterenok 2011 Available online 8 October 2011 Keywords: Cosmic rays Polar ice Radiocarbon In situ production a b s t r a c t We study interactions of cosmic ray particles with the Earth's atmosphere and polar ice

235

Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

236

Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion Authors Abu believed to cause fuel formation for in-situ combustion have been studied and modeled. A thin, packed bed the approach of a combustion front. Analysis of gases produced from the reaction cell revealed that pyrolysis

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

237

Preparation of ferric-sulfide-based catalysts using an aerosol technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron sulfides are used as catalysts for direct coal liquefaction. They are reasonably active, cheap, and environmentally benign. This permits their use as once-through, non-regenerated catalysts. Our work in this area is based on the products of disproportionation of ferric sulfide, produced in sufficiently small particle sizes. The small particle sizes have been produced by in-situ impregnation or by using an aerosol reactor. This talk will concentrate on the aerosol process. The resulting particles have been characterized and used as catalysts for coal liquefaction. The effects of precursor solution concentration and the pressure and temperature in the aerosol reactor on the performance of the catalysts have been noted. We have recently investigated the effect of adding small amounts of a second metal to the catalyst. Multi-metal catalysts prepared to date with the aerosol technique include Fe-Cu-S and Fe-Zn-S, each with 10% additive, and Fe-Cu-Zn-S, with 10% Cu and 5% Zn.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Stinespring, C.D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance, Germany 2 Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

239

AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

SCHWARTZ, S.E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The engineering properties of CASS made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that are difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of wave interactions with the microstructure. To address the inspection needs, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious effects of the coarse-grained microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam will require knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detecting flaws. The goal of improving the reliability and effectiveness of ultrasonic inspection of CASS specimens can therefore potentially be achieved by first characterizing the microstructure of the component. The characterization of CASS microstructure must be done in-situ, to enable dynamic selection and optimization of the ultrasonic inspection technique. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two consistent microstructures-equiaxed-grain material and columnar-grain material.

Anderson, Michael T.; Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Mathews, Royce; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roberts, Kamandi C.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) was commonly used in selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems for corrosion resistance and enhanced durability in service. CASS materials are generally coarse-grained and elastically anisotropic in nature, and are consequently difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of ultrasonic wave interactions with the coarse-grain microstructures. To address the inspection needs for these materials, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being developed. However, to enhance the probability of detecting flaws, knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material may be required. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic backscatter measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date from laboratory experiments demonstrate the potential of these measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two homogeneous microstructures—equiaxed-grain material or columnar-grain material. Measurements on mixed or banded microstructures also show correlation with the estimated volume-fraction of columnar grains in the material. However, several operational issues will need to be addressed prior to applying this method for in-situ characterization of CASS microstructure.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Watson, Bruce E.; Mathews, Royce; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

Hershcovitch, A; Brennan, J M; Chawla, A; Fischer, W; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W; Todd, R; Custer, A; Erickson, M; Jamshidi, N; Kobrin, P; Laping, R; Poole, H J; Jimenez, J M; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Yin-Vallgren, C; Sochugov, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The UFA technology for characterization of in situ barrier materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site characterizations, choices of remedial strategies for site restoration, and performance assessments of chosen strategies all require knowledge of the transport properties for subsurface materials, such as hydraulic conductivities, diffusion coefficients, sorption properties, and in situ recharge rates. Unsaturated conditions in the vadose zone are especially difficult to investigate because of the extreme variability in the transport properties of geologic materials as a function of water content. A new technique, the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA), was developed to rapidly attain hydraulic steady-state in all porous/fractured media, including multicomponent/multiphase systems. The larger driving forces obtainable with centrifugation techniques are combined with precision fluid flow through a rotating seal. Hydraulic steady state is achieved in a period of hours to days, instead of months to years, depending on the target water content and intrinsic permeability of the material. Barrier materials such as bentonite slurries, chemical barriers, cements, and asphalt concretes can be rapidly run in the UFA prior to emplacement to fine-tune formulations and identify any site-specific or substrate-specific problems that could not be identified without actual field testing.

Wright, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ. Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method for in-situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled. A method of removing carbon contaminants from a substrate surface that is housed within a vacuum chamber is also disclosed. The method employs activated gaseous species that react with the carbon contaminants to form carbon containing gaseous byproducts.

Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham Jr., Samuel

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

In-situ coal-gasification data look promising  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to a report given at the 6th Underground Coal Conversion Symposium (Afton, Oklahoma 1980), the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal-gasification experiments Oil Gas J. 77 sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Gas Research Institute and directed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory demonstrated the feasibility of in-situ coal conversion and featured the use of a directionally drilled channel to connect the injection and production wells rather than the reverse-burn ordinarily used to produce the connecting channel. In the test, 2816 cu m of coal weighing (APPROX) 4200 tons was consumed, with (APPROX) 18% of the product gas escaping through the overburden or elsewhere. When air injection was used, the average heating value was 217 Btu/std cu ft. The average thermal efficiency of the burn was 65%, and the average gas composition was 35% hydrogen, 5% methane, 11% carbon monoxide, and 44% carbon dioxide. Subsidence occurred after completion of the test. The Uniwell gasification method, scheduled for use in the final experiment in the Deep-1 series of underground coal-gasification tests in Wyoming, seeks to prevent subsidence by use of concentric pipes which are inserted into the vertical well to control the combustion zone. Underground coal-gasification prospects and the mechanics of subsidence are discussed.

Not Available

1980-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

In situ repair of a failed compression fitting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitting is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

Wolbert, R.R.; Jandrasits, W.G.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

In situ repair of a failed compression fitting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitg is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

Wolbert, Ronald R. (McKees Rocks, PA); Jandrasits, Walter G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method for in situ biological conversion of coal to methane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for the in situ biological conversion of coal to methane comprising culturing on a coal-containing substrate a consortium of microorganisms capable of degrading the coal into methane under suitable conditions. This consortium of microorganisms can be obtained from an underground cavity such as an abandoned mine which underwent a change from being supplied with sewage to where no sewage was present, since these conditions have favored the development of microorganisms capable of using coal as a carbon source and converting coal to methane. The consortium of microorganisms obtained from such abandoned coal mines can be isolated and introduced to hard-to-reach coal-containing substrates which lack such microorganisms and which would otherwise remain unrecoverable. The present invention comprises a significant advantage in that useable energy can be obtained from a number of abandoned mine sites or other areas wherein coal is no longer being recovered, and such energy can be obtained in a safe, efficient, and inexpensive manner.

Volkwein, Jon C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Paper K-05, in: B.C. Alleman and M.E. Kelley (Conference Chairs), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2005. Proceedings of the Eighth International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, Maryland; June 69,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper K-05, in: B.C. Alleman and M.E. Kelley (Conference Chairs), In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation--2005. Proceedings of the Eighth International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium

Ma, Lena

257

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phase Tracer Tests.

258

Empirical design charts against earthquake-induced liquefaction in cohesionless soils based on in-situ tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available methods to predict the liquefaction susceptibility of cohesionless soils are based either in empirical charts (in-situ test) or laboratory tests. In-situ tests are a valuable source of information; especially in cohesionless soils, due...

Menendez, Jose Rafael

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings on SnO2-SiC Core-Shell Nanoparticles for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Storage. In Situ Generation of Few-Layer Graphene Coatings...

260

Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The reactors can also have reduced mass over conventional hardware. Over 60% conversion was achieved using a two stage RWGS reactor in which water was removed between stages. Sabatier conversions of greater than 85% were achieved in a single stage system. Since the RWGS is endothermic and the Sabatier is exothermic, by combining the two reactions, heat generated from the Sabatier can be used to fuel the RWGS reaction. A combined Sabatier/RWGS reactor was successfully tested. Both the Sabatier and RWGS reactions generate water. The water will be collected and electrolyzed to produce oxygen and recycle the hydrogen. A microchannel phase separator is also under development to separate liquid water from vapor and other gases in these product streams. This phase separator relies on surface forces, not gravitational effects, to separate the water and is therefore suited to space applications. The specific energy of this device reached values of 1200 to 8000 W/K for water mole fractions of 20 to 70%. The phase separator technology was scaled up in a system to removed water from a cathode effluent of a 5 kW PEM fuel cell. In this case a three channel device can remove 43 mL/min of water in 95 SCFM of air. This exceeded the design requirements of the device. A system model of the microchannel ISPP plant was generated to predict the size, weight and performance for the individual components and use it to optimize the overall system. The microchannel technologies developed for CO2 collection, reaction, and phase separation can be used not only for an ISPP system, but also life support, EVA, and lunar applications. The use of microchannel technologies reduces both mass and volume of the system as well as improving the system efficiency.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Validation of Surface Retrieved Cloud Optical Properties with in situ Measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) South Great Plains Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface inferred cloud optical properties from a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer have been validated against the in situ measurements during the second ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE II) field campaign at the ARM South Great Plains (SGP) site. On the basis of eight effective radius profiles measured by the in situ Forward Spectra Scattering Probe (FSSP), our retrieved cloud effective radii for single-layer warm water clouds agree well with in situ measurements, within 5.5%. The sensitivity study also illustrates that for this case a 13% uncertainty in observed liquid water path (LWP, 20 g/m2) results in 1.5% difference in retrieved cloud optical depth and 12.7% difference in referred cloud effective radius, on average. The uncertainty of the LWP measured by the microwave radiometer (MWR) is the major contributor to the uncertainty of retrieved cloud effective radius. Further, we conclude that the uncertainty of our inferred cloud optical properties is better than 5% for warm water clouds based on a surface closure study, in which cloud optical properties inferred from narrowband irradiances are applied to a shortwave model and the modeled broadband fluxes are compared to a surface pyranometer.

