Sample records for improving cancer detection

  1. Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kieper, Douglas Arthur; Majewski, Stanislaw; Welch, Benjamin L.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

  2. AN ANISOTROPIC DIFFUSION APPROACH FOR EARLY DETECTION OF BREAST CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AN ANISOTROPIC DIFFUSION APPROACH FOR EARLY DETECTION OF BREAST CANCER Marius George LINGURARU, Oxford OX2 7BZ, United Kingdom mglin@robots.ox.ac.uk Abstract: The prevalence of breast cancer must provide effective clinical methods to detect cancer and improve life expectancy. Considerable

  3. Lung Cancer (2005) 47, 41--47 Improving the specificity of fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lung Cancer (2005) 47, 41--47 Improving the specificity of fluorescence bronchoscopy spectroscopy; Lung cancer; Bronchoscopy Summary Detection of malignancies of the bronchial tree in an early

  4. Modeling Prostate Cancer Detection Probability, with Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serfling, Robert

    investigating causes and treatments. Robert Serfling Modeling Prostate Cancer Detection Probability cancer present as well as tumor nodule sizes, to judge clinical significance before treatment selectionModeling Prostate Cancer Detection Probability, with Applications Robert Serfling1 University

  5. Improving airport explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, C.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has developed the technology to detect hidden explosives in luggage using X ray and neutron detection devices. The Federal Aviation Administration has ordered the airlines to buy and install Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA) units. The combined pulsed-neutron and X-ray interrogation inspection (CPNX) system developed at ORNL uses less radioactive materials as well as being more sensitive to weapons, electronic devices and plastic explosives.

  6. Early Lung Cancer Detection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

  7. Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer: Detect and Destroy PrincetonPrinceton iGEMiGEM TeamTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer: Detect and Destroy PrincetonPrinceton iGEMiGEM TeamTeam PresentedPresentation Overview What is Synthetic Biology?What is Synthetic Biology? ProjectProject Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer regeneration Diabetes Cancer therapy Artificial immune system Environmental Biosensing Environmental

  8. Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Nanotechnology in Cancer Treatment and Detection Richard Acosta #12;Motivation ·Ineffectiveness or roughly 100 times smaller than most human cells Cancer Nanotechnology research is interdisciplinary

  9. Improved mehtods and reagents for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zajic, Stefan C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) of cancer improves upon conventional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) by decoupling the pharmacokinetics of the targeting agent and the radioisotope. In order to improve upon PRIT, we have ...

  10. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  11. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  12. Improved Microseismicity Detection During Newberry EGS Stimulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) require optimal fracture networks for efficient heat transfer between hot rock and fluid. Microseismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes in geothermal regions. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Consequently, we have developed a set of algorithms that provide improved microearthquake detection. Our objective is to investigate the microseismicity at the DOE Newberry EGS site to better image the active regions of the underground fracture network during and immediately after the EGS stimulation. Detection of more microearthquakes during EGS stimulations will allow for better seismic delineation of the active regions of the underground fracture system. This improved knowledge of the reservoir network will improve our understanding of subsurface conditions, and allow improvement of the stimulation strategy that will optimize heat extraction and maximize economic return.

  13. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Goodwin; Charles Jenkins; Andrew Lambert

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  14. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  15. Radio Sensors to Help Detect Cancer Monday, July 28, 2008 -Anni Shaer Levitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    , Treatments & Facts on Breast Cancer Cancers Acid Reflux Causes Cancer A free, informative online video.RefluxRemedy.com American Cancer Society Get the latest information on stomach cancer treatments www.cancerSearch Home Headlines News Articles Forums Radio Sensors to Help Detect Cancer Monday, July 28

  16. Potential for Cardiovascular Exercise Dosing to Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Breast Cancer Survivors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Dave

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increase in early detection and curative treatment for breast cancer, there is a growing number of breast cancer survivors. Cancer survivors are at greater risk than their age matched peers for long-term health ...

  17. Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

  18. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.9 Breast Cancer Treatment . . . . . . . 2.9.1. Localassessing antivascular cancer treatments. Br J Radiol, 2003.imaging, for breast cancer treatment monitoring. To achieve

  19. Bonus-- Cameras Designed To Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high-resolution gamma camera exists that can be used to detect prostate cancer.

  20. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paximadis, Peter, E-mail: ppaximad@med.wayne.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John [Department of Otolaryngology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Sukari, Ammar [Department of Medical Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Dyson, Greg [Department of Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p < .01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions: Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors.

  1. Nano-Sensor and Circuit Design for Anti-Cancer Drug Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    in the case of some pharmacological treatments based on drug regimens, such as anti-cancer drug therapies [2]. Etoposide is a widely used anti-cancer drug, administered for the treatment of many kinds of tumours [3, 4Nano-Sensor and Circuit Design for Anti-Cancer Drug Detection S. Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Camilla Baj

  2. Microwave imaging for ultra-wideband antenna based cancer detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haoyu

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is one of the most widespread types of cancer in the world. The key factor in treatment is to reliably diagnose the cancer in the early stages. Moreover, currently used clinical diagnostic methods, such as ...

  3. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  4. Improvements to Existing Transit Detection Algorithms and Their Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tingley

    2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In Tingley (2003), all available transit detection algorithms were compared in a simple, rigorous test. However, the implementation of the Box-fitting Least Squares (BLS) approach of Kovacs et al. (2002) used in that paper was not ideal for those purposes. This letter revisits the comparison, using a version of the BLS better suited to the task at hand and made more efficient via the knowledge gained from the previous work. Multiple variations of the BLS and the matched filter are tested. Some of the modifications improve performance to such an extent that the conclusions of the original paper must be revised.

  5. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  6. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer is a class of diseases in which a group of cells grow uncontrollably, destroy surrounding tissue and eventually spread to other parts of the body, often leading to death. According to the American Cancer Society cancer causes accounts for 13...

  7. A Distributed Biomarker Atlas for Lung Research aiding the Discovery and Early Detection of Cancer Biomarkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    A Distributed Biomarker Atlas for Lung Research aiding the Discovery and Early Detection of Cancer Atlas software system that allows a researcher to correlate lung cancer patients with similar characteristics around regions of the lung in which their sample specimens including multiple types

  8. Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms for Early Detection of Oral Epithelial Cancer Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joohyung

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the clinical potential of the endogenous multispectral Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was investigated to objectively detect oral cancer. To this end, in vivo FLIM imaging was performed on a hamster cheek pouch model...

  9. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  10. A Novel Imaging Approach for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Based on Endogenous Zinc Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Subrata K.

    The early detection of prostate cancer is a life-saving event in patients harboring potentially aggressive disease. With the development of malignancy, there is a dramatic reduction in the zinc content of prostate tissue ...

  11. Ultra-low field MRI of prostate cancer using SQUID detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busch, Sarah Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coil. Chapter 3 3 Ultra low field MRI 3.1 Polarization TheUltra-low field MRI of prostate cancer using SQUID detectionSteven Conolly Spring 2011 Ultra-low field MRI of prostate

  12. Sensitive detection of somatic point mutations in impure and heterogeneous cancer samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cibulskis, Kristian

    Detection of somatic point substitutions is a key step in characterizing the cancer genome. However, existing methods typically miss low-allelic-fraction mutations that occur in only a subset of the sequenced cells owing ...

  13. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  14. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  15. Method for detecting the presence of prostate cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karin, Michael; Luo, Jun-Li; Tan, Wei

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for cancer diagnosis, treatment and drug screening. In particular, the present invention provides compositions and methods for targeting the nuclear translocation of IkB kinase-.alpha. (IKK.alpha.) and the IKK.alpha.-mediated suppression of Maspin expression observed in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  16. Recent Progress in Ultra-Wideband Microwave Breast Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coates, Mark

    were diagnosed in the United States and Canada ­ with as many as 45,000 cases leading to death. For women, breast cancer mortality rates are higher than for any other cancer, with the exception of lung as early as possible. This will not only reduce mortality and incidence rates, but also significantly ease

  17. An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilley, George

    An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

  18. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L. [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  19. The Role of Fucose in Early Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzman, Jeff; McKenzie, David; Melrose, Scott; Selley, Patrick; Wenke, Jamie

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . High performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPLC- PAD) is a highly sensitive method for separating and detecting the components of a solution. This method utilizes an anion exchange column, separating fucose through... for identification and accurate quantitation. Pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) was used with HPLC to detect fucose electrochemically. Amperometry was used with three electrodes to drive an electrochemical reaction. One of the electrodes is the working...

  20. Design and evaluation of a novel breast cancer detection system combining both thermoacoustic ,,TA... and photoacoustic ,,PA... tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    Design and evaluation of a novel breast cancer detection system combining both thermoacoustic ,,TA thermoacoustic and photoacoustic techniques to achieve dual contrast microwave and light absorption imaging

  1. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, IssueSciTech ConnectDetection

  2. AN IMPROVED SOFT FEEDBACK V-BLAST DETECTION TECHNIQUE FOR TURBO-MIMO SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Andrew C

    AN IMPROVED SOFT FEEDBACK V-BLAST DETECTION TECHNIQUE FOR TURBO-MIMO SYSTEMS Jun Won Choi*, Andrew-demapper) and the channel decoder exchange soft (extrinsic) information to iteratively improve system perfor- mance. Hence In this paper, an improved minimum mean square error (MMSE) soft feedback detector, called the soft input, soft

  3. Gold nanoparticles for cancer detection and treatment: The role of adhesion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oni, Y. [Princeton Institute for Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hao, K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.; Odusanya, O. S. [African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Kilometer 10, Airport Road, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO), Gwagwalada, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Obayemi, J.D. [African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Kilometer 10, Airport Road, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Anuku, N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Bronx Community College, New York, New York 10453 (United States); Soboyejo, W. O. [Princeton Institute for Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); African University of Science and Technology (AUST), Kilometer 10, Airport Road, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the effects of adhesion between gold nanoparticles and surfaces that are relevant to the potential applications in cancer detection and treatment. Adhesion is measured using a dip coating/atomic force microscopy (DC/AFM) technique. The adhesion forces are obtained for dip-coated gold nanoparticles that interact with peptide or antibody-based molecular recognition units (MRUs) that attach specifically to breast cancer cells. They include MRUs that attach specifically to receptors on breast cancer cells. Adhesion forces between anti-cancer drugs such as paclitaxel, and the constituents of MRU-conjugated Au nanoparticle clusters, are measured using force microscopy techniques. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust gold nanoparticle clusters and for potential applications in localized drug delivery and hyperthermia.

  4. FUSING MICROWAVE RADAR AND MICROWAVE-INDUCED THERMOACOUSTICS FOR BREAST CANCER DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUSING MICROWAVE RADAR AND MICROWAVE-INDUCED THERMOACOUSTICS FOR BREAST CANCER DETECTION Evgeny in the microwave range. Microwave-radar and microwave-induced thermoacoustic methods both struggle when-induced thermoacoustic (MIT) methods measure and process the acoustic signals induced by differential microwave heating

  5. Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

  6. Microwave detection of metastasized breast cancer cells in the lymph node; potential application for sentinel lymphadenectomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    Report Microwave detection of metastasized breast cancer cells in the lymph node; potential Metastasis Index (CMI), was developed to effectively represent all parame- ters. Broadband microwave scanning reflected by CMI. CMI effectively magnified the difference of the electromagnetic properties between normal

  7. Improvement of the New NO Detection Method Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    by impurities in the ionization cell by using a TOF mass spectrometer. The obtained sensitivity of this method. Sci. Instrum. 1997, 68, 2891). This method uses a frequency-doubled pulsed-dye laser operating near developed a new detection method for NO by using a pulsed-dye laser operating at near 226 nm to photoionize

  8. Improved Lithium-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for Neutron Detection - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpactControl - EnergyDetection System

  9. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast...

  10. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Arm, J; Hunter, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Kim, T [The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 52, NO. 7, JULY 2005 1237 Ultrawideband Microwave Breast Cancer Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    :1. Index Terms--Array signal processing, biomedical electromag- netic imaging, breast cancer detection not require breast compression. For this modality, low-power electromagnetic waves that are transmitted

  12. SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER Sponsored by: The Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Melanoma & Skin Cancer University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Purpose The overall goals of the Melanoma & Skin Cancer SPORE are to improve the detection

  13. FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD IN MELANOMA & SKIN CANCER Sponsored by: The Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Melanoma & Skin Cancer University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Purpose The overall goals of the Melanoma & Skin Cancer SPORE are to improve the detection

  14. Breast cancer detection using automated whole breast ultrasound and mammography in radiographically dense breasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, KM; Dean, J; Comulada, WS; Lee, S-J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at high risk for breast cancer with MR imaging. Breast Can-Findings from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium:women undergoing biopsy after screening mammography. Cancer

  15. Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

  16. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France); Rochel, Natacha [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR 7104, CNRS/INSERM/Université de Strasbourg, rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal [Faculté de Pharmacie, UMR 7213, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, route du Rhin, 67401 Illkirch (France); Weiss, Etienne, E-mail: eweiss@unistra.fr [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ? Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ? Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ? GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ? GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ? This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins.

  17. SYN T H E S I S THE magazinE OF UC DAVIS COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER VOL 16 nO 1 SPRing/SUmmER 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , targeted lung cancer treatments have given her hope and inspiration. We hope you enjoy this issue to improve cancer detection First steps>> Targeted treatments, like Herceptin against breast cancer, have, the best treatments in the world may not be good enough if the disease is not detected early. Cancer

  18. Phase-based x-ray scattering—A possible method to detect cancer cells in a very early stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feye-Treimer, U., E-mail: feye-treimer@helmholtz-berlin.de; Treimer, W. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Applied Sciences, D-13353 Berlin, Germany and Joint Department G-GTOMO, Helmholtz Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, University of Applied Sciences, D-13353 Berlin, Germany and Joint Department G-GTOMO, Helmholtz Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This theoretical work contains a detailed investigation of the potential and sensitivity of phase-based x-ray scattering for cancer detection in biopsies if cancer is in a very early stage of development. Methods: Cancer cells in their early stage of development differ from healthy ones mainly due to their faster growing cell nuclei and the enlargement of their densities. This growth is accompanied by an altered nucleus–plasma relation for the benefit of the cell nuclei, that changes the physical properties especially the index of refraction of the cell and the one of the cell nuclei. Interaction of radiation with matter is known to be highly sensitive to small changes of the index of refraction of matter; therefore a detection of such changes of volume and density of cell nuclei by means of high angular resolved phase-based scattering of x rays might provide a technique to distinguish malignant cells from healthy ones ifthe cell–cell nucleus system is considered as a coherent phase shifting object. Then one can observe from a thin biopsy which represents a monolayer of cells (no multiple scattering) that phase-based x-ray scattering curves from healthy cells differ from those of cancer cells in their early stage of development. Results: Detailed calculations of x-ray scattering patterns from healthy and cancer cell nuclei yield graphs and numbers with which one can distinguish healthy cells from cancer ones, taking into account that both kinds of cells occur in a tissue within a range of size and density. One important result is the role and the influence of the (lateral) coherence width of the radiation on the scattering curves and the sensitivity of phase-based scattering for cancer detection. A major result is that a larger coherence width yields a larger sensitivity for cancer detection. Further import results are calculated limits for critical sizes and densities of cell nuclei in order to attribute the investigated tissue to be healthy or diseased. Conclusions: With this proposed method it should be in principle possible to detect cancer cells in apparently healthy tissues in biopsies and/or in samples of the far border region of abscised or excised tissues. Thus this method could support established methods in diagnostics of cancer-suspicious samples.

