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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Controlling Minimally-Actuated Vehicles for Applications in Ocean Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean currents to compute a path between prescribed waypoints that has the highest likelihood to achieve reliable trajectories, as their motion is dictated more by external forces (ocean currents) thanControlling Minimally-Actuated Vehicles for Applications in Ocean Observation Ryan N. Smith

Smith, Ryan N.

2

Tabular icebergs in ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in ocean waves. Two field seasons have been carried out by SPRI in cooperation with Norsk Polarinstitutt, and Foldvik et a/.11 have reported some measurements which took place during ... officers and the crew of the ship for their patience and help. We thank the Norsk Polarinstitutt (NP) and the Radio Echo Group at SPRI for loan of equipment, ...

Monica Kristensen; Vernon A. Squire; Stuart C. Moore

1982-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mechanisms Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leading to Co-existence of Gas Leading to Co-existence of Gas and Hydrate in Ocean Sediments Steven Bryant Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering The University of Texas at Austin and Ruben Juanes Dept. of Civil Engineering MIT Observations and Ruminations * Some proposed explanations for co-existence - kinetics of hydrate formation; - regional geotherms; - hypersaline brines as a result of hydrate formation;

4

Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement Glenn A. Spinelli, Emily R. Giambalvo, and Andrew T. Fisher 6.1 Introduction Sediments blanketing oceanic igneous basement rocks control the communication between fluid within the crust and the oceans. Seafloor sediments

Fisher, Andrew

5

 COMPOUND-SPECIFIC RADIOCARBON ANALYSES OF PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACIDS AND n -ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Analyses of Phospholipid Fatty Acids and n-Alkanes in Ocean Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monica Basin surface sediment: a model based on compound-ACIDS AND n-ALKANES IN OCEAN SEDIMENTS Ellen R M Druffel 1 •organic matter in ocean sediments from the northeast Pacific

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there?methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy & Fuels 2005: 19:Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

``Going with the Flow'' or Not: Evidence of Positive Rheotaxis in Oceanic Juvenile Loggerhead Turtles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Donald R. Kobayashi1 *, Richard Farman2 , Jeffrey J. Polovina1 , Denise M. Parker3 , Marc Rice4 , George significance of rheotaxis in oceanic juvenile loggerhead turtles are discussed. Citation: Kobayashi DR, Farman

9

The feasibility of creating private property rights in ocean fisheries resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FEASIBILITY OF CREATING PRIVATE PPOPERTY RIGHTS IN OCEAN FISHERIES RESOURCES A Thesis by Gordon Mathews Euler Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requiremerts for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Management THE I EASIGILITY OF CREATING PRIVATE PROPERTY RIGHTS IN OCEAN FISHERIES RESOURCES A Thesis by Gordon Mathews Euler Approved as to style and content by: ' (Chairman of Co, ittee) ( (Head...

Euler, Gordon Mathews

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Optimal Trajectory Generation in Ocean Flows Tamer Inanc, Shawn C. Shadden and Jerrold E. Marsden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currents to help propel the gliders around the ocean for sustainable missions. The idea of exploitingOptimal Trajectory Generation in Ocean Flows Tamer Inanc, Shawn C. Shadden and Jerrold E. Marsden near optimal trajectories for autonomous underwater gliders in a dynamic ocean environment. This opens

Marsden, Jerrold

11

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

12

Improved irradiances for use in ocean heating, primary production, and photo-oxidation calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

computed by a radiative transfer code that can be used to convert above-surface values in either energy- plankton affect upper-ocean thermal structure via absorption of solar irradiance at visible wavelengthsImproved irradiances for use in ocean heating, primary production, and photo-oxidation calculations

Boss, Emmanuel S.

13

A model for motion pattern discovery in ocean drifter networks Arda Nural, Silvia Nittel, Niki Trigoni, Neal Pettigrew  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

{arda, nittel}@spatial.maine.edu Abstract-- Ocean currents monitoring is a crucial re- search area drifters and high frequency coastal radars are utilized in ocean current monitoring. In the near future challenges with regard to in-network data collection, and aggregation to provide continuous ocean current

Nittel, Silvia

14

Macroscopic observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave 'classically' provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

Poulin, David [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Macroscopic observables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave “classically” provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

David Poulin

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

17

The impact of bimodal distribution in ocean transportation transit time on logistics costs : an empirical & theoretical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As ocean shipments have increased alongside globalization, transit time uncertainty has increased as well. This problem was observed to have variable levels of impacts on logistics cost and safety stock levels. This thesis ...

Das, Lita

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

20

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atomic Collapse Observed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

22

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

24

Global Lightning Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flash Rate Global distribution of lightning from a combined nine years of observations of the NASA OTDGlobal Lightning Observations #12;Optical Transient Detector ( launched April, 1995 ) Lightning Imaging Sensor ( launched November, 1997 ) Lightning Detection from Low Earth Orbit #12;LIS on TRMM #12

California at Berkeley, University of

25

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

26

Minisuperspaces: Observables and Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A canonical transformation is performed on the phase space of a number of homogeneous cosmologies to simplify the form of the scalar (or, Hamiltonian) constraint. Using the new canonical coordinates, it is then easy to obtain explicit expressions of Dirac observables, i.e.\\ phase space functions which commute weakly with the constraint. This, in turn, enables us to carry out a general quantization program to completion. We are also able to address the issue of time through ``deparametrization'' and discuss physical questions such as the fate of initial singularities in the quantum theory. We find that they persist in the quantum theory {\\it inspite of the fact that the evolution is implemented by a 1-parameter family of unitary transformations}. Finally, certain of these models admit conditional symmetries which are explicit already prior to the canonical transformation. These can be used to pass to quantum theory following an independent avenue. The two quantum theories --based, respectively, on Dirac observables in the new canonical variables and conditional symmetries in the original ADM variables-- are compared and shown to be equivalent.

Abhay Ashtekar; Ranjeet S. Tate; Claes Uggla

1993-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

Seasonality in Ocean Microbial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the mesopelagic and bathypelagic realms of the North Atlantic basin . Deep Sea Res. II 57 , 1433 ( 2010 ). 10.1016/j.dsr2...patterns of microbial community structure in the Mid-Atlantic Bight . FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 65 , 484 ( 2008 ). 10.1111/j...

Stephen J. Giovannoni; Kevin L. Vergin

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

Challenges in Ocean Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean is a reservoir of energy. It is ... . Development of suitable cost effective technologies for power generation from different forms of ocean energy (like wave energy, tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conv...

S. Neelamani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edge Turbulence Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center *Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory + MPI for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Assoc., Greifswald, Germany American Physical Society - Div. of Plasma Physics Orlando, FL Nov. 12 - Nov. 16, 2007 APS-2007 (2) Background and Motivation for "Xpt-region" View Strong edge turbulence has been observed in nearly all magnetic confinement devices. Desire predictive capability Most previous measurements made near outboard midplane where the turbulence has the following main features: - generation is ballooning-like (absent at inboard midplane, etc.) - filaments/blobs moves radially outward with some poloidal motion

30

Nonlocal theory of accelerated observers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nonlocal theory of accelerated observers is developed on the basis of the hypothesis that an electromagnetic wave can never stand completely still with respect to an observer. In the eikonal approximation, the nonlocal theory reduces to the standard extension of Lorentz invariance to accelerated observers. The validity of the nonlocal theory would exclude the possibility of existence of any basic scalar field in nature. The observational consequences of this theory are briefly discussed.

Bahram Mashhoon

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

33

Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Multiple Magnetic Islands in the Core of a Reversed Field Pinch P. Franz, 1,2 L. Marrelli, 1,2 P. Piovesan, 1,2 B. E. Chapman, 3 P. Martin, 1,2 I. Predebon, 1,2 G. Spizzo, 1 R....

34

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

structure of K x Fe 2-y Se 2 . (a) FS mapping with the 2-Fe BZ boundary marked in green. (b),(d) Spec- tral images and (c),(e) second derivative in energy along the -X...

35

Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

52.25.Fi, 52.70.La Energy loss in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas for thermonuclear fusion research is dominated by fluc- tuation driven transport 1. In the...

36

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

37

NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

Gianotto, David

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Current HMS Observations - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS...

39

OVERVIEW OF SATURN LIGHTNING OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF SATURN LIGHTNING OBSERVATIONS G. Fischer* , U. A. Dyudina , W. S. Kurth , D. A. Gurnett The lightning activity in Saturn's atmosphere has been monitored by Cassini for more than six years favorably with imaging observa- tions of related cloud features as well as direct observations of flash

Gurnett, Donald A.

40

Baryon Resonances Observed at BES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

B. S. Zou

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Improving and Observing Lithiation Reactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to observe these reactions in real-time as these reactions proceed. Enabling Silicon Carbide to Host Lithium In one set of measurements, they have discovered that the lithiation...

42

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

43

Observing dynamos in cool stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim of this paper is to introduce the most important observables that help us to investigate stellar dynamos and compare those to the modeling results. We give an overview of the available observational methods and data processing techniques that are suitable for such purposes, with touching upon examples of inadequate interpretations as well. Stellar observations are compared to the solar data in such a way, which ensures that the measurements are comparable in dimension, wavelength, and timescale. A brief outlook is given to the future plans and possibilities. A thorough review of this topic was published nearly a decade ago (Berdyugina 2005), now we focus on the experience that have been gathered since that time.

Kovari, Zsolt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

46

Observations of the Icy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Observational Consequences of a Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider the implications of the "landscape" paradigm for the large scale properties of the universe. The most direct implication of a rich landscape is that our local universe was born in a tunnelling event from a neighboring vacuum. This would imply that we live in an open FRW universe with negative spatial curvature. We argue that the "overshoot" problem, which in other settings would make it difficult to achieve slow roll inflation, actually favors such a cosmology. We consider anthropic bounds on the value of the curvature and on the parameters of inflation. When supplemented by statistical arguments these bounds suggest that the number of inflationary efolds is not very much larger than the observed lower bound. Although not statistically favored, the likelihood that the number of efolds is close to the bound set by observations is not negligible. The possible signatures of such a low number of efolds are briefly described.

Ben Freivogel; Matthew Kleban; Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Leonard Susskind

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 13, 2012 December 13, 2012 CX-009588: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sologen Geothermal Co-Production Field Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.31, B3.1, B4.12, B5.5, B5.12, B5.15 Date: 12/13/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Assessment of Wind Resource on Tribal Land CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

51

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2012 2, 2012 CX-009577: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rochester Regional, Optics, Photonics & Imaging Accelerator CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York, New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012 CX-009566: Categorical Exclusion Determination Loan Loss Reserve CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B1.35, B2.1, B2.2, B5.1, B5.14, B5.16, B5.17, B5.18, B5.19 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 12, 2012

52

Detecting anthropogenic influences on climate with an atmospheric model forced with observed variations in sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six ensembles of four simulations with the Hadley Centre atmospheric general circulation model (HADAM2a) have been carried out for late 1948 to the end of 1994 with different specified atmospheric forcing distributions. These simulations are being used to understand the role of different forcing processes in determining the observed climate variations during the second half of the twentieth century. All ensembles started from different initial conditions and were forced with specified global observed monthly sea ice and sea surface temperature distributions using the GISST1.1 data set. The approach used deterministic sampling of observed variations in climate rather than a coupled model. The technique was also different in that it looked at the smaller residual climate signal due to direct anthropogenic over and above those captured in ocean surface temperatures. The results indicate that this method is a useful complement to approaches based on coupled models, aided by the fact that some of the residual climate signals are almost as large as the full signals seen in coupled models, particularly in the stratosphere. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Folland, C.K.; Sexton, D. [Hadley Centre, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Karoly, D. [Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Observation of the Top Quark  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Top quark production is observed in{bar p}p collisions at{radical}s= 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D{O} observe signals consistent with t{bar t} to WWb{bar b}, but inconsistent with the background prediction by 4.8{sigma} (CDF), 4.6a (D{O}). Additional evidence for the top quark Is provided by a peak in the reconstructed mass distribution. The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with the top quark decay. They measure the top quark mass to be 176{plus_minus}8(stat.){plus_minus}10(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (CDF), 199{sub -21}{sup+19}(stat.){plus_minus}22(sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} (D{O}), and the t{bar t} production cross section to be 6.8{sub -2.4}{sup+3.6}pb (CDF), 6.4{plus_minus}2.2 pb (D{O}).

Kim, S. B.

1995-08-00T23:59:59.000Z

54

Jet Observables Without Jet Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables---jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum---have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their "local" computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

Daniele Bertolini; Tucker Chan; Jesse Thaler

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Tappert, Claus [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Hoffman, Douglas I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Campbell, Ryan K., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu, E-mail: claus.tappert@uv.cl, E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humobldt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA 95521 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

58

Distributions: generators of observations What about reality?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributions: generators of observations What about reality? An example: homeopathy Conclusion Models, Estimation and Reality #12;Distributions: generators of observations What about reality? An example: homeopathy Conclusion 1. Distributions: generators of observations Statistical modelling is based

Hennig, Christian

59

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

60

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Directions in ocean-bottom surveying  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...autonomous buoys, powered either by a diesel generator or batteries. Each buoy is...increase and more crews will enter the market. This will in turn lead to shorter transit...the share of OBS data in the seismic market has remained relatively small. Apart...

Rob de Kok

62

Thermodynamic Optimization in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As alternative energy sources to oil and uranium, we can consider well known alternative sources such as solar power, geothermal power and wind power. However when we consider the 21st century energy sources, ocean

Y. Ikegami; H. Uehara

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fish are crucial in oceanic carbon cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Fish may play a more important role in the marine carbon cycle than previously thought, ... marine carbon cycle than previously thought, a new study shows. Researchers have found that fish excrete prodigious amounts of a mineral, calcium carbonate, that had been thought to come ...

Roberta Kwok

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of variations in ocean color  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 9, 1976 ... mote sensing values of the color of the ocean .... its spectral variations, we must first study ... tering can be expressed in terms of a power.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

WORLD SURFACE CURRENTS FROM SHIP'S DRIFT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 4 million observations of ship's drift are on file at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Centre, in Washington, D. C., representing a vast amount of information on ocean surface currents. The observed drift speeds are dependent on the frequency of occurence of the particular current speeds and the frequency of observation. By comparing frequency of observation with the drift speeds observed it is possible to confirm known current patterns and detect singularities in surface currents.

Duncan, C.P.; Schladow, S.G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Special Emphasis Observances | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services » Diversity and Inclusion » Special Emphasis Observances Services » Diversity and Inclusion » Special Emphasis Observances Special Emphasis Observances The Energy Department celebrates special emphasis observances regularly, inviting guest speakers to highlight how the agency's mission benefits from diversity and inclusion. The Energy Department celebrates special emphasis observances regularly, inviting guest speakers to highlight how the agency's mission benefits from diversity and inclusion. The Department of Energy observes special days, weeks, and months as reflected in the below list of special program observances. Observances are held annually in compliance with Executive Order 11478, 29 CFR Part 1614.102(b)(4), joint Congressional Resolutions, Presidential Proclamations, and the Department's diversity and inclusion goals as

67

First Plasma Wave Observations at Uranus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electrons. Various other plasma waves were also observed...plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive...BRIDGE, H.S., PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR URANUS...FROM URANUS AT 0.5 MHZ, ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; F. L. SCARF; R. L. POYNTER

1986-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

NASA to revamp Earth Observing System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA to revamp Earth Observing System ... EOS is the centerpiece of NASA's comprehensive Mission to Plant Earth, a program designed to observe simultaneously the atmosphere, oceans, and land—and their interactions—from space. ...

PAMELA ZURER

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions ...

Canizares, Claude R.

70

Statistical Design for Adaptive Weather Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Suppose that one has the freedom to adapt the observational network by choosing the times and locations of observations. Which choices would yield the best analysis of the atmospheric state or the best subsequent forecast? Here, this problem of “...

L. Mark Berliner; Zhan-Qian Lu; Chris Snyder

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Satellite observations of the Agulhas Current system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chlorophyll concentration| Satellite observations of the Agulhas...masses. | Laboratory for Satellite Oceanography, Southampton...Temperature Time Factors Weather 10.1098/rsta.2002.1107 Satellite observations of the Agulhas...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cooperation or Coordination of Underwater Glider Networks? An Assessment from Observing System Simulation Experiments in the Ligurian Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coordinated and cooperative-unaware networking of glider fleets have been proposed to obtain a performance gain in ocean sampling over naïve collective behavior. Whether one of these implementations results in a more efficient sampling of the ...

A. Alvarez; B. Mourre

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Natural geometric representation for electron local observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Automated Automated Surface Observing System Standby Options Power Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) General System Description * Self contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government weather operations, public consumption, etc. * Initial deployment began in 1991 and continued through 1997 * Located at 884 sites nationwide, normally at airports * System has two distinct subsystems: Field installed equipment (DCP & Sensor Group) and an indoor processor (ACU) with peripherals * Separate facility power for DCP & Sensors and ACU 1 * measure and collect data * Located on the airport * back up group for 10 minutes * Currently pl

75

On the realization of Bell observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how Bell observables on a bipartite quantum system can be obtained by local observables via a controlled-unitary transformation. For continuous variables this result holds for the Bell observable corresponding to the non-conventional heterodyne measurement on two radiation modes, which is connected through a 50-50 beam-splitter to two local observables given by single-mode homodyne measurements. A simple scheme for a controlled-unitary transformation of continuous variables is also presented, which needs only two squeezers, a parametric downconverter and two beam splitters.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paolo Perinotti

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Complex photosensitivity observed in germanosilica planar waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photosensitive effects distinguished as type I and type IIA photosensitivity within optical fibers were observed in a much more pronounced form within germanosilica waveguides...

Bazylenko, M V; Moss, D; Canning, J

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

78

ARM - Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 2013 BNL BBOP Website Contacts Larry Kleinman, Lead Scientist Arthur Sedlacek Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burning Plants, trees, grass, brush, and...

79

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Reinjection test wells can be used to obtain quite precise measurements of reservoir permeability....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

82

An observational analysis of the conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through naturalistic observational procedures, this study examined the dynamics of individualized education program (IEP) conferences. Participants present, the nature and frequency of topics discussed, and the length ...

Turnbull, Ann P.; Goldstein, Sue; Strickland, Bonnie; Curry, Lynn

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana Fall 2010 T/Th 2:10 ­ 3:30 pm CHCB 227://www.physics.umt.edu/~nate/astr362/ Course Description Observational astronomy relies heavily on application of advanced technology astronomy is dominated by the CCD and related pixel array detectors: digital devices with unprecedented

Vonessen, Nikolaus

84

Video Observation of the Leonids 2001 Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2012 research-article Papers 7020 7040 Video Observation of the Leonids 2001 Activity...presents an analysis of records obtained by video equipment of the 2001 Leonid meteor storm...performed a high-sensitivity and wide-field video observation during the period from 15 45......

Chilong Lin; Shinsuke Abe; Pavel Koten; I-Ching Yang

2012-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861 - 1881 October 2004 Prepared By Glen Conner Center under the auspices of the Climate Database Modernization Program, NOAA's National Climatic Data;1 HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861-1881 Glen Conner Kentucky State Climatologist

Maynard, J. Barry

86

JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Satellite (ALOS) 3 #12;4 Disaster Monitoring (Earthquake in Haiti, Jan 2010) ALOS AVNIR-2 ALOS PALSAR Hyper-/Multi- Spectral Panchromatic X Y Z #12;6 Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Current

87

H-alpha observations of zeta Tauri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report H-alpha observations of zeta Tauri, taken between late 2000 and early 2006. Next to extending existing long-term montioring of the disk state of this star we report an intermediate timescale of about 69 days to be present in the V/R variations of the Halpha line. The observational data will be published together with this manuscript.

E. Pollmann; Th. Rivinius

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle/EIT coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

S. Barreiro; J. W. R. Tabosa; H. Failache; A. Lezama

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Spectroscopic Observation of the Rotational Doppler Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

S. Barreiro; J. W. R. Tabosa; H. Failache; A. Lezama

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for providing satellite observations. The final step in this process will be the publication of a National Plan; Homeland and National Security; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education; ScienceNATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS Executive Office of the President National Science

Schrijver, Karel

91

Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

92

Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) will raise and lower a heavily instrumented tethered balloon system at regular intervals in the lower 2 kilometers of the atmosphere at Oliktok Point. Data obtained during the ALTOS campaign will provide a statistically significant set of observed in situ cloud properties for validating retrieval algorithms and help scientists reduce the uncertainty in the radiative forcing and heating rates on hourly time scales. The data will also help researchers gain a better understanding of the driving processes that control climate changes and determine the state of the Arctic climate system. Collaborators Science Team: The Pennsylvania State University, Stratton

93

Exponential smoothing with credibility weighted observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Our interest is in time series data smoothing. We view this process as an aggregation of previously observed values. We first discuss the features desired of a good smoothing operator. We particularly note the conflict that exists between our desire for minimal variance and desire to use the freshest data. We describe a number of commonly used smoothing techniques, moving average and exponential smoothing. We then consider the extension of these methods to the case where the observations can have different credibility or importances. Specifically we develop an extension of the exponential smoothing method to the case where the observations can have different importance weights in the smoothing process.

Ronald R. Yager

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01: Categorical Exclusion Determination 01: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007901: Categorical Exclusion Determination Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping and Prediction Using LIDAR, Aircraft, and In-Ocean Observations CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.2 Date: 02/22/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE is proposing to provide federal funding to State University of New York (SUNY) to develop, research, model, and collect data of environmental factors that influence wind turbine structures along the Atlantic coast. This study would include information gathering, data analysis and modeling, mapping, and reporting. CX-007901.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009575: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009130: Categorical Exclusion Determination

95

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

96

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

97

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

98

First Plasma Wave Observations at Neptune  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...revealed that Neptune has a large and complex magnetosphere...first observations of plasma waves and low-frequency...from lightning. Such large dispersions would require path lengths and plasma densities that are much larger than anything plausible...

D. A. Gurnett; W. S. Kurth; R. L. Poynter; L. J. Granroth; I. H. Cairns; W. M. Macek; S. L. Moses; F. V. Coroniti; C. F. Kennel; D. D. Barbosa

1989-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School ________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School (mark all that apply) Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Explore ideas, test conjectures, look for patterns Explore ideas, test conjectures

Lee, Carl

100

Observations, measurements and semantic reference spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

What is needed to enable communication about observation and measurement results in information systems? Information system ontologies make a certain conceptualization explicit and partially account for the meanings of symbols associated with this conceptualization. ... Keywords: Foundational ontology, measurement theory, semantics

Florian Probst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Filtering Turbulent Sparsely Observed Geophysical Flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Filtering sparsely turbulent signals from nature is a central problem of contemporary data assimilation. Here, sparsely observed turbulent signals from nature are generated by solutions of two-layer quasigeostrophic models with turbulent cascades ...

John Harlim; Andrew J. Majda

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Observations on Buoyant Convection in Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations on Buoyant Convection in Reverse Osmosis ... Buoyancy Effects in Dead-End Reverse Osmosis:? Visualization by Holographic Interferometry ... Buoyancy Effects in Dead-End Reverse Osmosis:? Visualization by Holographic Interferometry ...

Terry J. Hendricks; Jean F. Macquin; Forman A. Williams

1972-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) the nodal dynamics (linear and nonlinear). We find that typical observability metrics for 3 neuron motifs model of a natural system has many useful applications in nonlinear dynamics from weather prediction

Brennan, Sean

104

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print First Direct Observation of Spinons and Holons Print Spin and charge are inseparable traits of an electron, but in one-dimensional solids, a 40-year-old theory predicts their separation into "collective" modes-as independent excitation quanta called spinons and holons. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) should provide the most direct evidence of this spin-charge separation, as the single quasiparticle peak splits into a spinon-holon two-peak structure. However, despite extensive ARPES experiments, the unambiguous observation of the two-peak structure has remained elusive. Working at the ALS, a team of researchers from Korea, Japan, and the U.S. has now observed electron spin-charge separation in a one-dimensional solid. These results hold implications for future developments in several key areas of advanced technology, including high-temperature superconductors, nanowires, and spintronics.

105

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Some Observations on Competency Based Instruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: This article summarizes the authors' observations derived over the course of 3 years of research and experimentation with competency based instruction. While the intent of this project has been the development of ...

Altman, Reuben; Meyen, Edward L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Observations of the PSR transverse instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fast instability with beam loss is observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) when the injected beam current exceeds thresholds, with both bunched and unbunched beams. Large coherent transverse oscillations occur before and during beam loss. Recent observations of the instability indicate that it is an e-p''-type instability, driven by coupled oscillations due to electrons trapped within the proton beam. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Colton, E. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Fitzgerald, D.; Hardek, T.; Macek, R.J.; Plum, M.A.; Thiessen, H.A.; Wang, T.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Neuffer, D. (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

How Can We Observe and Describe Chaos?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new approach to define chaos in dynamical systems from the point of view of Information Dynamics. Observation of chaos in reality depends upon how to observe it, for instance, how to take the scale in space and time. Therefore it is natural to abandon taking several mathematical limiting procedures. We take account of them, and chaos degree previously introduced is redefined in this paper.

Andrzej Kossakowski; Masanori Ohya; Yosio Togawa

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Observation and modeling of the injection observed by THEMIS and LANL satellites during the 23  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007, the THEMIS constellation observed energetic particle injections and dipolarizations was leading in the constellation at 8.3 RE, also observed a clear injection signature, but the dipolarization; Kivelson et al., 1980]. The injections can be observed with or without energy dispersion, depending

California at Berkeley, University of

110

Predictions for Observing Protostellar Outflows with ALMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protostellar outflows provide a means to probe the accretion process of forming stars and their ability to inject energy into their surroundings. However, conclusions based on outflow observations depend upon the degree of accuracy with which their properties can be estimated. We examine the quality of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of protostellar outflows by producing synthetic $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{13}$CO(1-0) observations of numerical simulations. We use various ALMA configurations, observational parameters, and outflow inclinations to assess how accurately different assumptions and setups can recover underlying properties. We find that more compact arrays and longer observing times can improve the mass and momentum recovery by a factor of two. During the first $\\sim$0.3 Myr of evolution, $^{12}$CO(1-0) is optically thick, even for velocities $|v|\\ge 1$ km s$^{-1}$, and outflow mass is severely underestimated without an optical depth correction. Likewise, $^{13}$CO(1-0) i...