Min, Qilong; Duan, M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Simultaneous P and B diffusion, in-situ surface passivation, impurity filtering and gettering for high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is presented to simultaneously diffuse boron and phosphorus in silicon, and grow an in-situ passivating oxide in a single furnace step. It is shown that limited solid doping sources made from P and B Spin-On Dopant (SOD) films can produce optimal n{sup +} and p{sup +} profiles simultaneously without the deleterious effects of cross doping. A high quality passivating oxide is grown in-situ beneath the thin ({approximately} 60 {angstrom}) diffusion glass, resulting in low J{sub o} values below 100 fA/cm{sup 2} for transparent ({approximately} 100 {Omega}/{open_square}) phosphorus and boron diffusions. For the first time it is shown that impurities present in the boron SOD film can be effectively filtered out by employing separate source wafers, resulting in bulk lifetimes in excess of 1 ms for the sample wafers. The degree of lifetime degradation in the sources is related to the gettering efficiency of boron in silicon. This novel simultaneous diffusion, in-situ oxidation, impurity filtering and gettering technique was successfully used to produce 20.3% Fz, and 19.1% Cz solar cells, in one furnace step.

Krygowski, T.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Ruby, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

264

In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

Sharma, Renu [National Institute of Standards and Technology] National Institute of Standards and Technology; Crozier, Peter [Arizona State University] Arizona State University; Adams, James [Arizona State University] Arizona State University

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING WORKSHOP REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private sector, universities or other agencies are expected to have greater expertise will be accomplished through an open, competitive solicitation process. Several areas will require joint efforts from the two classes of resources.

Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cold cap subsidence for in situ vitrification and electrodes therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrode for use in in situ vitrification of soil comprises a molybdenum rod received within a conductive sleeve or collar formed of graphite. Electrodes of this type are placed on either side of a region containing buried waste material and an electric current is passed therebetween for vitrifying the soil between the electrodes. The graphite collar enhances the thermal conductivity of the electrode, bringing heat to the surface, and preventing the formation of a cold cap of material above the ground surface. The annulus between the molybdenum rod electrode and the graphite collar is filled with a conductive ceramic powder of a type that sinters upon the molybdenum rod, protecting the same from oxidation as the graphite material is consumed, or a metal powder which liquifies at operating temperatures. The molybdenum rod in the former case may be coated with an oxidation protectant, e.g. of molybdenum disilicide. As insulative blanket is suitably placed on the surface of the soil during processing to promote subsidence by allowing off-gassing and reducing surface heat loss. In other embodiments, connection to vitrification electrodes is provided below ground level to avoid loss of connection due to electrodes deterioration, or a sacrificial electrode may be employed when operation is started. Outboard electrodes can be utilized to square up the vitrified area. Further, the center of the molybdenum rod can be made hollow and filled with a powdered metal, such as copper, which liquifies at operating temperatures. In one embodiment, the molybdenum rod and the graphite collar are physically joined at the bottom.

Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Carter, John G. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); FitzPatrick, Vincent F. (Richland, WA); Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA); Morgan, William C. (Richland, WA); Oma, Kenton H. (Richland, WA); Timmerman, Craig L. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in situ test, however, block joints were not pre-sealed.swelling and seal the joints between bentonite blocks. In

Zheng, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source type and mechanism information for the four aerosol samples gathered from the Caribbean, the Sea of Japan, and New Jersey. One way to gauge an aerosol's ability to stay...

270

Synthesis of in-situ microphysical measurements with remote retrievals and models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report describes research analysis done relating to the DOE ASR ISDAC (Indirect and SemiDirect Aerosol Campaign) in Alaska April 2008.

R. Paul Lawson; S. Lance; M. Qixu

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Oil production response to in situ electrical resistance heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the electric power through electrical resistance heating with a very small electromagnetic power absorption component. The oil viscosity decreases as the temperature increases thus stimulating oil production. DEDICATION I would like to dedicate this thesis... PROFILE FOR CASE S-2 INTRODUCTION Oil production can be stimulated by applying electrical power to the formation. The electrical power causes a temperature increase that reduces oil viscosity, resulting in increased oil production rates. Electrical...

McDougal, Fred William

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

In-situ measurements of surface tension-driven shape recovery in a metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new technique, involving nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy at high temperature under an inert atmosphere, is used to study deformation of a Pt-based metallic glass. As temperature is increased into ...

Schuh, Christopher A.

274

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water co produced with shale oil and decanted from it isWater from Green River Oil Shale, Chemistry and Industry,for an In-Situ Produced Oil-Shale Processin g Water, LERC

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4, 19'70, p. 89. 24. C-b Shale Oil Venture: Hydrology, MinePiles Solid wastes from the shale-oil recovery process alsofrom a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511522 In situ Raman spectroscopy of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 511­522 In situ Raman spectroscopy. In this situation, a low energy excitation (e.g. visible light) is needed to excite an electron to a neighboring

Nabben, Reinhard

277

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

In-situ ellipsometry: Identification of surface terminations during GaN growth , T. Schmidtling1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 In-situ ellipsometry: Identification of surface terminations during GaN growth C. Cobet1 , T SE, one is not limited to any special bulk or surface symmetry for optical characterisation. In PAMBE

Feenstra, Randall

279

Multiscale determination of in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we address the problem of determining in situ stress and fracture properties in reservoirs using borehole logs and surface seismic reflection data. The dissertation covers four subtopics. The first is the ...

Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

In Situ Groundwater Arsenic Removal Using Iron Oxide-Coated Sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the sand filter suggest that both reversible adsorption and irreversible precipitation are responsible for removing arsenic from the water. Unlike conventional excavate-and-fill permeable reactive barriers, the treatment capacity of our in situ created...

Yu, Hongxu

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning...

Molloy, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In-situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of a Catalyst for Artificial Photosynthesis Monday, June 30, 2014 Plants and other organisms use a process called photosynthesis to produce...

283

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings ofthe 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shale andOil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone the

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In situ decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a contaminated facility. At present, ISD is not recognized or addressed in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Office of Environmental...

287

Phylum Arthropods Study Material: Demodex folliculorum. 2 slides: section in situ, whole mount.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phylum Arthropods Study Material: Demodex folliculorum. 2 slides: section in situ, whole mount. Sarcoptes scabei. 1 slide, wholemount. Dermanyssus gallinae. 1 slide, wholenount. Argas persicus. 1 slide, wholemount. Dermacentor andersoni. 1 slide, wholemount. Amblyomma americana. 1 slide, wholemount

Schluter, Dolph

288

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS,...

289

Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

Fisher, Frank

290

In Situ, Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that ...

Cziczo, Daniel James

291

Effect of Initial Oil Saturation on In-Situ Combustion Performance of a Canadian Bitumen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Situ Combustion (ISC) is a very complex thermal recovery process that is strongly affected by the chemical composition and physical properties of reservoir rock and fluids. Stability of the process depends on the amount of heat continuously...

Aleksandrov, Denis

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stabilization of Spent Oil Shales, EPA-600/'7-'78- 021, Feb.Impact Analysis for an Oil Shale Complex at Parachute Creek,from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedings of

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ( ? 10?min) time scale with ? 1??m depth and ? ...

Hartwig, Zachary Seth

294

A methodology for in-situ calibration of steam boiler instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a broadly useful diagnostic methodology to engineers and plant managers for finding the in-situ operating characteristics of power plant boilers when metered data is either missing or obviously erroneous. The methodology is able...

Wei, Guanghua

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retort, Proceedingsof the 11th Oil Shale Symposium, 1978. J. W.MB_terial in Green River Oil Shale, U.S. Bur. lvlines Rept.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Strategy for the Abandonment of Modified In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of steam on oil shale ing: a preliminary laboratoryInstitute to Rio Blanco Oil Shale Project, May 1977. 1~OF MODIFIED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS J. P. Fox and P.

Fox, J.P.; Persoff, P.; Moody, M.M.; Sisemore, C.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale J. P. Fox, J. J. Duvall,of elements in rich oil shales of the Green River Formation,V. E . • 1977; Mercury in Oil Shale from the Mahogany Zone

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. A. Robb, and T. J. Spedding. Minor Elements in Oil Shaleand Oil Shale Products. LERC Rept. of Invest. 77-1, 1977.Significant to In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Quart. Colo.

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

In-situ prediction on sensor networks using distributed multiple linear regression models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within sensor networks for environmental monitoring, a class of problems exists that requires in-situ control and modeling. In this thesis, we provide a solution to these problems, enabling model-driven computation where ...

Basha, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROL ID: 1469463 TITLE: In Situ Techniques for Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Small Bodies information about their formation histories and evolution. Combined geochemistry and mineralogy measurements measurement techniques that could provide microscopic mineralogy and isotope geochemistry. We will discuss

Rossman. George R.

302

Parametric study to evaluate benefits of fracture fluid quality control and in-situ stress research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluate the benefits of the GRI research using a data set for an "average" well. Results of that study indicated that the money invested in fluid quality control and in-situ stress measurements will yield a positive return on the investment...PARAMETRIC STUDY TO EVALUATE BENEFITS OF FRACTURE FLUID QUALITY CONTROL AND IN-SITU STRESS RESEARCH A Thesis by JEERADETE SATAYAPUNT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Satayapunt, Jeeradete

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Review of models applicable to accident aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

Glissmeyer, J.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Stimulating the In Situ Activity of Geobacter Species to Remove Uranium from the Groundwater of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 _M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant, and Geobacter species became a minor component of the community. This apparent switch from Fe(III) reduction to sulfate reduction as the terminal electron accepting process for the oxidation of the injected acetate was associated with an increase in uranium concentration in the groundwater. These results demonstrate that in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater is feasible but suggest that the strategy should be optimized to better maintain long-term activity of Geobacter species.