  19. Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain for Treatment of Cancer; Nanocomposites To Improve Computers' Life Span; Lithium Sulfur Batteries Using Nanocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain for Treatment of Cancer; Nanocomposites To Improve Computers/29/2009 Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain f... frost.com/.../market-service-segment... 1/2 #12;Learn how we can provide/29/2009 Nanotechnology Alert. Nanofountain f... frost.com/.../market-service-segment... 2/2 #12;

  20. Improved methods for detecting gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Williamson; C. Biwer; S. Fairhurst; I. W. Harry; E. Macdonald; D. Macleod; V. Predoi

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In the era of second generation ground-based gravitational wave detectors, short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) will be among the most promising astrophysical events for joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave observation. A targeted search for gravitational wave compact binary merger signals in coincidence with short GRBs was developed and used to analyze data from the first generation LIGO and Virgo instruments. In this paper, we present improvements to this search that enhance our ability to detect gravitational wave counterparts to short GRBs. Specifically, we introduce an improved method for estimating the gravitational wave background to obtain the event significance required to make detections; implement a method of tiling extended sky regions, as required when searching for signals associated to poorly localized GRBs from Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor or the InterPlanetary Network; and incorporate astrophysical knowledge about the beaming of GRB emission to restrict the search parameter space. We describe the implementation of these enhancements and demonstrate how they improve the ability to observe binary merger gravitational wave signals associated with short GRBs.

  1. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Holly H. (Bethel Island, CA); Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B. (late of Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  2. Treatment of prostate cancer with Ad5/3#24hCG allows non-invasive detection of the magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Treatment of prostate cancer with Ad5/3#24hCG allows non-invasive detection of the magnitudeCGB production. In a s.c. in vivo model of hormone refractory prostate cancer, Ad5/3#24hCG treatment resultedCG is a potent virus for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

  3. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Moss; L. Bugel; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; B. J. P. Jones; J. Moon; M. Toups; T. Wongjirad

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  4. Analytical platform evaluation for quantification of ERG in prostate cancer using protein and mRNA detection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shi, Tujin; Wu, Chaochao; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Rastogi, Anshu; Tan, Shyh-Han; Yan, Wusheng; Mohamed, Ahmed A.; Huang, Wei; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; McLeod, David; Srivastava, Shiv; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Dobi, Albert; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The established methods for detecting prostate cancer (CaP) are based on tests using PSA (blood), PCA3 (urine), and AMACR (tissue) as biomarkers in patient samples. The demonstration of ERG oncoprotein overexpression due to gene fusion in CaP has thus provided ERG as an additional biomarker. Based on this, we hypothesized that ERG protein quantification methods can be of use in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Methods: Therefore, an antibody-free assay for ERG3 protein detection was developed based on PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) mass spectrometry. We utilized TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP and TMPRSS2-ERG negative LNCaP cells to simulate three different sample types (cells, tissue, and post-DRE urine sediment). Results: Recombinant ERG3 protein spiked into LNCaP cell lysates could be detected at levels as low as 20 pg by PRISM-SRM analysis. The sensitivity of the PRISM-SRM assay was around approximately 10,000 VCaP cells in a mixed cell population model of VCaP and LNCaP cells. Interestingly, ERG protein could be detected in as few as 600 VCaP cells spiked into female urine. The sensitivity of the in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was similar to the PRISM-SRM assay, with detection of 30 pg of purified recombinant ERG3 protein and 10,000 VCaP cells. On the other hand, qRT-PCR exhibited a higher sensitivity, as TMPRSS2-ERG transcripts were detected in as few as 100 VCaP cells, in comparison to NanoString methodologies which detected ERG from 10,000 cells. Conclusions: Based on this data, we propose that the detection of both ERG transcriptional products with RNA-based assays, as well as protein products of ERG using PRISM-SRM assays, may be of clinical value in developing diagnostics and prognostics assays for prostate cancer given their sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility.

  5. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends.

  6. Method of detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  7. Method for detecting cancer in a single cell using mitochondrial correlation microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for distinguishing a normal cell from an abnormal cell, such as, for example a cancer cell or diseased cell, of the same tissue type using mitochondrial correlation microscopy.

  8. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsunoda, Hiroko [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Osamu [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not received previous chest CT examinations within 1 year.

  9. Can Locoregional Treatment of the Primary Tumor Improve Outcomes for Women With Stage IV Breast Cancer at Diagnosis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, David H.A., E-mail: dhanguyen@yahoo.com [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Truong, Pauline T. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada) [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Department of Radiation Oncology, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl; Walter, Caroline V.; Hayashi, Emily; Christie, Jennifer [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada)] [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC (Canada); Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, BC (Canada)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine the effect of locoregional treatment (LRT) of the primary tumor on survival in patients with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 733 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1996 and 2005 with newly diagnosed clinical or pathologic M1 breast cancer. Tumor and treatment characteristics, overall survival (OS), and locoregional progression-free survival were compared between patients treated with (n = 378) and without (n = 355) LRT of the primary disease. Multivariable analysis was performed with Cox regression modeling. Results: The median follow-up time was 1.9 years. LRT consisted of surgery alone in 67% of patients, radiotherapy alone in 22%, and both in 11%. LRT was used more commonly in women with age <50 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, Stage T1-2 tumors, N0-1 disease, limited M1 burden, and asymptomatic M1 disease (all p < 0.05). Systemic therapy was used in 92% of patients who underwent LRT and 85% of patients who did not. In patients treated with LRT compared with those without LRT, the 5-year OS rates were 21% vs. 14% (p < 0.001), and the rates of locoregional progression-free survival were 72% vs. 46% (p < 0.001). Among 378 patients treated with LRT, the rates of 5-year OS were higher in patients with age <50, ECOG performance status 0-1, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear surgical margins, single subsite, bone-only metastasis, and one to four metastatic lesions (all p < 0.003). On multivariable analysis, LRT was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.94, p = 0.009). Conclusion: Locoregional treatment of the primary disease is associated with improved survival in some women with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Among those treated with LRT, the most favorable rates of survival were observed in subsets with young age, good performance status, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear margins, and distant disease limited to one subsite, bone-only involvement, or fewer than five metastatic lesions.

  10. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Jennifer S. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Shively, John E. (Arcadia, CA); Li, Lin (Monrovia, CA)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  11. DETECTING CANCER-RELATED GENES AND GENE-GENE INTERACTIONS BY MACHINE LEARNING METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Bing

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    to use two Bayesian Network based methods: DASSO-MB (Detection of ASSOciations using Markov Blanket) and EpiBN (Epistatic interaction detection using Bayesian Network model) to address the two critical challenges: searching and scoring. DASSO-MB is based...

  12. Bonus-- Cameras Designed to Strengthen Nuclear Security Can Also Detect Cancer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technologies that are improving our ability to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and material are also saving lives on a daily basis.

  13. Improvements to a queue and delay estimation algorithm utilized in video imaging vehicle detection systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheek, Marshall Tyler

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , then utilizing the frequency and power of the spectrum associated with images produced within this analysis window (8, 9). Furthermore, methods developed by Hoose utilized a full frame approach for queue detection (9). The full frame method is able...

  14. Non-invasive detection of oral cancer using reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Sasha Alanda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In vivo reflectance and fluorescence spectra were collected from patients with oral lesions, as well as healthy volunteers, in order to evaluate the potential of spectroscopy to serve as a non-invasive tool for the detection ...

  15. Improving Cyber-Security of Smart Grid Systems via Anomaly Detection and Linguistic Domain Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrej Linda; Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned large scale deployment of smart grid network devices will generate a large amount of information exchanged over various types of communication networks. The implementation of these critical systems will require appropriate cyber-security measures. A network anomaly detection solution is considered in this work. In common network architectures multiple communications streams are simultaneously present, making it difficult to build an anomaly detection solution for the entire system. In addition, common anomaly detection algorithms require specification of a sensitivity threshold, which inevitably leads to a tradeoff between false positives and false negatives rates. In order to alleviate these issues, this paper proposes a novel anomaly detection architecture. The designed system applies the previously developed network security cyber-sensor method to individual selected communication streams allowing for learning accurate normal network behavior models. Furthermore, the developed system dynamically adjusts the sensitivity threshold of each anomaly detection algorithm based on domain knowledge about the specific network system. It is proposed to model this domain knowledge using Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic rules, which linguistically describe the relationship between various features of the network communication and the possibility of a cyber attack. The proposed method was tested on experimental smart grid system demonstrating enhanced cyber-security.

  16. Multimodal spectroscopy : real-time diagnosis of breast cancer during core needle biopsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volynskaya, Zoya I

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early detection of breast cancer is critical for improved survival. Currently, breast abnormalities are diagnosed based on a histopathological evaluation of tissue removed during core needle biopsy. Microcalcifications are ...

  17. FOCUS www.rsc.org/loc | Lab on a Chip Improving fluorescence detection in lab on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    ) graft on glass. Two cell populations are separately labeled with live cell dyes and are mixed and seeded and sensitivity, due primarily to sub-optimal light collection. More sensi- tive, higher resolution LOC devices for performing high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluo- rescence detection within LOC devices. Fluorescence

  18. Early detection of malignant skin can-cers, in particular melanoma, is crucial as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Mark S.

    MOTIVATION · Early detection of malignant skin can- cers, in particular melanoma, is crucial). EXPERIMENTS AND RESULTS Melanoma Melanin Haemoglobin Geo­mean BCC Spits Nevus Task n Precision Recall F-measure AUC Segmentation 120 0.89 0.90 0.89 ­ Malignant vs. Benign 500 0.89 0.89 0.89 0.95 Melanoma vs. Benign

  19. Improved multi-directional eddy current inspection test apparatus for detecting flaws in metal articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Roy A. (McMurray, PA); Hartley, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Caffarel, Alfred J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for detecting flaws in a tubular workpiece in a single scan. The coils of a dual coil bobbin eddy current inspection probe are wound at a 45.degree. angle to the transverse axis of the probe, one coil having an angular position about the axis about 90.degree. relative to the angular position of the other coil, and the angle of intersection of the planes containing the coils being about 60.degree..

  20. Elastic scattering spectroscopy for detection of cancer risk in Barrett's esophagus: experimental and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the in vivo data. Its removal allowed the construction of a diagnostic model with specificity improved from 67 in vivo data set. EROS works well as an effective pre- treatment for Barrett's in vivo data by identifying; orthogonal projection; pretreatment; principal component analysis; replicated measurements. Paper 09099R

  1. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same.

  2. Vision 20/20: The role of Raman spectroscopy in early stage cancer detection and feasibility for application in radiation therapy response assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devpura, Suneetha, E-mail: sdevpur1@hfhs.org; Barton, Kenneth N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Siddiqui, Farzan; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Palyvoda, Olena [College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [College of Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Kalkanis, Steven [Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Naik, Vaman M. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States)] [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States); Naik, Ratna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique capable of identifying chemical constituents of a sample by their unique set of molecular vibrations. Research on the applicability of Raman spectroscopy in the differentiation of cancerous versus normal tissues has been ongoing for many years, and has yielded successful results in the context of prostate, breast, brain, skin, and head and neck cancers as well as pediatric tumors. Recently, much effort has been invested on developing noninvasive “Raman” probes to provide real-time diagnosis of potentially cancerous tumors. In this regard, it is feasible that the Raman technique might one day be used to provide rapid, minimally invasive real-time diagnosis of tumors in patients. Raman spectroscopy is relatively new to the field of radiation therapy. Recent work involving cell lines has shown that the Raman technique is able to identify proteins and other markers affected by radiation therapy. Although this work is preliminary, one could ask whether or not the Raman technique might be used to identify molecular markers that predict radiation response. This paper provides a brief review of Raman spectroscopic investigations in cancer detection, benefits and limitations of this method, advances in instrument development, and also preliminary studies related to the application of this technology in radiation therapy response assessment.

  3. Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard A. Frey, Steven A. Ackerman, Yinghui Liu, Kathleen I. Strabala, Hong Zhang,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud Detection with MODIS, Part I: Improvements in the MODIS Cloud Mask for Collection 5 *Richard.frey@ssec.wisc.edu August 2007 #12;ABSTRACT Significant improvements have been made to the MODIS cloud mask (MOD35 and MYD35 to the 3.9-12 m and 11-12 m cloud tests. More non-MODIS ancillary input data has been added. Land and sea

  4. Cancer Imaging Clinical Cancer Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near Ir; Heptamethine Cyanine Dye–mediated; Xiaojian Yang; Chunmeng Shi; Rong Tong; Weiping Qian; Haiyen E. Zhau; Ruoxiang Wang; Guodong Zhu; Jianjun Cheng; Vincent W. Yang; Tianmin Cheng; Maged Henary; Lucjan Strekowski; W. K. Chung

    Purpose: Near-IR fluorescence imaging has great potential for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumors. In this study, we show the preferential uptake and retention of two hepatamethine cyanine dyes, IR-783 and MHI-148, in tumor cells and tissues. Experimental Design: IR-783 and MHI-148 were investigated for their ability to accumulate in human cancer cells, tumor xenografts, and spontaneous mouse tumors in transgenic animals. Time- and concentration-dependent dye uptake and retention in normal and cancer cells and tissues were compared, and subcellular localization of the dyes and mechanisms of the dye uptake and retention in tumor cells were evaluated using organelle-specific tracking dyes and bromosulfophthalein, a competitive inhibitor of organic anion transporting peptides. These dyes were used to detect human cancer metastases in a mouse model and differentiate cancer cells from normal cells in blood. Results: These near-IR hepatamethine cyanine dyes were retained in cancer cells but not normal cells, in tumor xenografts, and in spontaneous tumors in transgenic mice. They can be used to detect cancer metastasis and cancer cells in blood with a high degree of sensitivity. The dyes were found to concentrate in the mitochondria and lysosomes of cancer cells, probably through organic anion transporting peptides,

  5. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oikawa, Hirobumi [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan)], E-mail: oihiro@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan); Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Iwate Medical University, Morioka (Japan)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Vazquez, Esther G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

  7. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  8. Improved Detection of Bed Boundaries for Petrophysical Evaluation with Well Logs: Applications to Carbonate and Organic-Shale Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    , and uncertainty in physical and pore-structure models. The interpretation method introduced in this paper improves. This improvement in the assessment of petrophysical/compositional properties reduces uncertainty in hydrocarbon

  9. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwinska, Anna, E-mail: alphaonetau@poczta.onet.p [Department of Breast Cancer and Reconstructive Surgery, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Tacikowska, Malgorzata [Department of Radiology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Murawska, Magdalena [Department of Biostatistics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  10. Whole-Pelvis Radiotherapy in Combination With Interstitial Brachytherapy: Does Coverage of the Pelvic Lymph Nodes Improve Treatment Outcome in High-Risk Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, Washington (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@UrologicResearchInstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, Washington (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Wheeling Hospital, Department of Pathology, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) rates among high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with brachytherapy and supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT) using either a mini-pelvis (MP) or a whole-pelvis (WP) field. Methods and Materials: From May 1995 to October 2005, 186 high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with brachytherapy and EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). High-risk prostate cancer was defined as a Gleason score of >=8 and/or a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >=20 ng/ml. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.7 years, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 91.7% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.126), 95.5% vs. 92.6% (p = 0.515), and 79.5% vs. 67.1% (p = 0.721), respectively. Among those patients who received ADT, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 93.6% vs. 90.1% (p = 0.413), 94.2% vs. 96.0% (p = 0.927), and 73.7% vs. 70.2% (p = 0.030), respectively. Among those patients who did not receive ADT, the 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS rates for the WP vs. the MP arms were 82.4% vs. 75.0% (p = 0.639), 100% vs. 88% (p = 0.198), and 87.5% vs. 58.8% (p = 0.030), respectively. Based on multivariate analysis, none of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, while bPFS was best predicted by ADT and percent positive biopsy results. OS was best predicted by age and percent positive biopsy results. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, there is a nonsignificant trend toward improved bPFS, CSS, and OS rates when brachytherapy is given with WPRT. This trend is most apparent among ADT-naive patients, for whom a significant improvement in OS was observed.