Bradshaw, C; Arce, H G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

112

Observing AAPI Heritage Month | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Observing AAPI Heritage Month Observing AAPI Heritage Month Observing AAPI Heritage Month May 1, 2012 - 4:42pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director What are the key facts? President Obama has also appointed a historic number of highly qualified Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to senior positions in his Administration Throughout May,the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders will be sharing the many ways in which the Obama Administration has helped the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Editor's Note: This blog originally appeared on the White House Blog, and is authored by Chris Lu, Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary. He is also the Co-Chair of the White House Initiative on Asian

113

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

114

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

115

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

116

OBSERVED DAMPING OF THE SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC MODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopic and stereoscopic imaging observations of slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation within a coronal loop are investigated to determine the decay length scale of the slow magnetoacoustic mode in three dimensions and the density profile within the loop system. The slow wave is found to have an e-folding decay length scale of 20,000{sup +4000}{sub -3000} km with a uniform density profile along the loop base. These observations place quantitative constraints on the modeling of wave propagation within coronal loops. Theoretical forward modeling suggests that magnetic field line divergence is the dominant damping factor and thermal conduction is insufficient, given the observed parameters of the coronal loop temperature, density, and wave mode period.

Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); De Moortel, I., E-mail: mike.s.marsh@gmail.com, E-mail: mmarsh@uclan.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Buonanno, Alessandra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Alessandra Buonanno; B. S. Sathyaprakash

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

Gorham, P.W.

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has been found, this work is the first observation of their distinct energy bands in graphene, or indeed in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a wide range of other tools and applications.

122

Microscopic observations on a kinetic Ising model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We comment on the practical realization and physical relevance of a k i n e t i cIsing model which has played an important role during the last decade as a guide for real experiments and for the development of theory. We stress the possibility of performing m i c r o s c o p i c observations during the computer evolution of the model system. This is illustrated by discussing the observed behavior of some general concepts of physics such as energy specific heat and metastable states.

J. Marro; R. Toral

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

Thomas W. Baumgarte

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A: PREINTERVIEW OBSERVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SECTION B: HOUSING TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SECTION C: HOME HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 SECTION D: AIR CONDITIONING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 SECTION E: WATER HEATING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 SECTION F: LIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 SECTION G: APPLIANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Refrigerators and Freezers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

125

AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) transition of the research results into sustained operations; and 3) management ap- plications in the U, and effective data integration and dissemination. Efficient management of sustained observing sys- tem, and the management and strategic planning applications at CPO. The final discussion contains some concluding remarks

126

The Observer Algorithm for Visibility Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

other algorithms do. We test this algorithm in several settings: rural, mountainous and urban areasThe Observer Algorithm for Visibility Approximation Per-Magnus OLSSON a and Patrick DOHERTY present a novel algorithm for visibility approximation that is sub- stantially faster than ray casting

Doherty, Patrick

127

Negative energy seen by accelerated observers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sampled negative energy density seen by inertial observers, in arbitrary quantum states is limited by quantum inequalities, which take the form of an inverse relation between the magnitude and duration of the negative energy. The quantum inequalities severely limit the utilization of negative energy to produce gross macroscopic effects, such as violations of the second law of thermodynamics. The restrictions on the sampled energy density along the worldlines of accelerated observers are much weaker than for inertial observers. Here we will illustrate this with several explicit examples. We consider the worldline of a particle undergoing sinusoidal motion in space in the presence of a single mode squeezed vacuum state of the electromagnetic field. We show that it is possible for the integrated energy density along such a worldline to become arbitrarily negative at a constant average rate. Thus the averaged weak energy condition is violated in these examples. This can be the case even when the particle moves at nonrelativistic speeds. We use the Raychaudhuri equation to show that there can be net defocusing of a congruence of these accelerated worldlines. This defocusing is an operational signature of the negative integrated energy density. These results in no way invalidate nor undermine either the validity or utility of the quantum inequalities for inertial observers. In particular, they do not change previous constraints on the production of macroscopic effects with negative energy, e.g., the maintenance of traversable wormholes.

L. H. Ford and Thomas A. Roman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation Breakdown in Carbon Nanotubes Adam W of the theoretically predicted breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes. The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) or adiabatic approximation is widely used to simplify the very complex

Cronin, Steve

129

First Plasma Wave Observations at Uranus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected...kilometers. BRIDGE, H.S., PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR URANUS...RADIO-EMISSION FROM URANUS AT 0.5 MHZ, ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL...SATURN BY THE VOYAGER PLASMA-WAVE INSTRUMENT, ICARUS...position where the 97.2-kHz radiation was blocked...

D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; F. L. SCARF; R. L. POYNTER

1986-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

F. Hautmann

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

OBSERVATIONS ON FISHES AND OTHER BIOTA OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.0 Sunrimary 27 References 29 FIGURES No. Page 1. East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas iv 2. Mouth- ber 1953 - May 1958 27 111 #12;GULF I NAUTICAL MILE MEXICO Figure l.--East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas344 OBSERVATIONS ON FISHES AND OTHER BIOTA OF EAST LAGOON, GALVESTON ISLAND Marino Biological

132

observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

b observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD) for CDF June 15, 2007 Special seminar #12 and plans q Conclusion June 15, 2007 Dmitry Litvintsev, Fermilab, CDF 2 #12;Introduction Happy to show, Fermilab, CDF 3 #12;Source of data: CDF II 3 ¡ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ total 2 ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ on tape Analysis uses data

Quigg, Chris

133

Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Weather (temperature, etc.) #12;Soil Moisture Drought monitoring in North-East Argentina by Aqua with other satellite data Land vegetation, ocean chlorophyll-a, and primary production Sea and Land surface

134

Hadley Cell Widening: Model Simulations versus Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations show that the Hadley cell has widened by about 2°–5° since 1979. This widening and the concomitant poleward displacement of the subtropical dry zones may be accompanied by large-scale drying near 30°N and 30°S. Such drying poses a ...

Celeste M. Johanson; Qiang Fu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

Lott, Francois

136

Timed Control with Observation Based and Stuttering Invariant Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Timed Control with Observation Based and Stuttering Invariant Strategies Franck Cassez1- tion of observations and must be stuttering invariant in the sense that repeated identical observations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

137

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis W. F. Feltz, D. D. Turner, R. O. Knuteson, and R. G. Dedecker Space Science and Engineering Center Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has funded the development of the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI). This has led to a hardened, autonomous system that measures downwelling infrared (IR) radiance at high-spectral resolution. Seven AERI systems have been deployed around the world as part of the ARM Program. The initial goal of these instruments was to characterize the clear-sky IR emission from the atmosphere,

138

Are We Observing Violations of Lorentz Symmetry?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations of ultra high energy cosmic rays and gamma rays suggest that there are small violations of Lorentz symmetry. If there were no such violations, then the GZK cut off would hold and cosmic rays with energy $\\sim 10^{20}eV$ or higher would not be reaching the earth. However some such events seem to have been observed. This has lead to phenomenological models in which there is a small violation of the Lorentz symmetry or the velocity of light. However recent Quantum Gravity and String Theory approaches which no longer consider a differentiable spacetime manifold already predict such violations. Similarly there are other theoretical reasons which also point to this. We briefly discuss the various possibilities.

B. G. Sidharth

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Polarization Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polarization observations of the cosmic microwave background with the Cosmic Background Imager from September 2002 to May 2004 provide a significant detection of the E-mode polarization and reveal an angular power spectrum of polarized emission showing peaks and valleys that are shifted in phase by half a cycle relative to those of the total intensity spectrum. This key agreement between the phase of the observed polarization spectrum and that predicted based on the total intensity spectrum provides support for the standard model of cosmology, in which dark matter and dark energy are the dominant constituents, the geometry is close to flat, and primordial density fluctuations are predominantly adiabatic with a matter power spectrum commensurate with inflationary cosmological models.

A. C. S. Readhead; S. T. Myers; T. J. Pearson; J. L. Sievers; B. S. Mason; C. R. Contaldi; J. R. Bond; R. Bustos; P. Altamirano; C. Achermann; L. Bronfman; J. E. Carlstrom; J. K. Cartwright; S. Casassus; C. Dickinson; W. L. Holzapfel; J. M. Kovac; E. M. Leitch; J. May; S. Padin; D. Pogosyan; M. Pospieszalski; C. Pryke; R. Reeves; M. C. Shepherd; S. Torres

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

Adamson, P [Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C [Rutherford; Auty, D J [Sussex U.; Ayres, D S [Argonne; Backhouse, C [Oxford U.; Barr, G [Oxford U.; Bishai, M [Brookhaven; Blake, A [Cambridge U.; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Boehnlein, D J [/Fermilab; Bogert, D [Fermilab; Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However there have been limited in situmeasurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity I with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence ? s to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume ? e . Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering.

Louis Goodman; Marcos M. Sastre-Córdova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Visual Observability of the Cassiopeia A Supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is generally believed that the explosion which gave birth to the Cassiopeia A supernova remmant resulted from core collapse of a hydrogen-deficient star. A progenitor that has lost all its hydrogen envelope and part of its helium envelope would lead to an explosion with the optical properties of a Type Ic supernova. There is evidence, if not general agreement, that Flamsteed observed the Cas A supernova as a sixth magnitude object in August, 1680. If an explosion with a typical SNIc light curve at the position and distance of Cas A attained maximum luminosity during the winter of 1679-1680, it would at that time have been poorly situated for visual observation, as its upper culmination would have taken place during daylight, while in August, between 170-200 days after peak luminosity, it would have been a sixth magnitude star.

J. A. Morgan

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

Ritsche, MT

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Direct observation of time reversal violation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electron Cloud observation in the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Recent observational progress in AM CVn binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of some recent research on AM CVn systems. We present: X-ray/UV observations made using XMM-Newton; the X-ray grating spectrum of RX J1914+24; preliminary results of a search for radio emission from AM CVn binaries, and discuss the strategy and first results of the RATS project, whose main aim is to discover AM CVn systems.

G. Ramsay; C. Brocksopp; P. Groot; P. Hakala; H. Lehto; T. Marsh; R. Napiwotzki; G. Nelemans; S. Potter; B. Slee; D. Steeghs; K. Wu

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Exotica possibility of new observations by BES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The employment of interpolating currents of existed studies of four-quark state and glueball with QCD sum rule approach is analyzed. In terms of suitable currents, the masses of the lowest lying scalar and pseudo-scalar glueball were determined. The masses of some tetraquark states and their first orbital excitations were obtained through a combination of the sum rule with the constituent quark model. Exotica possibility of the new observations by BES is discussed.

Ailin Zhang

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

A stratospheric balloon observing facility: Milo Base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a favourable geographic position (38°01?N 12°35?E) Milo Base guarantees long duration flights on Mediterrean Sea (at least 20 hours) at atmosphera limit (40 km of altitude) from Sicily to Spain. With a low X ray background it represents a special point for astrophysical observation. Programs for the next years collaboration feasibility work facilities and obtained results will be presented and discussed.

M. C. Falvella

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

RHESSI and SphinX Common Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) energy range: 3-8 keV (16 energy bands, E=0.3 keV) #12;Fluxes comparison SphinX DRM conversion factors possible. In 2009 we had three instruments that observed the Sun in similar energy band: SphinX, RHESSI, design & manufacture - energy range: 1.2 ­ 15 keV - time resolution: ~0.00001 s - sensitivity: 100x

Mrozek, Tomasz

152

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2081 MIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts: electrons, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly slow emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, and scrubbing.

FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUAN, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.; IRISO, U.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2001 RHIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly incoherent emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, scrubbing, and operation with long bunches.

FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUANG, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; ET AL.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Extreme commutative quantum observables are sharp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that, in the description of quantum observables, positive operator valued measures (POVMs) generalize projection valued measures (PVMs) and they also turn out be more optimal in many tasks. We show that a commutative POVM is an extreme point in the convex set of all POVMs if and only if it is a PVM. This results implies that non-commutativity is a necessary ingredient to overcome the limitations of PVMs.

Teiko Heinosaari; Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Pair-Production Supernovae: Theory and Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the physical properties of pair-production supernovae (PPSNe) as well as the prospects for them to be constrained observationally. In very massive (140-260 solar mass) stars, much of the pressure support comes from the radiation field, meaning that they are loosely bound, with an adiabatic coefficient that is close to the minimum stable value. Near the end of C/O burning, the central temperature increases to the point that photons begin to be converted into electron-positron pairs, softening gamma below this critical value. The result is a runaway collapse, followed by explosive burning that completely obliterates the star. While these explosions can be up to 100 times more energetic that core collapse and Type Ia supernovae, their peak luminosities are only slightly greater. However, due both to copious Ni-56 production and hydrogen recombination, they are brighter much longer, and remain observable for ~ 1 year. Since metal enrichment is a local process, PPSNe should occur in pockets of metal-free gas over a broad range of redshifts, greatly enhancing their detectability, and distributing their nucleosyntehtic products about the Milky Way. This means that measurements of the abundances of metal-free stars should be thought of as directly constraining these objects. It also means that ongoing supernova searches, already provide weak constraints for PPSN models. A survey with the NIRCam instrument on JWST, on the other hand, would be able to extend these limits to z ~ 10. Observing a 0.3 deg^2 patch of sky for one week per year for three consecutive years, such a program would either detect or rule out the existence of these remarkable objects.

Evan Scannapieco

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 × 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 ± 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ?> 2 × 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup –3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillwig, Todd [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heinz, Sebastian, E-mail: hermanm@space.mit.edu, E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu, E-mail: nss@space.mit.edu, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department, 5408 Sterling Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ground-Based Radiometric Observations of Atmospheric Water for Climate Research J. B. Snider, D. A. Hazen, A. J. Francavilla, W. B. Madsen, and M. D. Jacobson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction Surface-based microwave and infrared radiometers have been employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) in climate research since 1987. The ability of these systems to operate continuously and unattended for extended periods of time has provided significant new information on atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid. These data are being employed to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation feedback mechanisms, an understanding

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161

Physical Observables for Noncommutative Landau Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Quantum Mechanics of a point particle on a Noncommutative Plane in a magnetic field is implemented in the present work as a deformation of the algebra which defines the Landau levels. I show how to define, in this deformed Quantum Mechanics, the physical observables, like the density correlation functions and Green function, on the completely filled ground level. Also it will be shown that the deformation changes the effective magnetic field which acts on the particles at long range, leading to an incompressible fluid with fractional filling of Laughlin type.

Mauro Riccardi

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quantum discord between relatively accelerated observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quantum discord between two free modes of a scalar field which start in a maximally entangled state and then undergo a relative, constant acceleration. In a regime where there is no distillable entanglement due to the Unruh effect, we show that there is a finite amount of quantum discord, which is a measure of purely quantum correlations in a state, over and above quantum entanglement. Even in the limit of infinite acceleration of the observer detecting one of the modes, we provide evidence for a non-zero amount of purely quantum correlations, which might be exploited to gain non-trivial quantum advantages.

Animesh Datta

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 110  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the first XMM-Newton observation of the bright Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 110. We find a narrow Fe K fluorescent line, a broad component FWHM ~ 16500 km/s of the OVII triplet, either due to infall motions or gravitational redshift effects in the vicinity of the central black hole, a Comptonized accretion disc layer, and a strong starburst component. If the broad redshifted soft X-ray components are due to gravitational redshift effects, the distance of the line emitting regions ranges between about 0.2 and 1 light day with respect to the central black hole.

Th. Boller; I. Balestra; W. Kollatschny

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

Michael Lemonick

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Helicity Observation of Weak and Strong Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report in this letter our analysis of a large sample of photospheric vector magnetic field measurements. Our sample consists of 17200 vector magnetograms obtained from January 1997 to August 2004 by Huairou Solar Observing Station of the Chinese National Astronomical Observatory. Two physical quantities, $\\alpha$ and current helicity, are calculated and their signs and amplitudes are studied in a search for solar cycle variations. Different from other studies of the same type, we calculate these quantities for weak ($100G1000G$) fields separately. For weak fields, we find that the signs of both $\\alpha$ and current helicity are consistent with the established hemispheric rule during most years of the solar cycle and their magnitudes show a rough tendency of decreasing with the development of solar cycle. Analysis of strong fields gives an interesting result: Both $\\alpha$ and current helicity present a sign opposite to that of weak fields. Implications of these observations on dynamo theory and helicity production are also briefly discussed.

Mei Zhang

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

X-Ray Observations of Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the ways that X-ray observations provide unique information on radio galaxies. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission provides detailed data on ambient densities and temperatures. These parameters in turn can be used for pressure balance calculations and can demonstrate how the ambient gas affects radio source structure. Additionally, many signatures of the interaction of radio jets and lobes with the hot gas are found in high resolution X-ray maps. Non-thermal X-ray emission from knots and hotspots of radio jets can give us constraints on the relativistic electron population for energies greater that that normally sampled in the radio (in the case of synchrotron emission) or can give us an independent estimate of the average magnetic field strength (if inverse Compton emission is the origin of the X-rays). From recent ROSAT HRI observations of 3C 390.3 and 3C 120, we show evidence that X-ray emission from knots and hotspots appears to be associated with regions of large gradients in the radio surface brightness; i.e. at the location of powerful shocks.

D. E. Harris

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Report: Human Capital Discussion and Observations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Human Capital Discussion, Human Capital Discussion, Observations, and Recommendations August 24, 2006 Submitted by: Mr. A. James Barnes and Mr. Dennis Ferrigno Background: During the March 23-24, 2006 EMAB Public Meeting, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1), James Rispoli, asked the EMAB members to pursue a review of EM Human Capital issues. Although the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) is also conducting a review of this topic - the results of which will be available in October 2007 - Mr. Rispoli instructed EMAB to identify areas that need improvement and make recommendations to begin bettering the program now. EMAB focused specifically on the areas of: Morale/Workplace Census Planning/Accountability Training/Certification

168

Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

169

Non-observability of Spectroscopic Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectroscopic factor has long played a central role in nuclear reaction theory. However, it is not an observable. Consequently it is of minimal use as a meeting point between theory and experiment. In this paper the nature of the problem is explored. At the many-body level, unitary transformations are constructed that vary the spectroscopic factors over the full range of allowed values. At the phenomenological level, field redefinitions play a similar role and the spectroscopic factor extracted from experiment depend more on the assumed energy dependence of the potentials than on the measured cross-sections. The consistency conditions, gauge invariance and Wegmann's theorem play a large role in these considerations.

B. K. Jennings

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

172

Moving observers, nonorthogonal boundaries, and quasilocal energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The popular Hamilton-Jacobi method first proposed by Brown and York for defining quasilocal quantities such as energy for spatially bound regions assumes that the timelike boundary is orthogonal to the foliation of the spacetime. Such a restriction is undesirable for both theoretical and computational reasons. We remove the orthogonality assumption and show that it is more natural to focus on the foliation of the timelike boundary rather than the foliation of the entire four dimensional bound region. Reference spacetimes which define additional terms in the action are discussed in detail. To demonstrate this new formulation, we calculate the quasilocal energies seen by observers who are moving with respect to a Schwarzschild black hole.

I. S. Booth and R. B. Mann

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Observables in Neutrino Mass Spectroscopy Using Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP.

D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka; M. Yoshimura

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Solar coronal observations at high frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

A. C. Katsiyannis; M. Mathioudakis; K. J. H. Phillips; D. R. Williams; F. P. Keenan

2001-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Time Variability of the "Quiet" Sun Observed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observed a "quiet-Sun" region on 1999 February 17 from 02:15 UT to 3:00 UT with full resolution (05 pixel size), high cadence (125 s), and deep exposures (65 and 46 s) in the 171 Å and 195 Å wavelengths. We start our investigation of the time variability of "quiet-Sun" images with a detailed analysis of instrumental and nonsolar effects, such as orbital temperature variations, filtering of particle radiation spikes, spacecraft pointing drift, and solar rotation tracking. We quantify the magnitude of various noise components (photon Poisson statistics, data digitization, data compression, and readout noise) and establish an upper limit for the data noise level, above which temporal variability can safely be attributed to solar origin. We develop a pattern recognition code that extracts spatiotemporal events with significant variability, yielding a total of 3131 events in 171 Å and 904 events in 195 Å. We classify all 904 events detected in 195 Å according to flarelike characteristics and establish a numerical flare criterion based on temporal, spatial, and dynamic cross-correlation coefficients between the two observed temperatures (0.9 and 1.4 MK). This numerical criterion matches the visual flare classification in 83% of the cases and can be used for automated flare search. Using this flare discrimination criterion we find that only 35% (and 25%) of the events detected in 171 (and 195) Å represent flarelike events. The discrimination of flare events leads to a frequency distribution of peak fluxes, N(?F) ? ?F-1.83±0.07 at 195 Å, which is significantly flatter than the distribution of all events. A sensitive discrimination criterion of flare events is therefore important for microflare statistics and for conclusions on their occurrence rate and efficiency for coronal heating.

Markus J. Aschwanden; Richard W. Nightingale; Ted D. Tarbell; C. J. Wolfson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Observations of O2:CO2 exchange ratios during ecosystem gas W. A. Brand, M. Heimann, and J. Lloyd2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and respiration, thermal ingassing and outgassing of O2 in ocean water, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass than would be expected from fossil fuel combustion. This implies that the terrestrial biosphere has combustion consumes O2 and produces CO2 with exchange ratios (defined here as Ã?D[O2]/D[CO2]) varying from

177

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: an overviewNetworked Aquatic Microbial Observing Sys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems Ocean Research Goals · Development of autonomous networks of heterogeneous sensors to monitor and sample

Smith, Ryan N.

178

Time Variability of the "Quiet" Sun Observed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the geometric and physical parameters of 281 EUV nanoflares, simultaneously detected with the TRACE telescope in the 171 and 195 Å wavelengths. The detection and discrimination of these flarelike events is detailed in the first paper in this series. We determine the loop length l, loop width w, emission measure EM, the evolution of the electron density ne(t) and temperature Te(t), the flare decay time ?decay, and calculate the radiative loss time ?loss, the conductive loss time ?cond, and the thermal energy Eth. The findings are as follows: (1) EUV nanoflares in the energy range of 1024-1026 ergs represent miniature versions of larger flares observed in soft X-rays (SXR) and hard X-rays (HXR), scaled to lower temperatures (Te 2 MK), lower densities (ne 109 cm-3), and somewhat smaller spatial scales (l ? 2-20 Mm). (2) The cooling time ?decay is compatible with the radiative cooling time ?rad, but the conductive cooling timescale ?cond is about an order of magnitude shorter, suggesting repetitive heating cycles in time intervals of a few minutes. (3) The frequency distribution of thermal energies of EUV nanoflares, N(E) ? 10-46(E/1024)-1.8 (s-1 cm-2 ergs-1) matches that of SXR microflares in the energy range of 1026-1029, and exceeds that of nonthermal energies of larger flares observed in HXR by a factor of 3-10 (in the energy range of 1029-1032 ergs). Discrepancies of the power-law slope with other studies, which report higher values in the range of a = 2.0-2.6 (Krucker & Benz; Parnell & Jupp), are attributed to methodical differences in the detection and discrimination of EUV microflares, as well as to different model assumptions in the calculation of the electron density. Besides the insufficient power of nanoflares to heat the corona, we find also other physical limits for nanoflares at energies 1024 ergs, such as the area coverage limit, the heating temperature limit, the lower coronal density limit, and the chromospheric loop height limit. Based on these quantitative physical limitations, it appears that coronal heating requires other energy carriers that are not luminous in EUV, SXR, and HXR.

Markus J. Aschwanden; Ted D. Tarbell; Richard W. Nightingale; Carolus J. Schrijver; Alan Title; Charles C. Kankelborg; Piet Martens; Harry P. Warren

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies on the Variational Assimilation Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations M. Janisková, J.-F. Mahfouf, and J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berskshire, United Kingdom Abstract A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been developed at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to assimilate cloud properties in the framework of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) assimilation system. To investigate the potential of those schemes to modify the model temperature, humidity and cloud profiles and produce a better match to the observed radiation fluxes, one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) assimilation experiments have been carried out using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

180

Global Hydrometeor Occurrence as Observed by CloudSAT: Initial Observations from Summer 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of global hydrometeor coverage and occurrence frequencies as observed by the cloud radar on CloudSat are summarized using data collected during Summer 2006. CloudSat was launched on 28 April 2006 and began collecting data routinely on 7 June 2006. In this article we document the distribution of cloudiness from the ITCZ to the Polar regions as observed by CloudSat during the first summer of operations. The overall global hydrometeor coverage as observed by CloudSat is found to be 0.506. The vertical distribution of zonally averaged hydrometeor occurrence shows the relationship of clouds with components of the atmospheric general circulation such as the Hadley Cell, the ubiquitous storms over the Southern Ocean, and the subtropical stratocumulus regimes.

Mace, Gerald G.; Marchand, Roger T.; Zhang, Qiuqing; Stephens, Graeme L.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During the Synthesis of Ordered Nanoporous Metal in Soft Templates. In Situ Observation of Directed Nanoparticle Aggregation During...

182

Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide. Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide....

183

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice...

184

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

185

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsObservations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) Campaign Links GOAMAZON Website ARM Manacapuru Deployment Page Related Campaigns Observations and...

186

Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine in Free Oligonucleotides by Using Photoelectron Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine...