Anderson, R. T.; Vrionis, Helen A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Resch, Charles T.; Long, Philip E.; Dayvault, R. D.; Karp, Ken; Marutzky, Sammy J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; Lowe, Mary; Lovley, Derek R.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering ALAN ROBOCK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering ALAN ROBOCK ABSTRACT In response to global warming, one suggested geoengineering response involves creating a cloud of particles in the stratosphere to reflect some, the volcano analog also warns against geoengineering because of responses such as ozone depletion, regional

Robock, Alan

306

DO AEROSOLS CHANGE CLOUD COVER AND AFFECT CLIMATE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified from;AEROSOL INFLUENCES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS

Schwartz, Stephen E.

307

Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulation of In-Situ Combustion Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed for the project 'Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Numerical Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes', DE-FC26-03NT15405. In summary, this work improved our understanding of in-situ combustion (ISC) process physics and oil recovery. This understanding was translated into improved conceptual models and a suite of software algorithms that extended predictive capabilities. We pursued experimental, theoretical, and numerical tasks during the performance period. The specific project objectives were (i) identification, experimentally, of chemical additives/injectants that improve combustion performance and delineation of the physics of improved performance, (ii) establishment of a benchmark one-dimensional, experimental data set for verification of in-situ combustion dynamics computed by simulators, (iii) develop improved numerical methods that can be used to describe in-situ combustion more accurately, and (iv) to lay the underpinnings of a highly efficient, 3D, in-situ combustion simulator using adaptive mesh refinement techniques and parallelization. We believe that project goals were met and exceeded as discussed.

Margot Gerritsen; Tony Kovscek

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

309

Optimization of aerosol penetration through transport lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be minimum and -' he penetration of aerosols through the transport system will be maximal. It is the purpose of the study reported herein to experimentally investigate the optimization of aerosol penetration through transport systems and to obtain a... numbers less than 869, bounded the use of this model to Reynolds numbers less than or equal to 1100. 19 IV. SUNNARY OF WORK AND EXPERINENTAL NETHODOLOGY The purpose of the study reported herein was to further analyze the optimization of aerosol...

Wong Luque, Fermin Samuel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

311

Numerical simulations in support of the in situ bioremediation demonstration at Savannah River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the performance of the in situ bioremediation technology demonstrated at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration (SRID) site in 1992--1993. The goal of the technology demonstration was to stimulate naturally occurring methanotrophic bacteria at the SRID site with injection of methane, air and air-phase nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate) such that significant amounts of the chlorinated solvent present in the subsurface would be degraded. Our approach is based on site-specific numerical simulations using the TRAMP computer code. In this report, we discuss the interactions among the physical and biochemical processes involved in in situ bioremediation. We also investigate improvements to technology performance, make predictions regarding the performance of this technology over long periods of time and at different sites, and compare in situ bioremediation with other remediation technologies.

Travis, B.J.; Rosenberg, N.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?°C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu,...

316

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October? 2. To what extent do the different properties of the Arctic aerosol during April produce differences in clouds? * Do the more polluted conditions during April in the...

317

People Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to the PacificCollaboration »People Profiles Featured

318

Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

319

aerosol ratio program: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contribute a major portion of atmospheric aerosol mass loading 5. The estimated global annual Liou, K. N. 2 Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and...

320

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

aerosol optical thickness: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

322

aerosol black carbon: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

323

aerosols iii morphologic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: of aerosols. Keywords: metal waste recycling; aerosols; fire hazard; explosion hazard. 1. OVERVIEW ProductsRisks generated by the treatment of...

324

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

ambient ultrafine aerosols: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer...

326

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

328

acid aerosol exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nenes, Athanasios 8 Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia Geosciences Websites Summary: Neutralization of soil aerosol and...

329

Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the Mexico City...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area with PIXEPESASTIM and Multivariate Analysis. Aerosol Composition and Source Apportionment in the...

330

Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

331

aerosol samples collected: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

elements analysis of aerosol samples from some CiteSeer Summary: Aerosols deposits on filters from ten Romanian towns with different kinds and levels of industrial development...

332

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in...

333

aerosol particles emitted: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aerosols scatter and absorb solar, estimates of the impact of aerosols on visibility, the solar radiation balance, and crop production is presented. 1. INTRODUCTION The attenuation...

334

aerosolized pentamidine effect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

335

aerosols radioactifs artificiels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

336

aerosol particle analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: data analysis algorithm is presented. Our earlier algorithm assumed a monomodal aerosol size distribution, while the new algorithm allows us to partition the aerosol...

337

aerosol research study: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in atmospheric thermal structure, burning, bio-sources changes? 12;Aerosol microphysics: size distribution, mixing state, morphology, shape 9 Aerosol Science and Technology,...

338

Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles This webinar was presented by research team Building...

339

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

340

Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

Hu, Jian Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Preparation of membranes using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of fabricating a composite membrane from a membrane substrate using solvent-less vapor deposition followed by in-situ polymerization. A first monomer and a second monomer are directed into a mixing chamber in a deposition chamber. The first monomer and the second monomer are mixed in the mixing chamber providing a mixed first monomer and second monomer. The mixed first monomer and second monomer are solvent-less vapor deposited onto the membrane substrate in the deposition chamber. The membrane substrate and the mixed first monomer and second monomer are heated to produce in-situ polymerization and provide the composite membrane.

O'Brien, Kevin C. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA); Morse, Jeffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Buckley, Steven R. (Modesto, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Wilson, Keith B. (San Ramon, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Pile design predictions in sand and gravel using in situ tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1983 Ma]or Sub]ect: Civil Engineering PILE DESIGN PREDICTIONS IN SAND AND GRAVEL USING IN SITU TESTS A Thesis by LINDA GRUBBS HUFF Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle Chairman of Committee syne A. Du lap Member Chri opher C... Committee: Dr. Harry M. Coyle The pressuremeter, cone penetrometer and standard penetration tests are in situ tests which are being performed more frequently in recent years to obtain soil parameters used in the design of pile foundations. New design...

Huff, Linda Grubbs

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The effect of carbon dioxide-oxygen mixtures on oil recovery by in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-OXYGEN MIXTURES ON OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by NEAL J. BROUSSARD7 JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1970 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-OXYGEN MIXTURES ON OIL RECOVERY BY IN-SITU COMBUSTION A Thesis by NEAL J. BROUSSARD) JR. Approved as to style and content by Chp r an o ommrttee m er...

Broussard, Neal Joseph

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The displacement of oil from porous media by in-situ combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion. The temperature of the combustion front was also higher in the ex- periments where water and air were injected to displace the high viscosity oil as compared to the experiments where air was injected alone to support combustion... porous media by in-situ combustion and to develop a technique using in-situ combustion which might have wide applica- tion in the oil industry. A three-step procedure for displacing both a low viscosity oil and a high viscosity oil from porous medium...

Corcoran, John Thomas

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Influence of in situ biological activity on the vertical profile of pre-emergence herbicides in sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in sediment Damien A. Devault,* Sebastien Delmotte, Georges Merlina, Puy Lim, Magali Gerino and Eric Pinelli was studied in sediment. Early diagenesis indicators of organic matter (OM) was selected to provide in the degradation of fresh organic matter, the vector of herbicides in sediment. Two tandem-coring samples were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near-surface NO{sub x} concentrations by a factor of 2-5. These results suggest the importance of using the more accurate hybrid dynamical method in the estimates of both aerosol forcing and tropospheric ozone chemistry.

Joyce E. Penner

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Stimulating the in situ activity of Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater of a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential for removing uranium from contaminated groundwater by stimulating the in situ activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms was evaluated in a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, Colo. Acetate (1 to 3 mM) was injected into the subsurface over a 3-month period via an injection gallery composed of 20 injection wells, which was installed upgradient from a series of 15 monitoring wells. U(VI) concentrations decreased in as little as 9 days after acetate injection was initiated, and within 50 days uranium had declined below the prescribed treatment level of 0.18 ?M in some of the monitoring wells. Analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences and phospholipid fatty acid profiles demonstrated that the initial loss of uranium from the groundwater was associated with an enrichment of Geobacter species in the treatment zone. Fe(II) in the groundwater also increased during this period, suggesting that U(VI) reduction was coincident with Fe(III) reduction. As the acetate injection continued over 50 days there was a loss of sulfate from the groundwater and an accumulation of sulfide and the composition of the microbial community changed. Organisms with 16S rDNA sequences most closely related to those of sulfate reducers became predominant,

Robert T. Anderson; Helen A. Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-bernad; Charles T. Resch; Philip E. Long; Richard Dayvault; Ken Karp; Sam Marutzky; Donald R. Metzler; Aaron Peacock; David C. White; Mary Lowe; Derek R. Lovley

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Upper Haze of Venus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The upper haze (UH) of Venus is variable on the order of days and it is populated by two particle modes. We use a 1D microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two size modes and whether their observed variability are due to cloud top vertical transient winds. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets that then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. The mass transport enabled by cloud top transient winds are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with observations. Sedimentation and convection in the middle and lower...