  11. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    --22000000 58 Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer Prostate cancer

  12. JOURNAL OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 24, 159-174 (2008) Improving the Efficacy of a Termination Detection Algorithm*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Neeraj

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Termination Detection Algorithm* SATHYA PERI AND NEERAJ MITTAL Department of Computer Science The University@utdallas.edu} An important problem in distributed systems is to detect termination of a distributed computation. A distributed computation is said to have terminated when all processes have become passive and all channels

  13. PREDICT: a new UK prognostic model that predicts survival following surgery for invasive breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wishart, Gordon C.; Azzato, Elizabeth M.; Greenberg, David C.; Rashbass, Jem; Kearins, Olive; Lawrence, Gill; Caldas, Carlos; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    breast cancer Gordon C Wishart*†1,7, Elizabeth M Azzato†2,3, David C Greenberg4, Jem Rashbass4, Olive Kearins5, Gill Lawrence5, Carlos Caldas1,6,7 and Paul DP Pharoah2 Abstract Introduction: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a... trials. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005, 97:1195-1203. 15. Wishart GC, Greenberg DC, Britton PD, Chou P, Brown CH, Purushotham AD, Duffy SW: Screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer: is improved survival due to stage migration alone? Br J Cancer 2008...

  14. Improved Clinical Outcomes With High-Dose Image Guided Radiotherapy Compared With Non-IGRT for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Fidaleo, Anthony; Sperling, Dahlia; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Carver, Brett; Coleman, Jonathan [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with high-dose image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, 186 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IGRT to a dose of 86.4 Gy with daily correction of the target position based on kilovoltage imaging of implanted prostatic fiducial markers. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 190 patients who were treated between 2006 and 2007 with IMRT to the same prescription dose without, however, implanted fiducial markers in place (non-IGRT). The median follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 2-6 years). Results: A significant reduction in late urinary toxicity was observed for IGRT patients compared with the non-IGRT patients. The 3-year likelihood of grade 2 and higher urinary toxicity for the IGRT and non-IGRT cohorts were 10.4% and 20.0%, respectively (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identifying predictors for grade 2 or higher late urinary toxicity demonstrated that, in addition to the baseline Internatinoal Prostate Symptom Score, IGRT was associated with significantly less late urinary toxicity compared with non-IGRT. The incidence of grade 2 and higher rectal toxicity was low for both treatment groups (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively; p = 0.81). No differences in prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes were observed for low- and intermediate-risk patients when treated with IGRT and non-IGRT. For high-risk patients, a significant improvement was observed at 3 years for patients treated with IGRT compared with non-IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT is associated with an improvement in biochemical tumor control among high-risk patients and a lower rate of late urinary toxicity compared with high-dose IMRT. These data suggest that, for definitive radiotherapy, the placement of fiducial markers and daily tracking of target positioning may represent the preferred mode of external-beam radiotherapy delivery for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@UCHSC.edu

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  16. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  17. Forward Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Breast Cancer to Improve Dose Homogeneity: Feasibility of Class Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peulen, Heike, E-mail: h.peulen@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hanbeukers, Bianca; Boersma, Liesbeth; Baardwijk, Angela van; Ende, Piet van den; Houben, Ruud; Jager, Jos; Murrer, Lars; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To explore forward planning methods for breast cancer treatment to obtain homogeneous dose distributions (using International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements criteria) within normal tissue constraints and to determine the feasibility of class solutions. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were optimized in a stepwise procedure for 60 patients referred for postlumpectomy irradiation using strict dose constraints: planning target volume (PTV){sub 95%} of >99%; V{sub 107%} of <1.8 cc; heart V{sub 5Gy} of <10% and V{sub 10Gy} of <5%; and mean lung dose of <7 Gy. Treatment planning started with classic tangential beams. Optimization was done by adding a maximum of four segments before adding beams, in a second step. A breath-hold technique was used for heart sparing if necessary. Results: Dose constraints were met for all 60 patients. The classic tangential beam setup was not sufficient for any of the patients; in one-third of patients, additional segments were required (<3), and in two-thirds of patients, additional beams (<2) were required. Logistic regression analyses revealed central breast diameter (CD) and central lung distance as independent predictors for transition from additional segments to additional beams, with a CD cut-off point at 23.6 cm. Conclusions: Treatment plans fulfilling strict dose homogeneity criteria and normal tissue constraints could be obtained for all patients by stepwise dose intensity modification using limited numbers of segments and additional beams. In patients with a CD of >23.6 cm, additional beams were always required.

  18. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Dean A. (60 San Juan St., Los Alamos, NM 87544); Moody, III, David C. (402 Pine Tree La., Boulder, CO 80304); Ellinwood, L. Edward (694 Sperber La., Grand Junction, CO 81506); Klein, M. Gerard (715 Victor Dr., Grand Junction, CO 81506)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with .sup.67 Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the situs thereof by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the .sup.67 Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques cna be used to locate the malignant tissue mass.

  19. Method of using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphine for detecting cancers of the lung

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, D.A.; Moody, D.C. III; Ellinwood, L.E.; Klein, M.G.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for using tetra-aryl porphyrins for and, in particular, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine as a fluorescent tracer for cancers of the lung, and as a radiotracer therefor as a complex with [sup 67]Cu. The latter complex also provides a source of beta radiation for selective destruction of lung malignancies as well as gamma radiation useful for image analysis of the lungs by single photon emission computed tomography, as an example, both in vivo. Copper-64 may be substituted for the [sup 67]Cu if only radiotracer characteristics are of interest. This lighter isotope of copper is a positron emitter, and positron emission tomography techniques can be used to locate the malignant tissue mass. 1 figure.

  20. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martineau, Rebecca M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, one in eight women will be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed - as well as the second most fatal - cancer in American women. It is estimated that there will be nearly 200,000 diagnoses of breast cancer this year; more than 40,000 of these will be fatal. Although advances in medical technologies have greatly increased the odds of surviving the disease, the increase in screenings has not resulted in a significant reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate. Moreover, recent studies have even suggested that an increase in these methods might, in itself, cause cancer. A new tool for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, supported by an award from the Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs of Department of Defense, could give women a new advantage in the fight against breast cancer. This LANL-led project will integrate ultrasound tomography (UST) with recent discoveries in the field of cell and tissue biomechanics to improve breast cancer detection and characterization. UST uses ultrasound waves instead of X-rays to identify and characterize breast tumors. This technology reveals small mechanical-property changes within the breast. These changes are often the earliest signs of breast cancer. Additionally, UST is effective for women with dense breast tissue, who have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Because the technology does not use radiation, UST can also be used as frequently as needed for women with a high risk of developing breast cancer. In contrast, mammography, the only routine breast-cancer screening tool currently available, is not effective for women with dense breast tissue and may come with unwanted side-effects caused by ionizing radiation. UST has great potential to become an alternative breast-cancer screening tool because of UST's advantages and benefits over mammography. Currently, there is fierce debate surrounding the age at which breast cancer screening should begin, and once begun, how often it should occur. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40. On the other hand, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine so early. Rather, the Task Force recommends biennial mammography screening for women aged 50 to 74 years. The ten-year discrepancy in the onset of screening results from recent data suggesting that the frequent use of X-ray radiation during screenings could potentially increase the likelihood of developing cancer. This danger is increased by the low sensitivity and accuracy of mammograms, which sometimes require multiple screenings to yield results. Furthermore, mammograms are often not only inaccurate, but average appalling misdiagnoses rates: about 80% false positives and 15% false negatives. These misdiagnoses lead to unwarranted biopsies at an estimated health care cost of $2 billion per year, while at the same time, resulting in excessive cases of undetected cancer. As such, the National Cancer Institute recommends more studies on the advantages of types and frequency of screenings, as well as alternative screening options. The UST technology developed at LANL could be an alternative option to greatly improve the specificity and sensitivity of breast cancer screening without using ionizing radiation. LANL is developing high-resolution ultrasound tomography algorithms and a clinical ultrasound tomography scanner to conduct patient studies at the UNM Hospital. During UST scanning, the patient lies face-down while her breast, immersed in a tank of warm water, is scanned by phased-transducer arrays. UST uses recorded ultrasound signals to reconstruct a high-resolution three-dimensional image of the breast, showing the spatial distribution of mechanical properties within the breast. Breast cancers are detected by higher values of mechanical properties compared to surrounding tissues. Thus, high-resolution breast images obtained using LANL's novel UST algorithms ha

  1. Metformin Decreases Glucose Oxidation and Increases the Dependency of Prostate Cancer Cells on Reductive Glutamine Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    Metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation, and epidemiology studies suggest an association with increased survival in patients with cancer taking metformin; however, the mechanism by which metformin improves cancer ...

  2. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improves lymph node coverage and dose to critical structures compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in clinically localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang-Chesebro, Alice [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: awang@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Xia Ping [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Coleman, Joy [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Akazawa, Clayton C. [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Roach, Mack [Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify gains in lymph node coverage and critical structure dose reduction for whole-pelvis (WP) and extended-field (EF) radiotherapy in prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for the first treatment phase of 45 Gy in the concurrent treatment of lymph nodes and prostate. Methods and Materials: From January to August 2005, 35 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with pelvic IMRT; 7 had nodes defined up to L5-S1 (Group 1), and 28 had nodes defined above L5-S1 (Group 2). Each patient had 2 plans retrospectively generated: 1 WP 3DCRT plan using bony landmarks, and 1 EF 3DCRT plan to cover the vascular defined volumes. Dose-volume histograms for the lymph nodes, rectum, bladder, small bowel, and penile bulb were compared by group. Results: For Group 1, WP 3DCRT missed 25% of pelvic nodes with the prescribed dose 45 Gy and missed 18% with the 95% prescribed dose 42.75 Gy, whereas WP IMRT achieved V{sub 45Gy} = 98% and V{sub 42.75Gy} = 100%. Compared with WP 3DCRT, IMRT reduced bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 78%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 48%, and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 232 cm{sup 3}. EF 3DCRT achieved 95% coverage of nodes for all patients at high cost to critical structures. For Group 2, IMRT decreased bladder V{sub 45Gy} by 90%, rectum V{sub 45Gy} by 54% and small bowel V{sub 45Gy} by 455 cm{sup 3} compared with EF 3DCRT. Conclusion: In this study WP 3DCRT missed a significant percentage of pelvic nodes. Although EF 3DCRT achieved 95% pelvic nodal coverage, it increased critical structure doses. IMRT improved pelvic nodal coverage while decreasing dose to bladder, rectum, small bowel, and penile bulb. For patients with extended node involvement, IMRT especially decreases small bowel dose.

  4. Method to improve reliability of a fuel cell system using low performance cell detection at low power operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Tayoung; Ganapathy, Sriram; Jung, Jaehak; Savage, David R.; Lakshmanan, Balasubramanian; Vecasey, Pamela M.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for detecting a low performing cell in a fuel cell stack using measured cell voltages. The method includes determining that the fuel cell stack is running, the stack coolant temperature is above a certain temperature and the stack current density is within a relatively low power range. The method further includes calculating the average cell voltage, and determining whether the difference between the average cell voltage and the minimum cell voltage is greater than a predetermined threshold. If the difference between the average cell voltage and the minimum cell voltage is greater than the predetermined threshold and the minimum cell voltage is less than another predetermined threshold, then the method increments a low performing cell timer. A ratio of the low performing cell timer and a system run timer is calculated to identify a low performing cell.

  5. IMPROVED VARIABLE STAR SEARCH IN LARGE PHOTOMETRIC DATA SETS: NEW VARIABLES IN CoRoT FIELD LRa02 DETECTED BY BEST II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruth, T.; Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Eigmueller, P.; Erikson, A.; Kirste, S.; Pasternacki, T.; Rauer, H.; Titz-Weider, R. [Institut fuer Planetenforschung, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kabath, P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Chini, R.; Lemke, R. [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Murphy, M., E-mail: thomas.fruth@dlr.de [Depto. Fisica, Universidad Catolica del Norte, PO 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CoRoT field LRa02 has been observed with the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope II (BEST II) during the southern summer 2007/2008. A first analysis of stellar variability led to the publication of 345 newly discovered variable stars. Now, a deeper analysis of this data set was used to optimize the variability search procedure. Several methods and parameters have been tested in order to improve the selection process compared to the widely used J index for variability ranking. This paper describes an empirical approach to treat systematic trends in photometric data based upon the analysis of variance statistics that can significantly decrease the rate of false detections. Finally, the process of reanalysis and method improvement has virtually doubled the number of variable stars compared to the first analysis by Kabath et al. A supplementary catalog of 272 previously unknown periodic variables plus 52 stars with suspected variability is presented. Improved ephemerides are given for 19 known variables in the field. In addition, the BEST II results are compared with CoRoT data and its automatic variability classification.

  6. Also in This Issue 2 International Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Also in This Issue 2 International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership 3 Improving Staging Information 4 Studying the Care of Older Prostate Cancer Patients (CARDI) 4 The Northern Ireland PSA Database 5 Lung Cancer Resection Rates 5 All Ireland Cancer Atlas 5 CaPPS Update 6 Living With and Beyond Prostate

  7. Detection of aldehydes in lung cancer cell culture by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Guangqing

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Aldehydes in lung cancer cell culture have been investigated using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and solid-phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization. In this study, the poly(dimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber was used...

  8. Near infrared optical lymphography for cancer diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Jessica Perea

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A new molecular imaging modality has been developed to detect and locate positive axillary and sentinel lymph nodes non-invasively in breast cancer patients undergoing lymphoscintigraphy. The modality is based on fluorescent photon detection...

  9. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    --22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

  10. LUNG CANCER 6. LUNG CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    LUNG CANCER 47 6. LUNG CANCER 6.1. SUMMARY Lung cancer was the third most common cancer in Ireland (Table 6.1). The average number of new lung cancer cases diagnosed each year was 1,000 in women and 1 for women and 1% for men. The risk of developing lung cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 37 for women and 1

  11. Cancer Cells DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100115

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liangfang

    Cancer Cells DOI: 10.1002/anie.201100115 Micromachine-Enabled Capture and Isolation of Cancer Cells (CTCs) are the primary entities responsible for spawning cancer metastasis. Detection of CTCs provides an indicator for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of various types of cancers. Several approaches, based

  12. For Immediate Release --Wednesday, March 20, 2013 Treating male and female cancer patients with radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    ? · gender differences in cancer treatment rarely explored · consequences of radiation with radiation treatment of cancer cells and the difference between female and male or female-specific treatments that improve the quality of life for all cancer

  13. 1284 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 26, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Improving SVM-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducatelle, Frederick

    classification. I. INTRODUCTION DISTRIBUTON losses in power utilities originating from electricity theft-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using the Fuzzy Inference System Jawad Nagi, Keem Siah Yap, Sieh of fraud and electricity theft in power distribution utilities. Pre- vious work was carried out by using

  14. Improving Soft-Tissue Contrast in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Images of Liver Cancer Patients Using a Deformable Image Registration Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang He [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang Xiaochun; Beddar, A. Sam; Briere, Tina M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate a deformable image registration method to improve soft-tissue contrast in four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images of the liver. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma underwent 4D CT scan for radiotherapy treatment planning on a positron emission tomography/CT scanner. Four-dimensional CT images were binned into 10 equispaced phases. The exhale phase served as the reference phase, and images from the other nine phases were coregistered to the reference phase image using an intensity-based, automatic deformable image registration method. Then the coregistered images were combined to create a single, high-quality reconstructed CT image at exhale phase as the new reference for target delineation. The extent of image quality enhancement was quantified relative to the original CT by calculating the signal-to-noise ratio and the contrast-to-noise ratio. Results: The soft tissue image contrast was noticeably better after deformable image registration than in the original scans. Signal-to-noise ratios inside the liver region of interest increased for all patients by a factor of 3.0 (range, 2.3-3.7). The improvement in image quality was not linearly proportionate to the number of images averaged. Using only 6 phases can achieve at least 85% of the contrast enhancement that can be achieved using all 10 phases. We also found that contrast enhancement was inversely proportional to the original image quality (p = 0.006), and the contrast enhancement is attained with little loss of spatial resolution. Conclusions: This deformable image registration method is feasible to improve soft-tissue image quality in 4D CT images.