187

Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

188

Observational constraints to a unified cosmological model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a phenomenological unified model for dark matter and dark energy based on an equation of state parameter $w$ that scales with the $\\arctan$ of the redshift. The free parameters of the model are three constants: $\\Omega_{b0}$, $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$. Parameter $\\alpha$ dictates the transition rate between the matter dominated era and the accelerated expansion period. The ratio $\\beta / \\alpha$ gives the redshift of the equivalence between both regimes. Cosmological parameters are fixed by observational data from Primordial Nucleosynthesis (PN), Supernovae of the type Ia (SNIa), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The calibration of the 138 GRBs events is performed using the 580 SNIa of the Union2.1 data set and a new set of 79 high-redshift GRBs is obtained. The various sets of data are used in different combinations to constraint the parameters through statistical analysis. The unified model is compared to the $\\Lambda$CDM model and their differences are emphasized.

Cuzinatto, R R; de Morais, E M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Observational tests for ?(t)CDM cosmology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the observational viability of a class of cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, resulting in a production of cold dark matter particles at late times. Similarly to the flat ?CDM case, there is only one free parameter to be adjusted by the data in this class of ?(t)CDM scenarios, namely, the matter density parameter. To perform our analysis we use three of the most recent SNe Ia compilation sets (Union2, SDSS and Constitution) along with the current measurements of distance to the BAO peaks at z = 0.2 and z = 0.35 and the position of the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum. We show that in terms of ?{sup 2} statistics both models provide good fits to the data and similar results. A quantitative analysis discussing the differences in parameter estimation due to SNe light-curve fitting methods (SALT2 and MLCS2k2) is studied using the current SDSS and Constitution SNe Ia compilations. A matter power spectrum analysis using the 2dFGRS is also performed, providing a very good concordance with the constraints from the SDSS and Constitution MLCS2k2 data.

Pigozzo, C.; Carneiro, S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Dantas, M.A.; Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br, E-mail: aldinez@on.br, E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Observatório Nacional, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radio Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some aspects of radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies. The correlation between extreme values of Faraday rotation observed toward radio emitting structures in nearby radio galaxies, and X-ray emitting cluster atmospheres, is presented as a method for targeting objects at high redshift for deep X-ray searches. We present an X-ray detection of the extreme rotation measure radio galaxy PKS 1138-262 at z = 2.156, and we argue that the X-ray emission is from a cluster atmosphere with a luminosity of 1.7x10^{44} h^{-2} ergs sec^{-1}. We also present results on the correlation between size and redshift for a sample of ultra-luminous radio galaxies between 0 < z < 4.3. Source sizes decrease systematically with redshift, suggesting either denser environments, or younger sources, at high redshift. An alternative explanation is significant inverse Compton losses off the microwave background at high redshift.

C. L. Carilli; H. J. A. Rottgering; G. K. Miley L. Pentericci; D. E. Harris

1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Neutron scattering observation of solitons (invited)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been suggested that in systems with strong fluctuations as around a critical point strongly nonlinear effects should occur. The simplest possible equation for nonlinear dynamics is the sine?Gordon equation. This equation can be applied to the dynamics of a 1?D?ferromagnetic chain with planar anisotropy in a symmetry?breaking field (magnetic field perpendicular to the chain direction). The dynamics of such a system consist of two types of elementary excitations: nonlinear modes (solitons and breathers) and linear modes (spin waves). The thermodynamics for the nonlinear modes are the same as for a gas of noninteracting relativistic quasi?particles. In the frame of that picture the dynamic structure factor for an inelastic neutron scattering experiment can be calculated for the relativistic case and it appears that inelastic n?scattering is the most direct way for the observation of solitons. Experimental results obtained for CsNiF3 are discussed and compared with the theoretical results. These experimental results show that nonlinear modes are indeed an essential part of the dynamics of that system.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Observational Cosmology With Semi-Relativistic Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxy mergers lead to the formation of massive black hole binaries which can accelerate background stars close to the speed of light. We estimate the comoving density of ejected stars with a peculiar velocity in excess of $0.1c$ or $0.5c$ to be $\\sim 10^{10}$ and $10^5$ Gpc$^{-3}$ respectively, in the present-day Universe. Semi-relativistic giant stars will be detectable with forthcoming telescopes out to a distance of a few Mpc, where their proper motion, radial velocity, and age, can be spectroscopically measured. In difference from traditional cosmological messengers, such as photons, neutrinos, or cosmic-rays, these stars shine and so their trajectories need not be directed at the observer for them to be detected. Tracing the stars to their parent galaxies as a function of speed and age will provide a novel test of the equivalence principle and the standard cosmological parameters. Semi-relativistic stars could also flag black hole binaries as gravitational wave sources for the future eLISA observatory.

Loeb, Abraham

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

POLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF {sigma} ORIONIS E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some massive stars possess strong magnetic fields that confine plasma in the circumstellar environment. These magnetospheres have been studied spectroscopically, photometrically, and, more recently, interferometrically. Here we report on the first firm detection of a magnetosphere in continuum linear polarization, as a result of monitoring {sigma} Ori E at the Pico dos Dias Observatory. The non-zero intrinsic polarization indicates an asymmetric structure whose minor elongation axis is oriented 150. Degree-Sign 0 east of the celestial north. A modulation of the polarization was observed with a period of half of the rotation period, which supports the theoretical prediction of the presence of two diametrally opposed, corotating blobs of gas. A phase lag of -0.085 was detected between the polarization minimum and the primary minimum of the light curve, suggestive of a complex shape of the plasma clouds. We present a preliminary analysis of the data with the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere model, which could not reproduce simultaneously the photometric and polarimetric data. A toy model comprising two spherical corotating blobs joined by a thin disk proved more successful in reproducing the polarization modulation. With this model we were able to determine that the total scattering mass of the thin disk is similar to the mass of the blobs (2M{sub b}/M{sub d} = 1.2) and that the blobs are rotating counterclockwise on the plane of the sky. This result shows that polarimetry can provide a diagnostic of the geometry of clouds, which will serve as an important constraint for improving the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere model.

Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Townsend, R. H. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bjorkman, J. E., E-mail: carciofi@usp.br [Ritter Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

University of Hawaii#Institute for Astronomy OBSERVING TIME REQUEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the tidal features, and nuclear separation. By comparing the observed characteristics of such an optica

Hibbard, John

197

Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

198

Verification of speckle contrast measurement interrelation with observation distance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The speckle contrasts of two types of laser projectors were measured at various observation distances and observation lens pinhole diameters using a quantitative measurement technique. We found that the speckl...

Koji Suzuki; Tatsuo Fukui; Shigeo Kubota; Yasunori Furukawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The edge observed : island landscape for a marine biology facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the concept of edges through observation and design. The intent of the observation/design is to understand and to illustrate possibilities for design that will enrich the experience of the built ...

Stringer, Geraldine A

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Toward a Mesoscale Observation Network in Southeast Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current weather observation network in Southeast Asia is unable to support the accurate monitoring and prediction of the region's predominantly convective weather. Establishing a multisensor mesoscale observation network comprising automated ...

Tieh-Yong Koh; Chee-Kiat Teo

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder, 1957) Exploration Activity Details Location...

202

Observers for systems with nonlinearities satisfying incremental quadratic constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of designing observers to asymptotically estimate the state of a system whose nonlinear time-varying terms satisfy an incremental quadratic inequality that is parameterized by a set of multiplier matrices. Observer design is reduced ... Keywords: Application of nonlinear analysis and design, Linear matrix inequalities, Nonlinear observer and filter design, Optimization-based controller synthesis

Behçet Aç?kme?e; Martin Corless

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

Sandu, Adrian

204

Nonlinear observer and parameter estimation for electropneumatic clutch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient. General designs for nonlinear observer design are devel- oped for particular classes of nonlinear of estimate errors. They also consider a three-way proportional valve as con- trol valve while we consider on/off-solenoid valves. The presented observer in this paper is a deterministic observer with linear output

Johansen, Tor Arne

205

Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

B. Dittrich

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Relaxing the Boussinesq Approximation in Ocean Circulation Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing need for ocean circulation models that conserve mass rather than volume (as in traditional Boussinesq models). One reason is bottom pressure data expected to flow from satellite-mounted gravity-measuring instruments, and ...

Richard J. Greatbatch; Youyu Lu; Yi Cai

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sustainability in Ocean Freight Richard Cox, Branch Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compliance with ISO 9001 Quality and ISO 14001 Environmental Standards #12;16/12/2010Corporate Communications

Minnesota, University of

208

Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Prufer Transformations for the Normal Modes in Ocean Acoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1926 Prufer introduced a method of transforming the second order Sturm-Liouville (SL) equation into two nonlinear first order differential equations for the phase oe and ''magnitude'', |oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}| for a Poincare phase space representation, (oe,oe). The useful property is the phase equation decouples from the magnitude one which leads to a nonlinear, two point boundary value problem for the eigenvalues, or SL numbers. The transformation has been used both theoretically, e.g. Atkinson, [1960] to prove certain properties of SL equations as well as numerically e.g Bailey [1978]. This paper examines the utility of the Prufer transformation in the context of numerical solutions for modes of the ocean acoustic wave equation. (Its use is certainly not well known in the ocean acoustics community.) Equations for the phase, oe, and natural logarithm of the ''magnitude'', ln(|oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}|) lead to same decoupling and a fast and efficient numerical solution with the SL eigenvalues mapping to the horizontal wavenubers. The Prufer transformation has stabilty problems for low order modes at high frequecies, so a numerically stable method of integrating the phase equation is derived. This seems to be the first time the these stability issues have been highlighted to provide a robust algorthim for the modes.

Baggeroer, Arthur B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Vertical velocity in oceanic convection off tropical Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . v Vl Vl I I 1 3 6 10 Description of the Data Data Processing . . Event Criteria 10 15 21 III RESULTS . . . 26 Cores. Environment 26 34 IV COMPARISON WITH OTHER STUDIES . . . . . 40 Cores... Variations with altitude of median and strongest 10'/o-level statistics of (a) average vertical velocity, (b) maximum vertical velocity, (c) mass flux per unit length normal to the flight track and (d) diameter 32 Figure Page Reconstructed temperature...

Lucas, Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Evolution of Boundary Pressure in Ocean Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The boundary pressure adjustment process on an ocean basin scale is elucidated in two sets of numerical experiments. First, an initial-value problem is posed in a primitive equation shallow-water model that leads to significant changes in the ...

Ralph F. Milliff; James C. McWilliams

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

On Acoustic Transmission in Ocean-Surface Waveguides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface. The bubble layer acts as a waveguide for sound in the audio frequency range, above 2 kHz, although transmission may be severely...extend access to Philosophical Transactions: Physical Sciences and Engineering. www.jstor.org

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Use of ebRIM-based CSW with sensor observation services for registry and discovery of remote-sensing observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent advances in Sensor Web geospatial data capture, such as high-resolution in satellite imagery and Web-ready data processing and modeling technologies, have led to the generation of large numbers of datasets from real-time or near real-time observations ... Keywords: CSW, Earth observation, Registry, Sensor Web, Sensor observation service

Nengcheng Chen; Liping Di; Genong Yu; Jianya Gong; Yaxing Wei

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

215

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) 964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

216

NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

David Gianotto

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

How Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? How Are You Observing Energy Awareness Month? October 7, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis October is Energy Awareness Month, and we think a great way to celebrate would be to make an improvement that gets you a tax credit. But there are plenty of other ways you could observe Energy Awareness Month help spread the word about saving energy. So tell us: How are you observing Energy Awareness Month? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. Addthis Related Articles How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? What Are You Doing to Fight Climate Change? How Do You Stay Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather?

218

Calculation of Fission Observables Through Event-by-Event Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased interest in more exclusive fission observables has demanded more detailed models. We present here a new computational model, FREYA, that aims to met this need by producing large samples of complete fission events from which any observable of interest can then be extracted consistently, including arbitrary correlations. The various model assumptions are described and the potential utility of the model is illustrated by means of several novel correlation observables.

Randrup, J; Vogt, R

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

220

Untrained Forward Observer (UFO) translator for call for fire .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many observers need indirect fire but are not proficient in Call for Fire, the procedure used to request indirect fire. To alleviate this, we propose… (more)

King, Regan R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Underwater observations of blue-water plankton: Logistics ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Apr 28, 1975 ... lines marked at 5-m intervals with metric white markers. Vertical lines are .... Use of a magnetic reed-switch can ... Field observations of the.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Christopher R. Samoray Communications ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside bulk material Selected frames from a sequence of scanning transmission electron...

223

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Observational evidence for poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How the Hadley circulation changes in response to global climate ... consistent and statistically significant poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation in the past few decades is ... independent observational ...

Yongyun Hu ???; Chen Zhou ? ?; Jiping Liu ???

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune’s Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Resource Letter: OTS-1: Observations and theory of supernovae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the observations of supernovae and the theory of their explosion mechanisms. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: observations of the spectra spectropolarimetry and light curves of supernovae of various types theory of thermonuclear explosions core collapse and radioactive decay applications to cosmology and possible connections to gamma-ray bursts.

J. Craig Wheeler

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

62 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Observations and infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources in the taking and recording of observations. It strategically plans, builds and operates improving delivery efficiencies; and · facilitating both management and cultural change to ensure continued System Strategy; · Observing Network Operations; and · Infrastructure Management. The performance of each

Greenslade, Diana

228

GROUND-BASED AND SPACE-BASED RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharge/flash consists of many consecutive strokes) [e.g. Gibbard et al., 1997] LightningGROUND-BASED AND SPACE-BASED RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETARY LIGHTNING P. Zarka1 , W. Farrell2 , G; Lightning's radio signature Space-based radio observations of planetary lightning Lightning

Demoulin, Pascal

229

High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission W...Vestrand We review high-energy observations of solar flares with emphasis...expectation, high-energy emission is a common property of solar flares. Direct interpretation...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru Renos Vakis, Elisabeth these transactions costs. When opportunities exist to sell a crop on alternative markets, the observed choice of market can be used to infer a monetary measure of transactions costs in market participation. The market

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

231

Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations Brooke L Fridley1 (fax) 1 #12;SUMMARY Spatial environmental data sometimes include below detection limit observations (i. We develop a measurement error Bayesian spatial model for the analysis of spatial data with censored

232

Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor Radon Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor...Lapere Two sets of data obtained by long-term observations of radon concentration...phosphogypsum was used. Around a nuclear waste storage place containing radium, 22 dosemeters......

J. Uyttenhove; R. Lapere

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

Pak, Soojong

234

UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND Rolf Rysdyk, University of Washington, Seattle is affected by wind, aircraft performance, and camera limits. Analytic expressions are derived for paths which, and stability of its integration with aircraft dynamics is assessed. An observer estimates wind data, which

Washington at Seattle, University of

235

ON THINNING METHODS FOR DATA ASSIMILATION OF SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2B.3 ON THINNING METHODS FOR DATA ASSIMILATION OF SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS T. Ochotta1 C. Gebhardt2 V ABSTRACT Thinning of observational data sets is an essen- tial task in assimilation of satellite data for numer- ical weather forecast. In this work we modify and improve the scheme of so-called estimation

Reiterer, Harald

236

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

Santolik, Ondrej

237

Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology. Citation, provides cru- cial context for interpreting a planet's geological history [e.g., Schubert et al., 2001

Zuber, Maria

238

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS Rick Katz Institute) Unified Modeling of Distributions (6) Resources #12;4 #12;5 (1) Background · Use of Extremal Models -- Stochastic weather generators Improved treatment of extremes #12;6 (2) Observed Tail Behavior · Extreme Value

Katz, Richard

239

ARM - Field Campaign - Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations govCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations 2002.04.01 - 2002.06.30 Lead Scientist : Marvin Wesely For data sets, see below. Description The U.S. DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) is a 3-year feasibility investigation focused on accurately evaluating the water cycle components and using stable isotopes as an effective tool in doing so. The study area is primarily the Whitewater subbasin in the Walnut River Watershed in southeastern Kansas. Two intensive observations periods are planned, this first one in April to June 2002 and a second currently scheduled for December 2002 to February 2003. Observations will be made of precipitation

240

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 4 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Mccoy_Geothermal_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402599" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Haynes, John Colorado State University Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Category: Cloud Properties The results of an analysis of tropical cloud systems observed from a variety of vertically pointing radar systems are described. In particular, observations taken during five years of operation of the ARM millimeter wavelength radar system (MMCR) at Manus Island in the Tropical West Pacific region are characterized into cloud classes according to the radar reflectivity structures of these cloud systems, associated rainfall, and surface radiative properties. These observations of cloud properties are composited with respect to various phases of the Madden Julian Oscillation, which is a dominant mode of variability at Manus Island. A method of better

242

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from Radiosonde observations at Pt. Reyes and cloud properties retrieved from GOES-WEST Inoue, Toshiro MRI/JMA Category: Field Campaigns Low-level cloud formed off the west coast of continents plays an important role in general circulation and climate. Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) was conducted at the ARM mobile site deployed at Pt Reyes, California during April to September. Here, we studied the relationship between meteorological parameters observed by GPS sonde and cloud properties observed from GOES-WEST during the MASRAD intensive operational period. Cloud properties are retrieved from VISST (Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split window Technique). The vertical profile of stability, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed observed by GPS sonde are

243

Modern cosmology: Interactive computer simulations that use recent observational surveys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a collection of new open-source computational tools for numerically modeling recent large-scale observational data sets using modern cosmology theory. These tools allow both students and researchers to constrain the parameter values in competitive cosmological models thereby discovering both the accelerated expansion of the universe and its composition (e.g. dark matter and dark energy). These programs have several features to help the non-cosmologist build an understanding of cosmological models and their relation to observational data including a built-in collection of several real observational data sets. The current list of built-in observations includes several recent supernovae Type-Ia surveys baryon acoustic oscillations the cosmic microwave background radiation gamma-ray bursts and measurements of the Hubble parameter. In this article we discuss specific results for testing cosmological models using these observational data.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The physical observer I: Absolute and relative fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Jet Theory (QJT) is a deformation of QFT where also the quantum dynamics of the observer is taken into account. This is achieved by introducing relative fields, labelled by locations measured by rods relative to the observer's position. In the Hamiltonian formalism, the observer's momentum is modified: p_i \\to p_i - P_i, where P_i is the momentum carried by the field quanta. The free scalar field, free electromagnetism and gravity are treated as examples. Standard QFT results are recovered in the limit that the observer's mass M \\to \\infty and its charge e \\to 0. This limit is well defined except for gravity, because e = M in that case (heavy mass equals inert mass). In a companion paper we describe how QJT also leads to new observer-dependent gauge and diff anomalies, which can not be formulated within QFT proper.

T. A. Larsson

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

245

Simulating AIA observations of a flux rope ejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. Observations now show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. These observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities. To fully understand CMEs we need to compare equivalent quantities derived from both observations and theoretical models. To this end we aim to produce synthesised AIA observations from simluations of a flux rope ejection. To carry this out we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. We perform a simulation where a flux rope is ejected from the solar corona. From the density and temperature of the plasma in the simulation we synthesise AIA observations. The emission is then integrated along the...

Pagano, Paolo; Poedts, Stefaan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 14, 2010 July 14, 2010 CX-003102: Categorical Exclusion Determination Center of Excellence in Ocean Research and Development CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3 Date: 07/14/2010 Location(s): Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 13, 2010 CX-003026: Categorical Exclusion Determination Advanced Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection Engine Development CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 8, 2010 CX-003163: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technical Analysis for Geothermal System CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/08/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

247

Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track the evolution of coronal plasma. The evolution of the emission observed with XRT and EIS during these events is generally consistent with loops that have been heated and are cooling. We have analyzed the most energetic heating event observed during this period, a small GOES B-class flare, in some detail and present some of the spectral signatures of the event, such as relative Doppler shifts at one of the loop footpoints and enhanced line widths during the rise phase of the event. While the analysis of these transient events has the potential to yield insights into the coronal heating mechanism, these observations do not rule out the possibility that there is a strong steady heating level in the active region. Detailed statistical analysis will be required to address this question definitively.

Harry P. Warren; Ignacio Ugarte-Urra; David H. Brooks; Jonathan W. Cirtain; David R. Williams; Hirohisa Harra

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) govCampaignsRoutine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) Campaign Links RACORO Website Related Campaigns Surface Radiation Comparison Transfer Measurements for RACORO 2009.01.20, Long, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) 2009.01.22 - 2009.06.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/racoro/ Lead Scientist : Andrew Vogelmann For data sets, see below. Description The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) supported the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, led by principal investigator Andrew Vogelmann. During this long-term campaign, the AAF conducted routine flights at the ACRF Southern

250

How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Observe Energy Awareness Month? Observe Energy Awareness Month? How Will You Observe Energy Awareness Month? October 1, 2009 - 7:00am Addthis October is Energy Awareness Month! This year's theme, "A Sustainable Energy Future; Putting All the Pieces Together," encourages you to see yourself as a piece of a larger puzzle-fitting into the big picture, shaping our energy future, and moving our nation toward energy independence. Learn more about Energy Awareness Month and how you can download or order materials to help spread the word. How will you observe Energy Awareness Month? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments.

251

ARM - News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project (BBOP)News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project Related Links BBOP Home Outreach News & Press Backgrounder (PDF, 2.1MB) Images ARM flickr site ARM Data Discovery...

252

Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap ...

Frenzel, Alex James

253

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

255

ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parsivel2 Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) 2014.01.01, Martin, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note...

256

Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thought to be produced by the core-collapse of massive stars or merging compact objects, are the most luminous events observed since the… (more)

Aune, Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optical technologies for the observation of low Earth orbit objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to avoid collisions with space debris, the near Earth orbit must be continuously scanned by either ground- or spaced-based facilities. For the low Earth orbit, radar telescopes are the workhorse for this task, especially due to their continuous availability. However, optical observation methods can deliver complementary information, especially towards high accuracy measurements. Passive-optical observations are inexpensive and can yield very precise information about the apparent position of the object in the sky via comparison with background stars. However, the object's distance from the observer is not readily accessible, which constitutes a major drawback of this approach for the precise calculation of the orbital elements. Two experimental methods have been devised to overcome this problem: Using two observatories a few kilometres apart, strictly simultaneous observations of the same object yield an accurate, instantaneous 3D position determination through measurement of the parallax. If only on...

Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Gamma-ray Energy Spectra Observed around a Nuclear Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Energy Spectra Observed around a Nuclear Reactor Yoshiyuki Nakashima * Susumu Minato...Katsurayama ** * Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering...Nagoya, Japan ** Reseach Reactor Institute, Kyoto Univ., Kumatori-cho......

Yoshiyuki Nakashima; Susumu Minato; Minoru Kawano; Tadashi Tsujimoto; Kousuke Katsurayama

1971-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Information-Disturbance Theorem for Mutually Unbiased Observables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a novel version of information-disturbance theorems for mutually unbiased observables. We show that the information gain by Eve inevitably makes the outcomes by Bob in the conjugate basis not only erroneous but random.

Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier Hujun Shen1 and Harris J. Silverstone2 June, 2006. Accepted 11 July, 2006. #12;238 Hujun Shen and Harris J. Silverstone where ±x0 = ± -2E

Silverstone, Harris J.

262

Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steffes 1996) and a solar abundance or less of NH 3 (RomaniSteffes 1996) and using a solar abundance of nitrogen in NHof 0.1 times the solar abundance, from observations of the

Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Analysis of Convergence Boundaries Observed during IHOP_2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of six convergence boundaries observed during the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) is presented. The detailed kinematic and thermodynamic structure of these boundaries was examined using data collected by an airborne Doppler ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Hanne V. Murphey

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Unknown Input Observers and Fault Tolerant Control Allocation Andrea Cristofaro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives [3] [13] [17] , such as power or fuel consumption minimization. On the other hand, usually in order to make relevant faults observable. The case study of an overactuated marine vessel supports

Johansen, Tor Arne

265

Observable fast kinetic eigenmode in binary noble-gas mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is suggested that a fast kinetic mode should be observable in a whole class of disparate mass fluid mixtures, such as gaseous He-Xe, by neutron scattering experiments, at not too high densities and Xe concentrations.

Campa, A.; Cohen, E.G.D.

1988-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

On Magnetical Observations in Germany, Norway, and Russia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1837-1843 research-article On Magnetical Observations in Germany, Norway, and Russia Major Sabine The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Abstracts of the Papers...

1837-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Terahertz photometer to observe solar flares in continuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar observations at sub-THz frequencies detected a new flare spectral component peaking in the THz range, simultaneously with the well known microwaves component, bringing challenging constraints for interpretation. Higher THz frequencies observations are needed to understand the nature of the mechanisms occurring in flares. A THz photometer system was developed to observe outside the terrestrial atmosphere on stratospheric balloons or satellites, or at exceptionally transparent ground stations. The telescope was designed to observe the whole solar disk detecting small relative changes in input temperature caused by flares at localized positions. A Golay cell detector is preceded by low-pass filters to suppress visible and near IR radiation, a band-pass filter, and a chopper. A prototype was assembled to demonstrate the new concept and the system performance. It can detect temperature variations smaller than 1 K for data sampled at a rate of 10/second, smoothed for intervals larger than 4 seconds. For a 76 ...

Marcon, Rogerio; Fernandes, Luis Olavo T; Godoy, Rodolfo; Marun, Adolfo; Bortolucci, Emilio C; Zakia, Maria Beny; Diniz, José Alexandre; Kudaka, Amauri S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Observations onSchistosoma intercalatum in south-east gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations were made in the field and laboratory to determine the strain characteristics ofSchistosoma intercalatum in south-east Gabon. For an isolate from Franceville, data...S. intercalatum as known from sou...

D. S. Brown; C. Sarfati; V. R. Southgate; G. C. Ross…

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Observation of Two New ? [subscript b][superscript ?] Baryon Resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the ?[0 over b]?[superscript -] mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0??fb[superscript ...

Aaij, R.

270

Observing Healthcare Interior Environments and the Effect on Patient Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variables in the interior environments that have the greatest impact, whether positive or negative, on patients. The methods used to perform this research include: inspections of the facility, observations, and surveys. By combining all of these methods...