Gao, Peter; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G; Yung, Yuk L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

ENCAPSULATION EFFECTS ON CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL LIGHT ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENCAPSULATION EFFECTS ON CARBONACEOUS AEROSOL LIGHT ABSORPTION Arthur Sedlacek, Brookhaven National of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry

351

2, 12871315, 2002 Aerosol sources and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in climate variability and climate change studies (IPCC, 2001). Radiative forcing of natural and their contribution to the chemical composition of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea during summertime J aerosol sources in the Eastern Mediterranean5 Basin could be investigated at this location since the site

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

6, 1217912197, 2006 Aerosol formation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model implements a first order scheme for resolving the aerosol size distribution within its geometric size10 sections, which efficiently suppresses numerical diffusion. We operate removes freshly nucleated particles by coagulation. The observation of high ultrafine aerosol

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

6, 32653319, 2006 Study aerosol with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 3265­3319, 2006 Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et in Europe to two different emission inventories and temporal distribution of emissions A. de Meij 1 , M Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

Martin, Randall

355

In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells D.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane under methane-to-oxygen ratio (Rmix) of 2. Anode-supported fuel cells are investigated regarding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

356

Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source Paul A. Johnson,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which traps seismic energy near the surface. In this case, reverberations within soil layers furtherInducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source Paul A. Johnson,1 Paul Bodin,2 January 2009; accepted 11 March 2009; published 21 May 2009. [1] It is well known that soil sites have

357

The feeding behaviour of a deep-sea holothurian, Stichopus tremulus (Gunnerus) based on in situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations and experiments using a Remotely Operated Vehicle Ian R. Hudson*, Benjamin D. Wigham, Paul A September 2003 Abstract Using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) to deploy an in situ cage experiment-2380-596-247. E-mail address: irh@soc.soton.ac.uk (I.R. Hudson). www.elsevier.com/locate/jembe Journal

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

358

Experimental Study of In Situ Combustion with Decalin and Metallic Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a hydrogen donor and a catalyst for upgrading and increasing oil recovery during in situ combustion is a known and proven technique. Based on research conducted on this process, it is clear that widespread practice in industry is the usage...

Mateshov, Dauren

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Method for initiating in-situ vitrification using an impregnated cord  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In-situ vitrification of soil is initiated by placing a cord of dielectric material impregnated with conductive material in thermally-conductive contact with the soil, and energizing the cord with an electric current for heating the cord and starting the vitrification process.

Carter, John G. (Richland, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nondestructive In Situ Identification of Crystal Orientation of Anisotropic ZnO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nondestructive In Situ Identification of Crystal Orientation of Anisotropic ZnO Nanostructures to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical proper- ties compared to their bulk counterparts.1 4 Important, a fast, unambiguous, and nondestructive technique for identification of the crystalline orientation

Wang, Zhong L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Formation and hydrogen storage properties of in situ prepared Mg­Cu alloy and surface defects. The maximal hydrogen storage contents of Mg­Cu alloy nanoparticles can reach 2.05 � 0. Introduction The storage of hydrogen gas is presently accomplished with the stainless steel cylinders under

Cao, Guozhong

362

MOLTEN OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LUNAR OXYGEN GENERATION USING IN-SITU RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLTEN OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS FOR LUNAR OXYGEN GENERATION USING IN-SITU RESOURCES A.T. Vai1 , J.; Woburn, MA, 01801, USA Keywords: ISRU, Molten Oxide Electrolysis, Inert Anode, Oxygen Generation Abstract technology for generating oxygen from lunar regolith simulant. Prior to this work, iridium metal was the only

Sadoway, Donald Robert

363

In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

365

Quantification of thermophilic archaea and bacteria in a Nevada hot spring using fluorescent in situ hybridization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in situ hybridization Abstract Previous studies of high temperature hot springs in Yellowstone National temperatures. The cells, which were concentrated from 300 liters of hot spring water through tangential flow dominate in high-temperature environments such as Yellowstone National Park. However, our study indicates

Walker, Lawrence R.

366

A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Microfluidic Device for Kinetic Optimization of Protein Crystallization and In Situ Structure Received November 10, 2005; E-mail: quake@stanford.edu Recently microfluidic technologies have emerged microfluidic crystallization devices do not allow the post- crystallization addition of cryoprotectant

Quake, Stephen R.

367

Influence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the intense solar heat. For perihelion distances of radius R = 4-10 solar radii, R, (the values proposedInfluence of Solar-ProbeInherent Atmosphereon In-Situ Observations A. Hassanein Argonne National or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

Harilal, S. S.

368

In situ study of defect migration kinetics in nanoporous Ag with enhanced radiation tolerance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In situ Kr ion irradiation at 1 MeV was performed for CG and NP Ag at room temperature in the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory, where an ion accelerator was attached to a HITACHI H-9000NAR microscope...

Sun, C.; Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, M.; Wang, H.; Maloy, S. A.; Zhang, X.

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaluation of a New Liquid Breaker for Polymer Based In-Situ Gelled Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A solid breaker is used to reduce the viscosity of the gel at pH range of 4-5 for in-situ gelled acids with Zr4 cross-linkers utilize. However, the literature survey confirmed that solid breakers caused a premature reduction in the fluid viscosity...

Aksoy, Gamze

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

Sommaruga, Ruben

371

Evaluation of solvent-based in situ processes for upgrading and recovery of heavy oil bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent-based in situ recovery processes have been proposed as lower cost alternatives to thermal processes for recovery of heavy oil and bitumen. Advantages of solvent based processes are: reduced steam requirements, reduced water treating, and in situ upgrading of the produced oil. Lab results and process calculations show that low-pressure, low-energy solvent-based in situ processes have considerable technical and economic potential for upgrading and recovery of bitumen and heavy oil. In a lab flow test using Athabasca tar sand and propane as solvent, 50 percent of the bitumen was recovered as upgraded oil. Relative to the raw bitumen, API gravity increased by about 10{degrees}API, viscosity was reduced 30-fold, sulfur content was reduced about 50 percent, and metals content was also substantially reduced. Process uncertainties that will have a major impact on economics are: (1) oil production rate, (2) oil recovery, (3) extent of in situ upgrading, and (4) solvent losses. Additional lab development and field testing are required to reduce these process uncertainties and to predict commercial-scale economics.

Duerksen, J.H.; Eloyan, A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Liquid phase oxidation kinetics of oil sands bitumen: Models for in situ combustion numerical simulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiresponse kinetic models are established for the low-temperature oxidation (LTO) reaction of Athabasca oil sands bitumen. The models provide adequate description of the overall rate of oxygen consumption and of the reactions of the liquid phase bitumen components. The LTO models are suitable for use in the in situ combustion numerical simulators of oil sands.

Adegbesan, K.O.; Donnelly, J.K.; Moore, R.G.; Bennion, D.W.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ Monitoring of Cyanobacterial HABs in Western Lake Erie using Buoy-mounted Sensors Primary for the rest of the western basin of Lake Erie. We propose to deploy environmental sensors at these sites. The first sensor is a fluorescence-based detector of phycocyanin, a pigment found predominantly

374

In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-situ measurement of ethanol tolerance in an operating fuel cell Matt S. Naughton a , Claire E online xxx Keywords: Alkaline fuel cell Gas diffusion electrodes Ag cathode Electrode characterization Reference electrode Non-Platinum catalyst a b s t r a c t Ethanol is seen as an attractive option as a fuel

Kenis, Paul J. A.

375

In Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanosecond irradiation coupled with extinction measurement Total deposited fluence Fig. 2 Optical microscopyIn Situ Optical Extinction Measurement for Locally Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance During Nanosecond Laser Irradiation of Silver Ion Exchanged Silicate Glass Olivier VĂ©ron & Jean-Philippe Blondeau

376

Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization and In-Situ Ion-Irradiation of MA957 ODS Steel Djamel Kaoumi1 , Arthur Motta1/Martensitic steels produced by mechanical alloying with Y2O3 particles are considered as possible cladding materials--II #12;Fig. 1. (a) Bright Field TEM images of the grain microstructure in MA957 ODS steel in transversal

Motta, Arthur T.

377

Fracture enhanced in-situ foam remediation. Topical report, July 1995-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the technical feasibility of soil fracturing as an enhancement to transportation of foam and foam-assisted site remediation. This project is part of an overall effort by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to develop technologies for cost-effective, in-situ remediation of soils.

Chowdiah, P.; Misra, B.R.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Aliphatic polyester-grafted starch composites by in situ ring opening polymerization*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aliphatic polyester-grafted starch composites by in situ ring opening polymerization* Abstract-Catalyzed Ring-Opening Polymerization (ROP) of lactones, such as c-caprolactone and ii-vnlerolactone. ha\\ been polymerization of ethylene oxide on starch has also been reported [ l 11. Other starch graft copolymers have been

Narayan, Ramani

379

Towards Autonomous Robotic In-Situ Assembly on Unstructured Construction Sites Using Monocular Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Autonomous Robotic In-Situ Assembly on Unstructured Construction Sites Using Monocular and implemented algorithms that address these challenges and enable autonomous robotic assembly of freeform-vision-based pose estimation, the designed algorithms enable a mobile robotic manipulator to: 1) autonomously

Kamat, Vineet R.

380

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN-SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN- SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Abington, Cambridge, CB21 6AL, UK bic@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is crucial to maintain wind turbine blades. This work investigates using pulse-echo ultrasound to detect internal damages in wind turbine blades without

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting In-Situ Identity Fraud on Social Network Services: A Case Study on Facebook 1 Shan as the victims. Using Facebook as a case study, we show that it is possible to detect such incidents by analyz significant efforts to prevent identity fraud and protect users' privacy. For example, Facebook records

Chen, Sheng-Wei

382

Proceedings: In Situ Contaminated Sediment Capping Workshop: Cincinnati, Ohio, May 12-14, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In Situ Contaminated Sediment Capping Workshop was designed to provide the most current information and bring about consensus in understanding of a technology that offers one of the few options for remediation of contaminated sediments. These electronic proceedings document workshop sessions on various capping issues, such as site assessment; cap suitability, performance, and design; site monitoring; and research and development in capping.