  15. The National Cancer Survivorship Initiative: new and emerging evidence on the ongoing needs of cancer survivors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    ; #12; A key commitment of the Cancer Reform Strategy (Department of Health, 2007) in UK, and endorsed Floor Portland House, Bressenden Place, London SW1E 5RS, UK; 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University in Improving Outcomes Strategy for Cancer (Department of Health, 2011), was to establish a National Cancer

  16. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  17. STOMACH CANCER 9. STOMACH CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    of association and strength of evidence Increases risk Decreases risk Convincing or probable Helicobacter pylori/obesity 9 1 Helicobacter and Cancer Collaborative Group, 2001; 2 International Agency for Research on Cancer

  18. Metformin Selectively Targets Cancer Stem Cells, and Acts Together with Chemotherapy to Block Tumor Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the disease. Thus, drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells offer great promise for cancer treatment and chemotherapeutic drugs to improve treatment of patients with breast (and possibly other) cancers. [Cancer Res 2009;69(19):7507­11] Introduction Chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer can effectively reduce tumor mass, but the disease often

  19. Computer enhancement of mammograms for assistance in detection of microcalcifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estevez, Leonardo William

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At current rate of incidence, breast cancer will afflict about 9% of women. Regular mammograms have proven to be effective in early detection of breast cancer. In mammograms the presence of microcalcification clusters is an indicator of breast...

  20. Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Three-Dimensional Thermal Tomography Advances Cancer Treatment Technology available for licensing: A 3D technique to detect early skin changes due to radiation treatment in breast...

  1. Alpha and recoil track detection in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)—Towards a method for in vitro assessment of radiopharmaceuticals internalized in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myhra, S., E-mail: sverre.myhra@materials.ox.ac.uk; Chakalova, R. [Oxford University Begbroke Science Park, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [Oxford University Begbroke Science Park, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Falzone, N. [MRC/CRUK Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom and Department of Biomedical Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa)] [MRC/CRUK Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom and Department of Biomedical Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and characterization of single MeV ?-particle and recoil tracks in PMMA photoresist by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been demonstrated. The energy deposition along the track is shown to lead to a latent pattern in the resist due to contrast reversal. It has been shown that the pattern, consisting of conical spikes, can be developed by conventional processing as a result of the dissolution rate of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) being greater than that for the modified material in the cylindrical volume of the track core. The spikes can be imaged and counted by routine AFM analysis. Investigations by angular-resolved near-grazing incidence reveal additional tracks that correspond to recoil tracks. The observations have been correlated with modelling, and shown to be in qualitative agreement with prevailing descriptions of collision cascades. The results may be relevant to technologies that are based on detection and characterization of single energetic ions. In particular, the direct visualization of the collision cascade may allow more accurate estimates of the actual interaction volume, which in turn will permit more precise assessment of dose distribution of ?-emitting radionuclides used for targeted radiotherapy. The results could also be relevant to other diagnostic or process technologies based on interaction of energetic ions with matter.

  2. Volume-Based Parameters of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Improve Disease Recurrence Prediction in Postmastectomy Breast Cancer Patients With 1 to 3 Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Naomi, E-mail: haruhi0321@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Sugawara, Yoshifumi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Ochi, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan); Kiyoto, Sachiko; Ohsumi, Shozo [Department of Breast Oncology, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University, Ehime (Japan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine whether volume-based parameters on pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without adjuvant radiation therapy are predictive of recurrence. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 93 patients with 1 to 3 positive axillary nodes after surgery, who were studied with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for initial staging. We evaluated the relationship between positron emission tomography parameters, including the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and clinical outcomes. Results: The median follow-up duration was 45 months. Recurrence was observed in 11 patients. Metabolic tumor volume and TLG were significantly related to tumor size, number of involved nodes, nodal ratio, nuclear grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and triple negativity (TN) (all P values were <.05). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, MTV and TLG showed better predictive performance than tumor size, ER status, or TN (area under the curve: 0.85, 0.86, 0.79, 0.74, and 0.74, respectively). On multivariate analysis, MTV was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 34.42, 95% confidence interval 3.94-882.71, P=.0008) and disease-free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio 13.92, 95% confidence interval 2.65-103.78, P=.0018). The 3-year DFS rate was 93.8% for the lower MTV group (<53.1; n=85) and 25.0% for the higher MTV group (?53.1; n=8; P<.0001, log–rank test). The 3-year DFS rate for patients with both ER-positive status and MTV <53.1 was 98.2%; and for those with ER-negative status and MTV ?53.1 it was 25.0% (P<.0001). Conclusions: Volume-based parameters improve recurrence prediction in postmastectomy breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive nodes. The addition of MTV to ER status or TN has potential benefits to identify a subgroup at higher risk for recurrence.

  3. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  4. acid biomarker detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: .g., cancer, Alzheimer's disease) by positron emission tomography (PET).3 In a similar vein, we have developedDisease Detection by Ultrasensitive...

  5. [CANCER RESEARCH 61, 59745978, August 15, 2001] Advances in Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Jiashun

    [CANCER RESEARCH 61, 5974­5978, August 15, 2001] Advances in Brief Analysis of Gene Expression Identifies Candidate Markers and Pharmacological Targets in Prostate Cancer John B. Welsh, Lisa M. Sapinoso., H. F. F.] Abstract Detection, treatment, and prediction of outcome for men with prostate cancer

  6. Estimating Volumes of Simulated Lung Cancer Nodules David E. Gilsinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilsinn, David E.

    Estimating Volumes of Simulated Lung Cancer Nodules David E. Gilsinn Bruce R. Borchardt Amelia Tebbe§ July 15, 2009 Abstract Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. Computed to- mography (CT) shows promise in detecting lung cancers at earlier, more operable

  7. CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

  8. A filter-based feature selection approach for identifying potential biomarkers for lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Hee; Lushington, Gerald H.; Visvanathan, Mahesh

    2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in the world and its treatment is dependant on the type and stage of cancer detected in the patient. Molecular biomarkers that can characterize the cancer phenotype are thus a key...

  9. Lessons from Tarceva in pancreatic cancer: where are we now, and how should future trials be designed in pancreatic cancer ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of this network trying to improve the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. Recent findings: Tarceva has the mechanisms of cell transformation and also to find appropriate targeted anti- cancer treatments. Among human in the therapeutic armamentarium against cancer raised some hopes in the treatment of patients with advanced

  10. Capability Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement As stated in Section 3.5 of the Technical Requirements, The performance of the ASC and NERSC...

  11. Quantitative spectroscopy for detection of cervical dysplasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirkovi?, Jelena, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current clinical standard for cervical cancer diagnosis is colposcopy, a procedure that involves visual inspection and biopsy of at-risk tissue, followed by histopathology. The major objective of colposcopy is detection ...

  12. Application Of LIF Technique In The Diagnosis Of Some Human Cancer Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Hussein, A.; Kasem, A. K.; Harith, M. A. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University (Egypt); Ismail, H. [National Cancer Institute, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an evolving technology that can rapidly differentiate between benign and malignant tissues. These differences are thought to be due to endogenous fluorophores, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and tryptophan, and absorbers such as {beta}-carotene and hemoglobin. This is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that can identify diseased tissue sites in situ and in real time could have a major impact on the detection and treatment of cancer. This study evaluates the utility of autofluorescence and spectroscopy to distinguish tissue transformation associated with the malignant change in two types of human cancer - colorectal and breast cancer - Fluorescence spectra were obtained using a high-sensitivity fiber optic spectrometer and using two types of excitation sources, Argon laser with an emission at wavelength 488 nm and Xenon lamp. The results showed that the fluorescence intensity changes from normal to malignant tissue samples may be explained in terms of simple collagen, oxidized riboflavins and NAD(P)H intensity changes. In the future, improving our understanding of the biological changes that can be assessed using spectroscopy will not only improve optical techniques but also provide new tools to better understand cancer biology.

  13. Cancer, Palliative and End of Life Care ResearchProjects2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Cancer, Palliative and End of Life Care ResearchProjects2012 #12;2 5 4 Cancer, Palliative and End and students working together to transform care and improve outcomes for individuals affected by cancer, other the right questions to generate theory, influence policy and change practice. Cancer survivorship

  14. Therapeutics, Targets, and Chemical Biology Real-time In Vivo Molecular Detection of Primary Tumors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    T. Nguyen2 Abstract Management of metastatic disease is integral to cancer treatment. Evaluation protease sensors and sentinel lymph node detection methods, which give no information about cancer invasion. Cancer Res; 73(2); 855­64. Ó2012 AACR. Introduction Cancer staging depends on evaluation of both

  15. Real-world Polymorphic Attack Detection Michalis Polychronakis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markatos, Evangelos P.

    proposed network-level emulation, a heuristic detection method that scans network traffic to detect, sophisticated obfuscation schemes. Keywords Polymorphism, intrusion detection, code emulation 1. Introduction them under control for as long as possible. As detection mechanisms improve, attackers employ

  16. Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

  17. DICTIONARY EXTENSION FOR IMPROVING AUTOMATED SENTIMENT DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    algorithms such as Pointwise Mutual Information - Information Retrieval (PMI-IR) and Latent Semantic Analysis Information - Infor- mation Retrieval (PMI-IR). Our evaluation shows that this approach leads to gains how we used LSA and PMI-IR to find similar values and how the prop- agation of the sentiment values

  18. Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jordan Andrew

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPROVING TARGETED RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY USING NUCLEAR NANOTECHNOLOGY A Thesis by JORDAN ANDREW EVANS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of Nanotechnology ................................................. 4 1.3 Paradigm Shift - Improving TRT Using Nuclear Nanotechnology .......... 8 1.4 Cancer Cell Line Investigated in This Study .......................................... 14 1.5 Nano...

  19. Reduce Building Energy Consumption by Improving the Supply Air Temperature Schedule and Recommissioning the Terminal Boxes, Submitted to the Energy Management and Operations Division at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Energy Management and Operations Department at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University performed a study of optimizing the HVAC operation at its Basic Research Building. The Basic...

  20. Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

  1. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, Timothy J. (Graniteville, SC)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  2. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  3. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  4. 1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Cancer Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 888 939 3333 | cancer.ca Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Special topic: Liver cancer Produced by Canadian Cancer Society, Statistics Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Provincial/Territorial Cancer Registries cancer.ca/statistics #12;2Canadian Cancer Society n Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013 Citation

  5. RSS Feeds Submit Biological Cancer Therapy There is hope. Learn more about biotherapy treatment options today. CancerCenter.com/CareThatNev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    RSS Feeds » Submit Biological Cancer Therapy There is hope. Learn more about biotherapy treatment options today. CancerCenter.com/CareThatNev O li CNA C tifi ti Q i k d E S h f CNA N i P O li ! Home Earth of pesticides Scientists discover how to improve immune response to cancer at Princess Margaret Hospital Similar

  6. Detection, Prevention and Mitigation of Cascading Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disturbances and protective relay operations leading to cascading events. The detection algorithms improved (such as weak connections, unexpected events, hidden failures in protection system, and human errors

  7. The use of polarized light for skin cancer detecton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLaughter, Aimee Hill

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection system. Presented here is a method for the optical determination of cancerous tissue using polarized light. This thesis describes the development of a polarimetric imaging system including its calibration and testing. In addition, experiments...

  8. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  9. Cancer gene therapy with oncolytic adenoviruses K. Guse,A. Hemminki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    , Helsinki, Finland Summary Metastatic cancer remains difficult to treat effectively and treatments therapy hold promise for the treatment of various tu- mor types. Among the most promising cancer gene efficacy needs to be improved to make oncolytic adenoviruses a viable treatment alterna- tive for cancer

  10. Oncolytic Adenoviruses for the Treatment of Human Cancer: Focus on Translational and Clinical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Oncolytic Adenoviruses for the Treatment of Human Cancer: Focus on Translational and Clinical Data results of cancer treatment have improved steadily, metastatic solid tumors can be cured only rarely of more sensitive diagnostic methods and new treatment modalities. However, cancer is still usually incur

  11. CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    CANCER BIOLOGY Infectioustumourcells David Dingli and Martin A. Nowak Cancer cells are generally infectious agents and be transmitted between individuals. The current view of cancer development is that normal cells are transformed into tumour cells by sequential mutations that activate cancer- promoting

  12. The National Cancer Institute,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Information Center Bldg. 82, Rm 123 Bethesda, MD 20892 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the Federal Government. NCI coordinates the government's cancer research program. It is the largest of the 17 biomedical research institutes and centers

  13. A Learning Method for Automated Polyp Detection S.B.Gokturk1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasi, Carlo

    carcinoma, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in United States. In this paper, we propose a new Introduction Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. American adults polyp detection rate with the false positive rate reduced by 80 percent compared to previous work. 1

  14. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  15. CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRA NSFO RMING LIVES THRO UG H RE SE ARC H #12;CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRANSFORMING LIVES THROUGH RESEARCH #12;II AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014

  16. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Upper Trinity River Basin was mainly from findings in a Corps environmental impact statement (EIS) report in the 1980s, according to Gene Rice, Corps project manager of the Dallas Floodway and Dallas Floodway Extension projects, two of the Trinity River... to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed...

  17. Improved ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  18. Local Pulmonary Structure Classification for Computer-Aided Nodule Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okada, Kazunori

    in the past year in the United States alone. While not smoking is the best prevention against lung cancer procedure is more flexible and efficient than current state of the art and will help to improve the accuracy Clustering, Directional Statistics 1. INTRODUCTION Lung cancer is responsible for over 160,000 deaths

  19. Paul Workman Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Workman Cancer Research UK Cancer Therapeutics Unit Institute of Cancer Research/Royal Marsden Hospital Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG UK ian.collins@icr.ac.uk Drugging the cancer genome: The challenges therapeutic agents Personalised diagnosis and treatment Exploiting cancer biology and the cancer genome

  20. Corps Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H 2 O | pg. 6 O ne of the key federal players in the restoration of the Trinity River Basin is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, whose primary civil mission is developing and managing the nation?s water resources, including projects to reduce... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  1. aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    explain the higher US survival rate. Aggressive treatment may also be a factor. 5. Colorectal cancer Risks--22000000 28 Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Col orectal cancer Colorectal cancer Colorectal ca ncer Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Color ectal cancer

  2. Improved aethalometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  3. Cancer Research Beckman Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cancer Research Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY #12;T The medical and scientific worlds have known for many years that in order to truly understand and treat cancer, the fight has and cancerous tumors have to first be visualized at the smallest scales possible, and then treated in the most

  4. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  5. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves (El Cerrito, CA); Campisi, Judith (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  6. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  7. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1000: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  8. Analysis of Senate Bill 961: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recurrent cancers, and treatment of cancers that cannotNeill VJ, Twelves CJ. Oral cancer treatment: Developments inchanging paradigm in cancer treatment: Oral chemotherapy.

  9. Fingerprint detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, George C. (Rt. 1, Box 428B, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  10. Lymphatic and Angiogenic Candidate Genes Predict the Development of Secondary Lymphedema following Breast Cancer Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following breast cancer treatment. Cancer Epidemiollymphedema after breast cancer treatment. Cancer Epidemiolfollowing breast cancer treatment. Clin Cancer Res 18: 232–

  11. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  12. Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

  13. Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

  14. Cancer Due to Prolonged Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Werb J. Inflammation and cancer. Nature. 2002 December 19;J.T. , Szabo E. , et al. Cancer and inflammation: PromiseInflammation, a Key Event in Cancer Development. Molecular

  15. Bismuth 213 Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are increasing supplies of radioactive medical isotopes to treat cancer. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  17. Skin metastases from lung cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollet, Todd W; Garcia, Carlos A; Koester, Glenn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cutaneous metastases from the lung frequently indicate aof skin metastases from lung cancer. Intern Med. 1996; 35:9. Coslett LM, Katlic MR. Lung cancer with skin metastasis.