Rice, Courtney R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off of Fire Island, NY. The Wave Glider records data on the wind, water temperature and salinity pressure, temperature and sound velocity. The Wave Glider is an autonomous ocean observing platform

272

Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics Michael Brady  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a weather forecasting sense ­ Costs ­ Satellite acquisition strategies · Different definitions and protocols satellite observing systems to support fire management, policy decision- making, and global change research

273

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

274

Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for new charmless decays of neutral b hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons, using 1??fb[superscript -1] of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report the first observation of the ...

Xie, Si

276

Reducing Inconsistencies in Point Observations of Maximum Flood Inundation Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flood simulation models and hazard maps are only as good as the underlying data against which they are calibrated and tested. However, extreme flood events are by definition rare, so the observational data of flood inundation extent are limited in ...

Brandon L. Parkes; Hannah L. Cloke; Florian Pappenberger; Jeff Neal; David Demeritt

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A multisensory observer model for human spatial orientation perception  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative "observer" models for spatial orientation and eye movements have been developed based on 1-G data from humans and animals (e.g. Oman 1982, 1991, Merfeld, et al 1993, 2002; Haslwanter 2000, Vingerhoets 2006). ...

Newman, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High temperature plasma in? Lyrae, observed fromCopernicus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-resolution ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the complex close binary system? Lyrae was performed with the Princeton Telescope Spectrometer onCopernicus.... Observations were made at phases 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, an...

Yoji Kondo; Margherita Hack; John B. Hutchings…

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Is there a maximum observable redshift in an open universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An estimate of the maximum observable redshift is obtained using only t_{0} approximately equal to (14+- 3)10^{9}years, H_{0} approximately equal to 65 +- 10Km\\sec^{-1}Mpc^{-1}(t_{0}H_{0} approximately equal to 0.91 +- 0.08/0.18) assuming \\Lambda approximately equal to 0. The resulting maximum redshift z_{+} approximately equal to 10 appears to give a reasonable upper limit to the highest actually observed redshifts. Some implications are discussed.

J. A. Gonzalo

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Observation of the uranium 235 nuclear magnetic resonance signal (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

before. We report here the first NMR observation of 23SU. The uranium hexafluoride has been chosenL-1017 Observation of the uranium 235 nuclear magnetic resonance signal (*) H. Le Bail, C. Chachaty signal de résonance magnétique nucléaire de l'isotope 235 de l'uranium est présentée. Elle a été

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

OBSERVATIONS OF RECONNECTING FLARE LOOPS WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perhaps the most compelling evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares comes from the supra-arcade downflows that have been observed above many post-flare loop arcades. These downflows are thought to be related to highly non-potential field lines that have reconnected and are propagating away from the current sheet. We present new observations of supra-arcade downflows taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The morphology and dynamics of the downflows observed with AIA provide new evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares. With these new observations we are able to measure downflows originating at larger heights than in previous studies. We find, however, that the initial velocities measured here ({approx}144 km s{sup -1}) are well below the Alfven speed expected in the lower corona, and consistent with previous results. We also find no evidence that the downflows brighten with time, as would be expected from chromospheric evaporation. These observations suggest that simple two-dimensional models cannot explain the detailed observations of solar flares.

Warren, Harry P.; Sheeley, Neil R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); O'Brien, Casey M. [Also at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

Young, Joseph G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dynamics and variability of the plasmasphere observed from synchronous orbit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of the cold ions in the outer plasmasphere is studied using data obtained with the magnetospheric plasma analyzers from multiple geosynchronous satellites. Dense (10-100 cm{sup {minus}3}), cold ({approx}1 eV) regions of plasma are often observed at geosynchronous orbit; in this study the authors refer to these as plasmaspheric intervals. The duration, local time of observation, density variability, and temperature behavior within these regions often depend in a systematic way on geomagnetic and substorm activity. With increasing geomagnetic activity (as indicated by Kp) the plasmaspheric regions are generally observed over shorter durations and at earlier local times. With increasing substorm activity (as indicated by geosynchronous energetic electron injections) the density becomes increasingly variable in these regions. Occasionally, up to order-of-magnitude density variations are observed over several minute timescales corresponding to regions with physical dimensions on the order of 1000 km or less. The appearance of these short-duration, cold-plasma intervals is strongly correlated with energetic ion and electron signatures both at the spacecraft making the plasmaspheric observations and at other spacecraft observing simultaneously in the midnight region. Such energetic particle signatures are indicative of the growth and expansive phase of geomagnetic substorms. The authors conclude that the appearance of these short-duration, plasmaspheric intervals is due to a reconfiguration of the duskside magnetosphere during geomagnetic substorms.

Moldwin, M.B.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

T.P. Ackerman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Role of Global Observations for Climate and Other Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the current earth-observing systems have been designed primarily for the needs of weather forecasting. Weather forecasting is an initial condition problem; the success of the forecast is heavily dependent on the quality of the specified initial state of the atmosphere. Thus, weather forecasting observing systems tend to focus on determining the 3D values of the state variables of the system – namely temperature, humidity, and wind vector. While weather forecasting requires accurate observations, spatial patterns and relative accuracy across those patterns are the primary concern. Climate, on the other hand, is a boundary condition problem, i.e., climate simulation depends on knowing the energy fluxes into and out of the system, and quantities such as CO2 that affect the flow of those energy fluxes in the system. Consequently, climate-observing systems must extend beyond measurements of state variables to flux measurements of radiation energy and water. We focus on these two cycles because the dominant forms of energy transfer in the climate system (solar energy, thermal infrared energy, evaporation, and condensation) involve these two quantities. Further, because climate is a search for small system trends and imbalances in the midst of large weather variability, climate observations require a much higher degree of precision than do weather observations.

Ackerman, TP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference (cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1 - 2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

Arnold O. Benz; Peter Messmer; Christian Monstein

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Observed Southern Ocean Cloud Properties and Shortwave Reflection. Part I: Calculation of SW Flux from Observed Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the reflection of shortwave radiation over the Southern Ocean to the cloud properties there is estimated using observations from a suite of passive and active satellite instruments in combination with radiative transfer ...

Daniel T. McCoy; Dennis L. Hartmann; Daniel P. Grosvenor

289

NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. These include observation of four "IGR" High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) discovered by INTEGRAL. We also summarize the results that have been obtained and their implications. Among the IGR HMXBs, we focus on the discovery of a cyclotron line in the spectrum of IGR J17544-2619.

Tomsick, John A; Fuerst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bhalerao, Varun; Chakrabarty, Deepto; King, Ashley; Miller, Jon M; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF12): Observational Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128-orbit Cycle 19 \\HST\\ program aimed at extending previous WFC3/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at $z$$\\,\\gtrsim\\,$8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at $z$$\\,\\sim\\,7\\,-\\,$8, facilitate the construction of new samples of $z$$\\,\\sim\\,9\\,-\\,$10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to $z$$\\,\\sim\\,$12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset, to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky currently achievable. In this paper we present the observational overview of the pr...

Koekemoer, Anton M; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A; Ouchi, Masami; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V; Targett, T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Detection of CFIRB with AKARI/FIS Deep Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) contains information about the number and distribution of contributing sources and thus gives us an important key to understand the evolution of galaxies. Using a confusion study to set a fundamental limit to the observations, we investigate the potential to explore the CFIRB with AKARI/FIS deep observations. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) is one of the focal-plane instruments on the AKARI (formerly known as ASTRO-F) satellite, which was launched in early 2006. Based upon source distribution models assuming three different cosmological evolutionary scenarios (no evolution, weak evolution, and strong evolution), an extensive model for diffuse emission from infrared cirrus, and instrumental noise estimates, we present a comprehensive analysis for the determination of the confusion levels for deep far-infrared observations. We use our derived sensitivities to suggest the best observational strategy for the AKARI/FIS mission to detect the CFIRB fluctuations. If the source distribution follows the evolutionary models, observations will be mostly limited by source confusion. We find that we will be able to detect the CFIRB fluctuations and that these will in turn provide information to discriminate between the evolutionary scenarios of galaxies in most low-to-medium cirrus regions.

Woong-Seob Jeong; Chris P. Pearson; Hyung Mok Lee; Shuji Matsuura; Mitsunobu Kawada; Takao Nakagawa; Sang Hoon Oh; Mai Shirahata; Sungho Lee; Ho Seong Hwang; Hideo Matsuhara

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Collaboration yields 'The Right Glasses' for observing mystery behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing mystery behavior In electrons Observing mystery behavior In electrons Collaboration yields 'The Right Glasses' for observing mystery behavior in electrons The research may lead to a better understanding of superconductors or development of better materials for powering high-speed electronics. December 13, 2007 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

293

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

294

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

295

Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE Schumacher, Courtney Texas A&M University Houze, Robert University of Washington May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre Frederick, Kaycee Cetrone, Jasmine Vallgren, Andreas Category: Field Campaigns This poster will describe the radar dataset obtained in the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which is to take place 20 January - 14 February 2006 in the vicinity of Darwin, Australia. We will describe the convective systems observed during the project by two scanning C-band Doppler radars, one of which will provide dual-polarization measurements, and ARM's vertically pointing cloud radar and lidar installations. In addition, we will discuss the potential for combining

296

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

297

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of a Macroscopically Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print Wednesday, 27 May 2009 00:00 It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of quantum matter called a topological insulator that is characterized by entangled wavefunctions. The proposal has now been realized by an international collaboration led by researchers from Princeton University who studied the electronic structure of insulating alloys of bismuth and antimony by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES. Their results constitute the first direct experimental evidence of a topological insulator in nature that is fully quantum entangled. In the future, a detailed study of topological order and quantum entanglement using their method can potentially pave the way for fault-tolerant (topological) quantum computing.

298

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Observations of Natural  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observations of Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Observations of Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami Kollias, Pavlos RSMAS/University of Miami Jo, Ieng Rosentiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Ghate, Virendra RSMAS/Univ. Miami Serpetzoglou, Efthymious Minnis, Patrick NASA Langley Research Center Sun-Mack, Szedung SAIC Large to mesoscale features affecting the albedo of marine stratocumulus clouds are observed frequently and can have a substantial impact on the overall albedo of the subtropical cloud decks. One such naturally occurring feature-defined as a cloud rift-is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. We review results from a

299

Sample Observations from the 2001.Multi-Frequency Radar IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample Observations from the 2001 Sample Observations from the 2001 Multi-Frequency Radar IOP C. R. Williams Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado C. R. Williams and K. S. Gage National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado L. Leon and S. Cruz-Pol University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Campus S. M. Sekelsky Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts Introduction The 2001 Multi-Frequency Radar Intensive Operational Period (IOP) was designed to collect a long dataset of W-band (95 GHz), Ka-band (35 GHz), and S-band (2.8 GHz) vertical profiling observations to investigate insect scattering and precipitating particle scattering above the Southern Great Plains

300

Genuine CP-odd Observables at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss how to construct genuine CP-odd observables at the LHC. We classify the observables according to the even and odd properties under the naive T-transformation (\\hat{T}). There are two classes of observables of our interests: CP-odd and \\hat{T}-even; CP-odd and \\hat{T}-odd. We expect them to have broad applications to many processes in theories beyond Standard Model with CP violation. For the purpose of illustration, we use simple example of W+W- production and subsequent decays at the LHC, where the CP violation effects are parameterized by effective CP-violating operators of WWZ coupling. We find significant sensitivity to the CP-odd couplings.

Tao Han; Yingchuan Li

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Wideband noise observed at ground level in the auroral region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sideband noise event was detected at ground level from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway in January 1989. The signals were observed on four commercial communication receivers (tuned to 159, 515, 905, and 1200 kHz), an ionosonde (200-kHz to 3.5-MHz interference-free observations) and a riometer (32.5 MHz). The event, which occurred during a period of magnetic disturbance near magnetic midnight, was the only one observed during nearly 3 weeks of operations. This low frequency-of-occurrence is attributed partly to high local noise levels. The ease with which this event was identified on the ionograms produced by the local ionosonde suggests that routine ionosonde recordings should be inspected in search for such events. Such an effort would enhance existing research directed toward developing techniques for identifying quiet communication channels and help to identify the origin and frequency-of-occurrence of high-latitude wideband noise events. 20 refs.

Benson, R.F.; Desch, M.D. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Observational Constraints of New Variable Modified Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming the flat FRW universe in Einstein's gravity filled with New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas (NVMCG) dark energy and dark matter having negligible pressure. In this research work we analyze the viability on the basis of recent observation. Hubble parameter $H$ is expressed in terms of the observable parameters $H_0$, $\\Omega_m^0$ and the model parameters $A_0$, $B_0$, $C_0$, $m$, $n$, $\\alpha$ and the red shift parameter $z$. Here we find a best fitted parameter range of $A_0$, $B_0$ keeping $0\\leq \\alpha \\leq 1$ and using Stern data set (12 points) by minimizing the $\\chi^2$ test at 66%, 90% and 99% confidence levels. Next we do the joint analysis with BAO and CMB observations. Again evaluating the distance modulus $\\mu(z)$ vs redshift ($z$) curve obtained in the model NVMCG with dark matter with the best fitted value of the parameters and comparing with that derived from the union2 compilation data.

Jhumpa Bhadra; Ujjal Debnath

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Observing CP Violation in Many-Body Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that observing CP violation in many-body decays could provide strong evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Many searches have been carried out; however, no 5sigma evidence for CP violation has yet been found in these types of decays. A novel model-independent method for observing CP violation in many-body decays is presented in this paper. It is shown that the sensitivity of this method is significantly larger than those used to-date.

Mike Williams

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

The physical observer II: Gauge and diff anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a companion paper we studied field theory in the presence of a physical observer with quantum dynamics. Here we describe the most striking consequence of this assumption: new gauge and diff anomalies arise. The relevant cocycles depend on the observer's spacetime trajectory and can hence not appear in QFT, where this quantity is never introduced. Diff anomalies necessarily arise in every locally nontrivial, non-holographic theory of quantum gravity. Cancellation of the divergent parts of the anomalies only works if spacetime has four dimensions.

T. A. Larsson

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)] [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observe the end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNT ends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failed to remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbon and oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed on the SWCNT ends.

Zhang Zhao-Xiang; Zhang Geng-Min; Du Min; Jin Xin-Xi; Hou Shi-Min; Sun Jian-Ping; Gu Zhen-Nan; Zhao Xing-Yu; Liu Wei-Min; Wu Jin-Lei; Xue Zeng-Quan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dynamical Observations of Local Bio-molecular Sites Using Nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, we succeeded time-resolved x-ray observations of picometer-scale slow Brownian motions of individual protein molecules in aqueous solutions. In this work, we investigated the relationship between individual protein molecules and the labeled nanocrystals. In order to control the number of the bonding sites on the labeled gold nanocrystals, we utilized both the periodical structure in Actin filaments and using the mercury compound. As a result, we observed free Brownian Motions of the C-terminal in F-actin, when single gold nanocrystal is linked to single G-actin.

Sasaki, Yuji C.; Okumura, Yasuaki [Bio-medical Group, SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sasaki -team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST/CREST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan); Ohishi, Noboru [Sasaki -team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST/CREST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan); Biotechnology Research Center, Teikyo University, Miyamae, Kawasaki 216-0001 (Japan)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Meteor observations by the Arecibo 430 \\{MHz\\} incoherent scatter radar. II. Results from time-resolved observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report high time resolution observations using the powerful Arecibo incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The majority of the meteor-like echoes observed lasted less than 50 ms at one range gate, although echoes lasting for a second were also occasionally observed. The latter may not necessarily be associated with meteors. Most of the meteor echoes in our observations have an effective radar cross-section of the order of 3 × 10?8m2, and an estimated electron line density (ELD) of the order of 4 × 109/m. The visual magnitude is approximately + 16, which is about two orders of magnitude fainter than the meteor echoes found in our time-integrated data (Zhou et al., 1995). The average echo power is positively correlated with the number of range bins in which an echo is detected. This characteristic, along with other experimental evidence, strongly suggests that the Arecibo 430 \\{MHz\\} radar is more sensitive to head-on meteors than to those arriving at an oblique angle. Although classical underdense scattering mechanisms may account for echoes having short range extensions, it is clear that they are insufficient to explain echoes having long range extensions. Some possible mechanisms are discussed. In particular, we suggest that Bragg scattering due to the irregular structure existing in a meteor trail is the most important scattering mechanism for the latter type of echoes in our observations. A plasma instability operating near the Arecibo wavelength is required.

Qihou H. Zhou; Michael C. Kelley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Quantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with considerable spatial and temporal variability, resulting in a global annual total of 0.1 Tg C/yr. Air vegetation [Guenther et al., 1995], with the tropics responsible for most of the global annual total ($500 TgQuantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations Paul I. Palmer

Palmer, Paul

316

Laser Altimeter Observations from MESSENGER's First Mercury Flyby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT Laser Altimeter Observations from MESSENGER's First Mercury Flyby Maria T. Zuber,1 * David E Barnouin-Jha,8 John K. Harmon10 A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part

Hauck II, Steven A.

317

MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure and dynamics at Mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure and dynamics at Mercury Gina A. DiBraccio,1 James December 2012; accepted 10 January 2013; published 1 March 2013. [1] On 18 March 2011, MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury

Salzman, Daniel

318

Interferometric observations of large biologically interesting interstellar and cometary molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemistry to the solar system can...methanol. Major obstacles to understanding...had enough energy to knock off...stars (>10 solar masses...activation energy to overcome...However, a major obstacle to observational...chemistry to the solar system can...methanol. Major obstacles to understanding...

Lewis E. Snyder

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Observation of conical electron distributions over Martian crustal magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Although the main obstacle to the solar wind is the Martian ionosphere, the strong crustal magnetic fields. The energy spectra of the conics exhibit substantial decreases in all energy levels in relation (draped IMF direction, solar wind pressure, and EUV flux) do not affect the observation of the events

California at Berkeley, University of

320

Planetary Radio Astronomy Observations from Voyager 2 Near Jupiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5 ~ m"~ ~ BND MHz with a 200-kHz...04 to nearly I MHz. It is composed...sult presents a p plasma torus, Voyager...78 59 40 20 ry large electric fields...bottom). The plasma resonances observed...frequency at 1 MHz in this region...regions of very large electric field...

J. B. PEARCE; A. C. RIDDLE; J. W. WARWICK; J. K. ALEXANDER; M. D. DESCH; M. L. KAISER; J. R. THIEMAN; T. D. CARR; S. GULKIS; A. BOISCHOT; Y. LEBLANC; B. M. PEDERSEN; D. H. STAELIN

1979-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Circle criterion observer for a compression system Bjrnar Bhagen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.gravdahl@itk.ntnu.no Abstract-- Observers for a compression system using turbo compressors are derived for a model that captures speed. Results are validated by simulations. I. MOTIVATION Compression systems using turbo compressors, centrifugal or axial, are exposed to the phenomenons of surge and rotating stall. Surge is an axisymmtrical

Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

322

Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry David J. Walesa,1 and Peter structures that interconvert on a given time scale are lumped together, the corresponding free-energy surface that are connected by free-energy barriers below a certain threshold. We illustrate this time dependence for some

Salamon, Peter

323

VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data management procedures 8. Project management 9. Information exchange Attachment 1: ScientificWMO IOC JCOMM VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT #12 Attachment 5: List of focal points Attachment 7: Preliminary action plan #12;PROJECT DOCUMENT

324

Observables in the decays of B to two vector mesons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general there are nine observables in the decay of a B meson to two vector mesons defined in terms of polarization correlations of these mesons. Only six of these can be detected via the subsequent decay angular distributions because of parity conservation in those decays. The remaining three require the measurement of the spin polarization of one of the decay products.

Cheng-Wei Chiang and Lincoln Wolfenstein

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Observation of critical slowing down close to a roughening transition (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-159 Observation of critical slowing down close to a roughening transition (*) L. Puech, B. Hebral growing process, close to the roughening transition of the facet (TR ~ 215 mK). These times exhibit the existence of a so-called « Roughening-Transition » on the fluid-solid interface of pure com- pounds, studies

Boyer, Edmond

326

Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks Jia (Jasmine for the implementation of cognitive radio. Collaborative spectrum sensing among the cognitive radio nodes is expected to improve the ability of checking complete spectrum usage. Due to hardware limitations, each cognitive radio

Yin, Wotao

327

Expanding the Discovery Potential of VERITAS via Moonlight Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant partially supported the base research efforts of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), Very-High-Energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray research group from 8/1/09 to 7/31/14. During the project period, the SAO gamma-ray group carried out a wide-range of research efforts, but focused on VHE observations of extragalactic sources with VERITAS. The SAO group led or co-lead nearly all VERITAS extragalactic working groups and the observations addressed themes in Particle Physics and Fundamental Laws, Cosmology, and Black Holes. The primary topics of this research were processes in exotic galaxies, especially active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies, which have implications for cosmology and Lorentz invariance violation, as well as indirect dark matter detection via VERITAS observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In addition, the SAO group let the development of unique capabilities for VERITAS to observe during all periods of moonlight. Overall, this has increased the VERITAS data yield by 60% and these data are both scientifically useful and regularly published. This grant funded research that led to contributions towards the publication of 51 refereed journal articles during the project period, including several led by, or with significant contributions from, the SAO group.

Benbow, Wystan R. [PI

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Are we observing Lorentz violation in gamma ray bursts?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From recent observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it appears that spectral time lags between higher-energy gamma rays photons and lower-energy photons vary with energy difference and time (distance) traveled. These lags appear to be smaller for the most luminous (close) bursts but larger for the fainter (farther away) bursts. From this observation, it has been suggested that it might be possible to determine the distance (L) these bursts have traveled from these time lags alone, without performing any red-shift measurements. These observed spreads (dispersion) of high-energy electromagnetic pulses of different energies with time contradict the special theory of relativity (STR). However, extended theories (ET) of the STR have been developed that contain a dispersive term, predicting the above observations. An example of such an ET is presented, allowing us to derive a relationship between time lags of gamma rays of different energies and distance L traveled from their origin. In addition, this theory predicts the origin of X-ray flashes.

Theodore G. Pavlopoulos

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH?EURECA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The WATCH wide field x?ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 in 1992 is verified.

S. Brandt; N. Lund; A. J. Castro?Tirado

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Some Observational Aspects of R Coronae Borealis Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some of the observational aspects related to the evolutionary status and dust production in R Cor Bor stars are discussed. Recent work regarding the surface abundances, stellar winds and evidence for dust production in these high luminosty hydrogen deficient stars are also reviewed. Possibility of the stellar winds being maintained by surface magnetic fields is also considered.

N. Kameswara Rao

2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Observation of the radiative decay D*+-> D+gamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed a signal for the decay D*(+) --> D(+)gamma at a significance of 4 standard deviations. From the measured branching ratio B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma)/B(D*(+) --> D(+)pi(0)) = 0.055 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.010 we find B(D*(+) --> D(+)gamma) = 0...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

333

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Sonar Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Additional Information KHz: RPM / Other _______________Global Registry ID:MMSI No. Permit expiration (dd-mm- yy): Y / N Present? Usage contact Diver / dive equipment Usage Manufacturer Hull mounted / towed Catch Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther

334

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

335

Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming Igor V. Polyakov,1) are similar, and do not support the predicted polar amplification of global warming. The possible moderating amplification of global warming. Intrinsic arctic variability obscures long-term changes, limiting our ability

Bhatt, Uma

336

Coastal Underwater Field Observer with Remote IP Access  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and network capacity Significant challenge to reconcile energy consumption of hardware and communications Observer 9/16/09 Low Tide High Tide #12;Boston University Slideshow Title Goes Here Underwater Enclosure Prototype Testing Sealing Low Tide Simulation High Tide Simulation Result: NO Leakage Costal Underwater

337

Air–Water Momentum Flux Observations over Shoaling waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper drab, with simultaneous momentum flux observations from four towers placed at different depths along a shore-normal line at the west end of Lake Ontario, Canada. The towers were at nominal depths of 12, 8, 4, and 2 m, in order to study ...

F. Anctil; M. A. Donelan

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mirror Mode Structures in the Solar Wind: STEREO Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mirror Mode Structures in the Solar Wind: STEREO Observations O. Enríquez-Rivera1 , X. Blanco-Cano1 Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, D.F., 04510, MEXICO 2. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. Mirror mode structures occur in the solar wind either

California at Berkeley, University of

339

Gamma-Ray Burst Observations by Pioneer Venus Orbiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed spectra appear to be consistent with dNI dE-exp [-E(keV)/150] [where...Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 R. E. SPALDING Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87115 References and Notes 1. R. W...

W. D. EVANS; J. P. GLORE; R. W. KLEBESADEL; J. G. LAROS; E. R. TECH; R. E. SPALDING

1979-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

An integrated view of data quality in Earth observation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to a Theme Issue e-Science-towards the cloud...While our data quality management approach is in the domain of...methodologies for data quality management can be applied to wider...observation (EO) is the science of measurement of all...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Observations of Comet b 1881 made at Monte Video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 1881 Royal Astronomical Society. Provided by the NASA Astrophysics Data System 14 July 1881 research-article Articles Observations of Comet b 1881 made at Monte Video Lieut. B. E. W. Gwynne R.A. 1881MNRAS..41..438G...

B. E. W. Gwynne

1881-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

342

Observation of objects under intense plasma background illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the observation of a brightness-amplified image of an object through a masking arc discharge are presented. The copper-vapor laser active medium was used as an image brightness amplifier. It is shown that the image quality does not worsen under plasma background illumination.

Buzhinsky, R. O.; Savransky, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Natural Science Center, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation); Zemskov, K. I.; Isaev, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Observations and Theories of Langmuir Circulation: A Story of Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occasion to review the history of this field of study. An underlying theme here is that the study interdisciplinary history; the first half of this work is a brief and eclectic review of this. Much of the research recent observations and the nature of this unexplained variability. 1 Introduction The oceanic surface

Smith, Jerome A.