None

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Investigation of the Thermal Decomposition of Triethylgallium Using in situ Raman Spectroscopy and DFT Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TEGa) were followed using in situ Raman spectroscopy measurements in an up-flow, cold-wall CVD reactor an design with ss beads to p ure 1. Schem asurements. dy, the gas p ectroscopy i h numerical ons, which w Ex

Anderson, Timothy J.

384

Multiple, distant (401) in situ observations of a magnetic cloud and a corotating interaction region complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ejections (CMEs) were observed at the Sun; the energy densities of the solar wind, both magnetic as well Space Sciences Laboratory, University of Berkeley, Berkeley, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history report a comprehensive analysis of in situ observations made by Wind and the STEREO probes (STA, STB

California at Berkeley, University of

385

Tracking the catalyzed growth process of nanowires by in situ x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity.4­7 Silicon nanowires have also found application in solar cells, both as ab- sorber OF NANOSTRUCTURES Gold-catalyzed silicon nanowires were grown in an x-ray furnace so that in situ x-ray diffraction-type furnace attached to a Pana- lytical X'Pert PRO diffractometer. The temperature of the furnace

Wang, Zhong L.

386

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental techniques (LGIT), LCPC, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble Abstract Seismic vulnerability analysis. This curve is particularly interesting in moderate seismic areas. This methodology is applied to the Grenoble

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

WoodPolymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood­Polymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood Yong-Feng Li in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). ABSTRACT: Wood­polymer composites (WPCs) were prepared words: composites; mechanical properties; modifi- cation; monomers; renewable resources INTRODUCTION

388

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ satellite images the aurora in three different spectral regions. One of the channels of the spectrographic to spectrally discriminate between the proton and electron FUV aurora and to globally map the energetic protons

California at Berkeley, University of

390

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WiSARDNET: A SYSTEM SOLUTION FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE IN SITU ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Zijiang Yang-temporal monitoring of environmental and ecosystems processes. WiSARDNet is a complete distributed sensing system. These features, combined with an energy-efficient hardware/software architecture and network protocol stack

391

In situ doping control of the surface of high-temperature superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS In situ doping control of the surface of high-temperature superconductors M. A. HOSSAIN1.1038/nphys998 Central to the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity is the evolution of the electronic structure as doping alters the density of charge carriers in the CuO2 planes. Superconductivity

Michelson, David G.

392

In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs RG Ramirez, N Garcia and energy to small ruminants in northeastern Mexico (Ramirez et al, 1993, J Appl Anim Res, 3, 113 (DM) and crude protein (CP) of 13 commonly available native forbs. Forbs evaluated were Coldenia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

In Situ Tribo-Electrochemical Characterization of Diamond-Containing Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diamond carbon (sp^(3)) to amorphous carbon (sp^(2)) is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy in the diamond composite. The surface roughness of the diamond grits was found to be greatly reduced due to wear. A tribo-electrochemical method is developed to in situ...

Xiao, Huaping

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

In situ characterization of soil properties using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, organic C, and inorganic C. Water potential did not improve model predictions, nor did it correlate with the VNIR spectra; r2-values were below 0.31. These results show that DRS is an acceptable technique to measure selected soil properties in-situ...

Waiser, Travis Heath

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, respectively--together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentra- tion

Boss, Emmanuel S.

396

Development of a Microfluidic Device for Synthesis of Lipid Bi-Layer In-Situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and result in unstable bi-layers having a short lifetime. In this investigation a novel microfluidic device and a method for artificial synthesis of lipid bi-layer in-situ are explored. In the proposed method, lipid trapped at an aperture on a Teflon sheet...

Banneyake, Bm U.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extended scaling factors for in situ cosmogenic nuclides: New measurements at low latitude Darin by the intensity of energetic cosmic-ray nucleons, which changes rapidly with elevation. An incomplete knowledge, and that there has been an incomplete mapping of nucleon fluxes at high RC (low geomagnetic latitude). We report new

Zreda, Marek

398

Correlations to determine in-situ stress from open-hole logging data in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stress determination in the Travis Peak Formation, (2) the effect of shale has been considered in the correlation model, and (3) the model is easy to use once the lithology of the layer has been identified. This new model can be used to estimate in-situ...

Gongora, Cesar Augusto

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emission of individual carbon nanotube with in situ tip image and real work function Zhi Xu of the most promising applications of carbon nanotubes CNTs for flat panel displays1 and highly coherent field-emission studies on carbon nanotube field emission took the work function as a constant e.g., 5 eV . Actually

Wang, Zhong L.

400

In situ imaging of field emission from individual carbon nanotubes and their structural damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ imaging of field emission from individual carbon nanotubes and their structural damage; accepted for publication 27 November 2001 Field emission of individual carbon nanotubes was observed found to exhibit very low turn-on field and superior field emission performance. Carbon nanotubes grow

Wang, Zhong L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010SeptemberInfrared SpectralgovCampaignsAerosol IOP

403

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

404

Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Ar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. Analysis of Arż Sputter Etched and UPS were used to study epitaxial TiN 001 layers grown in situ which were Ar sputter etched. The films Host Material: epitaxial TiN(001) thin film sputter etched Instrument: Physical Electronics, Inc. 5400

Gall, Daniel

405

Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. I. Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epitaxial TiN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. I. Analysis of As-deposited Layers used to characterize as- deposited epitaxial TiN 001 layers grown in situ. The films were deposited, while the UPS data was generated by He I and He II UV radiation. The spectra show that the TiN 001

Gall, Daniel

406

Evaluation of In Situ Grouting as a Potential Remediation Method for the Hanford Central Plateau Deep Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau report identifies in situ grouting as a potential remediation technology for the deep vadose zone and includes a planned effort to evaluate in situ grouting to provide information for future feasibility studies. This report represents the first step in this evaluation effort.

Truex, Michael J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Mattigod, Shas V.

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

REFERENCES CITED IN: Draft Technical Report: Considerations Related to Post-Closure Monitoring Of Uranium In-Situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2008, Cogema Mining, Inc, and Petrotek Engineering Corp. ML081060131. http://www.wise- uranium://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/ Crow Butte 2000. Mine Unit 1 Restoration Report, Crow Butte Uranium Project. Submitted to NRC January Of Uranium In-Situ Leach/In-Situ Recovery (ISL/ISR) Sites. How to obtain the references: Most

408

Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure, and Relation to Physical Forcing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation, Vertical Structure. Arlington, VA 22203-1995 TITLE: Optics, Acoustics and Stress in Situ (OASIS): Effects of Aggregation of Research and Sponsored Programs #12;Abstract Nearbed optical and acoustical properties in coastal waters

Boss, Emmanuel S.

409

In situ UPb dating of micro-baddeleyite by secondary ion mass spectrometry Axel K. Schmitt a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ U­Pb dating of micro-baddeleyite by secondary ion mass spectrometry Axel K. Schmitt a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in situ analysis of ng-mass crystals that cannot be efficiently conventional mineral separation methods are not optimized for recovery of such small grains, techniques

410

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other Halogenated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other, California 94305-4020 Enhanced in-situ transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was observed under anoxic Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)with one or two carbon atoms are widely used as solvents, degreasing

Semprini, Lewis

411

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

412

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME the resulting time series, we use tropospheric NO2 data as a reference in the regions dominated by biomass sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

413

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract: A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic...

414

The behavior of constant rate aerosol reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An aerosol reactor is a gaseous system in which fine particles are formed by chemical reaction in either a batch or flow process. The particle sizes of interest range from less than 10 angstrom (molecular clusters) to 10 ..mu..m. Such reactors may be operated to study the aerosol formation process, as in a smog reactor, or to generate a product such as a pigment or a catalytic aerosol. Aerosol reactors can be characterized by three temporal or spatial zones or regions of operation for batch and flow reactors, respectively. In zone I, chemical reaction results in the formation of condensable molecular products which nucleate and form very high concentrations of small particles. The number density depends on the concentration of preexisting aerosol. Zone II is a transition region in which the aerosol number concentration levels off as a result of hetergeneous condensation by the stable aerosol. In zone III coagulation becomes sufficiently rapid to reduce the particle number concentration. There may be a zone IV in which agglomerates form.

Friedlander, S.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

Dev, H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Influence of radar frequency on the relationship between bare surface soil moisture vertical profile and radar backscatter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced from Envisat ASAR and TerraSAR-X data, acquired over bare soils with in situ measurements heterogeneity into account in the backscatter model. Key words: SAR, AIEM, soil moisture profile, bare soil hal in the L, C, and X frequency bands, empirical and semi-empirical models are often calibrated using soil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Stable isotopic investigations of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents. 1997 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The author has made significant progress in developing innovative methods for investigating the mechanism and extent of in situ bioremediation of chlorinated organic solvents. These methods use precise isotopic ratio measurements of chlorine and carbon in reactant and product species in laboratory experiments and in materials from field demonstration sites. Specific tasks completed during FY 1997 include: (1) refinement and publication of a new analytical method for precise determination of chlorine and carbon isotope ratios in chlorinated volatile organic compounds; (2) laboratory experiments involving biological degradation of chlorinated solvents in liquid cultures and soil columns; and (3) use of chlorine and carbon isotope ratios to investigate natural attenuation of trichloroethene at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This work can have immediate impact because it will provide the fundamental basis for a new and cost-effective means of evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation schemes for chlorinated organic solvents in soils, vadose horizons, and groundwater plumes.'