  18. Using Passive Cavitation Detection to Observe Postexcitation Response of Ultrasound Contrast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Using Passive Cavitation Detection to Observe Postexcitation Response of Ultrasound Contrast Agents, FR Email: daking3@illinois.edu Abstract-- Passive cavitation detection was used to improve. Keywords - microbubbles; postexcitation; passive cavitation detection; inertial cavitation; flow rate I

  19. Inflammation & Inflammation & cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    Tam & tnf dc cytokines metastasis metabolism #12;22 chemokine gradient in cancer (Balkwill et al. 2004 1861) Wound healing dc Tam & tnf cytokines metastasis therapeutics metabolism inflammation The end #12 & tnf cytokines metastasis metabolism #12;4 Motivation Cancer as an overhealing wound Lets Go! Wound

  20. Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

  1. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  2. Detecting persons concealed in a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Jr., Raymond W.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for detecting the presence of humans or animals concealed within in a vehicle uses a combination of the continuous wavelet transform and a ratio-based energy calculation to determine whether the motion detected using seismic sensors placed on the vehicle is due to the presence of a heartbeat within the vehicle or is the result of motion caused by external factors such as the wind. The method performs well in the presence of light to moderate ambient wind levels, producing far fewer false alarm indications. The new method significantly improves the range of ambient environmental conditions under which human presence detection systems can reliably operate.

  3. Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.W.; Zheng, T.Z.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.Z.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.

  4. ScientificWorldJournal . Author manuscript Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and describes the most promising avenues toward a significant improvementScientificWorldJournal . Author manuscript Page /1 10 Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer Patrick Chames * , Brigitte Kerfelec , Daniel Baty Stress Cellulaire INSERM : U624

  5. Anti-HER-3 MAbs Inhibit HER-3-Mediated Signaling in Breast Cancer Cell Lines Resistant to Anti-HER-2 Antibodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Axel

    the biologic effects of an antibody against HER3 (a-HER3ECD ) in the invasive breast cancer cell lines MCF-7ADRAnti-HER-3 MAbs Inhibit HER-3-Mediated Signaling in Breast Cancer Cell Lines Resistant to Anti can be designed based on genomic data, to improve the selectivity for cancer cells and reduce toxicity

  6. 6.21 Improving Neutron Beams for Cancer Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . S . D E 2 3 4801

  7. Lung cancer...115 Chapter 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    NICR/NCRI Lung cancer...115 Chapter 11: Lung cancer (including trachea, bronchus and lung; C33-C34 of lung cancer diagnosed each year in Ireland during 2000-2004. o Male incidence rates decreased by 1 by 2.7%. o Higher levels of treatment occurred among those with small cell lung cancer (compared to non

  8. QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER Q: What are the early signs of lung cancer? How would I know I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: · A cough that doesn't go away what may be causing these symptoms. Q: How is lung cancer diagnosed? A: Your doctor may do one or more

  9. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  10. Proteasome Inhibitors Block DNA Repair and Radiosensitize Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cron, Kyle R.

    Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, ...

  11. Nonlinear Michelson interferometer for improved quantum metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Luis; Ángel Rivas

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine nonlinear quantum detection via a Michelson interferometer embedded in a gas with Kerr nonlinearity. The interferometer is illuminated by pulses of classical light. This strategy combines the robustness against practical imperfections of classical light with the improvement provided by nonlinear detection. Regarding ultimate quantum limits, we stress that, as a difference with linear schemes, the nonlinearity introduces pulse duration as a new variable into play along with the energy resources.

  12. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  13. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  14. Cancer Therapies: A Bane and a Boon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neogi, Sushrita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative Medicine in Cancer Treatment. (2012). Retrievedcancertopics/pdq/cam/cam-cancer-treatment/patient/page2 8.and alternative (CAM) cancer treatments in use, including

  15. Evidence That New Hypnotics Cause Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. , Hays, J. C. , Blazer,the likelihood of cancer causation is sufficiently strong

  16. Target detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brusseau, Charles A. (Tijeras, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  17. Aneuploidy: Cancer's Fatal Flaw?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Bret R.

    Aneuploidy is a characteristic of cancer, with greater than 90% of all solid tumors in humans carrying an aberrant karyotype. Yet, whether or how this condition contributes to tumorigenesis is not understood. Here we ...

  18. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program ­ Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer Associate Professor Tenuretrack Health is expanding research in Cancer Genetic Epidemiology to enrich an already robust campuswide

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Nanomedicine drug delivery system could improve chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Nanomedicine drug delivery system could improve chemotherapy Chemotherapy is still the backbone of today's cancer treatment. This is exemplified by acute myeloid leukemia (AML generation anti-leukemia treatments. The results have been published in the Journal of Advanced Healthcare

  20. Colorectal cancer and diet in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodoratou, Evropi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is a cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon and/ or rectum and more than 95% of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas. It is the third most common cancer in incidence and mortality ...

  1. Autoclaving nitrocellulose membranes to improve detection of ubiquitin immunoreactivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    autoclave. Carefully disassemble blot after it has cooled. Use forceps and be careful not to tear the blot;Some additional tips... - I have observed that milk (and pure casein) is not the very best blocking-inactived bovine calf serum gave a four-fold higher signal than blocking with milk in otherwise identical

  2. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14 FEDERALAmerica TreatyWastewantsRequests||Nuclear

  3. Ris-M-2873 Improvement ofthe Bandwidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for checking the rise time of the test pulse. The pulse in "fed to the digitizer, and the step response be modified to improve the response time from approx. 480 to 410 ps. ISBN 87-550-1648-0 ISSN 0418-6435 Grafisk duration, and rn the response time of the detection system. The duration of the laser pulse is 300 ps

  4. advanced cancer detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uniform convergence, transformation of multiple integrals, A. Catalog Description 311 Hollow silica and silica-boron nanomicroparticles for contrast-enhanced ultrasound to...

  5. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    emission computed tomography SUV standard uptake values SLN sentinel lymph node TK tyrosine kinase TBR target to background ratio Symbols ? pharmacokinetic parameter ? pharmacokinetic parameter )(tC BOUND concentration of dye... bound to integrin receptor either in the vascular or extravascular compartments )(tC LAREXTRAVASCU concentration of dye in extravascular space )(tC VASCULAR concentration of dye in vascular space 0 I background fluorescence intensity c k...

  6. Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer through Radial Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    , fail to achieve a concurrently high sensitivity and speci city. In vivo uorescence spectroscopy., 1994). In a Pap test, a large number of cells obtained by scraping the cervical epithelium are smeared to achieve a concurrently high sensitivity1 and high speci city2 due to both sampling and reading errors

  7. Applications of micromachined devices to malaria and cancer detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, James O. (James Otey)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the many micromachined diagnostic devices currently being developed, suspended microchannel resonator technology seems unique in that is not a scaling down of an existing technique and does not require labeling of the ...

  8. Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work using conventional methods." New technology puts bioinformatics within easy reach of health-care professionals, researchers and others LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 1, 2014-Los...

  9. Detecting and molecular profiling cancer cells in patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Vanessa M. (Vanessa Marie)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although tumor cells obtained from human patients by surgical biopsy, image-guided intervention, blood draws or fluid drainage (paracentesis, thoracentesis) are a valuable source for analyzing tumor cells, conventional ...

  10. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non...

  11. Algorithms for Detecting Significantly Mutated Pathways in Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Ben J.

    , Italy vandinfa@dei.unipd.it 2 Department of Computer Science, Brown University, Providence, RI {eli in part by the "Ing. Aldo Gini" Foundation, Padova, Italy. This work was done while the author, described by [33]. Fluid is pumped into the source node s at a constant rate, and fluid diffuses through

  12. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometry. The sensor probe consists of a lithographically patterned polymer waveguides chip and three micromachined positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 degree light incidence and collection of spatially resolved diffuse...

  13. Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology| Nationalof big-data science Eric

  14. Software speeds detection of diseases and cancer-treatment targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou are

  15. The development of a sensitive method to study volatile organic compounds in gaseous emissions of lung cancer cell lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroly, Anupam

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a low cost, reliable system that would lead to early detection of lung cancer. Tests involved the quantitation of gaseous metabolic emissions from immortalized lung ...

  16. Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Huidong "Warren"

    , abbreviated as CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for both men to lung cancer in cause of cancer deaths. Despite the fact that it is highly preventable, approximately, colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of death from cancer in women (after breast and lung cancer

  17. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  18. Advanced technologies for perimeter intrusion detection sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.D.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of integrated circuit fabrication techniques and the resulting devices have contributed more to the advancement of exterior intrusion detectors and alarm assessment devices than any other technology. The availability of this technology has led to the improvements in and further development of smaller more powerful computers, microprocessors, solid state memories, solid state cameras, thermal imagers, low-power lasers, and shorter pulse width and higher frequency electronic circuitry. This paper presents information on planning a perimeter intrusion detection system, identifies the site characteristics that affect its performance, and describes improvements to perimeter intrusion detection sensors and assessment devices that have been achieved by using integrated circuit technology.

  19. Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to...

  20. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation Prostate Cancer Volume 2011, Article ID 176164, 7 pages doi:10.1155/2011/176164 Clinical Study Effect of Zoledronic Acid on Bone Mineral Density in Men with Prostate Cancer Receiving cancer is well recognized. We assessed the effects of quarterly infusion of zoledronic acid on bone

  1. Discrete Packet Analysis for Improved Atmospheric Rejection on Modulated Laser Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, M., McKenna, I., DiBenedetto, J., Capelle, G., Trainham, R.

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide-show discusses how the method of discrete packet analysis improves atmospheric compensation for quasi-CW fluorescence detection methods. This is key to improving remote sensing capabilities.

  2. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  3. Pomegranate Juice and Pomegranate Derived Natural Products as Alternative Treatment for Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prostate cancer. Cancer Treatment Reviews 36, Sternlicht,prostate cancer. Cancer Treatment Reviews 36, Steiner, H. ,prostate cancer. Cancer Treatment Reviews 36, Sureban,

  4. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  5. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapatic R. (Grafton, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  6. Integrated nuclear techniques to detect illicit materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the problem of detecting explosives in the context of an object being transported for illicit purposes. The author emphasizes that technologies developed for this particular application have payoffs in many related problem areas. The author discusses nuclear techniques which can be applied to this detection problem. These include: x-ray imaging; neutronic interrogation; inelastic neutron scattering; fieldable neutron generators. He discusses work which has been done on the applications of these technologies, including results for detection of narcotics. He also discusses efforts to integrate these techniques into complementary systems which offer improved performance.

  7. Annealing Induced Transmission Improvements and Photoluminescence Reduction of ARROW Optofluidic Chips for Improved Fluorescence Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8. Yin, D. ; Lunt, E. J. ; Rudenko, M. I. ; Deamer, D. W. ;on a chip 2007, 7, 1171–5. Rudenko, M. I. ; Kühn, S. ; Lunt,

  8. Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Fromme

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

  9. Post-diagnosis weight gain and breast cancer recurrence in women with early stage breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hunter DJ, Willett WC (1996): Nutrition and breast cancer.Cancer Causes Control 7:56- 37. Weiderpass E, Braaten T,of premenopausal breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.Biomarkers

  10. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography for the detection of early stage neoplastic pathologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiung, Pei-Lin, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of changes associated with early stage disease remains a critical objective of clinical detection and treatment. Effective screening and detection is important for improving outcome because advanced disease, ...

  11. Overlapping Community Detection by Online Cluster Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozdoba, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new online algorithm for detecting overlapping communities. The main ingredients are a modification of an online k-means algorithm and a new approach to modelling overlap in communities. An evaluation on large benchmark graphs shows that the quality of discovered communities compares favorably to several methods in the recent literature, while the running time is significantly improved.

  12. Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwig, Simone

    diseases. They grow at different rates and respond to different treatments. That is why people with cancer need treatment that is aimed at their kind of cancer. Therefore, it is important to identify the type of cancer accurately, so that the correct treatment can be started. Breast cancer is a cancer that starts

  13. Detecting buffer overflows using testcase synthesis and code instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhivich, Michael A

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis aims to improve existing approaches to dynamic buffer overflow detection by developing a system that utilizes code instrumentation and adaptive test case synthesis to find buffer ...

  14. Review of Literature for Model Assisted Probability of Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Crawford, Susan L.; Lareau, John P.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a draft technical letter report for NRC client documenting a literature review of model assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) for potential application to nuclear power plant components for improvement of field NDE performance estimations.

  15. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  16. Estimating radiogenic cancer risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

  17. Re-organisation of oesophago-gastric cancer care in England: progress and remaining challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palser, Tom R; Cromwell, David A; Hardwick, Richard H; Riley, Stuart A; Greenaway, Kimberley; Allum, William; van der Meulen, Jan HP

    2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    for Cancer Services London: Her Maj- esty's Stationary Office; 2004. 11. The Royal College of Radiologists: Good Practice Guide for Clinical Oncologists 2nd edition. London: The Royal College of Radiologists; 2003. 12. National Cancer Action Team: National... Research 2009, 9:204 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6963/9/204 their surgical inpatients and 41 (33%) did not perform any formal nutritional assessment before starting treat- ment. Discussion Since the publication of the Improving Outcomes Guid- ance [5...

  18. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Dry, B. (BE, Inc., Barnwell, SC (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Erysipelas after breast cancer treatment (26 cases)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erysipelas after breast cancer treatment. Tunis Med, 2002 ,after breast cancer treatment (26 cases) A Masmoudi 1 , Iof 5.23 years after cancer treatment (3 months to 15 years)

  20. Could You Cure Cancer? Alastair M Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Could You Cure Cancer? Alastair M Thompson Professor of Surgical Oncology, University of Dundee a.m.thompson ............................could YOU cure cancer? Some questions on cancer: #12;a.m.thompson @ dundee.ac.uk #12;

  1. Cancer Therapies: A Bane and a Boon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neogi, Sushrita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the surgical decision-making process for breast cancer.Cancer, 112(3), 489-494. 2. Grealy, Lucy (1994).Mifflin. 3. He, Lin (2011). Cancer Therapy. [PowerPoint

  2. Diet, MicroRNAs and Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deregulation in human cancer. Cell Cycle. 2008;7:2643–6. 25.genomic regions involved in cancers. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.A, Jacks T. MicroRNAs and cancer: short RNAs go a long way.

  3. Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts: Developing a New Electronic Tool Presented (CEH) Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) #12;Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative "Develop methods for linking environmental databases with childhood cancer incidence data to identify

  4. Using mammographic density to predict breast cancer risk: dense area or percent dense area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Jennifer; Ding, Jane; Warren, Ruth M L; Duffy, Stephen; Hopper, John L

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and dense area were strongly associated with breast cancer risk; however, inclusion of dense area in a PDA-adjusted model improved the pre- diction of breast cancer risk, but not vice versa. This suggests that, in terms of a single parameter, dense area... dense area alone. Conclusions: As a single parameter, dense area provides more information than PDA on breast cancer risk. Introduction A number of prospective, nested case control studies have shown that, for women of the same age, those with greater...

  5. JDF: Detecting Duplicate Bug Reports in Jazz Yoonki Song1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    JDF: Detecting Duplicate Bug Reports in Jazz Yoonki Song1 Xiaoyin Wang2,3 Tao Xie1 Lu Zhang2 and users submit bug reports to a bug repository. These reports can help reveal defects and improve software defects. However, it is challenging to manually detect all potential duplicates because of the large

  6. Mathematical Toolkit Unlocks Some Cancer Secrets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Calculations Run at NERSC Pinpoint Rare Mutants More Quickly November...