344

Ram Pressure Stripping in Groups: Comparing Theory and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ram pressure stripping may be the dominant mechanisms driving the evolution of galaxy colors in groups and clusters. In this paper, an analytic model of ram pressure stripping is confronted with observations of galaxy colors and star formation rates in groups using a group catalog drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. An observed increase in the fraction of galaxies residing on the red sequence, the red fraction, with both increasing group mass, $M_{gr}$, and decreasing satellite luminosity, $L_{sat}$, is predicted by the model. The size of the differences in the red fraction can be understood in terms of the effect of the scatter in satellite and cluster morphologies and satellite orbits on the relationship between $M_{gr}$ and $L_{sat}$ and the stripped gas fraction. Observations of the group galaxies' H$\\delta$ and 4000\\AA break spectral measures and a comparison of the distribution of $SFR/M_{\\ast}$ for star forming galaxies in the groups and in isolation both indicate that the color differences observed in the groups are the result of slowly declining SFRs, as expected if the color change is driven by stripping of the outer H \\textsc{i} disk.

J. A. Hester

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

345

INTEGRATING THE OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM: MOBILE PLATFORMS Dean Roemmich(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/AOML, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami FL 33149 USA, Email: rick.lumpkin@noaa.gov (12) Center for Ocean, including oxygen, chlorophyll-A, and particulate organic carbon, and coordination with shipboard and moored. The observing system infrastructure must evolve in parallel with the system's scope and complexity. Expanded

346

1. ABSTRACT Clouds substantially affect the observed infrared  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initial guess Clouds vary over orders from BT difference between observed of magnitude and Jacobians of clouds 4. TESTING ASSUMPTIONS: FORWARD MODEL ERRORS * Comparing model that includes scattering (CHARTS heights and optical depths can be adequately modeled by our approach 3. ASSUMPTIONS / APPROACH In order

347

First observation of the decay B-0 -> D*D+*(-)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed four fully reconstructed B-0 --> D*+D*- candidates in 5.8 x 10(6) Y(4S) --> B (B) over bar decays recorded with the CLEO detector. The background is estimated to be 0.31 +/- 0.10 events. The probability that the background could...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

XRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER i SCULPTORIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the cluster main sequence and deduce a distance modulus of 6.9 (i.e. a distance of 240 pc) and a color excess magnetic activity on young stars. Lithium observations indicate that i Sculptoris has an age similar

349

Observation of the top quark with the DO detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DO Collaboration reports on the observation of the top quark in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the top quark mass to be 199{sub -21}{sup -19}(stat){sub -21}{sup +14}(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4 {+-}2.2 pb. Our result is based on approximately 50 pb{sup -1} of data. We observe 17 events with an expected background of 3.8 {+-} 0.6 events. The probability of an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2 x 10{sup -6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the events are consistent with top quark decay, and the distribution of events across the seven decay channels is consistent with the Standard Model top quark branching fractions. We describe the analysis that led to the observation of the top quark as well as the properties of the top quark events.

Hadley, N.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Loop Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: Linking Loops to Observational Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research during the last decade demonstrates that effects originating on the Planck scale are currently being tested in multiple observational contexts. In this review we discuss quantum gravity phenomenological models and their possible links to loop quantum gravity. Particle frameworks, including kinematic models, broken and deformed Poincar\\'e symmetry, non-commutative geometry, relative locality and generalized uncertainty principle, and field theory frameworks, including Lorentz violating operators in effective field theory and non-commutative field theory, are discussed. The arguments relating loop quantum gravity to models with modified dispersion relations are reviewed, as well as, arguments supporting the preservation of local Lorentz invariance. The phenomenology related to loop quantum cosmology is briefly reviewed, with a focus on possible effects that might be tested in the near future. As the discussion makes clear, there remains much interesting work to do in establishing the connection between the fundamental theory of loop quantum gravity and these specific phenomenological models, in determining observational consequences of the characteristic aspects of loop quantum gravity, and in further refining current observations. Open problems related to these developments are highlighted. characteristic aspects of loop quantum gravity, and in further refining current observations. Open problems related to these developments are highlighted.

Florian Girelli; Franz Hinterleitner; Seth A. Major

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Observations onCebus capucinus in Southwestern Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations onCebus capucinus in 10 forests in Chiriqui, Panama, are reported. Troop size ranged from...Cebus. The troop’s daily path length was approximately 1.6 to 2.5 km and their home range was between 32 an...

John D. Baldwin; Janice I. Baldwin

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Variability in active galactic nuclei: confrontation of models with observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......flux. The time-scale of the light variation corresponds to the...However, observations of quasar light curves imply time-scales of...parameter sets to produce simulated light curves from which they can evaluate...had come to be known as the Christmas tree model (Pica Smith 1983......

M.R.S. Hawkins

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

John Smart

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1. Wang,6 D. R. Blake,7 E. Atlas,8 A. Fried,8 B. Potter,9 M. A. Avery,10 G. W. Sachse,10 S. T. Sandholm,11 the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment are used in conjunction

Clarke, Antony

355

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho Alan G. Jones Dublin Institute Electrical Moho Electrical conductivity Electrical resistivity Crust­mantle boundary Defining the depth on crustal and mantle rocks suggest that there should be a concomitant step-lie change in electrical

Jones, Alan G.

356

Information Theory and Observational Limitations in Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Information Theory and Observational Limitations in Decision Making David H. Wolpert Santa Fe: Hedonic utility, risk attitudes, S-shaped utility, decision theory, constrained obser- vation, bounded for formalizing and analyzing the problem faced by a Decision Maker (DM) working under information

357

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

358

Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

Steen Hannestad

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Correspondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, others argue that supercooling is not the only mechanism for producing thick basal ice sequencesCorrespondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen from supercooled water. Supercooling has been invoked to explain anomalously thick basal ice sequences beneath temperate glaciers

Knight, Peter G.

360

Observable coherence theory for statistically periodic fields Brynmor J. Davis*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observable coherence theory for statistically periodic fields Brynmor J. Davis* The Beckman processes is used to develop classical coherence theory for the measurement of statistically periodicRevA.76.043843 PACS number s : 42.25.Kb, 42.60.Mi, 42.65.Re I. INTRODUCTION Coherence theory 1

Bhargava, Rohit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS (ARANEAE: THERIDIOSOMATIDAE that theridiosomatids spin modified orb-webs, but only the web of the holarctic Theridiosoma gemmosum (C. L. Koch) has the unusual webs ofsome tropical theridio- somatid spiders that the senior author later identified

Mathis, Wayne N.

362

8) Equatorial waves a)Observations in the low stratosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal End on May 11 #12;Zonal wind Meridional wind a) Observation in the low stratosphere A balloon trip field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal

Spiga, Aymeric

363

DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S: tdekker@limno.com 2 NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: steve, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction

364

Observing the Origin of the Universe Ned Wright (UCLA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observing the Origin of the Universe by Ned Wright (UCLA) ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-DT.html ·http

Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

365

Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck is the computation of a subset of predicates sufficient for control and whose cost is minimal. Our solution avoids, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The

David, Alexandre

366

Observability and Estimation Uncertainty Analysis for PMU Placement Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observability and Estimation Uncertainty Analysis for PMU Placement Alternatives Jinghe Zhang unit (PMU), developed in the 1980s, is considered to be one of the most important devices in the future of power systems. While PMU measurements currently cover fewer than 1% of the nodes in the U.S. power grid

Bishop, Gary

367

Solar activity studies through coronal X–ray observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coronal holes and a sporadic slow solar wind coming from mainly closed regions. The solar wind has a very complex structure...R. Soc. Lond. A (2000) Solar activity studies 655 L. Harra...Pudritz (McCaster University, Canada). Do your observations show...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Observing the Earth and planets: a Leicester symposium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for instance using transmission electron microscopy...encompasses the iron-line complex at 6-7...strength and modest data rate (180 kbs...forward to avoid data loss). Mike Hapgood...g. major power outages). The impact of...better observational data to push the physics......

Mark Sims; John Pye; John Remedios

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Observation of the negative ions: Ra-, Pa-, and Pu-  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The negative ions of the isotopes Ra226, Pa231, and Pu244 have been observed by means of accelerator mass spectrometry and their properties compared with the negative ions of Th and U. The electron affinities of all these elements have been estimated to be similar and greater than 50 meV.

X.-L. Zhao; M.-J. Nadeau; M. A. Garwan; L. R. Kilius; A. E. Litherland

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Ring current intensity estimated from low-altitude proton observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Oksavik Department of Physics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway D. S. Evans NOAA Space Environment as a proxy for estimating the energy injection rate into the ring current (RC) due to energetic protons. The injection rate Q(t) is not based upon solar wind parameters but directly on the observed proton

Bergen, Universitetet i

371

Testing gravity with halo density profiles observed through gravitational lensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new test of the modified gravity endowed with the Vainshtein mechanism with the density profile of a galaxy cluster halo observed through gravitational lensing. A scalar degree of freedom in the galileon modified gravity is screened by the Vainshtein mechanism to recover Newtonian gravity in high-density regions, however it might not be completely hidden on the outer side of a cluster of galaxies. Then the modified gravity might yield an observational signature in a surface mass density of a cluster of galaxies measured through gravitational lensing, since the scalar field could contribute to the lensing potential. We investigate how the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism affects the surface mass density observed through gravitational lensing, assuming that the density profile of a cluster of galaxies follows the original Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, the generalized NFW profile and the Einasto profile. We compare the theoretical predictions with observational results of the surface mass density reported recently by other researchers. We obtain constraints on the amplitude and the typical scale of the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism in a subclass of the generalized galileon model.

Narikawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, E-mail: narikawa@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Observation of Beam ION Instability in Spear3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weak vertical coupled bunch instability with oscillation amplitude at {mu}m level has been observed in SPEAR3. The instability becomes stronger when there is a vacuum pressure rise by partially turning off vacuum pumps and it becomes weaker when the vertical beam emittance is increased by turning off the skew quadrupole magnets. These confirmed that the instability was driven by ions in the vacuum. The threshold of the beam ion instability when running with a single bunch train is just under 200 mA. This paper presents the comprehensive observations of the beam ion instability in SPEAR3. The effects of vacuum pressure, beam current, beam filling pattern, chromaticity, beam emittance and bunch-by-bunch feedback are investigated in great detail. In an electron accelerator, ions generated from the residual gas molecules can be trapped by the beam. Then these trapped ions interact resonantly with the beam and cause beam instability and emittance blow-up. Most existing light sources use a long single bunch train filling pattern, followed by a long gap to avoid multi-turn ion trapping. However, such a gap does not preclude ions from accumulating during one passage of the single bunch train beam, and those ions can still cause a Fast Ion Instability (FII) as predicted by Raubenheimer and Zimmermann. FII has been observed in ALS, and PLS by artificially increasing the vacuum pressure by injecting helium gas into the vacuum chamber or by turning off the ion pumps in order to observe the beam ion instability. In some existing rings, for instance B factory, the beam ion instability was observed at the beginning of the machine operation after a long period of shutdown and then it automatically disappeared when the vacuum was better. However, when the beam emittance becomes smaller, the FII can occur at nominal conditions as observed in PLS, SOLEIL and SSRF. This paper reports the observations of beam ion instabilities in SPEAR3 under different condition during a period of one year, which includes single bunch train instability (FII) and multi-bunch train instability. Note that the instability may be not the same even with the same beam due to the change of the vacuum with time. SPEAR3 has a circumference of 234 m with a harmonic number of 372. SPEAR3 runs with six bunch train filling pattern in order to suppress the possible beam ion instability. Table 1 lists the main parameters of SPEAR3. The vacuum of SPEAR3 ranges from 0.1 to 0.5 nTorr, which varies from section to section.

Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City; Cai, Y.; Corbett, W.J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Safranek, J.A.; Schmerge, J.F.; Sebek, J.J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

The invisible gorilla strikes again: Sustained attentional blindness in expert observers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The invisible gorilla strikes again: Sustained attentional blindness in expert observers Trafton lung. Extending to Naive Observers Is the gorilla simply invisible? 12 observers were cued to location

374

Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

376

THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ?> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ? 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ? 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ? 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ? 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Climatological Data for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations for Clouds Over the Globe from Surface Observations (1988) (NDP-026) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp026 data Data Investigators C. J. Hahn, S. G. Warren, J. London, R. L. Jenne, and R. M. Chervin With some data from as early as 1930, global long-term monthly and/or seasonal total cloud cover, cloud type amounts and frequencies of occurrence, low cloud base heights, harmonic analyses of annual and diurnal cycles, interannual variations and trends, and cloud type co-occurrences have been compiled and presented in two atlases (Warren et al. 1988, 1990). These data were derived from land and ship synoptic weather reports from the "SPOT" archive of the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FNOC) and from Release 1 of the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) for

378

Observing Newtrinos: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Newtrinos Observing Newtrinos RECENT NEUTRINO EXPERIMENTS PROVIDE A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO GLIMPSE NEW PARTICLE PHYSICS The field of particle physics spent much of the last century converging on the "standard model" that describes subatomic particles and the forces by which they interact. Ambitious research that began in the early 1900s with hot-air balloon experiments aimed at catching cosmic rays, and followed later in the century with accelerator-based experiments, led to the extraordinary success of the standard model. Nonetheless, the excitement in particle physics often lies not with the vast body of solidly established textbook knowledge, but rather on the fringe, where researchers seek to identify new physics beyond the standard model. Some even hope to find a

379

Climatological Data For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, For Clouds Over the Globe From Surface Observations, 1982-1991: The Total Cloud Edition (1994) (NDP-026a) data Data Investigators C. J. Hahn, S. G. Warren, and J. London Routine, synoptic surface weather reports from ships and land stations over the entire globe, for the10-year period December 1981 through November 1991, were processed for total cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of clear sky, sky-obscured due to precipitation, and sky-obscured due to fog. Archived data, consisting of various annual, seasonal and monthly averages, are provided in grid boxes that are typically 2.5° × 2.5° for land and 5° × 5° for ocean. Day and nighttime averages are also given separately for each season. Several derived quantities, such as interannual variations and annual and diurnal

380

Computer-Related Ergonomic Safety Talking Points and Observation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Ergonomic Safety Related Ergonomic Safety Talking Points and Observation Criteria Supporting Managers and Supervisors in Meetings with Employees March 14, 2007 Background to Discussions * Scope of the Problem: - ~70% of recordable injuries this FY are from ergonomic causes - ~70% of ergonomic injuries involve computer work (remainder mainly involve laboratory and shop work) - Most significant cause of computer related ergo injuries is workload hazard control (help = work with manager) - Single most significant contributing factor is not requesting help when ergonomic issues surface (help = request ergonomic evaluation) Suggested Employee Discussion Topics - Computer Ergo (p1) * Meet with employees in their workspace so you can observe the ergonomic issues in their work. * Begin by telling the employee you are there to see

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of quantum matter called a topological insulator that is characterized by entangled wavefunctions. The proposal has now been realized by an international collaboration led by researchers from Princeton University who studied the electronic structure of insulating alloys of bismuth and antimony by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES. Their results constitute the first direct experimental evidence of a topological insulator in nature that is fully quantum entangled. In the future, a detailed study of topological order and quantum entanglement using their method can potentially pave the way for fault-tolerant (topological) quantum computing.

382

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of quantum matter called a topological insulator that is characterized by entangled wavefunctions. The proposal has now been realized by an international collaboration led by researchers from Princeton University who studied the electronic structure of insulating alloys of bismuth and antimony by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES. Their results constitute the first direct experimental evidence of a topological insulator in nature that is fully quantum entangled. In the future, a detailed study of topological order and quantum entanglement using their method can potentially pave the way for fault-tolerant (topological) quantum computing.

383

Hadronic sizes and observables in high-energy scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The functional dependence of the high-energy observables of total cross section and slope parameter on the sizes of the colliding hadrons predicted by the model of the stochastic vacuum and the corresponding relations used in the geometric model of Povh and H\\"ufner are confronted with the experimental data. The existence of a universal term in the expression for the slope, due purely to vacuum effects, independent of the energy and of the particular hadronic system, is investigated. Accounting for the two independent correlation functions of the QCD vacuum, we improve the simple and consistent description given by the model of the stochastic vacuum to the high-energy pp and pbar-p data, with a new determination of parameters of non-perturbative QCD. The increase of the hadronic radii with the energy accounts for the energy dependence of the observables.

Erasmo Ferreira; Flávio Pereira

1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Moon and Sun Shadowing Observed by the MACRO Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using over 40 million muons collected since 1989 by the MACRO detector we have searched for a depletion of muons coming from the direction of the Moon due to primary cosmic rays striking the Moon. We observe this Moon shadow in the expected position with a statistical significance of more than 5 standard deviations. We have analyzed the same data for an analogous Sun shadow, and have found a signal with a significance of about 4 standard deviations. The Sun shadow is displaced from the Sun's position by about 0.6 degrees North in ecliptic coordinates. This displacement is compatible with a deflection of primary cosmic rays due to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the 10-20 TeV primary energy range which is relevant to the underground muons observed by MACRO.

N. Giglietto; for the MACRO collaboration

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

A New Shear Estimator for Weak Lensing Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new shear estimator for weak lensing observations which properly accounts for the effects of a realistic point spread function (PSF). Images of faint galaxies are subject to gravitational shearing followed by smearing with the instrumental and/or atmospheric PSF. We construct a `finite resolution shear operator' which when applied to an observed image has the same effect as a gravitational shear applied prior to smearing. This operator allows one to calibrate essentially any shear estimator. We then specialize to the case of weighted second moment shear estimators. We compute the shear polarizability which gives the response of an individual galaxy's polarization to a gravitational shear. We then compute the response of the population of galaxies, and thereby construct an optimal weighting scheme for combining shear estimates from galaxies of various shapes, luminosities and sizes. We define a figure of merit --- an inverse shear variance per unit solid angle --- which characterizes the quality o...

Kaiser, N

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador-BA, 40210-340 (Brazil); Dantas, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/CRN, 59076-740, Natal-RN (Brazil)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Higgs boson mass and electroweak observables in the MRSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R-symmetry is a fundamental symmetry which can solve the SUSY flavor problem and relax the search limits on SUSY masses. Here we provide a complete next-to-leading order computation and discussion of the lightest Higgs boson mass, the W boson mass and muon decay in the minimal R-symmetric SUSY model (MRSSM). This model contains non-MSSM particles including a Higgs triplet, Dirac gauginos and higgsinos, and leads to significant new tree-level and one-loop contributions to these observables. We show that the model can accommodate the measured values of the observables for interesting regions of parameter space with stop masses of order 1 TeV in spite of the absence of stop mixing. We characterize these regions and provide typical benchmark points, which are also checked against further experimental constraints. A detailed exposition of the model, its mass matrices and its Feynman rules relevant for computations in this paper is also provided.

Dießner, Philip; Kotlarski, Wojciech; Stöckinger, Dominik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Molecular line observations of proto-planetary nebulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present our recent results on mm-wave CO observations of proto-planetary nebulae. These include high-resolution interferometric maps of various CO lines in three well known bipolar PPNe: M1-92, M2-56 and OH231.8+4.2. The global properties of the high velocity molecular emission in post-AGB sources have been also studied, by means of high-sensitivity single dish observations of the J=1-0 and 2-1 lines of 12CO and 13CO. We discuss the implications of these results to constrain the origin of the post-AGB molecular high-velocity winds and the shaping of bipolar PPNe and PNe. In addition, we also present the results of an interferometric map of the molecular envelope around the luminous high-latitude star 89 Her, a low mass post-AGB source which is also a close binary system.

J. Alcolea; V. Bujarrabal; A. Castro-Carrizo; C. Sanchez Contreras; R. Neri; J. Zweigle

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

ROSAT Public PSPC Observations in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Las Campanas Redshift Survey, an optically selected survey which contains 26,418 galaxy redshifts, has been correlated with ``The First ROSAT Source Catalogue of Pointed Observations with the PSPC,'' which contains 50,408 sources from 2876 ROSAT pointed observations. Ten matches were found. The optical spectra of most of the ten matches show weak narrow emission lines. Due to their high x-ray luminosities, their high x-ray--to--optical flux ratios, and the evidence of rapid x-ray variability in the two brightest matches, we interpret the majority of these objects to be narrow-line Seyfert galaxies or ``hidden'' active galactic nuclei. Of the ten matches, only one galaxy shows the characteristics of a bona fide starburst.

D. L. Tucker; G. Hasinger; H. Lin

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Recycling of quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a finite number of copies of an unknown qubit state that have already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? We give a positive answer to this question and quantify the information obtainable by a given observer as a function of the number of copies in the ensemble, and of the number of independent observers that, one after the other, have independently measured the same ensemble of qubits before him. The optimality of the protocol is proven and extensions to other states and encodings are also studied. According to the general lore, the state after a measurement has no information about the state before the measurement. Our results manifestly show that this statement has to be taken with a grain of salt, specially in situations where the quantum states encode confidential information.

Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Near Infrared observations of Soft X-ray selected AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of near infrared observations of 19 soft X-ray selected AGN. The goal of the observations was to search for strong, narrow Paschen-alpha or Brackett-gamma emission lines, as a sign of nuclear starbursts. We found Pa-alpha emission in the spectra of 11 sources and Br-gamma in at least five. Strong NIR emission has been found in two sources, CBS 126 and Mkn 766, both objects with strong [OIII]5007 emission, weak FeII emission and wavelength dependent degree of polarization in the optical. Classical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies do not show exceptionally strong NIR emission lines. We present the results of our study and discuss how our findings fit into an evolutionary scheme of AGN.

D. Grupe; H. -C Thomas

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Observations on waveforms of capillary and gravity-capillary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to extreme conditions in the field, there has not been any observational report on three-dimensional waveforms of short ocean surface waves. Three-dimensional waveforms of short wind waves can be found from integrating surface gradient image data (Zhang 1996a). Ocean surface gradient images are captured by an optical surface gradient detector mounted on a raft operating in the water offshore California (Cox and Zhang 1997). Waveforms and spatial structures of short wind waves are compared with early laboratory wind wave data (Zhang 1994, 1995). Although the large-scale wind and wave conditions are quite different, the waveforms are resoundingly similar at the small scale. It is very common, among steep short wind waves, that waves in the capillary range feature sharp troughs and flat crests. The observations show that most short waves are far less steep than the limiting waveform under weak wind conditions. Waveforms that resemble capillary-gravity solitons are observed with a close match to the form theoretically predicted for potential flows (Longuet-Higgins 1989, Vanden-Broeck and Dias 1992). Capillaries are mainly found as parasitic capillaries on the forward face of short gravity waves. The maximum wavelength in a parasitic wave train is less than a centimeter. The profiles of parasitic wave trains and longitudinal variations are shown. The phenomenon of capillary blockage (Phillips 1981) on dispersive freely traveling short waves is observed in the tank but not at sea. The short waves seen at sea propagate in all directions while waves in the tank are much more unidirectional.

Xin Zhang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Hard X-ray Sky: Recent Observational Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last fifty years have witnessed the birth, development, and maturation to full potential of hard X-ray astrophysics. The primary force driving the history of the field has been the development of space-based instrumentation optimized for getting the maximum science out of observations of high-energy photons from astrophysical sources. Hard X-ray telescopes are leading research in areas such as galactic diffuse emission, galactic transients, and active galactic nuclei.

Gehrels, Neil [NASA/GSFC/ASD/Code 661, Greenbelt, Md 20071 (United States); Cannizzo, John K. [CRESST/UMBC/NASA/GSFC/ASD/Code 661, Greenbelt, Md 20071 (United States)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

No-signaling, dynamical independence, and the local observability principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within a general operational framework I show that a-causality at a distance of "local actions" (the so-called "no-signaling") is a direct consequence of commutativity of local transformations, i.e. of dynamical independence. On the other hand, the tensor product of Quantum Mechanics is not just a consequence of such dynamical independence, but needs in addition the Local Observability Principle.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

INTEGRAL observations of SS433: Results of coordinated campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of simultaneous INTEGRAL and optical observations of galactic microquasar SS433 in May 2003 and INTEGRAL/RXTE observations in March 2004 are presented. Persistent precessional variability with a maximum to minimum uneclipsed hard X-ray flux ratio of \\sim 4 is discovered. The 18-60 keV X-ray eclipse is found to be in phase with optical and near infrared eclipses. The orbital eclipse observed by INTEGRAL in May 2003 is at least two times deeper and apparently wider than in soft X-ray band. The broadband X-ray spectrum 2-100 keV simultaneously detected by RXTE/INTEGRAL in March 2004 can be described by bremsstrahlung emission from optically thin thermal plasma with kT\\sim 30 keV. The optical spectroscopy with the 6-m SAO BTA telescope confirmed the optical companion to be an A5-A7 supergiant. For the first time, spectorscopic indications of a strong heating effect in the optical star atmosphere are found. The measurements of absorption lines which are presumably formed in the non-illuminated side of the supergiant yield its radial velocity semi-amplitude K_v=132\\pm 9 km/s. The analysis of the observed hard X-ray light curve and the eclipse duration, combined with spectroscopically found optical star radial velocity corrected for the strong heating effect, allows us to model SS433 as a massive X-ray binary. Assuming that the hard X-ray source in SS433 is eclipsed by the donor star that exactly fills its Roche lobe, the masses of the optical and compact components in SS433 are suggested to be M_v\\approx 30 M_\\odot and M_x\\approx 9M_\\odot, respectively. This provides further evidence that SS433 is a massive binary system with supercritical accretion onto a black hole.

A. M. Cherepashchuk; R. A. Sunyaev; S. N. Fabrika; K. A. Postnov; S. V. Molkov; E. A. Barsukova; E. A. Antokhina; T. R. Irsmambetova; I. E. Panchenko; E. V. Seifina; N. I. Shakura; A. N. Timokhin; I. F. Bikmaev; N. A. Sakhibullin; Z. Aslan; I. Khamitov; A. G. Pramsky; O. Sholukhova; Yu. N. Gnedin; A. A. Arkharov; V. M. Larionov

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Observing a Quantum Phase Transition by Measuring a Single Spin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the ground-state quantum correlations of an Ising model can be detected by monitoring the time evolution of a single spin alone, and that the critical point of a quantum phase transition is detected through a maximum of a suitably defined observable. A proposed implementation with trapped ions realizes an experimental probe of quantum phase transitions which is based on quantum correlations and scalable for large system sizes.