Sturchio, N.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

In-situ observation of a soap film catenoid - a simple educational physics experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solution to the Euler-Lagrange equation is an extremal functional.To understand that the functional is stationary at local extrema (maxima or minima), we propose a physics experiment that involves using soap film to form a catenoid. A catenoid is a surface that is formed between two coaxial circular rings and is classified mathematically as a minimal surface.Using soap film, we create catenoids between two rings and characterize the catenoid in-situ while varying distance between rings. The shape of the soap film is very interesting and can be explained using dynamic mechanics. By observing catenoid, physics students can observe local extrema phenomena. We stress that in-situ observation of soap film catenoids is an appropriate physics experiment that combines theory and experimentation.

Masato Ito; Taku Sato

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Kinetics and energetics of oxidation of bitumen in relation to in-situ combustion processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion processes involve injection of air or oxygen into the formation to burn part of the bitumen, thereby producing heat that raises the temperature of the reservoir. At low temperatures (<<300/sup 0/C) oxidation is incomplete and leads to an increase in viscosity and to enhances deposition of coke or oxidized bituman that has lower heating value than cokes formed by purely thermal processes. These incomplete oxidation reactions, collectively called ''low temperature oxidation'' or ''LTO'', predominate during the ignition delay period of in-situ combustion and also occur ahead of the combustion front when oxygen is available. It is therefore important to have knowledge of the kinetics of bitumen in the temperature range in which LTO occurs.

Barta, L.; Hepler, L.G.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ?300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Koch`s experience with deep in situ combustion in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koch Exploration Company has been active with the combustion process in the Williston basin of North and South Dakota since 1979. Koch has three ongoing combustion projects in the basin. The Medicine Pole Hills Unit (MPHU) and the Capa Madison Unit (CMU) are located in the North Dakota, while the Buffalo Unit is situated in South Dakota. Because of low primary recovery from these deep carbonate reservoirs, studies were conducted to determine how the large volume of remaining oil could be recovered, and decisions were made to initiate an in situ combustion by air injection, pressure maintenance project in these reservoirs. The principal objective of this talk is to review the past performance of these combustion projects and discuss some of the operating problems we encountered. The other objectives are to outline the economics of the projects and to speculate on the future of in situ combustion technology as Koch sees it.

Miller, R.J. [Koch Exploration Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

427

In situ global method for measurement of oxygen demand and mass transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two aerobic microorganisms, Saccharomycopsis lipolytica and Brevibacterium lactofermentum, have been used in a study of mass transfer and oxygen uptake from a global perspective using a closed gas system. Oxygen concentrations in the gas and liquid were followed using oxygen electrodes, and the results allowed for easy calculation of in situ oxygen transport. The cell yields on oxygen for S. lipolytica and B. lactofermentum were 1.01 and 1.53 g/g respectively. The mass transfer coefficient was estimated as 10 h{sup {minus}1} at 500 rpm for both fermentations. The advantages with this method are noticeable since the use of model systems may be avoided, and the in situ measurements of oxygen demand assure reliable data for scale-up.

Klasson, K.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Lundbaeck, K.M.O.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Preparation of grout for stabilization of abandoned in-situ oil shale retorts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the preparation of grout from burned shale by treating the burned shale in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. to maximize the production of the materials alite and larnite. Oil shale removed to the surface during the preparation of an in-situ retort is first retorted on the surface and then the carbon is burned off, leaving burned shale. The burned shale is treated in steam at approximately 700.degree. C. for about 70 minutes. The treated shale is then ground and mixed with water to produce a grout which is pumped into an abandoned, processed in-situ retort, flowing into the void spaces and then bonding up to form a rigid, solidified mass which prevents surface subsidence and leaching of the spent shale by ground water.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Method for forming an in situ oil shale retort with horizontal free faces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in an in situ oil shale retort is provided. A horizontally extending void is excavated in unfragmented formation containing oil shale and a zone of unfragmented formation is left adjacent the void. An array of explosive charges is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation. The array of explosive charges comprises rows of central explosive charges surrounded by a band of outer explosive charges which are adjacent side boundaries of the retort being formed. The powder factor of each outer explosive charge is made about equal to the powder factor of each central explosive charge. The explosive charges are detonated for explosively expanding the zone of unfragmented formation toward the void for forming the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles having a reasonably uniformly distributed void fraction in the in situ oil shale retort.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO); Fernandes, Robert J. (Bakersfield, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

Alvine, K. J., E-mail: kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov; Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

An In-situ Tensile Test Apparatus for Polymers in High Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulus data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

Alvine, Kyle J.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Pitman, Stan G.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Dahl, Michael E.

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M., E-mail: Kathrin.lange@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institute of Solar Fuels, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Golnak, R.; Xiao, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institute of Methods for Material Development, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

Dev, H.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

ThomasJr., C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, LLC, Knoxville, TN; Granstedt, E. M. [Tri-Alpha Energy] [Tri-Alpha Energy; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL] [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL] [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL] [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of in situ, at-wavelength metrology for soft x-ray nano-focusing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the at-wavelength tests, and an original alignment method that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a FWHM focused spot size of ~;;120 nm, at 1-nm soft x-ray wavelength.

Yuan, Sheng Sam; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

2010-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

In-situ remediation of naturally occurring radioactive materials with high-permeability hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN-SITU REMEDIATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS WITH HIGH-PERMEABILITY HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by ANDRONIKOS STAVROS DEMARCHOS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Michael J. Economides (Chair of Committee) ulat D. Mamora (Member...

Demarchos, Andronikos Stavros

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their concentrations in unweathered or slightly weathered granitic rocks, soils developed on granitic rocks, and material from a granitic source transported by a local stream. "Uranium maps", obtained by fission track analysis, are used to understand the mode... OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN THE GRANITIC 17 19 30 30 31 38 SOURCE ROCKS . 44 REDISTRIBUTION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN GRANITIC MATERIALS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION 77 CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 105 108 112 113...

Ledger, Ernest Broughton

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development of In-Situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of In-situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement Guopeng Liu, Ik-Seong Joo, Li Song, Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska ABSTRACT Fan airflow is the key parameter for air... is another issue for this method. Therefore, it is very important to find an effective way to measure the airflow accurately. An airflow control named VSD volumetric tracking (VSDVT) has been developed by Liu [13] recently. This method uses fan...

Liu, G.; Joo, I. S.; Song, L.; Liu, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase. 2 figs.

Kaufman, E.N.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Charlie G. Coble Trichloroethylene (TCE) which is used as a solvent in many industries is one of the most common contaminant of ground waters. TCE can be degraded by methanotrophic bacteria, along with other... heterotrophic organisms, into inorganic end products. An in situ model aquifer with six sampling zones was used to degrade TCE aerobically by stimulating a methanotrophic population. Three experiments were done on the aquifer. TCE concentration for all...

Natarajan, Ranjan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of novel sol-gel indicators (SGI`s) for in-situ environmental measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic indicator molecules have been incorporated in a porous sol- gel matrix coated on the end of a fiber-optic lens assembly to create sensors for in situ environmental measurements. Probes have been made that are sensitive to pH and uranyl concentration. The use of fiber optics allows the probe to be lowered into a well or bore hole, while support equipment such as a spectrophotometer and computer may be situated hundreds of meters away.

Livingston, R.R.; Wicks, G.G.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase.

Kaufman, Eric N. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Feasibility studies of in-situ coal gasification in the Warrior coal field. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies in support of in-situ gasification involved experiments in bench-scale combustors where three parameters were varied independently: initial fuel bed temperature, applied air flow and water vapor influx rate. Methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids at high temperatures were evaluated and measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were made over a temperature range for several samples of coke. (LTN)

Douglas G.W.; McKinley, M.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ARM - PI Product - In-Situ Microphysics from the MPACE IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethaneProductsCSSEF ARMBEProductsIn-Situ Microphysics

448

ARM - PI Product - In-Situ Microphysics from the RACORO IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearchWarmingMethaneProductsCSSEF ARMBEProductsIn-Situ

449

INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Southern hemisphere tropospheric aerosol microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol particle size distribution data have been obtained in the southern hemisphere from approximately 4{degree}S to 44{degree}S and between ground level and 6 km, in the vicinity of eastern Australia. The relative shape of the free-tropospheric size distribution for particles with radii larger than approximately 0.04 {mu}m was found to be remarkably stable with time, altitude, and location for the autumn-winter periods considered. This was despite some large concentration changes which were found to be typical of the southeastern Australian coastal region. The majority of free-troposphere large particles were found to have sulfuric acid or lightly ammoniated sulfate morphology. Large particles in the boundary layer almost exclusively had a sea-salt morphology.

Gras, J.L. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Aspendale (Australia))

1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

In situ bioremediation of petroleum in tight soils using hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study evaluated the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in tight soils. The study area was contaminated with cutting oil from historic releases from underground piping, probably dating back to the 1940`s. Previous site assessment work indicated that the only chemicals of concern were total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Two fracture sets (stacks) were installed at different locations to evaluate this in situ bioremediation technique under passive and active conditions. Several injection wells were drilled at both locations to provide entry for hydraulic fracturing equipment. A series of circular, horizontal fractures 40 to 50 feet in diameter were created at different depths, based on the vertical extent of contamination at the site. The injection wells were screened across the contaminated interval which effectively created underground bioreactors. Soils were sampled and analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbons on five separate occasions over the nine-month study. Initial average soil concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons of 5,700 mg/kg were reduced to 475 mg/kg within nine months of hydraulic fracturing. The analytical results indicate an average reduction in TPH at the sample locations of 92 percent over the nine-month study period. This project demonstrates that in situ bioremediation using hydraulic fracturing has significant potential as a treatment technology for petroleum contaminated soils.