  7. Improving Fired Heater Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shriver, J. E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1982. 2, Fehervari, Willi, "Gas Measurement and Control for Pipeline Systems," The Foxboro Company. 3. Shriver, James, "CO/02 Boiler Control: Point Is Vi tal," POWER, October 1982. Set 1\\. Dukelow, Samuel, "Improving Boiler Efficiency...

  8. Recent Improvements in DDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, D.J.

    1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will report new developments and recent improvements to DDT. "Window DDT" now will remember undefined symbols and define them on a later command. Using sequence breaks, it can change the contents of memory while ...

  9. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    additive shows some improvement in flammability compared to the control electrolyte (EC:EMC (2:8)). Metal Phosphate-Coated Cathodes (PSI): Delivered 2 kg of LiMPO4-coated...

  10. Improved Dragline Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, K. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause of energy conservation can be served by increasing the efficiency of large draglines used in surface coal mining. The topic is the application of a training simulator, computer instrumentation and computer simulation to improve dragline...

  11. Managing Energy Efficiency Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almaguer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results has been the utilization of Six Sigma methodology to identify and seize opportunities to improve our performance and to better meet customer needs. Since its implementation in 1999, Six Sigma has proven to be a breakthrough process that can... take Dow to the next level of performance for all our key stakeholders. The Six Sigma methodology has been especially successful in improving energy efficiency and reducing energy costs and is the primary methodology used by technology center...

  12. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  13. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  14. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China) [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China); Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xi’an 710300 (China); Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China); Ren, Hong, E-mail: renhongs2000@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)] [Department of Chest Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710061 (China)

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. •We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. •We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. •These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  15. Cancer Mortality and Wood Dust Exposure Among Participants in the American Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    Cancer Mortality and Wood Dust Exposure Among Participants in the American Cancer Society Cancer and Paolo Boffetta, MD, MPH3 In 1994, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified wood dust as a human carcinogen, based on very strong evidence of a carcinogenic risk of sino-nasal cancer

  16. Cancer Immunol Immunother . Author manuscript Anti-HER2 vaccines: new prospects for breast cancer therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cancer Immunol Immunother . Author manuscript Page /1 18 Anti-HER2 vaccines: new prospects for breast cancer therapy Maha Zohra Ladjemi 1 , William Jacot 2 , Thierry Chard sè 1 , Andr P legriné è 1 cancer accounts for more than 400.000 new cancer cases and more than 130.000 cancer deaths in Europe

  17. Skin cancer is the most com-mon form of cancer in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skin cancer is the most com- mon form of cancer in the United States. Excessive and unprotected exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation (UV light) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Howev- er, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer! The damaging and cumulative effects

  18. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 3. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 21 3. NON-MELANOMA SKIN CANCER 3.1. SUMMARY Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC their cancer diagnosis. Table 3.1 Summary information for non-melanoma skin cancer in Ireland, 1995 number of cases for both sexes presented in the 70­79 age group. Figure 3.1 Age distribution of non-melanoma

  19. Extinction Models for Cancer Stem Cell Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehl, Mary; Zhou, Hua; Sinsheimer, Janet; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia progenitor58], breast cancer [2], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [10],

  20. Extinction Models for Cancer Stem Cell Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mary Sehl; Hua Zhou; Janet S. Sinsheimer; Kenneth L. Lange

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia progenitor58], breast cancer [2], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [10],

  1. BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 4 Basic/Translational Research Carcinogenesis and Signaling Group 5R) Signaling in Breast Cancer 6 NF-B Family of Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer 7 Transgenic Mouse

  2. Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

  3. Making a difference... A National Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Making a difference... A National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Accredited Trials Unit Contacts Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University of Birmingham Edgbaston. Funding The CRCTU receives core funding from Cancer Research UK and has successfully obtained project

  4. CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    CANCER RISKS AM I AT RISK? It is often hard to explain why one person develops cancer and another does not. There are risk factors that could increase a person's likelihood of developing cancer, however, some people may have many of these risk factors and never get cancer. When thinking about your

  5. What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know About Bone Health A Publication of The Bone and Cancer Foundation #12;Contents THIS PUBLICATION PROVIDES IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LUNG CANCER AND BONE HEALTH. HOW BONE WORKS (PAGE 2). WHAT LUNG CANCER CAN DO TO BONE (PAGE 2). TREATING BONE

  6. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  7. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  8. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  9. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C. [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)] [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  10. Optical Markers in Duodenal Mucosa Predict the Presence of Pancreatic Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    death in the United States. It has one of the worst prognoses with an overall 5-year survival rate deadly cancers and carries a dismal 5-year survival rate of given high rate of complications) method of detection. Our group has developed a collection of novel

  11. Array for detecting microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  12. Detecting Illicit Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat that weapons of mass destruction might enter the United States has led to a number of efforts for the detection and interdiction of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons at our borders. There have been multiple deployments of instrumentation to detect radiation signatures to interdict radiological material, including weapons and weapons material worldwide.

  13. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  14. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  15. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  16. Analysis of the Texas A&M impact lightning detector to determine detection efficiency and site error corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Frank Byron

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M IMProved Accuracy from Combined Technology (IMPACT) lightning detector has been analyzed for 1997 and 1998-99 to determine detection characteristics. These characteristics include stroke detection efficiency as a function of range...

  17. The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network has profiled and analyzed large numbers of human tumors to discover molecular aberrations at the DNA, RNA, protein and epigenetic levels. The resulting rich data provide a ...

  18. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  19. Diabetes and breast cancer : the women's healthy eating & living study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kirsten Diann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weight after breast cancer treatments: evidence from thestatus), breast cancer treatment history (years sinceto follow less aggressive cancer treatments 33-37 associated

  20. Carbohydrate Intake and Outcomes among Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emond, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the primary breast cancer and treatments received overallof the primary cancer and treatments received, only twoduring and after cancer treatment: a guide for informed

  1. Feeding Frenzy: Shark Cartilage as Treatment for Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saben, Jamie

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over Shark Cartilage as Cancer Treatment." Journal of thewith shark cartilage as cancer treatment and are especiallyshark cartilage as a cancer treatment, assess the public's

  2. School Response to Families with Children with Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Shelley Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coping with childhood cancer: Where do we go from here?issues in childhood cancer. School Psychology Review, 28(2),2001). Children surviving cancer: Psychosocial adjustment,

  3. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    receptor-negative breast cancer patients. J Clin Invest 120,Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Distinguishing between Basaland Nonbasal Subtypes. Clin Cancer Res 15, 2302-2310. Reis-

  4. Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cigarette smoking, and the risk of breast cancer. Cancerand breast cancer risk. JAMA Ambrosone, C.B. , Kropp, S. ,genotypes, and breast cancer risk: pooled analysis and meta-

  5. Cancer prevention for global health: a report from the ASPO International Cancer Prevention Interest Group.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braithwaite, Dejana; Boffetta, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Meyskens, Frank

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bull 14. WHO. International Agency for Research on Cancer:World Cancer Report. In Stuart BW, Kleihues P, editors.of environmental and occupational cancer. Oncogene 2004;23:

  6. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  7. Cancer survivorship research: the challenge of recruiting adult long term cancer survivors from a cooperative clinical trials group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    late effects of cancer treatments. Retrospective recruitmenteffects associated with cancer treatments. Implications foron the late effects of cancer treatment, due to the growing

  8. Fault Detection and Load Distribution for the Wind Farm Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borchehrsen, Anders B.; Larsen, Jesper A.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a fault detection system and a fault tolerant controller for a wind farm model. The wind farm model used is the one proposed as a public challenge. In the model three types of faults are introduced to a wind farm consisting of nine turbines. A fault detection system designed, by taking advantage of the fact that within a wind farm several wind turbines will be operating under all most identical conditions. The turbines are then grouped, and then turbines within each group are used to generate residuals for turbines in the group. The generated residuals are then evaluated using dynamical cumulative sum. The designed fault detection system is cable of detecting all three fault types occurring in the model. But there is room for improving the fault detection in some areas. To take advantage of the fault detection system a fault tolerant controller for the wind farm has been designed. The fault tolerant controller is a dispatch controller which is estimating the possible power at each individual turbine and then setting the reference accordingly. The fault tolerant controller has been compared to a reference controller. And the comparison shows that the fault tolerant controller performance better in all measures. The fault detection and a fault tolerant controller has been designed, and based on the simulated results the overall performance of the wind farm is improved on all measures. Thereby this is a step towards improving the overall performance of current and future wind farms.

  9. Improved solar heating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  11. Improving haul truck productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

  12. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi, E-mail: hnakagam@ncc.go.jp [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Development System, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Okamoto, Koji, E-mail: kojokamo@ncc.go.jo [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)] [Division of Cancer Differentiation, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  13. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  14. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Termination Detection of Local Computations Emmanuel Godard1 , Yves M´etivier2 and Gerard Tel3 1 is glob- ally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination

  15. Detection of counterfeit currency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1250 namometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency.

  16. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  17. Bolt failure detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bolts of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor, each bolt provided with an internal chamber filled with a specific, unique radioactive tag gas. Detection of the tag gas is indicative of a crack in an identifiable bolt.

  18. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  19. Targeted cancer therapies can modu-late host immune responses, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    -incubation of ERBB2-expressing breast cancer cell lines and purified human NK cells with trastuzumab upregulated CD-1BB) in NK cells could improve trastuzumab efficacy. In vitro studies showed that co137 on the NK cells. These activated NK cells were able to kill trastuzumab-coated ERBB2-expressing

  20. Automated pavement crack detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Ashok Madhava

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Electrical Engineering AUTOMATED PAVEMENT CRACK DETECTION A Thesis by ASHOK MADHAVA RAO Approved as to style and content by . c Norman C. Grisw d (Chair of Committ ) Nasser Kehtarnavaz (Member) g, J~, Karan Watson Robert L. Lytt (Member) Jo W.... Howze (Head of Department) December 1991 111 ABSTRACT Automated Pavement Crack Detection. (December 1991) Ashok Madhava, Rao, B. E. , Mysore University Chair of Advisory Committee: Norman. C. Griswold Due to load, environmental and structural...

  1. The effect of gender on Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gastric cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the major risk factor of gastric cancer, and as such, this bacterium ...

  2. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Sharif Burgette

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis. AnticancerBray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002.CA-Cancer J Clin. 2005;55(2):74-108. American Cancer

  3. Fiber Optic Micro-endoscopy for Detection of Bacteria in Early Stages of Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mufti, Nooman Sadat

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . have built a wide field Light Emitting Diode (LED) illumination based, 1 mm diameter fiber bundle micro-endoscope capable of sub-cellular resolution imaging (4 ?m resolution with 750 ?m field of view) for pre-cancer detection in the oral mucosa [16...

  4. Fiber Optic Micro-endoscopy for Detection of Bacteria in Early Stages of Infection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mufti, Nooman Sadat

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . have built a wide field Light Emitting Diode (LED) illumination based, 1 mm diameter fiber bundle micro-endoscope capable of sub-cellular resolution imaging (4 ?m resolution with 750 ?m field of view) for pre-cancer detection in the oral mucosa [16...

  5. Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as cancer treatment, photosensitized oxidations, and biomolecular degradation. Ground state oxygen state of an oxygen molecule is a singlet state, which can readily react with other singlet molecules

  6. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

  7. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  8. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Tkachuk, Douglas (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  9. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  10. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kased, Norbert, E-mail: Norbert.Kased@ucsf.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Binder, Devin K. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); McDermott, Michael W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nakamura, Jean L.; Huang, Kim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Berger, Mitchel S. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wara, William M.; Sneed, Penny K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The relative roles of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) vs. whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer remain undefined. In this study, we reviewed our experience with these patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 1991 and 2005 with Gamma Knife SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The actuarial survival and freedom from progression endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Between 1991 and 2005, 176 patients underwent SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The median survival time was 16.0 months for 95 newly diagnosed patients and 11.7 months for 81 patients with recurrent brain metastases. In the newly diagnosed patients, omission of upfront WBRT did not significantly affect the MST (p = .20), brain freedom from progression (p = .75), or freedom from new brain metastases (p = .83). Longer survival was associated with age <50 years, Karnofsky performance score >=70, primary tumor control, estrogen receptor positivity, and Her2/neu overexpression. No association was found between the number of treated brain metastases and the survival time. Conclusion: We have described prognostic factors for breast cancer patients treated with SRS for newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases. Most patient subsets had a median survival time of >=11 months. Unexpectedly, upfront WBRT did not appear to improve brain freedom from progression, and a larger number of brain metastases was not associated with a shorter survival time. Breast cancer might be distinct from other primary sites in terms of prognostic factors and the roles of WBRT and SRS for brain metastases.

  11. Improved cycling cryopump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

  12. Improved Dark Energy Constraints

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in graphene byI _Improved Dark

  13. Clinical Cancer Care Full screening services and diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Clinical Cancer Care · Full screening services and diagnostics · Advanced treatments for all forms of cancer · Most frequent cancers at the Cancer Center: Breast 15% Gastrointestinal 13% Skin 17% Lung 13 treatment protocols that link the latest Cancer Center research to clinical care · Familial Cancer Program

  14. Occupancy Based Fault Detection on Building Level - a Feasibility Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuip, B.; Houten, M.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -going commissioning and fault detection and diagnostics (FDD) has been performed to improve the current situation of building problems by comparing measured building performance with design predictions [Portland 2003]. For fault detection, different methods... conference on building commissioning, Portland Energy Conservation. Portland. 2003. Methods for automated and continuous commissioning of building systems. US department of commerce, Portland energy conservation inc. Schijndel, A.W.M. van, 2008...

  15. STAT3 signaling pathway is necessary for cell survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +} stem cell-like human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Li, E-mail: lin.796@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States) [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Fuchs, James; Li, Chenglong [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olson, Veronica [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)] [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States); Bekaii-Saab, Tanios [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lin, Jiayuh, E-mail: lin.674@osu.edu [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)] [Center for Childhood Cancer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43205 (United States)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 inhibits P-STAT3 and STAT3 target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of STAT3 resulted in decreased cell viability and reduced numbers of tumorspheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer STAT3 is required for survival and tumorsphere forming capacity in colon cancer stem-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a novel treatment approach for colon cancer. -- Abstract: Persistent activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in colon cancer. Increasing evidence suggests the existence of a small population of colon cancer stem or cancer-initiating cells may be responsible for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Whether STAT3 plays a role in colon cancer-initiating cells and the effect of STAT3 inhibition is still unknown. Flow cytometry was used to isolate colon cancer stem-like cells from three independent human colon cancer cell lines characterized by both aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and CD133-positive subpopulation (ALDH{sup +}/CD133{sup +}). The effects of STAT3 inhibition in colon cancer stem-like cells were examined. The phosphorylated or activated form of STAT3 was expressed in colon cancer stem-like cells and was reduced by a STAT3-selective small molecular inhibitor, FLLL32. FLLL32 also inhibited the expression of potential STAT3 downstream target genes in colon cancer stem-like cells including survivin, Bcl-XL, as well as Notch-1, -3, and -4, which may be involved in stem cell function. Furthermore, FLLL32 inhibited cell viability and tumorsphere formation as well as induced cleaved caspase-3 in colon cancer stem-like cells. FLLL32 is more potent than curcumin as evidenced with lower IC50 in colon cancer stem-like cells. In summary, our results indicate that STAT3 is a novel therapeutic target in colon cancer stem-like cells and inhibition of STAT3 in cancer stem-like cells may offer a potential treatment for colorectal cancer.