Manuel Gessner; Michael Ramm; Hartmut Haeffner; Andreas Buchleitner; Heinz-Peter Breuer

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "in-ocean observations cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Applicability of radar observations to the prediction of storm runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Depaverne. (Yiembe~ 1967 (Yonwh) (Yea ) ABSTRACT Rainfall-runoff relaL'ronships fox 18 storms over the Little Nashita River basin in Oklahoma are studied in order to develop a method for predicting storm losses based on weather-radar observational..., for the use of their computer facilities. Credit is due Mr. M. A. Hartman, Chief Research Engineer, Agricultural Research Service, Chickasha, Oklahoma, for his assistance in obtaining treamflow and rainfall data from records maintained by the Agricultural...

Johnson, Odell Monroe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Observation of ionization fronts in low density foam targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionization fronts have been observed in low density chlorinated foam targets and low density foams confined in gold tubes using time resolved {ital K}-shell absorption spectroscopy. The front was driven by an intense pulse of soft x-rays produced by high power laser irradiation. The density and temperature profiles inferred from the radiographs provided detailed measurement of the conditions. The experimental data were compared to radiation hydrodynamics simulations and reasonable agreement was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Hoarty, D. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); [Radiation Physics Department, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Willi, O.; Barringer, L.; Vickers, C. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Watt, R. [P24, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [P24, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Nazarov, W. [Chemistry Department, University of Dundee (United Kingdom)] [Chemistry Department, University of Dundee (United Kingdom)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Observation and Properties of the Orbitally Excited Bs2* Meson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the direct observation of the excited L=1 state Bs2* in fully reconstructed decays to B+K-. The mass of the Bs2* meson is measured to be 5839.6±1.1(stat)±0.7(syst)??MeV/c2, and its production rate relative to the B+ meson is measured to be [1.15±0.23(stat)±0.13(syst)]%.

V. M. Abazov et al. (D0 Collaboration)

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

Some Observations on Energy Efficiency and Capital Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SO~ffi OBSERVATIONS ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CAPITAL COST William F. Kenney Exxon Chemical Company Florham Park, ABSTRACT The usual expectation in the process indus tries is that improved energy efficiency requires increased investment..., ACS Symposium Series ~. (3) Exxon Chemical Internal Studies. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author is grateful to Exxon Chemical for permission to publish this study. Particular thanks go to A. P. Durso and W. J. O'Brien of the Central Engineering...

Kenney, W. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Observational constraints on patch inflation in noncommutative spacetime  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study constraints on a number of patch inflationary models in noncommutative spacetime using a compilation of recent high-precision observational data. In particular, the four-dimensional general relativistic (GR) case, the Randall-Sundrum (RS), and the Gauss-Bonnet brane world scenarios are investigated by extending previous commutative analyses to the infrared limit of a maximally symmetric realization of the stringy uncertainty principle. The effect of spacetime noncommutativity modifies the standard consistency relation between the tensor spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We perform likelihood analyses in terms of inflationary observables using new consistency relations and confront them with large-field inflationary models with potential V{proportional_to}{phi}{sup p} in two classes of noncommutative scenarios. We find a number of interesting results: (i) the quartic potential (p=4) is rescued from marginal rejection in the class 2 GR case, and (ii) steep inflation driven by an exponential potential (p{yields}{infinity}) is allowed in the class 1 RS case. Spacetime noncommutativity can lead to blue-tilted scalar and tensor spectra even for monomial potentials, thus opening up a possibility to explain the loss of power observed in cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We also explore patch inflation with a Dirac-Born-Infeld tachyon field and explicitly show that the associated likelihood analysis is equivalent to the one in the ordinary scalar field case by using horizon-flow parameters. It turns out that tachyon inflation is compatible with observations in all patch cosmologies even for large p.

Calcagni, Gianluca [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy); INFN-Gruppo collegato di Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, I-43100 Parma (Italy); Tsujikawa, Shinji [Department of Physics, Gunma National College of Technology, Gunma 371-8530 (Japan)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Observation of a new isomeric state in 217Pa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new isomeric state in 217Pa has been observed with an ?-decay of E?=9.540±0.050 MeV and T1/2=1.5-0.4+0.9 ms. The isotope 217Pa was produced in the reaction 28Si+194Pt at a beam energy of 163 MeV. Measured ?-decay half-life was reproduced by the cluster model calculation with a transferred angular momentum of l=7 ?.

T. Ikuta; H. Ikezoe; S. Mitsuoka; I. Nishinaka; K. Tsukada; Y. Nagame; J. Lu; T. Kuzumaki

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The current status of observational constraints on cosmic strings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observational restrictions on the cosmic string scenario for the formation of large scale structure are evaluated. this restrictions are due to the spectrum of gravitational radiation emitted by oscillating string loops, anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background caused by the strings, and evaporating black holes formed from collapsed cosmic string loops. It is shown that the only free parameter of the scenario, the cosmic string mass-per-unit-length, {mu}, is severely restricted.

Caldwell, R.R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l=400 - 1500. The broadband amplitudes we have measured are deltaT(band) = 58.7 (-6.3, +7.7) microK for l = 603 (-166, +180) and 29.7 (-4.2, +4.8) microK for l = 1190 (-224, +261), where these are half-power widths in l. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

S. Padin; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; W. L. Holzapfel; S. T. Myers; J. E. Carlstrom; E. M. Leitch; M. Joy; L. Bronfman; J. May

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

INTEGRAL observations of SS433: Results of coordinated campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of simultaneous INTEGRAL and optical observations of galactic microquasar SS433 in May 2003 and INTEGRAL/RXTE observations in March 2004 are presented. Persistent precessional variability with a maximum to minimum uneclipsed hard X-ray flux ratio of \\sim 4 is discovered. The 18-60 keV X-ray eclipse is found to be in phase with optical and near infrared eclipses. The orbital eclipse observed by INTEGRAL in May 2003 is at least two times deeper and apparently wider than in soft X-ray band. The broadband X-ray spectrum 2-100 keV simultaneously detected by RXTE/INTEGRAL in March 2004 can be described by bremsstrahlung emission from optically thin thermal plasma with kT\\sim 30 keV. The optical spectroscopy with the 6-m SAO BTA telescope confirmed the optical companion to be an A5-A7 supergiant. For the first time, spectorscopic indications of a strong heating effect in the optical star atmosphere are found. The measurements of absorption lines which are presumably formed in the non-illuminated side of the ...

Cherepashchuk, A M; Fabrika, S N; Postnov, K A; Molkov, S V; Barsukova, E A; Antokhina, E A; Irsmambetova, T R; Panchenko, I E; Seifina, E V; Shakura, N I; Timokhin, A N; Bikmaev, I F; Sakhibullin, N A; Aslan, Z; Khamitov, I; Pramsky, A G; Sholukhova, O; Gnedin, Y N; Arkharov, A A; Larionov, V M; Gnedin, Yu.N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Mystery Deepens: Spitzer Observations of Cool White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 4.5$\\mu$m and 8$\\mu$m photometric observations of 18 cool white dwarfs obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our observations demonstrate that four white dwarfs with T_eff< 6000 K show slightly depressed mid-infrared fluxes relative to white dwarf models. In addition, another white dwarf with a peculiar optical and near-infrared spectral energy distribution (LHS 1126) is found to display significant flux deficits in Spitzer observations. These mid-infrared flux deficits are not predicted by the current white dwarf models including collision induced absorption due to molecular hydrogen. We postulate that either the collision induced absorption calculations are incomplete or there are other unrecognized physical processes occuring in cool white dwarf atmospheres. The spectral energy distribution of LHS 1126 surprisingly fits a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum in the infrared, mimicking a hot white dwarf with effective temperature well in excess of 10$^5$ K. This implies that the source of this flux deficit is probably not molecular absorption but some other process.

Mukremin Kilic; Ted von Hippel; Fergal Mullally; William T. Reach; Marc J. Kuchner; D. E. Winget; Adam Burrows

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mariska, John T. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lunar occultation observation of ? Sgr: A progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lunar Occultation (LO) is an event where limb of the Moon passing over a particular heavenly bodies such as stars, asteroids, or planets. In other words, during the event, stars, asteroids and planets are occulted by the Moon. When occulted objects contact the lunar limb, there will be a diffraction fringe(s) which can be measured photometrically, until the signal vanishes into noise. This event will give us a valuable information about binarities (of stars) and/or angular diameters estimation (of stars, planets, asteroids) in milliarcsecond resolution, by fitting with theoretical LO pattern. CCDs are common for LO observation because of its fast read out, and recently are developed for sub-meter class telescope. In this paper, our LO observation attempt of ? Sgr and its progress report are presented. The observation was conducted on July 30{sup th}, 2012 at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia, using 45cm f/12 GOTO telescope combined with ST-9 XE CCD camera and Bessel B filter. We used drift-scan method to obtain light curve of the star as it was disappearing behind Moon's dark limb. Our goal is to detect binarity (or multiplicity) of this particular object.

Jatmiko, A. T. P. [Bosscha Observatory, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Puannandra, G. P.; Hapsari, R. D.; Putri, R. A.; Arifin, Z. M.; Haans, G. K.; Hadiputrawan, I. P. W. [Bosscha Observatory, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia and Astronomy Study Program, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

ALMA Observations of the HH 46/47 Molecular Outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The morphology, kinematics and entrainment mechanism of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow were studied using new ALMA Cycle 0 observations. Results show that the blue and red lobes are strikingly different. We argue that these differences are partly due to contrasting ambient densities that result in different wind components having a distinct effect on the entrained gas in each lobe. A 29-point mosaic, covering the two lobes at an angular resolution of about 3", detected outflow emission at much higher velocities than previous observations, resulting in significantly higher estimates of the outflow momentum and kinetic energy than previous studies of this source, using the CO(1-0) line. The morphology and the kinematics of the gas in the blue lobe are consistent with models of outflow entrainment by a wide-angle wind, and a simple model may describe the observed structures in the position-velocity diagram and the integrated intensity map. The red lobe exhibits a more complex structure, and there is evidence tha...

Arce, Hector G; Corder, Stuartt; Garay, Guido; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Raga, Alejandro C; Cabrit, Sylvie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum-mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

M. W. Ray; E. Ruokokoski; S. Kandel; M. Möttönen; D. S. Hall

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

Emory, S. R. (Steven R.); Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M. (Peter M); Keller, Richard A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first observation of the heavy baryonic state {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0} is reported by the CDF Collaboration. A new decay mode of the established state {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} is also observed. In both cases the decay into a {Xi}{sub c} plus a charged pion is seen, with an equivalent statistical significance of above 6.8{sigma}. The quark model of elementary particles is well established and has a impressive history of success in its account of hadronic states. Nevertheless, it is important to continue to test it by searching for hitherto unobserved particles that are predicted to exist, both to provide continued confirmation of the quark model, and to provide a background for the possible discovery of unusual types of particle. In this presentation we report the first observation, by the CDF Collaboration, of a new baryonic state, the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}. This consists of a bsu quark combination and fills an important gap in the set of baryons containing a b quark.

Bussey, Peter; /Glasgow U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pacific Ocean observation programs: Gaps in ecological time series  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract How well do existing ocean observation programs monitor the oceans through space and time? A meta-analysis of ocean observation programs in the Pacific Ocean was carried out to determine where and how key parameters defining the physics, chemistry, and biology of the oceans were measured. The analysis indicates that although the chemistry and physics of the Pacific Ocean are reasonably well monitored, ecological monitoring remains largely ad hoc, patchy, unsystematic, and inconsistent. The California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI), for example, is the only Pacific Ocean program in which the zooplankton and micronekton are resolved to species with consistent time series of greater than 20 years duration. Several studies now indicate massive changes to nearshore, mesopelagic and other fish communities of the southern California Current but available time series do not allow these potential changes to be examined more widely. Firm commitment from the global community to sustained, representative, quantitative marine observations at the species level is required to adequately assess the ecological status of the oceans.

J. Anthony Koslow; Jennifer Couture

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Theory vs. Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review our theoretical understanding of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars, concentrating on comparisons to observations. Sequences of regular Type I X-ray bursts from GS 1826-24 and 4U 1820-30 are very well described by the theory. I discuss recent work which attempts to use the observed burst properties in these sources to constrain the composition of the accreted material. For GS 1826-24, variations in the burst energetics with accretion rate indicate that the accreted material has solar metallicity; for 4U 1820-30, future observations should constrain the hydrogen fraction, testing evolutionary models. I briefly discuss the global bursting behavior of burst sources, which continues to be a major puzzle. Finally, I turn to superbursts, which naturally fit into the picture as unstable carbon ignition in a thick layer of heavy elements. I present new time-dependent models of the cooling tails of superbursts, and discuss the various interactions between superbursts and normal Type I bursts, and what can be learned from them.

Andrew Cumming

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predicitions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

E. Bravo; C. Badenes; D. Garcia-Senz

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

CONFRONTING COLD DARK MATTER PREDICTIONS WITH OBSERVED GALAXY ROTATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich statistics of galaxy rotations as captured by the velocity function (VF) provide invaluable constraints on galactic baryon physics and the nature of dark matter (DM). However, the comparison of observed galaxy rotations against cosmological models is prone to subtle caveats that can easily lead to misinterpretations. Our analysis reveals full statistical consistency between {approx}5000 galaxy rotations, observed in line-of-sight projection, and predictions based on the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at the mass-resolution of the Millennium simulation (H I line-based circular velocities above {approx}50 km s{sup -1}). Explicitly, the H I linewidths in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) are found to be consistent with those in S{sup 3}-SAX, a post-processed semi-analytic model for the Millennium simulation. Previously found anomalies in the VF can be plausibly attributed to (1) the mass-limit of the Millennium simulation, (2) confused sources in HIPASS, (3) inaccurate inclination measurements for optically faint sources, and (4) the non-detectability of gas-poor early-type galaxies. These issues can be bypassed by comparing observations and models using linewidth source counts rather than VFs. We investigate if and how well such source counts can constrain the temperature of DM.

Obreschkow, Danail; Meyer, Martin; Power, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ma, Xiangcheng [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zwaan, Martin [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Dynamical Observations of Membrane Proteins: The Case of Bacteriorhodopsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new x-ray methodology, Diffracted X-ray Tracking (DXT), has been proven to be a valuable tool in observing intramolecular conformational changes of individual single molecules in real time and space. In order to achieve DXT, the fabrication of dispersive nanocrystals is one of the most important technologies, because DXT system monitors the diffracted x-ray (Laue) spots from nanocrystals labeled with single bio-molecules. In this study, we fabricated one-dimensional gold nanocrystals with an average diameter size of 16 nm using vacuum evaporation. Furthermore, using these nanocrystals, we succeeded in observing normal Brownian motions and momentary structural changes of a single-membrane protein (Bacteriorhodopsin: BR) in a membrane due to the expression of its function. The average movement of the momentarily structural changes in the 35th residue of BR was 76 {+-} 48 pm, and this agrees with estimated movements from known x-ray crystallography data. This result is an important step toward realizing in-vivo observations of single-molecular conformational changes in membrane proteins.

Okumura, Yasuaki [Department of Biomolecular Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Life and Environmental Science Div., Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); CREST-Sasaki Team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan); Oka, Toshihiko [Life and Environmental Science Div., Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshio [Department of Biomolecular Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Life and Environmental Science Div., Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); CREST-Sasaki Team, Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), Tachikawa 190-0012 (Japan)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Observational constraint on the varying speed of light theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The varying speed of light (VSL) theory is controversial. It succeeds in explaining some cosmological problems, but on the other hand it is excluded by mainstream physics because it will shake the foundation of physics. In the present paper, we devote ourselves to test whether the speed of light is varying from the observational data of the type Ia Supernova, Baryon Acoustic Oscillation, Observational $H(z)$ data and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We select the common form $c(t)=c_0a^n(t)$ with the contribution of dark energy and matter, where $c_0$ is the current value of speed of light, $n$ is a constant, and consequently construct a varying speed of light dark energy model (VSLDE). The combined observational data show a much trivial constraint $n=-0.0033 \\pm 0.0045$ at 68.3\\% confidence level, which indicates that the speed of light may be a constant with high significance. By reconstructing the time-variable $c(t)$, we find that the speed of light almost has no variation for redshift $z < 10^{-1}$....

Qi, Jing-Zhao; Liu, Wen-Biao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Experimentally observed field–gas interaction in intense optical lattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a gas perturbed by a laser interference pattern, an optical lattice, exhibits a periodic modulation of its refractive index, strong Bragg diffraction of the perturbing light can occur. This scattering reduces the field's ability to further manipulate the gas. Experimental observations of Bragg scattering, evidence of a two-way coupling, are compared to the evolution of the light fields calculated by solutions to the wave equation. Comparison indicates momentum deposition as a prime contributor to the shape of the scattering function vs. lattice velocity, a rationale further supported through additional direct simulation Monte Carlo simulation.

Graul, Jacob S.; Cornella, Barry M.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Lilly, Taylor C. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Observation of chi_{cJ} Decays to ??bar?^{+}?^{-}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of the chi_{cJ} states (J=0,\\ 1,\\ 2) to \\Lambda \\Lambda bar\\ pi^{+} \\pi^{-}, including processes with intermediate \\Sigma(1385), are studied through the E1 transition psi'-->\\gamma chi_{cJ} using 106 million psi' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of chi_{cJ} decays to the final state \\Lambda\\Lambda bar \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}. The branching ratio of the intermediate process chi_{cJ}-->\\Sigma(1385)^{+/-} \\bar{\\Sigma}(1385)^{-/+} is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Observable consequences of Langmuir turbulence in active galactic nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss in detail the observable consequences of non-linear microscopic plasma processes in active galactic nuclei. The combination of several elementary momentum gain (shock acceleration and stochastic acceleration) and loss processes (synchroton radiation, inverse Compton scattering) produces an almost monoenergetic distribution function of relativistic electrons - the pile-up - which excites Langmuir waves. Turbulent wave-wave and wave-particle interactions lead to nonlinear stabilization of the pile-up. The temporal and spatial evolution of the Langmuir waves and the relativistic electrons determine the shape and time scale of the spectral variations. The model is applied to extragalactic nuclei and to the galactic center as well.

Lesch, H.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Observation of Soliton Fusion in a Josephson Array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of topological solitons in a parallel array of a Josephson junction is studied experimentally. We observe the fusion of two relativistic 2{pi} solitons of the same polarity into a single 4{pi} soliton. The 4{pi} soliton carries two quanta of magnetic flux and, most strikingly, travels 18% faster than an ordinary 2{pi} soliton under the same driving force. We also find a variety of bunched states composed of 2{pi} solitons of the same polarity, moving with fixed separation.

Pfeiffer, J.; Schuster, M.; Abdumalikov, A.A. Jr.; Ustinov, A.V. [Physikalisches Institut III, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help to shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.

Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Spatial Correlations in General Circulation Models and Observation Reanalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set CCSM4 Community Climate System Model Version 4 CM3 Climate Model Version 3 Mk3 Mark 3.0 CM5A Climate Model Version 5A ESM Earth System Model OBS Observations REA Reanalysis picontrol Pre-Industrial Control Run GCM General... ESM 1.9? × 1.9? 1000 IPSL CM5A 1.9? × 3.75? 1000 CSIRO MK3 3.2? × 5.6? 1000 NCDC OBS 5? × 5? - NCEP REA 2.5? × 2.5? 65 3.1 General Circulation Models GCMs are useful tools for understanding the roles of the major climate system components. Analyses...

Sansom, Taylor Lee

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gamma?ray burst observations: Past and future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The past 20 years of gamma?ray burst observations are summarized. Time history morphologies and durations are discussed as well as continuum and line energy spectra. The results of statistical studies on the spatial distribution log N(?S)??log?S and V/V max are presented and the status of quiescent and transient counterpart searches are reviewed. A table of soon?to?be?obsolete ‘‘Gamma?ray Burst World Records’’ is given. Due to the presence of new ground?based and space experiments it seems likely that substantial progress in understanding this phenomenon will be made in the 90’s

K. Hurley

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Observations of deep scattering layers in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer (DSL), in the Gulf of Mexico, in reference to; ~ the distribution of the DSL during the past three years, ~ average and maximum rates of ascent and descent, ~ correlation between DSL motion during the total solar eclipse in March, 1970... was noted and discussed but not specifically identified as such. D. Reaction to Solar Eclipse Reported here are the results of observations of the DSL in the Gulf of Mexico during a three-day period which included the day of the total solar eclipse (TSE...

Thompson, Ronald Curtis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

Verlinde, J

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous analysis suggests that the whistler heat flux instability is responsible for the regulation of the electron heat flux of the solar wind. For an interval of quiescent solar wind during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission, the plasma wave data in the whistler frequency regime are compared to the predictions of the whistler heat flux instability model. The data is well constrained by the predicted upper bound on the electron heat flux and a clear correlation between wave activity and electron heat flux dissipation is observed.

Scime, Earl E.; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, John L.; Balogh, Andre; Lengyel-Frey, Denise [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (United States)

1996-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

433

Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University] [Clark University

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

First Observation of Accelerator Muon Antineutrinos in MINOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first direct observation of muon antineutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector in the current muon-neutrino dominated beam. The magnetic field of the detector is utilized to separate muon neutrinos and antineutrinos event-by-event by identifying the charge sign of the muon created in charged-current interactions. We present preliminary results on the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters as well as limit on the fraction of neutrinos that disappear and reappear as antineutrinos. We also discuss the prospect of the measurement when the polarity of the magnetic focusing horns will be reversed to create a dedicated muon antineutrino beam.

Danko, Istvan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Strangeness Suppression of qq? Creation Observed in Exclusive Reactions  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

Mestayer, Mac [JLAB; Park, Kijun; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Biselli, Angela; Boyarinov, Sergey; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garillon, Brice; Garcon, Michel; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guidal, Michel; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hattawy, Mohammad; Holtrop, Maurik; Hughes, Simon; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Jiang, Hao; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Keller, Dustin; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Levine, William; Livingston, Ken; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; Moody, Cristina; Moutarde, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Peng, Peng; Phelps, William; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Simonyan, Ani; Sokhan, Daria; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Tang, Wei; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Wei, Xiangdong; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Researchers Directly Observe Oxygen Signature in the Oxygen-evolving Complex of Photosynthesis Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil fuel resources and climate change. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanisms behind photosynthesis is of fundamental importance and will prove critical to the future design of devices aimed at converting sunlight into electrochemical energy and transportable fuel.

438

Multicolour observations of V404 Cyg with ULTRACAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high time-resolution multicolour observations of the quiescent soft X-ray transient V404 Cyg obtained with ULTRACAM. Superimposed on the secondary star's ellipsoidal modulation are large flares on timescales of a few hours, as well as several distinct rapid flares on timescales of tens of mins. The rapid flares, most of which show further variability and unresolved peaks, cover shorter timescales than those reported in previous observations. The power density spectrum (PDS) of the 5 s time-resolution data shows a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) feature at 0.78 mHz (=21.5 min). Assuming this periodicity represents the Keplerian period at the transition between the thin and advective disc regions, we determine the transition radius. We discuss the possible origins for the QPO feature in the context of the advection-dominated accretion flow model. We determine the colour of the large flares and find that the i' band flux per unit frequency interval is larger than that in the g' band. The colour is consistent with optically thin gas with a temperature of ~8000 K arising from a region with an equivalent blackbody radius of at least 2 Ro, which covers 3 percent of the accretion disc's surface. Our timing and spectral analysis results support the idea that the rapid flares (i.e. the QPO feature) most likely arise from regions near the transition radius.

T. Shahbaz; V. S. Dhillon; T. R. Marsh; C. Zurita; C. A. Haswell; P. A. Charles; R. I. Hynes; J. Casares

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE RUNAWAY BINARY HD 15137  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HD 15137 is an intriguing runaway O-type binary system that offers a rare opportunity to explore the mechanism by which it was ejected from the open cluster of its birth. Here, we present recent blue optical spectra of HD 15137 and derive a new orbital solution for the spectroscopic binary and physical parameters of the O star primary. We also present the first XMM-Newton observations of the system. Fits of the EPIC spectra indicate soft, thermal X-ray emission consistent with an isolated O star. Upper limits on the undetected hard X-ray emission place limits on the emission from a proposed compact companion in the system, and we rule out a quiescent neutron star (NS) in the propeller regime or a weakly accreting NS. An unevolved secondary companion is also not detected in our optical spectra of the binary, and it is difficult to conclude that a gravitational interaction could have ejected this runaway binary with a low mass optical star. HD 15137 may contain an elusive NS in the ejector regime or a quiescent black hole with conditions unfavorable for accretion at the time of our observations.

McSwain, M. Virginia; Aragona, Christina; Marsh, Amber N.; Roettenbacher, Rachael M. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); De Becker, Michael [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique, Universite de Liege, FNRS (Belgium); Roberts, Mallory S. E. [Eureka Scientific, Inc., Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Gies, Douglas R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Grundstrom, Erika D. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)], E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu, E-mail: cha206@lehigh.edu, E-mail: anm506@lehigh.edu, E-mail: rmr207@lehigh.edu, E-mail: debecker@astro.ulg.ac.be, E-mail: malloryr@gmail.com, E-mail: tabetha@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: erika.grundstrom@vanderbilt.edu

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Observation of $?_{c1}$ decays into vector meson pairs $??$, $??$, and $??$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of $\\chi_{c1}$ to vector meson pairs $\\phi\\phi$, $\\omega\\omega$ and $\\omega\\phi$ are observed for the first time using $(106\\pm4)\\times 10^6$ $\\psip$ events accumulated at the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are measured to be $(4.4\\pm 0.3\\pm 0.5)\\times 10^{-4}$, $(6.0\\pm 0.3\\pm 0.7)\\times 10^{-4}$, and $(2.2\\pm 0.6\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{-5}$, for $\\chi_{c1}\\to \\phi\\phi$, $\\omega\\omega$, and $\\omega\\phi$, respectively. The observation of $\\chi_{c1}$ decays into a pair of vector mesons $\\phi\\phi$, $\\omega\\omega$ and $\\omega\\phi$ indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in $\\chi_{cJ}$ decays. In addition, the measurement of $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\omega\\phi$ gives the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed decay. Branching fractions for $\\chi_{c0}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ decays into other vector meson pairs are also measured with improved precision.