Stavnes, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States); Yorke, C.A. [Foremost Solutions, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Thompson, L. [Pintail Systems, Inc., Aurora, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Combining In-situ and In-transit Processing to Enable Extreme-Sscale Scientific Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the onset of extreme-scale computing, I/O constraints make it increasingly difficult for scientists to save a sufficient amount of raw simulation data to persistent storage. One potential solution is to change the data analysis pipeline from a post-process centric to a concurrent approach based on either in-situ or in-transit processing. In this context computations are considered in-situ if they utilize the primary compute resources, while in-transit processing refers to offloading computations to a set of secondary resources using asynchronous data transfers. In this paper we explore the design and implementation of three common analysis techniques typically performed on large-scale scientific simulations: topological analysis, descriptive statistics, and visualization. We summarize algorithmic developments, describe a resource scheduling system to coordinate the execution of various analysis workflows, and discuss our implementation using the DataSpaces and ADIOS frameworks that support efficient data movement between in-situ and in-transit computations. We demonstrate the efficiency of our lightweight, flexible framework by deploying it on the Jaguar XK6 to analyze data generated by S3D, a massively parallel turbulent combustion code. Our framework allows scientists dealing with the data deluge at extreme scale to perform analyses at increased temporal resolutions, mitigate I/O costs, and significantly improve the time to insight.

Bennett, Janine C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Abbasi, Hasan [ORNL] ORNL; Bremer, Peer-Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Grout, Ray [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Gyulassy, Attila [University of Utah] University of Utah; Jin, Tong [Rutgers University] Rutgers University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL] ORNL; Kolla, Hemanth [Sandia National Laboratory (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); Parashar, Manish [Rutgers University] Rutgers University; Pascucci, Valerio [University of Utah] University of Utah; Pebay, Philippe [Kitware] Kitware; Thompson, David [Kitware] Kitware; Yu, Hongfeng [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Zhang, Fan [Rutgers University] Rutgers University; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Application of meta-transcriptomics and -proteomics to analysis of in situ physiological state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the growth-limiting factor or environmental stressors affecting microbes in situ is of fundamental importance but analytically difficult. Microbes can reduce in situ limiting nutrient concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, and contaminated ecosystems may contain multiple stressors. The patterns of gene or protein expression by microbes in nature can be used to infer growth limitations, because they are regulated in response to environmental conditions. Experimental studies under controlled conditions in the laboratory provide the physiological underpinnings for developing these physiological indicators. Although regulatory networks may differ among specific microbes, there are some broad principles that can be applied, related to limiting nutrient acquisition, resource allocation, and stress responses. As technologies for transcriptomics and proteomics mature, the capacity to apply these approaches to complex microbial communities will accelerate. Global proteomics has the particular advantage that it reflects expressed catalytic activities. Furthermore, the high mass accuracy of some proteomic approaches allows mapping back to specific microbial strains. For example, at the Rifle IFRC field site in Western Colorado, the physiological status of Fe(III)-reducing populations has been tracked over time. Members of a 'subsurface clade' within the Geobacter predominated during carbon amendment to the subsurface environment. At the functional level, proteomic identifications produced inferences regarding (i) temporal changes in anabolism and catabolism of acetate, (ii) the onset of N2 fixation when N became limiting, and (iii) expression of phosphate transporters during periods of intense growth. The application of these approaches in situ can lead to discovery of novel physiological adaptations.

Konopka, Allan; Wilkins, Michael J.

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

In Situ Laser Synthesis of Si Nanowires in the Dynamic TEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanowires (NWs) are a crucial component in today's nanoscale devices and are vital to the further development of nanotechnology. To achieve reliable growth of NWs and uniform electronic properties, the specific mechanisms that control the structural development of NWs and the correlation between NWs and their nucleation and growth processes must be examined. Because imaging is not possible in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) chambers, in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) based growth methods provide a method for characterizing NW evolution. In this paper, we describe a new method of in situ synthesis and imaging of NWs using laser-assisted growth inside a TEM. The vapor-liquid solid (VLS) growth mechanism (Figure 1), first described by Wagner and co-workers, is a widely accepted description of how many 1D nanostructures are formed. VLS and similar models have been applied to such methods as hybrid pulsed-laser ablation/chemical vapor deposition (PLA/CVD) and laser assisted NW growth at elevated temperatures, in which a pulsed laser ablates a target with gas flowing through the reaction chamber held at elevated temperature. These methods have successfully produced semiconductor and conducting oxide NWs with size control determined by the catalyst droplet diameter. The VLS description of NW growth is a widely accepted model, but the exact role of vapor species and its interaction with the catalyst particle is not fully understood. For example, NW growth has been observed to occur far below predicted eutectic temperatures, which suggests that alternative mechanisms such as solid-liquid-solid growth (SLS) may play a role. Many NW fabrication techniques preclude direct in situ characterization of the growth process. Because of this need for direct observation during growth, TEM-based NW growth methods have become increasingly popular. Though progress has been made in the study of the VLS mechanism of NW growth using in situ TEM, conventional in situ growth experiments are limited by the standard video frame rate ({approx}30 Hz). Because of this limitation, relationships between reactant incorporation and transport, catalyst-wire interface development, and wire growth texture remain somewhat unclear. Moreover, laser-assisted phenomena (PLA or PLA/CVD) cannot be studied with conventional in situ TEM, which is typically performed with environmental TEM techniques using resistive heating. A novel form of in situ TEM for the study of NW growth by laser-assisted techniques is described in this paper. Here we present an in situ method for PLA synthesis of 1D nanostructures using the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM)[18,19] that will permit the details of laser-assisted NW synthesis to be elucidated. The DTEM, schematically shown in Figure 2, consists of a TEM column (JEOL 2000FX) to which a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, labeled 'hydrodrive laser' in Fig. 2, is added. This laser is incident directly on the sample and can be operated at 1064, 532 or 355nm. The direct delivery of energy initiates a phase change or reaction that is investigated in situ during the experiment. Thus, the microscope can be used to fabricate NWs while simultaneously characterizing the reaction products created by each laser pulse. A second pulsed laser (15-ns-duration frequency-quintupled Nd:YLF) added to the column (labeled 'cathode laser' in figure 2) enables operation in both a pulsed photoemission and conventional thermionic continuous-wave (CW) electron beam imaging modes.[19] The pulsed mode's nanosecond-scale imaging capability greatly exceeds the {approx}30 Hz time resolution of conventional in situ TEM and can potentially provide a detailed understanding of NW growth. Time-resolved imaging experiments aimed at capturing the intermediate states at nanosecond time scales in PLA NW growth are underway and will be addressed in a future publication. In this paper, we present results obtained using in situ imaging in conventional CW imaging mode, but taking advantage of the DTEM's in situ laser drive capability. Specifically, we will present

Taheri, M; Reed, B; LaGrange, T; Browning, N

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measurement uncertainty from In-Situ gamma spectroscopy of nonhomogeneous containers and from Laboratory Assay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a D and D or ER process containers of radioactive waste are normally generated. The activity can commonly be determined by gamma spectroscopy, but frequently the measurement conditions are not conducive to precise sample-detector geometries, and usually the radioactive material is not in a homogeneous distribution. What is the best method to accurately assay these containers - sampling followed by laboratory analysis, or in-situ spectroscopy? What is the uncertainty of the final result? To help answer these questions, the Canberra tool ISOCS Uncertainty Estimator [IUE] was used to mathematically simulate and evaluate several different measurement scenarios and to estimate the uncertainty of the measurement and the sampling process. Several representative containers and source distributions were mathematically defined and evaluated to determine the in-situ measurement uncertainty due to the sample non-uniformity. In the First example a typical field situation requiring the measurement of 200-liter drums was evaluated. A sensitivity analysis was done to show which parameters contributed the most to the uncertainty. Then an efficiency uncertainty calculation was performed. In the Second example, a group of 200-liter drums with various types of non-homogeneous distributions was created, and them measurements were simulated with different detector arrangements to see how the uncertainty varied. In the Third example, a truck filled with non-uniform soil was first measured with multiple in-situ detectors to determine the measurement uncertainty. Then composite samples were extracted and the sampling uncertainty computed for comparison to the field measurement uncertainty. (authors)

Bronson, F. [CHP, Canberra Industries, Meriden CT (United States); Atrashkevich, V. [Stroiteley, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Molecular Analysis of Rates of Metal Reduction andMetabolic State of Geobacter Species During in situ Uranium Bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress from June 2004 through April 2005. Research focused on monitoring the in situ rates of metabolism and the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae during in situ bioremediation of uranium at the field study site in Rifle, Colorado. As detailed below, it was demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to quantify in situ levels of transcripts for key metabolic genes and from this information infer not only rates of electron transfer to metals, but also nutrient limitations which might be limiting this process.

Lovley, Derek R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incident radiation are distinguished, and albedos for oceanOceans using multiple satellite datasets in conjunction with MACR (Monte Carlo Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation)ocean temperature is coupled with the rest of the climate system, the dimming of surface radiation

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

Mekala, Malla R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with sediment contamination levels. While field assays may provide more ecologically relevant data, the multiple environmental variables may produce sufficient background noise to mask the true effects of contamination.