  16. Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

  17. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. Author manuscript Diet, cancer, and the lipidome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. Author manuscript Page /1 8 Diet, cancer, and the lipidome Bougnoux Philippe 1 * , Giraudeau Bruno 2 , Couet Charles 1 Nutrition, Croissance et Cancer1 INSERM : E211 with the development of breast cancer by delaying its occurrence makes identification of defined molecules a mandatory

  18. Seminars in Cancer Biology 15 (2005) 484493 Dynamics of colorectal cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Seminars in Cancer Biology 15 (2005) 484­493 Review Dynamics of colorectal cancer Franziska Michora Abstract Colorectal cancer results from an accumulation of mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. An additional defining characteristic of colorectal cancer is its genetic instability. Two main

  19. NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE The National Cancer Institute is accepting applications for its Fall 2011 HCIP class.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE The National Cancer Institute is accepting applications for its Fall 2011 by March 1st. Apply online! See website for further details. http://hcip.nci.nih.gov The National Cancer (NIH), is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI

  20. Mabs against Pancreatic cancer Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 1 Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer pancreatic cancer inserm-00497886,version1-6Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "TheScientificWorldJournal (electronic resource) 2010;10:1107-20" DOI : 10.1100/tsw.2010.103 #12;Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 2

  1. Do cancer cells undergo phenotypic switching? The case for imperfect cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    Do cancer cells undergo phenotypic switching? The case for imperfect cancer stem cell markers Celoria 26, 20133 Milano, Italy. The identification of cancer stem cells in vivo and in vitro relies on specific surface markers that should allow to sort cancer cells in phenotypically distinct subpopulations

  2. Clinical Imaging and Intervention in Cancer: Imaging and Cryotherapy in Renal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Clinical Imaging and Intervention in Cancer: Imaging and Cryotherapy in Renal Cancer Graeme Houston Fluoroscopy 2 #12;Treatments for Cancer Palliative ­ Relief of obstruction ­ Reduce Bleeding ­ Pain Control ­ Avoid complications Disease Modifying 4 #12;Disease Modifying Cancer Treatment In Situ Ablation

  3. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alex C [ORNL; Hitt, Austin N [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  4. 3D-FFT for Signature Detection in LWIR Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvick, Patricia A.; Lind, Michael A.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Nuffer, Lisa L.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in analysis detection exploitation are possible by applying whitened matched filtering within the Fourier domain to hyperspectral data cubes. We describe an implementation of a Three Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform Whitened Matched Filter (3DFFTMF) approach and, using several example sets of Long Wave Infra Red (LWIR) data cubes, compare the results with those from standard Whitened Matched Filter (WMF) techniques. Since the variability in shape of gaseous plumes precludes the use of spatial conformation in the matched filtering, the 3DFFTMF results were similar to those of two other WMF methods. Including a spatial low-pass filter within the Fourier space can improve signal to noise ratios and therefore improve detection limit by facilitating the mitigation of high frequency clutter. The improvement only occurs if the low-pass filter diameter is smaller than the plume diameter.

  5. Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

  6. Hypoxia activated cell signaling receptors in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Robin D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cancer cells MCF-7 and MDA- MB-231. Biomed. Pharmacother.and prevents apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. J.Gaithersburg, MD). Cell Culture MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-435, ZR-

  7. Lgr4 in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) comprise a huge family protein with almost 800 members. GPCRs sense molecules or other stimuli outside the cell, and activate intracellular...

  8. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  9. Cancer Vulnerabilities Unveiled by Genomic Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijhawan, Deepak

    Due to genome instability, most cancers exhibit loss of regions containing tumor suppressor genes and collateral loss of other genes. To identify cancer-specific vulnerabilities that are the result of copy number losses, ...

  10. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boukheris, Houda [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gilbert, Ethel S. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Stratton, Kayla L. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)] [Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hammond, Sue [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mertens, Ann C. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L. [Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Inskip, Peter D., E-mail: inskippe@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  11. Bursts detected and NOT detected by EGRET imaging spark chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, Brenda L. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Catelli, Jennifer R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop-Grummann, MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    EGRET has detected the highest energy emission from gamma-ray bursts. Only a few bursts have been detected either coincident or just following the BATSE detected emission. These bursts are among the brightest bursts detected by BATSE. The EGRET fluxes, including upper limits, are consistent with extrapolations for all the burst spectra measured with Comptel.

  12. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  13. Error detection method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  14. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  15. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  16. Detection of solar events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  17. Detection of neutrinos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  18. Systems Modeling for Prognostic Cancer Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    goal of this research is the development of personalized treatments in cancer, based on the genomic and treatment. A major challenge in contemporary cancer diagnosis and treatment is the development Systems Modeling for Prognostic Cancer Biology Xuefei Wang1 , BaiLian Li2 , Cheryl L. Willman

  19. Cancer Epidemiology Population Health Sciences 750

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -01/5/11-1 Cancer Epidemiology Population Health Sciences 750 3 credits When: Spring 2011 (1 Audience: This course is intended for students in health-related disciplines interested in cancer etiology. the unequal burden of cancer among populations and variations across time and geography, 2. the distinctive

  20. Eligibility: Cancer Survivor ages 35-75

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    Eligibility: · Cancer Survivor ages 35-75 · Patient has completed treatment within last two years for non-metastic solid tumor · Patient's cancer is currently considered stable or in remission · At least. Please contact Missy Buchanan 415-353-7019 for more information. Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer

  1. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Brower; Michael Cheng; George T. Fleming

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  2. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  3. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

  4. Upper extremity impairments in women with or without lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following breast cancer treatment Betty Smoot & Josephinefollowing breast cancer treatment, women will demonstratelymphedema. Breast cancer treatments include surgery,

  5. European Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol.8, 1999, Corpet & Gerber, Energy balance and cancer 77 European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1999, 8, 77-89 Author's version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    European Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol.8, 1999, Corpet & Gerber, Energy balance and cancer 77 European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1999, 8, 77-89 Author's version REVIEW Energy balance and cancers M overweight, have been recognized as risk factors for the development of cancers. Human epidemiological

  6. Liquid detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  7. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capabilities. Staff at PNNL are developing effective integrated systems for explosives detection, addressing, fundamental science and health. Battelle, based in Columbus, Ohio, has operated PNNL since 1965. PNNL's long. PNNL is located in Richland, Washington. Additional web resources are at: http

  8. Detection of counterfeit currency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, D.A.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1,250 nanometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency. 18 figs.

  9. Face Detection Raghuraman Gopalan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    -based Feature invariants Template-based Appearance learning Yang et al., "Face detection survey article", PAMI;Template Matching · Store a template ­ Predefined: edges or regions · Deformable: facial contours (e.g., Snakes) · Hand-coded templates (not learned) · Use correlation to locate faces 6 #12;Appearance

  10. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  11. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Agnew, Stephen F. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, William H. (Buena Park, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  13. Provider Communication, Self-Reported Health, and Post-Treatment Regret among Young Breast Cancer Survivors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes-Taylor, Sara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. A. (2004). Breast cancer treatment in older women: impactduring and after cancer treatment: an American Cancerlife following prostate cancer treatment. Cancer Invest, 25(

  14. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complaints after breast cancer treatments: examining the2012). Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 135 Wefel, J.STUDIES OF CANCER AND CANCER TREATMENT Assessment of the

  15. Colorectal Cancer Video for the Deaf Community: A Randomized Control Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabaik, Salma; LaHousse, Sheila F.; Branz, Patricia; Gandhi, Visha; Khan, Amir M.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cantly more colorectal cancer knowledge than the controlthe Deaf community about colorectal cancer. KeywordsASL . Cancer prevention . Colorectal cancer . Deaf .

  16. OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS. Considerable efforts have also been made to develop telescopes which detect VHE extensive air showers (EAS

  17. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4) using combinations of high and low molecular weight (Mw) polymers, (5) using secondary crosslinking reactions, (6) injecting un-hydrated polymer particles, and (7) incorporating particulates. All of these methods showed promise in some aspects, but required performance improvements in other aspects. All materials investigated to date showed significant performance variations with fracture width. High pressure gradients and limited distance of penetration are common problems in tight fractures. Gravity segregation and low resistance to breaching are common problems in wide fractures. These will be key issues to address in future work. Although gels can exhibit disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures, the levels of permeability reduction for oil flow are too high to allow practical exploitation in most circumstances. In contrast, disproportionate permeability reduction provided by gels that form in porous rock (adjacent to the fractures) has considerable potential in fractured systems.

  18. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  19. Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    creating an image. · A newer process, called full field digital mammography uses digital receptors. #12Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital Bremsstrahlung, a process in which electrons are accelerated against an anode, causing photons to be fired off

  20. DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/5 DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon INERIS (*) De nombreuses questions se posent sur la toxicité des émissions des moteurs diesel. C'est un sujet qui a beaucoup préoccupé les scientifiques ces EMISSIONS DU DIESEL. Avant d'aborder la toxicité des émissions du diesel, un rappel de leur composition est

  1. Cancer Cell Targeting Androgen Receptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    in the development of endo- crine therapies targeting estrogen production or ER for both breast cancer treatment targeting of AR, Wnt or HER2 signaling impairs androgen-stimulated tumor cell growth suggesting potential. Therapies targeting HER2 such as trastuzumab are becoming increasingly important in the treatment of HER2

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Conradi, Lena [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sprenger, Thilo [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Middel, Peter [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rau, Tillman [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin [Department of Radiotherapy, Lübeck University (Germany); Kitz, Julia [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Rüschoff, Josef [Targos Molecular Pathology, Kassel (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [Department of Medical Statistics, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Tumor Biology Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg (Germany); Ghadimi, B. Michael [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Liersch, Torsten [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not translate to poor survival in our clinical trial.

  3. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  4. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  5. Protein detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fruetel, Julie A. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); McIlroy, Andrew (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  6. Method for detecting biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode

  7. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  8. Detection of pump degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, R.H.; Casada, D.A.; Ayers, C.W. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II Nuclear Plant Aging Research study examines the methods of detecting pump degradation that are currently employed in domestic and overseas nuclear facilities. This report evaluates the criteria mandated by required pump testing at U.S. nuclear power plants and compares them to those features characteristic of state-of-the-art diagnostic programs and practices currently implemented by other major industries. Since the working condition of the pump driver is crucial to pump operability, a brief review of new applications of motor diagnostics is provided that highlights recent developments in this technology. The routine collection and analysis of spectral data is superior to all other technologies in its ability to accurately detect numerous types and causes of pump degradation. Existing ASME Code testing criteria do not require the evaluation of pump vibration spectra but instead overall vibration amplitude. The mechanical information discernible from vibration amplitude analysis is limited, and several cases of pump failure were not detected in their early stages by vibration monitoring. Since spectral analysis can provide a wealth of pertinent information concerning the mechanical condition of rotating machinery, its incorporation into ASME testing criteria could merit a relaxation in the monthly-to-quarterly testing schedules that seek to verify and assure pump operability. Pump drivers are not included in the current battery of testing. Operational problems thought to be caused by pump degradation were found to be the result of motor degradation. Recent advances in nonintrusive monitoring techniques have made motor diagnostics a viable technology for assessing motor operability. Motor current/power analysis can detect rotor bar degradation and ascertain ranges of hydraulically unstable operation for a particular pump and motor set. The concept of using motor current or power fluctuations as an indicator of pump hydraulic load stability is presented.

  9. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  10. Biomolecular detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode.

  11. Blood vessel detection in retinal images and its application in diabetic retinopathy screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    transform (RCT) algorithm, which converts the intensity information in spatial domain to a high dimensional radial contrast domain. Different feature descriptors are designed to improve the speed, sensitivity, and expandability of the vessel detection system...

  12. Fast Detection and Mitigation of Cascading Outages in the Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Chengzong

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the causes and mechanism of power system cascading outages and proposes the improved interactive scheme between system-wide and local levels of monitoring and control to quickly detect, classify and mitigate the cascading...

  13. Using Friends as Sensors to Detect Global-Scale Contagious Outbreaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Herranz, Manuel

    Recent research has focused on the monitoring of global–scale online data for improved detection of epidemics, mood patterns, movements in the stock market political revolutions, box-office revenues, consumer behaviour and ...

  14. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

  15. Remote detection of fissile material : Cherenkov counters for gamma detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Anna S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for large-size detectors for long-range active interrogation (Al) detection has generated interest in water-based detector technologies. AI is done using external radiation sources to induce fission and to detect, ...

  16. The Highest Energy Emission Detected by EGRET from Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingus, B L; Dingus, Brenda L.; Bertsch, David L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published EGRET spectra from blazars extend only to 10 GeV, yet EGRET has detected approximately 2000 gamma-rays above 10 GeV of which about half are at high Galactic latitude. We report a search of these high-energy gamma-rays for associations with the EGRET and TeV detected blazars. Because the point spread function of EGRET improves with energy, only ~2 gamma-rays are expected to be positionally coincident with the 80 blazars searched, yet 23 gamma-rays were observed. This collection of > 10 GeV sources should be of particular interest due to the improved sensitivity and lower energy thresholds of ground-based TeV observatories. One of the blazars, RGB0509+056, has the highest energy gamma-rays detected by EGRET from any blazar with 2 > 40 GeV, and is a BL Lac type blazar with unknown redshift.

  17. The Highest Energy Emission Detected by EGRET from Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenda L. Dingus; David L. Bertsch

    2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Published EGRET spectra from blazars extend only to 10 GeV, yet EGRET has detected approximately 2000 gamma-rays above 10 GeV of which about half are at high Galactic latitude. We report a search of these high-energy gamma-rays for associations with the EGRET and TeV detected blazars. Because the point spread function of EGRET improves with energy, only ~2 gamma-rays are expected to be positionally coincident with the 80 blazars searched, yet 23 gamma-rays were observed. This collection of > 10 GeV sources should be of particular interest due to the improved sensitivity and lower energy thresholds of ground-based TeV observatories. One of the blazars, RGB0509+056, has the highest energy gamma-rays detected by EGRET from any blazar with 2 > 40 GeV, and is a BL Lac type blazar with unknown redshift.

  18. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana [Radiotherapy Department, The Royal Marsden, Sutton/London (United Kingdom); Chau, Ian [Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden, Sutton/London (United Kingdom); Brown, Gina, E-mail: gina.brown@rmh.nhs.uk [Academic Radiology Department, The Royal Marsden, Sutton/London (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ?5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ?5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI predictive factors could be taken into account in the pursuit of individualized neoadjuvant treatments for patients with rectal cancer.

  19. Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report A report of cancer incidence, mortality AT and Comber H. Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report. Northern Ireland Cancer Registry/National Cancer Registry, Ireland; 2009 #12;#12;NICR/NCRI Contents...i Contents Contents

  20. PrincetonUniversity In-Vitro Studies of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    PrincetonUniversity In-Vitro Studies of Cancer Cell Death Due to Hyperthermia C. Barkey1, RUniversity Cancer: Facts and Figures World Wide 10.1 million newly diagnoses/year with ~10% increase 6.2 million deaths are attributed to cancer and its complication each year American Cancer Society 2007 and Le Cancer

  1. High Throughput Analysis of Breast Cancer Specimens on the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer accounts for about 30% of all cancers and 15% of all cancer deaths in women in the United States in the United States. Women living in North America have the highest rate of breast cancer in the world [1]. In spite of the increase in the incidence of the disease, the death rates of breast cancer continue

  2. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  3. Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  4. Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Improving Solar Cell Efficiency October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share The two-dimensional grazing...

  5. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  6. Genome Wide Proteomics of ERBB2 and EGFR and Other Oncogenic Pathways in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    three breast cancer cell lines (SKBR3, SUM149 and SUM190) with different onco- gene expression levels million mapped reads (RPKM) values for ERBB2 (14.4, 400, and 300 for SUM149, SUM190, and SKBR3, respectively) and for EGFR (60.1, not detected, and 1.4 for the same 3 cell lines). We then used RNA-Seq data

  7. Cancer Research UK eGMS Applicant Guide Cancer Research UK (eGMS) applicant guide June 2012 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cancer Research UK eGMS Applicant Guide Cancer Research UK (eGMS) applicant guide June 2012 Page 1 2012 INTERNAL USER GUIDE A Guide to the Cancer Research UK electronic Grants Management System (e://egms.cancerresearchuk.org #12;Cancer Research UK eGMS Applicant Guide Cancer Research UK (eGMS) applicant guide June 2012 Page 2

  8. Flaw detection and evaluation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilks, Robert S. (Plum, PA); Sturges, Jr., Robert H. (Plum, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of and apparatus for optically inspecting nuclear fuel pellets for surface flaws. The inspection system includes a prism and lens arrangement for scanning the surface of each pellet as the same is rotated. The resulting scan produces data indicative of the extent and shape of each flaw which is employed to generate a flaw quality index for each detected flaw. The flaw quality indexes from all flaws are summed and compared with an acceptable surface quality index. The result of the comparison is utilized to control the acceptance or rejection of the pellet.