M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; L. An; Q. An; Z. H. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini; Y. Ban; J. Becker; N. Berger; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; G. F. Cao; X. X. Cao; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkova; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; Y. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; I. Denysenkob; M. Destefanis; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; M. Y. Duan; R. R. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; C. Q. Feng; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; M. Greco; S. Grishin; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; B. Huang; G. M. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. K. Jia; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; M. Kavatsyuk; S. Komamiya; W. Kuehn; J. S. Lange; J. K. C. Leung; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Lei Li; N. B. Li; Q. J. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; G. C. Liu; H. Liu; H. B. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. H. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Y. W. Liu; Yong Liu; Z. A. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; T. Ma; X. Ma; X. Y. Ma; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; H. Mao; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; N. Yu. Muchnoi; Y. Nefedov; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; M. Pelizaeus; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; C. S. J. Pun; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsevc; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Sonoda; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; X. D. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; X. F. Tang; H. L. Tian; D. Toth; G. S. Varner; X. Wan; B. Q. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. R. Xu; Z. Z. Xu; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; M. Yang; T. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; L. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; T. R. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; Jiawei Zhao; Jingwei Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; Z. L. Zhao; A. Zhemchugova; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; Z. P. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; L. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; X. W. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou; J. X. Zuo; P. Zweber

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

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441

A New Shear Estimator for Weak Lensing Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new shear estimator for weak lensing observations which properly accounts for the effects of a realistic point spread function (PSF). Images of faint galaxies are subject to gravitational shearing followed by smearing with the instrumental and/or atmospheric PSF. We construct a `finite resolution shear operator' which when applied to an observed image has the same effect as a gravitational shear applied prior to smearing. This operator allows one to calibrate essentially any shear estimator. We then specialize to the case of weighted second moment shear estimators. We compute the shear polarizability which gives the response of an individual galaxy's polarization to a gravitational shear. We then compute the response of the population of galaxies, and thereby construct an optimal weighting scheme for combining shear estimates from galaxies of various shapes, luminosities and sizes. We define a figure of merit --- an inverse shear variance per unit solid angle --- which characterizes the quality of image data for shear measurement. The new method is tested with simulated image data. We discuss the correction for anisotropy of the PSF and propose a new technique involving measuring shapes from images which have been convolved with a re-circularizing PSF. We draw attention to a hitherto ignored noise related bias and show how this can be analyzed and corrected for. The analysis here draws heavily on the properties of real PSF's and we include as an appendix a brief review, highlighting those aspects which are relevant for weak lensing.

Nick Kaiser

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Multi-Messenger Observations of Neutron Rich Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At very high densities, electrons react with protons to form neutron rich matter. This material is central to many fundamental questions in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Moreover, neutron rich matter is being studied with an extraordinary variety of new tools such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). We describe the Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) that uses parity violating electron scattering to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. This has important implications for neutron stars and their crusts. We discuss X-ray observations of neutron star radii. These also have important implications for neutron rich matter. Gravitational waves (GW) open a new window on neutron rich matter. They come from sources such as neutron star mergers, rotating neutron star mountains, and collective r-mode oscillations. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations, we find neutron star crust to be very strong. It can support mountains on rotating neutron stars large enough to generate detectable gravitational waves. We believe that combing astronomical observations using photons, GW, and neutrinos, with laboratory experiments on nuclei, heavy ion collisions, and radioactive beams will fundamentally advance our knowledge of compact objects in the heavens, the dense phases of QCD, the origin of the elements, and of neutron rich matter.

Horowitz, C. J. [UTK/ORNL/Indiana University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Radar Observations of the 2011 October Draconid Outburst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A strong outburst of the October Draconid meteor shower was predicted for October 8, 2011. Here we present the observations obtained by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) during the 2011 outburst. CMOR recorded 61 multi-station Draconid echoes and 179 single-station overdense Draconid echoes (covering the magnitude range of +3 <= MV <= +7) between 16-20h UT on October 8, 2011. The mean radiant for the outburst was determined to be a_g = 261.9o +/- 0.3o, d_g = +55.3o +/- 0.3o (J2000) from observations of the underdense multi-station echoes. This radiant location agrees with model predictions to ~1o . The determined geocentric velocity was found to be ~10-15% lower than the model value (17.0 - 19.1 km s^-1 versus 20.4 km s^-1), a discrepancy we attribute to undercorrection for atmospheric deceleration of low density Draconid meteoroids as well as to poor radar radiant geometry during the outburst peak. The mass index at the time of the outburst was determined to be ~ 1.75 using the amplitude distribut...

Ye, Quanzhi; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D; Weryk, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Observations of nitrogen isotope fractionation in deeply embedded protostars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) The terrestrial planets, comets, and meteorites are significantly enriched in 15N compared to the Sun and Jupiter. While the solar and jovian nitrogen isotope ratio is believed to represent the composition of the protosolar nebula, a still unidentified process has caused 15N-enrichment in the solids. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations, including chemical fractionation. However, observational results that constrain the fractionation models are scarce. While there is evidence of 15N-enrichment in prestellar cores, it is unclear how the signature evolves into the protostellar phases. Our aim is to measure the 14N/15N ratio around three nearby, embedded low-to-intermediate-mass protostars. Isotopologues of HCN and HNC were used to probe the 14N/15N ratio. A selection of H13CN, HC15N, HN13C, and H15NC transitions was observed with the APEX telescope. The 14N/15N ratios were derived from the integrated intensities assuming a standard 12C/13C ratio. The assumption of optically...

Wampfler, S F; Bizzarro, M; Bisschop, S E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Observational constraints on growth of massive black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the observational constraints on the growth of massive black holes (BHs) in galactic nuclei. We use the velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies obtained by the SDSS and the relation between BH mass and velocity dispersion to estimate the local BH mass density to be 2.5x10^5 Msun/Mpc^3. We also use the QSO luminosity function from the 2dF Redshift Survey to estimate the BH mass density accreted during optically bright QSO phases. The local BH mass density is consistent with the density accreted during optically bright QSO phases if QSOs have an efficiency 0.1. By studying the continuity equation for the BH mass distribution, including the effect of BH mergers, we find relations between the local BH mass function and the QSO luminosity function. If the BH mass is assumed to be conserved during BH mergers, comparison of the predicted relations with the observations suggests that luminous QSOs (L_{bol}>10^{46} erg/s) have a high efficiency (e.g. 0.2), and the growth of high-mass BHs (>10^8 Msun) comes mainly from accretion during optically bright QSO phases, or that luminous QSOs have a super-Eddington luminosity. If luminous QSOs are not accreting with super-Eddington luminosities and the growth of low-mass BHs also occurs mainly during optically bright QSO phases, less luminous QSOs must accrete with a low efficiency 0.1.

Qingjuan Yu; Scott Tremaine

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

Implications of SCUBA observations for the Planck Surveyor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the implications for the Planck Surveyor of the recent sub-millimetre number counts obtained using the SCUBA camera. Since it observes at the same frequency as one of the higher frequency science channels on Planck, SCUBA can provide constraints on the point-source contribution to the CMB angular power spectrum, which require no extrapolation in frequency. We have calculated the two-point function of these sub-millimetre sources, using a Poisson model normalized to the observed counts. While the current data are uncertain, under reasonable assumptions the point-source contribution to the anisotropy is comparable to the noise in the 353GHz channel. The clustering of these sources is currently unknown, however if they cluster like the z~3 Lyman-break galaxies their signal would be larger than the primary anisotropy signal on scales smaller than about 10 arcmin. We expect the intensity of these sources to decrease for wavelengths longward of 850 microns. At the next lowest Planck frequency, 217GHz, the contribution from both the clustered and Poisson terms are dramatically reduced. Hence we do not expect these sources to seriously affect Planck's main science goal, the determination of the primordial anisotropy power spectrum. Rather, the potential determination of the distribution of sub-mm sources is a further piece of cosmology that Planck may be able to tackle.

Douglas Scott; Martin White

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

447

SOLAR H{alpha} OSCILLATIONS FROM INTENSITY AND DOPPLER OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromospheric wave activity around flares and filaments has been a research focus for years, and could provide indirect measurements of local conditions that are not otherwise accessible. One interesting observed phenomenon is oscillations in filaments, activated by distant flares and the large-scale waves they produce. Characteristics of these oscillations, such as periods, amplitudes, and lifetimes, can provide unique information about the filament. We measure oscillation properties in flares and filaments from H{alpha} chromospheric data using a new method that provides important spatial and frequency content of the dynamics. We apply the method to two flare events where filaments are observed to oscillate and determine their properties. We find strong oscillatory signal in flaring active regions in the chromosphere over a range of frequencies. Two filaments are found to oscillate without any detectable chromospheric wave acting as an activation mechanism. We find that filaments oscillate with periods of tens of minutes, but variations are significant at small spatial scales along the filamentary region. The results suggest that there is a frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude, as well as a spatial dependence along single filaments that is more difficult to quantify. It also appears that the strength of the oscillations does not necessarily depend on the strength of the trigger, although there are other possible effects that make this conclusion preliminary. Applications of this technique to other events and different data sets will provide important new insights into the local energy densities and magnetic fields associated with dynamic chromospheric structures.

Jackiewicz, Jason [New Mexico State University, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)] [New Mexico State University, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Balasubramaniam, K. S., E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 87114 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes, were found to occur during four hydraulic fracturing experiments carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Since the long period earthquakes occur in the same region as the shear type events, it is concluded that the unusual character of the long period earthquake waveforms is due to a source effect and not a path effect. The occurrence of long period earthquakes during hydraulic fracturing could indicate tensile fracturing. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. A proposed source for these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of each crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, crack lengths are estimated to be between 3 and 20m.

Bame, D.; Fehler, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter ? in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Chatterjee, Sourav [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rasio, Frederic A., E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl, E-mail: s.chatterjee@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

The effective Lagrangian of dark energy from observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using observational data on the expansion rate of the universe (H(z)) we constrain the effective Lagrangian of the current accelerated expansion. Our results show that the effective potential is consistent with being flat i.e., a cosmological constant; it is also consistent with the field moving along an almost flat potential like a pseudo-Goldstone boson. We show that the potential of dark energy does not deviate from a constant at more than 6% over the redshift range 0 < z < 1. The data can be described by just a constant term in the Lagrangian and do not require any extra parameters; therefore there is no evidence for augmenting the number of parameters of the LCDM paradigm. We also find that the data justify the effective theory approach to describe accelerated expansion and that the allowed parameters range satisfy the expected hierarchy. Future data, both from cosmic chronometers and baryonic acoustic oscillations, that can measure H(z) at the % level, could greatly improve constraints on the flatness of the potential or shed some light on possible mechanisms driving the accelerated expansion. Besides the above result, it is shown that the effective Lagrangian of accelerated expansion can be constrained from cosmological observations in a model-independent way and that direct measurements of the expansion rate H(z) are most useful to do so.

Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia [ICREA and ICC, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Talavera, P. [DFEN and ICC, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Comte Urgell 187, Barcelona (Spain); Moresco, Michele; Cimatti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Pozzetti, Lucia, E-mail: raul.jimenez@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: pere.talavera@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: michele.moresco@unibo.it, E-mail: a.cimatti@unibo.it, E-mail: lucia.pozzetti@oabo.inaf.it [INAF — Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Observation of a New $\\Xi_{b}$ Baryon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observation of a new b baryon via its strong decay into $\\Xi_{b}^- \\pi^+$ (plus charge conjugates) is reported. The measurement uses a data sample of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The known $\\Xi_b^-$ baryon is reconstructed via the decay chain $\\Xi_{b}^- \\to J/\\psi \\Xi^- \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^- \\Lambda^0 \\pi^-$, with $\\Lambda^0 \\to p \\pi^-$. A peak is observed in the distribution of the difference between the mass of the $\\Xi_{b}^- \\pi^+$ system and the sum of the masses of the $\\Xi_{b}^-$ and $\\pi^+$, with a significance exceeding five standard deviations. The mass difference of the peak is 14.84 +/- 0.74 (stat.) +/- 0.28 (syst.) MeV. The new state most likely corresponds to the $J^P=3/2^+$ companion of the $\\Xi_b$.

Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electron spin resonance observation of an interfacial Ge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we report on the observation of a first Ge dangling bond (DB)-type interface defect in the SiO2/(100)GexSi1?x/SiO2/(100)Si heterostructure manufactured by the condensation technique. The center, exhibiting monoclinic-I (C2v) symmetry with principal g values g1 = 2.0338 ± 0.0003, g2 = 2.0386 ± 0.0006, g3 = 2.0054 is observed in maximum densities of ~6.8 ? 1012 cm?2 of the GexSi1?x/SiO2 interface for x~0.7, the signal disappearing for x outside the 0.45–0.93 range. The notable absence of interfering Si Pb-type centers enables unequivocal spectral analysis. Collectively, the combination of all data leads to depicting the defect as a Ge Pb 1-type center, i.e. not a trigonal basic Ge Pb(0)-type center (). Understanding the modalities of the defect's occurrence may provide an insight into the thus far elusive role of Ge DB defects at Ge/insulator interfaces, and widen our understanding of interfacial DB centers in general.

A Stesmans; P Somers; V V Afanas'ev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

New XMM-Newton observations of SNRs in the SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete overview of the supernova remnant (SNR) population is required to investigate their evolution and interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Recent XMM-Newton observations of the SMC cover three known SNRs (DEM S5, SNR B0050-72.8, and SNR B0058-71.8), which are poorly studied and are X-ray faint. We used new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and new optical observations at Ha, [SII], and [OIII] wavelengths, in combination with the X-ray data, to investigate their properties and to search for new SNRs in the SMC. We used X-ray source selection criteria and found one SMC object with typical SNR characteristics (HFPK 334), that was initially detected by ROSAT. We analysed the X-ray spectra and present multi-wavelength morphological studies of the three SNRs and the new candidate. Using a non-equilibrium ionisation collisional plasma model, we find temperatures kT around 0.18 keV for the three known remnants and 0.69 keV for the candidate. The low te...

Filipovic, M D; Winkler, P F; Pietsch, W; Payne, J L; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y; Stootman, F H; Reaser, B E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A0620-00 IN QUIESCENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the black hole binary system, A0620-00, acquired in 2010 March. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained the first FUV spectrum of A0620-00 as well as NUV observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The observed spectrum is flat in the FUV and very faint (with continuum fluxes {approx_equal} 1e - 17 erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}). The UV spectra also show strong, broad (FWHM {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}) emission lines of Si IV, C IV, He II, Fe II, and Mg II. The C IV doublet is anomalously weak compared to the other lines, which is consistent with the low carbon abundance seen in NIR spectra of the source. Comparison of these observations with previous NUV spectra of A0620-00 shows that the UV flux has varied by factors of 2-8 over several years. We compiled the dereddened, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00 and compared it to previous SEDs as well as theoretical models. The SEDs show that the source varies at all wavelengths for which we have multiple samples. Contrary to previous observations, the optical-UV spectrum does not continue to drop to shorter wavelengths, but instead shows a recovery and an increasingly blue spectrum in the FUV. We created an optical-UV spectrum of A0620-00 with the donor star contribution removed. The non-stellar spectrum peaks at {approx_equal}3000 A. The peak can be fit with a T = 10,000 K blackbody with a small emitting area, probably originating in the hot spot where the accretion stream impacts the outer disk. However, one or more components in addition to the blackbody are needed to fit the FUV upturn and the red optical fluxes in the optical-UV spectrum. By comparing the mass accretion rate determined from the hot spot luminosity to the mean accretion rate inferred from the outburst history, we find that the latter is an order of magnitude smaller than the former, indicating that {approx}90% of the accreted mass must be lost from the system if the predictions of the disk instability model and the estimated interoutburst interval are correct. The mass accretion rate at the hot spot is 10{sup 5} the accretion rate at the black hole inferred from the X-ray luminosity. To reconcile these requires that outflows carry away virtually all of the accreted mass, a very low rate of mass transfer from the outer cold disk into the inner hot region, and/or radiatively inefficient accretion. We compared our broadband SED to two models of A0620-00 in quiescence: the advection-dominated accretion flow model and the maximally jet-dominated model. The comparison suggests that strong outflows may be present in the system, indicated by the discrepancies in accretion rates and the FUV upturn in flux in the SED.

Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Khargharia, Juthika [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

CONSTRAINING PERTURBATIVE EARLY DARK ENERGY WITH CURRENT OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we study a class of early dark energy (EDE) models, in which, unlike in standard dark energy models, a substantial amount of dark energy exists in the matter-dominated era. We self-consistently include dark energy perturbations, and constrain these models using current observations. We consider EDE models in which the dark energy equation of state is at least w{sub m} {approx_gt} -0.1 at early times, which could lead to an EDE density of up to {Omega}{sub DE}(z{sub CMB})= 0.03{Omega}{sub m}(z{sub CMB}). Our analysis shows that marginalizing over the non-DE parameters such as {Omega}{sub m}, H{sub 0}, andn{sub s} , current CMB observations alone can constrain the scale factor of transition from EDE to late-time dark energy to a{sub t} {approx_gt} 0.44 and width of transition to {Delta}{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.37. The equation of state at present is somewhat weakly constrained to w{sub 0} {approx_lt} -0.6, if we allow H{sub 0} < 60 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. Taken together with other observations, such as SNe, Hubble Space Telescope, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies, w{sub 0} is constrained much more tightly to w{sub 0} {approx_lt} -0.9, while redshift of transition and width of transition are also tightly constrained to a{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.19 and{Delta}{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.21. The evolution of the equation of state for EDE models is thus tightly constrained to {Lambda}CDM-like behavior at low redshifts. Incorrectly assuming dark energy perturbations to be negligible leads to different constraints on the equation of state parameters-w{sub 0} {approx_lt} -0.8, a{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.33, and{Delta}{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.31, thus highlighting the necessity of self-consistently including dark energy perturbations in the analysis. If we allow the spatial curvature to be a free parameter, then the constraints are relaxed to w{sub 0} {approx_lt} -0.77, a{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.35, and{Delta}{sub t} {approx_lt} 0.35 with -0.014 < {Omega}{sub {kappa}} < 0.031 for CMB + other observations. For perturbed EDE models, the 2{sigma} lower limit on {sigma}{sub 8} ({sigma}{sub 8} {>=} 0.59) is much lower than that in {Lambda}CDM ({sigma}{sub 8} {>=} 0.72), thus raising the interesting possibility of discriminating EDE from {Lambda}CDM using future observations such as halo mass functions or the Sunyaev-Zeldovich power spectrum.

Alam, Ujjaini [ISR-1, ISR Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

OBSERVATION REPORT BendKing Pipe Bending Machine.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BENDKING PIPE BENDING MACHI\NE BENDKING PIPE BENDING MACHI\NE DEMONSTRATION Field Observation Report for December 3 - 4, 2001 Date Published: March 2002 Brian Meindinger, RMOTC PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER 907 N. POPLAR, SUITE 150 CASPER, WY 82601 1-888-599-2200 Approval: RMOTC Manager_____________________________ Date:______________ Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or any third party's use or the results of such use of any

457

Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Observation of Muon Pairs in High-Energy Hadron Collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Muon pairs with effective masses between 1 GeV/c2 and 6.5 GeV/c2 have been observed in the collisions of 30-GeV protons with a uranium target. The production cross section was seen to vary smoothly with mass exhibiting no resonant structure. Data were taken at incident proton energies of 22, 25, 28.5, and 29.5 GeV. Within the experimental aperture the total cross section increased with energy by a factor of 5. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models. Limits are presented for the contributions to the signal from both massive muon-pair resonances and antiproton-proton annihilation. Implications are presented for higher-energy accelerators, using current ideas involving scaling.

J. H. Christenson, G. S. Hicks, L. M. Lederman, P. J. Limon, B. G. Pope, and E. Zavattini

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Observation of $?_{c}$ decay into $?^{+}\\bar?^{-}$ and $?^{-}\\bar?^{+}$ final states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a data sample of $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of $\\eta_{c}$ mesons to $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$. The branching fractions are measured to be $(2.11\\pm0.28_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.18_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.50_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ and $(0.89\\pm0.16_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.08_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.21_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ for $\\eta_{c} \\to \\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, respectively. These branching fractions provide important information on the helicity selection rule in charmonium-decay processes.

The BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; O. Albayrak; D. J. Ambrose; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; Y. Ban; J. Becker; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; J. M. Bian; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; V. Bytev; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; Y. P. Chu; F. Coccetti; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; W. M. Ding; Y. Ding; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; C. Q. Feng; R. B. Ferroli; C. D. Fu; J. L. Fu; Y. Gao; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Y. L. Han; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; M. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. P. Huang; T. Hussain; C. S. Ji; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; F. F. Jing; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; M. Kavatsyuk; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; Cui Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; Q. J. Li; S. L. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; X. R. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; X. T. Liao; B. J. Liu; C. L. Liu; C. X. Liu; C. Y. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; H. W. Liu; J. P. Liu; K. Y. Liu; Kai Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; G. R. Lu; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; Q. W. Lu; X. R. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; C. L. Ma; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. Y. Ma; Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; C. Morales Morales; C. Motzko; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; C. Nicholson; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; J. W. Park; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; E. Prencipe; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; A. Sarantsev; B. D. Schaefer; J. Schulze; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; M. R. Shepherd; X. Y. Song; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; D. H. Sun; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. Q. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. Wang; Q. J. Wang; S. G. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; Q. G. Wen; S. P. Wen; M. Werner; U. Wiedner; L. H. Wu; N. Wu; S. X. Wu; W. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; G. M. Xu; H. Xu; Q. J. Xu; X. P. Xu; Z. R. Xu; F. Xue; Z. Xue; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; Y. H. Yan; H. X. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; S. P. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. J. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. S. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; H. S. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; K. X. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. Z. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; X. H. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; J. Zhong; Z. Zhong; L. Zhou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; C. Zhu; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. H. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. M. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Extended Mosaic Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two years of microwave background observations with the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) have been combined to give a sensitive, high resolution angular power spectrum over the range 400 2000 power previously seen with the CBI is reduced. Under the assumption that any signal in excess of the primary anisotropy is due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy in distant galaxy clusters we use CBI, ACBAR, and BIMA data to place a constraint on the present-day rms mass fluctuation sigma_8. We present the results of a cosmological parameter analysis on the l < 2000 primary anisotropy data which show significant improvements in the parameters as compared to WMAP alone, and we explore the role of the small-scale cosmic microwave background data in breaking parameter degeneracies.

A. C. S. Readhead; B. S. Mason; C. R. Contaldi; T. J. Pearson; J. R. Bond; S. T. Myers; S. Padin; J. L. Sievers; J. K. Cartwright; M. C. Shepherd; D. Pogosyan; S. Prunet; P. Altamirano; R. Bustos; L. Bronfman; S. Casassus; W. L. Holzapfel; J. May; U. -L. Pen; S. Torres; P. S. Udomprasert

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Observing the Sun with the Murchison Widefield Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sun has remained a difficult source to image for radio telescopes, especially at the low radio frequencies. Its morphologically complex emission features span a large range of angular scales, emission mechanisms involved and brightness temperatures. In addition, time and frequency synthesis, the key tool used by most radio interferometers to build up information about the source being imaged is not effective for solar imaging, because many of the features of interest are short lived and change dramatically over small fractional bandwidths. Building on the advances in radio frequency technology, digital signal processing and computing, the kind of instruments needed to simultaneously capture the evolution of solar emission in time, frequency, morphology and polarization over a large spectral span with the requisite imaging fidelity, and time and frequency resolution have only recently begun to appear. Of this class of instruments, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is best suited for solar observations. T...

Oberoi, D; Bhatnagar, S; Lonsdale, C J; Matthews, L D; Cairns, I H; Tingay, S J; Benkevitch, L; Donea, A; White, S M; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A; Emrich, D; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; William, A; Williams, C L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Visual observation of fuel and clad relocation during LMFBR transients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first experiment in the jointly-sponsored (NRC-KfK) STAR experiment program was completed November 9, 1983. The STAR program investigates the transient relocation of fuel and cladding during the initiation phase of LMFBR hypothetical accidents. The name STAR is an acronym for the Sandia Transient Axial Relocation experiments. The program focuses on the key initiation phase issue of material relocation, since it dominates the reactivity input during the early phases of LOF type LMFBR accidents. The STAR experiment capsule was designed to allow the direct observation of small fuel pin bundles through an in-pile optical system. The motion of fuel and cladding during the simulated LOF are recorded on a high speed 35 mm motion picture camera.

Wright, S.A.; Pickard, P.S.; Schumacher, G.; Henkel, P.

1984-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Observation of pulsed medical ultrasound gratings in the optical farfield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple optical method is described for studying ultrasonic pulses as short as two or three cycles in duration in the low?megahertz frequency range. An incident collimated light beam having a width of one ultrasound wavelength is observed in the optical farfield of the ultrasonicgrating midway between the maxima of the central and first diffraction orders. A close approximation to both the amplitude and phase of the acoustical pressure along the light path is obtained. The simplicity and reproducibility of this method warrants its consideration as a procedure for calibration and comparison of the transmit pulse characteristics of medical ultrasound systems. [Work supported by NINCDS Grant NS?06655 and a grant from North Carolina United Way.

W. A. Riley; R. W. Barnes

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Rossiter-McLaughlin Observations of 55 Cnc e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of the transiting super-Earth 55 Cnc e collected during six transit events between January 2012 and November 2013 with HARPS and HARPS-N. We detect no radial-velocity signal above 35 cm/s (3-sigma) and confine the stellar v sin i to 0.2 +/- 0.5 km/s. The star appears to be a very slow rotator, producing a very low amplitude Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Given such a low amplitude, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of 55 Cnc e is undetected in our data, and any spin-orbit angle of the system remains possible. We also performed Doppler tomography and reach a similar conclusion. Our results offer a glimpse of the capacity of future instrumentation to study low amplitude Rossiter-McLaughlin effects produced by super-Earths.

Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Rodler, Florian; Dumusque, Xavier; Buchhave, Lars A; Harutyunyan, A; Hoyer, Sergio; Alonso, Roi; Gillon, Michael; Kaib, Nathan A; Latham, David W; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Queloz, Didier; Raymond, Sean N; Segransan, Damien; Waldmann, Ingo P; Udry, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Rossiter-McLaughlin Observations of 55 Cnc e  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of the transiting super-Earth 55 Cnc e collected during six transit events between 2012 January and 2013 November with HARPS and HARPS-N. We detect no radial velocity signal above 35?cm?s?1 (3?) and confine the stellar v sin i ? to 0.2 ? 0.5?km?s?1. The star appears to be a very slow rotator, producing a very low amplitude Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Given such a low amplitude, the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of 55 Cnc e is undetected in our data, and any spin-orbit angle of the system remains possible. We also performed Doppler tomography and reach a similar conclusion. Our results offer a glimpse of the capacity of future instrumentation to study low amplitude Rossiter-McLaughlin effects produced by super-Earths.

Mercedes L?pez-Morales; Amaury H. M. J. Triaud; Florian Rodler; Xavier Dumusque; Lars A. Buchhave; Avet Harutyunyan; Sergio Hoyer; Roi Alonso; Micha?l Gillon; Nathan A. Kaib; David. W. Latham; Christophe Lovis; Francesco Pepe; Didier Queloz; Sean N. Raymond; Damien S?gransan; Ingo P. Waldmann; St?phane Udry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Satellite thermal observation of oil slicks on the Persian Gulf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A possibility of oil slicks detection is discussed for oil slicks spread in the vicinity of the Nowruz oil fields in the Persian Gulf since March 1983 to July 1983 with considering an apparent thermal inertia. The apparent thermal was computed from continuous observations of sea surface temperature and albedo by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-7 through day and night with 12 h interval. The apparent thermal inertia is defined as a function of a temperature difference between the daytime and the nighttime and an apparent albedo. Sea surface temperature used for computing the apparent thermal inertia was obtained through an atmospheric correction with an empirical equation which uses an energy difference between two thermal channels of the AVHRR. Although there was an ambiguity on a selection of same object on water body, the computed apparent thermal inertia showed the possibility of oil slicks detection from sea water. 17 references.

Asanuma, I.; Muneyama, K.; Sasaki, Y.; Iisaka, J.; Yasuda, Y.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

STACEE Observations of Mrk 421 During the 2001 Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STACEE is a ground based gamma-ray observatory that uses a heliostat array, built for solar energy research, to detect atmospheric Cherenkov radiation from gamma-ray initiated extensive air showers. During the first half of 2001, a prototype detector, STACEE-48, was used to detect the blazar Markarian 421, which was in an extremely active state. Observations from March to May of 2001 yielded an integral flux of (8.0+/-0.7_{stat}+/-1.5_{sys})x 10^-10 1/cm^2/s at energies above 140+/-20 GeV, and provide some evidence of correlated trends on time scales of a week or more in the GeV and X-ray bands.

Boone, L M; Chae, E; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Müller, C; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

STACEE Observations of Mrk 421 During the 2001 Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STACEE is a ground based gamma-ray observatory that uses a heliostat array, built for solar energy research, to detect atmospheric Cherenkov radiation from gamma-ray initiated extensive air showers. During the first half of 2001, a prototype detector, STACEE-48, was used to detect the blazar Markarian 421, which was in an extremely active state. Observations from March to May of 2001 yielded an integral flux of (8.0+/-0.7_{stat}+/-1.5_{sys})x 10^-10 1/cm^2/s at energies above 140+/-20 GeV, and provide some evidence of correlated trends on time scales of a week or more in the GeV and X-ray bands.

STACEE Collaboration; L. M. Boone; D. Bramel; E. Chae; C. E. Covault; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; J. A. Hinton; R. Mukherjee; C. Mueller; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; D. A. Williams

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

469

An observable for vacancy characterization and diffusion in crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To locate the position and characterize the dynamics of a vacancy in a crystal, we propose to represent it by the ground state density of a quantum probe quasi-particle for the Hamiltonian associated to the potential energy field generated by the atoms in the sample. In this description, the h^2/2mu coefficient of the kinetic energy term is a tunable parameter controlling the density localization in the regions of relevant minima of the potential energy field. Based on this description, we derive a set of collective variables that we use in rare event simulations to identify some of the vacancy diffusion paths in a 2D crystal. Our simulations reveal, in addition to the simple and expected nearest neighbor hopping path, a collective migration mechanism of the vacancy. This mechanism involves several lattice sites and produces a long range migration of the vacancy. Finally, we also observed a vacancy induced crystal reorientation process.

Pierre-Antoine Geslin; Giovanni Ciccotti; Eric Vanden-Eijnden; Simone Meloni

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modified Finch and Skea stellar model compatible with observational data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new class of solutions to the Einstein's field equations corresponding to a static spherically symmetric anisotropic system by generalizing the ansatz of Finch and Skea [Class. Quantum Grav. 6 (1989) 467] for the gravitational potential $g_{rr}$. The anisotropic stellar model previously studied by Sharma and Ratanpal (2013) [Int. J. Mod. Phy. D 13 (2013) 1350074] is a sub-class of the solutions provided here. Based on physical requirements, regularity conditions and stability, we prescribe bounds on the model parameters. By systematically fixing values of the model parameters within the prescribed bound, we demonstrate that our model is compatible with the observed masses and radii of a wide variety of compact stars like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, SAX J1808.4-3658 and Her X-1.

Pandya, D M; Sharma, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

EVLA Observations of OH Masers in ON 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter reports on initial Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) observations of the 6035 MHz masers in ON 1. The EVLA data are of good quality, lending confidence in the new receiver system. Nineteen maser features, including six Zeeman pairs, are detected. The overall distribution of 6035 MHz OH masers is similar to that of the 1665 MHz OH masers. The spatial resolution is sufficient to unambiguously determine that the magnetic field is strong (~ -10 mG) at the location of the blueshifted masers in the north, consistent with Zeeman splitting detected in 13441 MHz OH masers in the same velocity range. Left and right circularly polarized ground-state features dominate in different regions in the north of the source, which may be due to a combination of magnetic field and velocity gradients. The combined distribution of all OH masers toward the south is suggestive of a shock structure of the sort previously seen in W3(OH).

Vincent L. Fish

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

472

New XMM-Newton observations of SNRs in the SMC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A complete overview of the supernova remnant (SNR) population is required to investigate their evolution and interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Recent XMM-Newton observations of the SMC cover three known SNRs (DEM S5, SNR B0050-72.8, and SNR B0058-71.8), which are poorly studied and are X-ray faint. We used new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and new optical observations at Ha, [SII], and [OIII] wavelengths, in combination with the X-ray data, to investigate their properties and to search for new SNRs in the SMC. We used X-ray source selection criteria and found one SMC object with typical SNR characteristics (HFPK 334), that was initially detected by ROSAT. We analysed the X-ray spectra and present multi-wavelength morphological studies of the three SNRs and the new candidate. Using a non-equilibrium ionisation collisional plasma model, we find temperatures kT around 0.18 keV for the three known remnants and 0.69 keV for the candidate. The low temperature, low surface brightness, and large extent of the three remnants indicates relatively large ages. The emission from the new candidate (HFPK 334) is more centrally peaked and the higher temperature suggests a younger remnant. Our new radio images indicate that a pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) is possibly associated with this object. The SNRs known in the SMC show a variety of morphological structures that are relatively uncorrelated in the different wavelength bands, probably caused by the different conditions in the surrounding medium with which the remnant interacts.

M. D. Filipovic; F. Haberl; P. F. Winkler; W. Pietsch; J. L. Payne; E. J. Crawford; A. Y. De Horta; F. H. Stootman; B. E. Reaser

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological processes can occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales; from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Although no single experimental method can fully cover this entire phase space, many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on the very fast timescales and very small length scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast x-ray or electron pulses are now available that are expected to reveal new mechanistic insights for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by three-dimensional crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize smaller protein samples such as single particles or two-dimensional crystals that mimic the target protein’s native environment. These samples aren’t typically amenable to x-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has successfully imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years and permits data acquisition using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have only visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy capabilities into dynamics. A new 2nd generation DTEM that is currently being constructed has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on the micro- and nanosecond timescale. In addition to the enhanced temporal resolution, the DTEM also operates in the pump-probe regime that can permit visualizing reactions propagating in real-time. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to allow direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment.

Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors search for new charmless decays of neutral b-hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they report the first observation of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay, with a significance of 8.2{sigma}, and measure {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (5.0 {+-} 0.7 (stat.) {+-} 0.8 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6}. They also report the first observation of charmless b-baryon decays in the channels {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -} with significances of 6.0{sigma} and 11.5{sigma} respectively, and they measure {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.6 (stat.) {+-} 0.9 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.8 (stat.) {+-} 1.5 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6}. No evidence is found for the decays B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and they set an improved upper limit {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.2 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. All quoted branching fractions are measured using {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) as a reference.

Morello, Michael J.; /Fermilab

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Joint galaxy-lensing observables and the dark energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep multicolor galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts will provide a large number of two-point correlation observables: galaxy-galaxy angular correlations, galaxy-shear cross correlations, and shear-shear correlations between all redshifts. These observables can potentially enable a joint determination of the dark-energy-dependent evolution of the dark matter and distances as well as the relationship between galaxies and dark matter halos. With recent cosmic microwave background determinations of the initial power spectrum, a measurement of the mass clustering at even a single redshift will constrain a well-specified combination of dark energy (DE) parameters in a flat universe; we provide convenient fitting formulas for such studies. The combination of galaxy-shear and galaxy-galaxy correlations can determine this amplitude at multiple redshifts. We illustrate this ability in a description of the galaxy clustering with 5 free functions of redshift which can be fitted from the data. The galaxy modeling is based on a mapping onto halos of the same abundance that models a flux-limited selection. In this context and under a flat geometry, a 4000 deg2 galaxy-lensing survey can achieve a statistical precision of ?(?DE)=0.005 for the dark energy density, ?(wDE)=0.02 and ?(wa)=0.17 for its equation of state and evolution, evaluated at dark energy matter equality z?0.4, as well as constraints on the 5 halo functions out to z=1. More importantly, a joint analysis can make dark energy constraints robust against systematic errors in the shear-shear correlation and halo modeling.

Wayne Hu and Bhuvnesh Jain

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

476

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

477

Observations of the Eyewall Structure of Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) during the Transformation Stage of Extratropical Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unique dataset observing the life cycle of Typhoon Sinlaku was collected during The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) in 2008. In this study observations of the ...

Annette M. Foerster; Michael M. Bell; Patrick A. Harr; Sarah C. Jones

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Mapping Ocean Observations in a Dynamical Framework: A 2004-06 Ocean Atlas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper exploits a new observational atlas for the near-global ocean for the best-observed 3-yr period from December 2003 through November 2006. The atlas consists of mapped observations and derived quantities. Together ...

Forget, Gael

479

Blending surface currents from HF radar observations and numerical modelling: Tidal hindcasts and forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An observation network operating three WERA-s in the German Bight, which are part of the Coastal Observing SYstem for Northern and Arctic seas (COSYNA), is presented in detail. Major consideration is given to expanding the patchy observations over ...

E. V. Stanev; F. Ziemer; J. Schulz-Stellenfleth; J. Seemann; J. Staneva; K.-W. Gurgel

480

Simultaneous STM and UHV electron microscope observation of silicon nanowires extracted from Si(111) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles Simultaneous STM and UHV electron microscope observation of silicon...silicon|tungsten| Simultaneous STM and UHV electron microscope observation of silicon...Semiconductor Special Issue Simultaneous STM and UHV electron microscope observation of silicon......

Y. Naitoh; K. Takayanagi; Y. Oshima; H. Hirayama

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Two-Temperature Coronal Models from SOHO/EIT Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a method for deriving a two-thermal-component approximation to the differential emission measure distribution of plasma in the Sun's corona in the temperature range to which the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is sensitive. EIT takes high-resolution full-disk coronal images in three of its four optimized channels by observing emission lines of highly ionized Fe whose formation temperatures overlap and cover the range from 0.7 to 2.8 MK. It is straightforward to show that the traditional single-temperature models based on the ratio of a pair of EIT images at different wavelengths are not able adequately to represent the plasma contributing to all three wavelength ranges. In this paper, we develop a modified image-ratio method that results in a two-thermal-component model for the plasma producing the coronal emission observed by EIT. The products of this method are two temperature and two emission measure full-disk maps of the Sun's corona, with the full resolution of the EIT telescope, in two temperature regimes: one from 0.8 to 1.6 MK and the other from 1.6 to 2.6 MK. The two-component solutions are tested using a series of model differential emission measures (DEMs) from the CHIANTI atomic database package. This method appears to produce realistic results in all regions of the Sun's atmosphere with the exception of coronal holes, where very cool Si VII/Mg VII lines (XV lines and result in unrealistically high temperatures for the hot component there. We demonstrate that while the raw EIT images are dominated by the spatial distribution of emission measure in the corona, the temperature maps often emphasize fine structure, which is less visible in the flux images. The emission measure of the hot component is always larger than that of the cool component. On the disk there appears to be a firm lower limit to the integrated column emission measure along any line of sight, including toward coronal holes. There is no overall correlation between temperature and emission measure.

J. Zhang; S. M. White; M. R. Kundu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Observation of $t$-channel electroweak top quark production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle, with a mass of 172.0{sub -1.3}{sup +0.9}GeV. This is nearly twice the mass of the second heaviest known particle, the Z boson, and roughly the mass of a gold atom. Because of its unusually large mass, studying the top quark may provide insight into the Higgs mechanism and other beyond the standard model physics. Only two accelerators in the world are powerful enough to produce top quarks. The Tevatron, which first accelerated protons in 1983, has produced almost 400,000 top quarks, roughly half at each of its two detectors: DO and CDF. The LHC is a much newer accelerator which currently has accumulated about 0.5% as much data as the Tevatron. However, when running at full luminosity, the LHC is capable of producing a top quark about once every second and will quickly surpass the Tevatron as the leading producer of top quarks. This analysis uses data from the D0 detector at the Tevatron, which are described in chapter 3. Top quarks are produced most often in pairs of top and anti-top quarks through an interaction of the strong force. This production mode was first observed in 1995 at the Tevatron. However, top quarks can also be produced though an electroweak interaction, which produces just one top quark. This production mode was first observed at the Tevatron in 2008. Single top quark production can occur in different channels. In this analysis, a measurement of the cross section of the t-channel production mode is performed. This measurement uses 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data and uses the technique of boosted decision trees in order to separate signal from background events. The t-channel cross section is measured to be: {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 3.03{sub -0.66}{sup +0.78}pb (0.0.1). Additional cross section measurements were also performed for the s-channel as well as the s + t-channel. The measurement of each one of these three cross sections was repeated three times using different techniques, and all three methods were combined into a 'super-method' which achieves the best performance. The details of these additional measurements are shown in appendix A.

Triplett, Nathan; /Iowa State U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark-matter-dominated cluster-scale halos act as an important cosmological probe and provide a key testing ground for structure formation theory. Focusing on their mass profiles, we have carried out (gravity-only) simulations of the concordance {Lambda}CDM cosmology, covering a mass range of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} and a redshift range of z = 0-2, while satisfying the associated requirements of resolution and statistical control. When fitting to the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, our concentration-mass (c-M) relation differs in normalization and shape in comparison to previous studies that have limited statistics in the upper end of the mass range. We show that the flattening of the c-M relation with redshift is naturally expressed if c is viewed as a function of the peak height parameter, {nu}. Unlike the c-M relation, the slope of the c-{nu} relation is effectively constant over the redshift range z = 0-2, while the amplitude varies by {approx}30% for massive clusters. This relation is, however, not universal: using a simulation suite covering the allowed wCDM parameter space, we show that the c-{nu} relation varies by about {+-}20% as cosmological parameters are varied. At fixed mass, the c(M) distribution is well fit by a Gaussian with {sigma}{sub c}/(c) {approx_equal} 1/3, independent of the radius at which the concentration is defined, the halo dynamical state, and the underlying cosmology. We compare the {Lambda}CDM predictions with observations of halo concentrations from strong lensing, weak lensing, galaxy kinematics, and X-ray data, finding good agreement for massive clusters (M{sub vir} > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }), but with some disagreements at lower masses. Because of uncertainty in observational systematics and modeling of baryonic physics, the significance of these discrepancies remains unclear.

Bhattacharya, Suman; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Vikhlinin, Alexey [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

484

Development and validation of standard classroom observation systems for school practitioners: Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development and validation of Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS), a computer-assisted observational system for school practitioners, are described. Portable computers, used to support observational ...

Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.; Kamps, Debra; Terry, Barbara; Delquadri, Joseph

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - angular correlations observed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

observed Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: angular correlations observed Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 arXiv:astroph0411130...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - allowing direct observation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observation Software Systems DASEL Technical Report 200707DL01 Summary: , this simple logic could be encoded directly into either the observer construction or event response...

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrometric observations influence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have been observed by Hipparcos, and even if the astrometric precision of Hipparcos... Cnc of about 30 M J using astrometric observations acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope...

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropy probe observations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anisotropies are significantly higher than... anisotropies of 2D and 3D ran- dom resistor networks, Labendz (1999) only observed dependence on models... , is better observed...

489

Spiral shock detection on eclipse maps: Simulations and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform simulations in order to reveal the effect of observational and physical parameters on the reconstruction of a spiral structure in an accretion disk, using eclipse mapping techniques. We show that a model spiral structure is smeared to a ``butterfly''-shape structure because of the azimuthal smoothing effect of the technique. We isolate the effects of phase resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and accurate centering of the eclipse at zero phase. We further explore disk emissivity factors such as dilution of the spiral structure by the disk light and relative spiral arm difference. We conclude that the spiral structure can be satisfactorily recovered in accretion disk eclipse maps with phase resolution |\\Delta\\phi| 25 and zero phase uncertainty |\\Delta\\phi| 30 % to the total disk light. Under the light of the performed simulations, we present eclipse maps of the IP Peg accretion disk reconstructed from eclipse light curves of emission lines and continuum during the outburst of August 1994, where spiral shocks were detected with the aid of Doppler tomography (Morales-Rueda et al. 2000). We discuss how the detection of spirals shocks with eclipse mapping is improved with the use of velocity-resolved eclipse light curves which do not include any contaminating low-velocity emission.

E. T. Harlaftis; R. Baptista; L. Morales-Rueda; T. R. Marsh; D. Steeghs

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

490

An observational test of common-envelope evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By analysing and modelling the change in the abundance ratio of $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C and $^{16}$O/$^{17}$O on the surface of the lower mass star of a binary during the common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution, we propose a simple observational test of the CE scenario. The test is based on the infrared measurement of either the $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C or $^{16}$O/$^{17}$O ratio of red dwarfs in post-common envelope binaries (PCEB's). In certain cases (main-sequence red dwarf secondaries in PCEB's without planetary nebulae), as well as determining whether or not accretion has occurred during the CE phase, we can determine the amount of mass accreted during the CE phase and hence the initial mass of the red dwarf component prior to the CE phase. In the other cases considered (low-mass red dwarfs in PCEB's and red dwarf's in PCEB's with planetary nebulae) we can only say whether or not accretion has occurred during the CE phase.

M. J. Sarna; V. S. Dhillon; T. R. Marsh; P. B. Marks

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

PMU Placement for Enhancing Dynamic Observability of a Power Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power grids are operated in an increasingly complicated environment. However, operators lack effective and accurate tools for real-time monitoring and control of power systems. The U.S. Department of Energy, along with several utilities and system operators, is making a major $108 million investment in the Western Interconnection for phasor measurement unit (PMU) installation and phasor application development. This phasor measurement network opens up many opportunities for the estimation and prediction of power system states in real time, which enable operators to evaluate the system dynamic security in advance and allow them more time to respond to disturbances. Kalman filter based dynamic state estimation offers a solution suitable for this purpose. Our work indicates that the performance of Kalman filters in dynamic state estimation would degrade if PMU measurements cannot adequately capture the system dynamics. This paper develops a framework to identify how to place PMUs to improve dynamic observability of the power grid. Simulation results validate the concept, and the guidelines for PMU placement are derived.

Du, Pengwei; Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Lee, Barry; Anderson, Kevin K.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

492

First observation of the hyper superheavy hydrogen 6?H  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three candidate events of the neutron-rich hypernucleus 6{\\Lambda}H were uniquely identified in the FINUDA experiment at DA{\\Phi}NE, Frascati, by observing {\\pi}+ mesons from the (K-stop,{\\pi}+) production reaction on 6Li targets, in coincidence with {\\pi}-mesons from 6{\\Lambda}H \\rightarrow 6He+{\\pi}- weak decay. Details of the experiment and the analysis of its data are reported, leading to an estimate of (2.9\\pm2.0)\\cdot10-6/K- stop for the 6{\\Lambda}H production rate times the two-body {\\pi}- weak decay branching ratio. The 6{\\Lambda}H binding energy with respect to 5H + {\\Lambda} was determined jointly from production and decay to be B{\\Lambda} = (4.0 \\pm 1.1) MeV, assuming that 5H is unbound with respect to 3H + 2n by 1.7 MeV. The binding energy determined from production is higher, in each one of the three events, than that determined from decay, with a difference of (0.98 \\pm 0.74) MeV here assigned to the 0+g.s. \\rightarrow 1+ excitation. The consequences of this assignment to {\\Lambda} hypernuclear dynamics are briefly discussed.

M. Agnello; L. Benussi; M. Bertani; H. C. Bhang; G. Bonomi; E. Botta; M. Bregant; T. Bressani; S. Bufalino; L. Busso; D. Calvo; P. Camerini; B. Dalena; F. De Mori; G. D'Erasmo; F. L. Fabbri; A. Feliciello; A. Filippi; E. M. Fiore; A. Fontana; H. Fujioka; P. Genova; P. Gianotti; N. Grion; V. Lucherini; S. Marcello; N. Mirfakhrai; F. Moia; O. Morra; T. Nagae; H. Outa; A. Pantaleo; V. Paticchio; S. Piano; R. Rui; G. Simonetti; R. Wheadon; A. Zenoni; A. Gal

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

493

ON THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE OBSERVED AT THE LIMB WITH HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broadband images in the Ca II H line, from the Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) instrument on the Hinode spacecraft, show emission from spicules emerging from and visible right down to the observed limb. Surprisingly, little absorption of spicule light is seen along their lengths. We present formal solutions to the transfer equation for given (ad hoc) source functions, including a stratified chromosphere from which spicules emanate. The model parameters are broadly compatible with earlier studies of spicules. The visibility of Ca II spicules down to the limb in Hinode data seems to require that spicule emission be Doppler shifted relative to the stratified atmosphere, either by supersonic turbulent or organized spicular motion. The non-spicule component of the chromosphere is almost invisible in the broadband BFI data, but we predict that it will be clearly visible in high spectral resolution data. Broadband Ca II H limb images give the false impression that the chromosphere is dominated by spicules. Our analysis serves as a reminder that the absence of a signature can be as significant as its presence.

Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Carlsson, Mats [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

494

Acoustic observations of suspended sediments in the Changjiang Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An acoustic backscatter instrument of dual frequencies (0.5 and 1.5 MHz) was developed for suspended sediment measurements and for sediment transport studies. The instrument measures the vertical concentration profiles of suspended sediments with a temporal resolution of 1 s and a spatial (depth) resolution of 10 cm for 0.5 MHz or 2 cm for 1.5 MHz. The data of backscattered acoustic energy are sampled at a rate of 75 kHz for a 450?s burst each time so each burst comprises 450 vertical profiles. Coincidentally six calibration points for the water column are taken through water sampling. Further data processing for each burst such as compensation for sound transmission losses in situ calibration of acoustic scattering intensity to real concentration of suspended sediments and ensemble averaging over adjustable time–depth sizes permits three?dimensional concentration profiles to be derived. To increase the accuracy of concentration measurement a multisegment procedure to form an appropriate compensation and calibration curve is applied. Through observations at the Changjiang Estuary four patterns of vertical suspension profiles are identified at flood and ebb tides. In addition lutoclines and interfacial waves within the near?bed high concentration suspensions are revealed.

Shuying Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Observational approach implementation guidance: Year-end report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally recognized that the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process can be time-consuming and costly. To expedite the process, the Environmental Protection Agency, through the National Contingency Plan and Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directives, has promoted streamlining'' the RI/FS. The concept of streamlining is directly applicable to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Remedial Facility Investigation/Corrective Measure Study (RFI/CMS) as well. The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) environmental restoration process promises to be lengthy and expensive: therefore, the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) believes that it is to incorporate streamlining into RI/FS and RFI/CMS efforts across the DOE complex. The Office of Program Support (EM-43) has asked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide presentations and workshops on streamlining concepts, including tenets of the observational approach'' at DOE environmental restoration sites around the complex. This report summarizes the FY91 activities that were conducted at PNL as part of this effort.

Smyth, J.D. (CH2M Hill, Richland, WA (United States)); Kohlman, J.P.; Peffers, M.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Observational approach implementation guidance: Year-end report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally recognized that the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process can be time-consuming and costly. To expedite the process, the Environmental Protection Agency, through the National Contingency Plan and Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Directives, has promoted ``streamlining`` the RI/FS. The concept of streamlining is directly applicable to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Remedial Facility Investigation/Corrective Measure Study (RFI/CMS) as well. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental restoration process promises to be lengthy and expensive: therefore, the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) believes that it is to incorporate streamlining into RI/FS and RFI/CMS efforts across the DOE complex. The Office o