Costa, Pedro M., E-mail: pmcosta@fct.unl.pt [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Neuparth, Teresa S. [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)] [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Caeiro, Sandra [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal) [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Aberta, Rua da Escola Politecnica, 141, 1269-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, Jorge [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)] [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal)] [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Angel DelValls, T. [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)] [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Costa, Maria H. [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)] [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Design of Hybrid Steam-In Situ Combustion Bitumen Recovery Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given enormous capital costs, operating expenses, flue gas emissions, water treatment and handling costs of thermal in situ bitumen recovery processes, improving the overall efficiency by lowering energy requirements, environmental impact, and costs of these production techniques is a priority. Steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is the most widely used in situ recovery technique in Athabasca reservoirs. Steam generation is done on surface and consequently, because of heat losses, the energy efficiency of SAGD can never be ideal with respect to the energy delivered to the sandface. An alternative to surface steam generation is in situ combustion (ISC) where heat is generated within the formation through injection of oxygen at a sufficiently high pressure to initiate combustion of bitumen. In this manner, the heat from the combustion reactions can be used directly to mobilize the bitumen. As an alternative, the heat can be used to generate steam within the formation which then is the agent to move heat in the reservoir. In this research, alternative hybrid techniques with simultaneous and sequential steam-oxygen injection processes are examined to maximize the thermal efficiency of the recovery process. These hybrid processes have the advantage that during ISC, steam is generated within the reservoir from injected and formation water and as a product of oxidation. This implies that ex situ steam generation requirements are reduced and if there is in situ storage of combustion gases, that overall gas emissions are reduced. In this research, detailed reservoir simulations are done to examine the dynamics of hybrid processes to enable design of these processes. The results reveal that hybrid processes can lower emitted carbon dioxide-to-oil ratio by about 46%, decrease the consumed natural gas-to-oil ratio by about 73%, reduce the cumulative energy-to-oil ratio by between 40% and 70% compared to conventional SAGD, and drop water consumption per unit oil produced. However, oil recovery is between 25% and 40% below that of SAGD. Design of successful hybrid steam-oxygen processes must take into account the balance between injected steam and amount of injected oxygen and combustion gas products that dilute injected and in situ-generated steam in the depletion chamber by lowering its partial pressure, and thus its saturation temperature which in turn impacts production rates and recovery.

Yang Xiaomeng; Gates, Ian D. [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)], E-mail: ian.gates@ucalgary.ca

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol chemical vapor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical and microphysical properties influence aerosol optical properties and radiative effects... distribution of aerosol extensive and intensive properties will aid ......

465

AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL SPECIATION MONITOR Yin-Nan Lee1 , Fan Mei1 , Stephanie DeJong1 , Anne Jefferson2 1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

466

Estimates of New and Total Productivity in Central Long Island Sound from In Situ Measurements of Nitrate and Dissolved Oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeochemical cycles in estuaries are regulated by a diverse set of physical and biological variables that operate over a variety of time scales. Using in situ optical sensors, we conducted a high-frequency time-series ...

Raymond, Peter A.

467

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: In-situ Solvothermal Synthesis of Novel High-Capacity Cathodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Brookhaven National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about in-situ...

469

In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High-Pressure and -Temperature 13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High the reaction of CO2 with water. Many studies6,8-10 have focused on the carbonation of the magnesium-contai

Skemer, Philip

470

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

471

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retorted and wet with oil, and shale sections 18 through 24V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- State

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- Stateactivation: Archaeometry, oil-shale analysis v. 11, p.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A study of air flow through saturated porous media and its applications to in-situ air sparging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficiency of an in situ air sparging system is controlled by the extent of contact between injected air and contaminated soil and pore fluid. Characterizing the mechanisms governing air propagation through saturated ...

Marulanda, Catalina, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Is there any beam yet. Uses of synchrotron radiation in the in situ study of electrochemical interfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advantages of employing synchrotron radiation for the in situ study of electrochemical interfaces are discussed with emphasis on the techniques of surface EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and X-ray standing waves. The principles behind the techniques are briefly considered followed by a discussion of recent experimental results. Examples include the study of under potentially deposited metallic monolayers, polymer films on electrodes, and in situ measurement of adsorption isotherms. The authors conclude with an assessment of future directions.

Abruna, H.D.; White, J.H.; Albarelli, M.J.; Bommarito, G.M.; Bedzyk, M.J.; McMillan, M.

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

Hu, Shishan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

aerosol particle penetration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the subsequent aerosol penetration performance through these tubes were conducted for a aerosol particle size range of 5 nm to 20 nm and a flow rate range of 28 Lmin to 169.9...

480

Effects of operating conditions on a heat transfer fluid aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of heat transfer fluid aerosols from process leaks. To simulate industrial leaks, aerosol formation from a plain orifice into ambient air is studied by measuring liquid drop sizes and size distributions at various distances from an orifice. Measurements...

Sukmarg, Passaporn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-situ aerosol profiles" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

In situ formation of micron-scale Li-metal anodes with high cyclability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning probe microscopy methods have been used to fabricate and cycle micron-scale Li anodes deposited electrochemically under nanofabricated Au current collectors. An average Li volume of 5 10^8 nm3 was deposited and cycled with 100 % coulombic efficiency for ~ 160 cycles. Integrated charge/discharge values agree with before/after topography, as well as in situ dilatometry, suggesting this is a reliable method to study solid-state electrochemical processes. In this work we illustrate the possibility to deposit highly cyclable nanometer thick Li electrodes by mature SPM and nanofab techniques which can pave the way for inexpensive nanoscale battery arrays.

Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Lawton, Jamie S [ORNL] [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL] [ORNL; Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL] [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL; Balke, Nina [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

Rodriguez, L. A. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Magen, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Fundacion ARAID, 50004 Zaragoza (Spain)] [Spain; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France) [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347 F-31055, Toulouse Cedex (France); Serrano-Ramon, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain) [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

In-situ measurements of friction and bearing correlated with instrumented pile tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure was adapted for use wi th a standard core dril 11ng rig. All load measurements were made at the ground surface. The 1n-situ measured values of skin fr1ct1on and point bearing taken dur1ng sampling operat1ons were compared with measured values... not have been possible. INTRODUCTION TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Nature of the Problem . Present Status of the Iluestion Objectives 1 2 4 IN-SITU TESTING E(UIPNENT General Load Neasuring Device . Loading Equipment . Load Recording Equipment...

Perdue, George William

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

An atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray diffraction and scattering analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structure of thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) will determine important performance properties such as conductivity, breakdown voltage, and catalytic activity. We report the design of an atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray analysis that can be used to monitor changes to the crystal structural during ALD. The application of the chamber is demonstrated for Pt ALD on amorphous SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} (001) using synchrotron-based high resolution x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and grazing incidence small angle scattering.

Geyer, Scott M.; Methaapanon, Rungthiwa; Kim, Woo-Hee; Bent, Stacey F., E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Johnson, Richard W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Van Campen, Douglas G.; Metha, Apurva [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Flow through in situ reactors with suction lysimeter sampling capability and methods of using  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An in situ reactor for use in a geological strata includes a liner defining a centrally disposed passageway and a sampling conduit received within the passageway. The sampling conduit may be used to receive a geological speciment derived from geological strata therein and a lysimeter is disposed within the sampling conduit in communication with the geological specimen. Fluid may be added to the geological specimen through the passageway defined by the liner, between an inside surface of the liner and an outside surface of the sampling conduit. A distal portion of the sampling conduit may be in fluid communication with the passageway.

Radtke, Corey W. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Blackwelder, D. Brad (Blackfoot, ID) [Blackfoot, ID; Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

488

In-Situ Monitoring of Particle Growth at PEMFC Cathode under Accelerated Cycling Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-situ method to measure changes in catalyst particle size at the cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is demonstrated. Synchrotron X-rays, 58 keV, were used to measure the pair distribution function on an operating fuel cell and observe the growth of catalyst particles under accelerated degradation conditions. The stability of Pt/C and PtCo/C with different initial particle sizes was monitored over 3000 potential cycles. The increase in particle size was fit to a linear trend as a function of cycles. The most stable electrocatalyst was found to be the alloyed PtCo with the larger initial particle size.

Redmond, Erin L.; Setzler, Brian P.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Fuller, Thomas F. (GIT); (Columbia)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

489

In-situ magnetoresistance measurements during patterning of spin valve devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation does not exceed the limit of length. Some of the work in this thesis has been published as listed below. Publications • “Control of the switching properties of magnetic thin films and spin valve devices by patterning”, D.Morecroft, C... .W. Leung, N.A. Stelmashenko, J.L. Prieto, D.B. Jardine and M.G. Blamire. IEEE Trans. Mag. 37 Issue: 4 Part: 1 (2001) pp. 2079 –2081. • “In-situ magnetoresistance measurements during patterning of thin films and spin valve devices”, D.Morecroft, C...

Morecroft, Deborah

490

Instrumentation and process control development for in situ coal gasification. Quarterly report, December 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of data for the Hanna IV and Hoe Creek in situ coal gasification tests raised questions concerning the fundamental controlling mechanisms of the process. The two main areas of concern are: (1) the air flow patterns; and (2) the initial cavity growth. Sandia National Laboratories is addressing these concerns by developing models of these processes. Results to date are in qualitative agreement with known phenomena. There have also been developments in data handling capability. These include improved data presentation ability and development of routine storage, access and back up methods.

Glass, R.E. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

BX in situ oil shale project. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1-November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

September 1, 1981-November 30, 1981, was the fourth consecutive quarter of superheated steam injection at the BX In Situ Oil Shale Project. During the quarter, 117,520 barrels of water as steam were injected into project injection wells at an average wellhead temperature of 715/sup 0/F and an average wellhead pressure of 1378 PSIG. During the same period, 148,516 barrels of fluid were produced from the project production wells for a produced-to-injected fluid ratio of 1.26 to 1.0. Net oil production for the quarter was 169 barrels.

Dougan, P.M.

1981-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

492

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z