  9. Opaque cloud detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  10. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  11. Electrical leakage detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wild, Arthur

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for detecting electrical leakage between a power supply and a frame of a vehicle or machine. The disclosed method includes coupling a first capacitor between a frame and a first terminal of a power supply for a predetermined period of time. The current flowing between the frame and the first capacitor is limited to a predetermined current limit. It is determined whether the voltage across the first capacitor exceeds a threshold voltage. A first output signal is provided when the voltage across the capacitor exceeds the threshold voltage.

  12. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Original Paper Skin Self-Examination Education for Early Detection of Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Original Paper Skin Self-Examination Education for Early Detection of Melanoma: A Randomized Background: Early detection of melanoma improves survival. Since many melanoma patients and their spouses seek the care of a physician after discovering their melanoma, an ongoing study will determine

  14. A Mobility and Energy-aware Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System for Mobile ad hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    A Mobility and Energy-aware Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System for Mobile ad hoc Networks consumption. The proposed architecture adopts and enhances the Mobility and Energy Aware Clustering Algorithm and energy of nodes in the cluster formation in order to improve detection accuracy and re- duce energy

  15. Medical Physics Letter Digital tomosynthesis of the chest for lung nodule detection: Interim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medical Physics Letter Digital tomosynthesis of the chest for lung nodule detection: Interim tomosynthesis for improving detectability of small lung nodules. Twenty-one patients under- going computed tomography CT to follow up lung nodules were consented and enrolled to receive an additional digital PA chest

  16. Double-strand DNA-templated formation of copper nanoparticles as fluorescent probe for label free nuclease enzyme detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    cleavage activity. Thus, a label-free strategy for sensitive detection of nuclease has been developed B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction As promising substitutes for organic dyes and quantum dots epithelial cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) using fluorescent gold nanoparticles which emitted a stable

  17. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joe Gray

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  18. DCA for Bot Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hammadi, Yousof; Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ensuring the security of computers is a non-trivial task, with many techniques used by malicious users to compromise these systems. In recent years a new threat has emerged in the form of networks of hijacked zombie machines used to perform complex distributed attacks such as denial of service and to obtain sensitive data such as password information. These zombie machines are said to be infected with a 'bot' - a malicious piece of software which is installed on a host machine and is controlled by a remote attacker, termed the 'botmaster of a botnet'. In this work, we use the biologically inspired Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) to detect the existence of a single bot on a compromised host machine. The DCA is an immune-inspired algorithm based on an abstract model of the behaviour of the dendritic cells of the human body. The basis of anomaly detection performed by the DCA is facilitated using the correlation of behavioural attributes such as keylogging and packet flooding behaviour. The results of the applica...

  19. age gastric cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tumour marker in patients with gastric cancer. unknown authors 2 The effect of gender on Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer MIT - DSpace Summary: Gastric cancer is the 2nd...

  20. advanced gastric cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tumour marker in patients with gastric cancer. unknown authors 2 The effect of gender on Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer MIT - DSpace Summary: Gastric cancer is the 2nd...

  1. aggressive gastric cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tumour marker in patients with gastric cancer. unknown authors 2 The effect of gender on Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer MIT - DSpace Summary: Gastric cancer is the 2nd...

  2. The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Scott Lambert

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of male cancer deaths in the United States. However, the full range of prostate cancer genomic alterations is incompletely characterized. Here we present the complete sequence ...

  3. Perspectives on the mesenchymal origin of metastatic cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of metastasis. Nature Reviews Cancer, 9(4), 239–252. 12.M. , & Kovarik, J. (1987). Is cancer a macrophage- mediatedof secondary growths in cancer of the breast. Lancet, 1,

  4. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jiangwei

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a polyclonal detector antibody. The capture antibody was covalently immobilized on modified glass slides. The detector antibody was conjugated with AF532 labeled secondary antibody prior to being used as probe for the antigen. Imaging was performed with a TIRF system. This technique is demonstrated for detecting HIV-1 p24 antigen down to 0.1 pg/mL with a dynamic range of over 4 orders of magnitude. A Langmuir isotherm fit the molecule count dependence on the target concentration. The results also showed that neither sensitivity nor dynamic range was affected by the biological matrix. SMISA is therefore a promising approach for the early diagnosis of virus-induced diseases. Single-molecule enzymatic kinetics and enantioselectivity were monitored in real time by using TIRF microscopy. AF532 labeled poly-L-lysine (PLL) or poly-D-lysine (PDL) was covalently immobilized on a dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) self-assembled monolayer (DSU SAM). Chain shortening due to enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in the reduction of the individual fluorescence intensities. A broad distribution was obtained when 100 single-molecule half-lives were analyzed. However, the detailed hydrolysis process involved also a long-lived component and an induction period that varied significantly among molecules. Charge and steric heterogeneity at the surface are responsible for these features.

  5. Modern mathematics for modern cancer medicine ACC Coolen, July 2013 Modern Mathematics for Modern Cancer Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    by developing advanced quantitative techniques, and applying them to cancer data analysis, outcome and treatment individual treatment response, and low success rates of medical trials. To extend and save lives of cancer of good or poor cancer outcomes, of response to specific treatments, or of metastasis sites. Unfortunately

  6. Nutrition and Cancer 1998, 32 (3) 165 NUTRITION AND CANCER 1998, 32 (3),165-173.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    or processed meat is associated with increased risk of colon cancer. In contrast, consumption of white meat supplied by 1) lard and casein, 2) olive oil and casein, 3) beef, 4) chicken with skin, and 5) bacon. Meat, France. Introduction Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer

  7. Prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in men in the United States, with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in men in the United States, with an estimated of death from cancer in men, with 33,720 estimated deaths (11% of all estimated deaths) in 2011 (REF. 1-year relative survival rate is essentially 100% based on 2001­2007 statistics2 . However, for patients

  8. Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Page /1 11 Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer screening among women participating in the French E3N cohort study Flamant Camille , Gauthier Estelle , Clavel-Chapelon Fran oiseç * E3N, Nutrition, hormones et cancer: pid miologie et pr

  9. J. Clairambault Theorems to treat cancer? Can theorems help treat cancer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J. Clairambault Theorems to treat cancer? Can theorems help treat cancer? Jean Clairambault 1 INRIA who treat patients with can- cer? Can mathematics have an impact on cancer biology? Is mathematics more than just a tool in the hands of [a few open-minded] physicians willing to understand and treat

  10. Remote NMR/MRI detection of laser polarized gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Saxena, Sunil; Moule, Adam; Spence, Megan; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Granwehr, Josef

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for remote NMR/MRI spectroscopy having an encoding coil with a sample chamber, a supply of signal carriers, preferably hyperpolarized xenon and a detector allowing the spatial and temporal separation of signal preparation and signal detection steps. This separation allows the physical conditions and methods of the encoding and detection steps to be optimized independently. The encoding of the carrier molecules may take place in a high or a low magnetic field and conventional NMR pulse sequences can be split between encoding and detection steps. In one embodiment, the detector is a high magnetic field NMR apparatus. In another embodiment, the detector is a superconducting quantum interference device. A further embodiment uses optical detection of Rb--Xe spin exchange. Another embodiment uses an optical magnetometer using non-linear Faraday rotation. Concentration of the signal carriers in the detector can greatly improve the signal to noise ratio.

  11. Radium-223: From Radiochemical Development to Clinical Applications in Targeted Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruland, Oyvind S.; Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiochemical properties of radium-223 (223Ra, T1/2 = 11.4 d) render this alpha-emitting radionuclide promising for targeted cancer therapy. Together with its short-lived daughters, each 223Ra decay produces four alpha-particle emissions—which enhance therapy effectiveness at the cellular level. In this paper, we review the recently published data reported for pre-clinical and clinical use of 223Ra in cancer treatment. We have evaluated two distinct chemical forms of 223Ra in vivo: 1) cationic 223Ra as dissolved RaCl2, and 2) liposome-encapsulated 223Ra. Cationic 223Ra seeks metabolically active osteoblastic bone and tumor lesions with high uptake and strong binding affinity based on its similarities to calcium. Based on these properties, we have advanced the clinical use of 223Ra for treating bone metastases from late-stage breast and prostate cancer. The results show impressive anti-tumor activity and improved overall survival in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. In other studies, we have evaluated the biodistribution and tumor uptake of liposomally encapsulated 223Ra in mice with human osteosarcoma xenografts, and in dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma and associated soft tissue metastases. Results indicate excellent biodistributions in both species. In dogs, we found considerable uptake of liposomal 223Ra in cancer metastases in multiple organs, resulting in favorable tumor-to-normal soft tissue ratios. Collectively, these findings show an outstanding potential for 223Ra as a therapeutic agent.

  12. Cutaneous cancers in Calabar, Southern Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asuquo, Maurice E; Ebughe, Godwin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer in Zaria, Nigeria. Trop Doct 1995; 25(Suppl. ):Malignancies in Kano, Northern Nigeria: A histopathologicalequatorial rain forest of Nigeria. International Journal of

  13. Airport testing an explosives detection portal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhykerd, C.; Linker, K.; Hannum, D.; Bouchier, F.; Parmeter, J.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the direction of the US Congress, following the Pan Am 103 and TWA 800 crashes, the Federal Aviation Administration funded development of non-invasive techniques to screen airline passengers for explosives. Such an explosives detection portal, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was field tested at the Albuquerque International airport in September 1997. During the 2-week field trial, 2,400 passengers were screened and 500 surveyed. Throughput, reliability, maintenance and sensitivity were studied. Follow-up testing at Sandia and at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was conducted. A passenger stands in the portal for five seconds while overhead fans blow air over his body. Any explosive vapors or dislodged particles are collected in vents at the feet. Explosives are removed from the air in a preconcentrator and subsequently directed into an ion mobility spectrometer for detection. Throughput measured 300 passengers per hour. The non-invasive portal can detect subfingerprint levels of explosives residue on clothing. A survey of 500 passengers showed a 97% approval rating, with 99% stating that such portals, if effective, should be installed in airports to improve security. Results of the airport test, as well as operational issues, are discussed.

  14. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

  15. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

  16. Cancer survivorship research: the challenge of recruiting adult long term cancer survivors from a cooperative clinical trials group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quality of life among long-term survivors of breast cancer.Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1996;39(3):261–73. doi:B, Bower JE. Breast Cancer in Younger Women: Reproductive

  17. This issue of the Stanford Cancer Institute Clinical Research Newsletter is focused on our multi-disciplinary Women's Cancer and Urologic Cancer Programs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    's cancer. In addition to cancer treatment, supportive services--including social services, psychological of the triple negative breast cancer. The Stanford Gynecologic Oncology Program offers treatments and clinical Group (COGi), a national cooperative research group for innovative treatments in ovarian cancer

  18. advanced colon cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from multiple specialties work together under Engineering Websites Summary: BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under...

  19. Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

  20. Sensitive Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal Amplification Strategy of Graphene Sheets and Multi-Enzyme Sensitive Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal...

  1. Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy Technology available for licensing: A successful and cost-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive...

  2. DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm...

  3. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterization of human colon and rectal cancer. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer. Abstract: We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors...

  4. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  5. Blood Peptidome-Degradome Profile of Breast Cancer. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blood Peptidome-Degradome Profile of Breast Cancer. Blood Peptidome-Degradome Profile of Breast Cancer. Abstract: We report on the degradomic-peptidomic insights into blood plasma...

  6. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers. Abstract: The stark difference in clinical outcome...

  7. advanced bladder cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer Mortality Kenneth G. Brown; Barbara D. Beck; Claudia Hopenhayn-Rich; Mary Lou Biggs; Allan H. Smith Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Arsenic and Bladder Cancer...

  8. adult cancer patients: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer Center's Adult Patient & Family Advisory Council Page 1 of 3 and compassionate health care provided by Dana-FarberBrigham and Women's Cancer Center. Working in active...

  9. Detection of gas leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven (Peralta, NM); Brown, Jason (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  10. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  11. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  12. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Albany, CA); Nihei, Kurt T. (Oakland, CA); Myer, Larry R. (Benicia, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  13. Drug-drug similarity networks for anti-cancer drug discovery Case studies on Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer and Leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Drug-drug similarity networks for anti-cancer drug discovery ­ Case studies on Breast Cancer the decades, the medical industry has been challenged with the issue of producing drugs that would avoid sidetracking to other targets (off-targets) and keep away from harmful side effects (drug adverse reactions

  14. Early Growth Response 3 (Egr3) Is Highly Over-Expressed in Non-Relapsing Prostate Cancer but Not in Relapsing Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pio, Rebecca; Jia, Zhenyu; Baron, Veronique T; Mercola, Dan; Agoulnik, Irina U

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    company developing prostate cancer related tests. Dr. Barontherapy for prostate cancer. There are no marketed productsand prognosis of prostate cancer. September 2011: US

  15. Understanding and Improving Software Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    Understanding and Improving Software Productivity Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research;2 Introduction · What affects software productivity? ­ Software productivity has been one of the most studied aspects of software engineering ­ Goal: review sample of empirical studies of software productivity

  16. Hamilton County- Home Improvement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hamilton County, Ohio, Home Improvement Program (HIP) was originally initiated in 2002, and then reinstated in May 2008. The HIP loan allows homeowners in Hamilton County communities to borrow...

  17. SUPERCONDUCTING NON-SCALING FFAG GANTRY FOR CARBON-PROTON CANCER THERAPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on improvements in the non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) gantry design. As we previously reported, a major challenge of the carbodproton cancer therapy facilities is isocentric gantry design. The weight of the isocentric gantry transport elements in the latest Heidelberg carbon/proton facility is 135 tons. In this report we detail improvements to the previous non-scaling gantry design. We estimate that this non-scaling FFAG gantry would be almost hundred times lighter than traditional heavy ion gantries. Very strong focusing with small dispersion permits passage of different energies of carbon beams through the gantry's fixed magnetic field.

  18. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Booth, Christopher M. [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: william.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  19. Diet and Cancer Are Cooked Meats Involved

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diet has been associated with differences in cancer rates in human populations for many years. Mark Knize presents the latest research on cancer causes including work performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory investigating some interesting chemical products created when meat is cooked and how to reduce them. Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 11542

  20. EDITORIAL Open Access Toward integrative cancer immunotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    alterations of normal host cells. Accordingly, the aim of most traditional cancer therapies has been to destroy the transformed cells themselves. There is now widespread appreciation that the progressive growth and metastatic spread of cancer cells requires the cooperation of normal host cells (endothelial cells

  1. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  2. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  3. Real-time system for imaging and object detection with a multistatic GPR array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N Reginald; Bond, Steven W; Top, Philip L; Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Donetti, John G; Mason, Blake C; Jones, Steven M

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  4. Chromosome-Specific Staining To Detect Genetic Rearrangements Associated With Chromosome 3 And/Or Chromosone 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray; Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel; Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Kallioniemi; Olli-Pekka (Tampere, FI); Kallioniemi; Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto; Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  6. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Lafayette, CA); Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka (Turku, FI); Kallioniemi, Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  7. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka (Tampere, FI); Kallioniemi, Anne (Tampere, FI); Sakamoto, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  8. Chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticles for use in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munaweera, Imalka; Balkus, Kenneth J. Jr., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy have been widely reported. Engineering of vehicles for the simultaneous delivery of chemo- and radiotherapeutics increases the effectiveness of the therapy and reduces the dosage of each individual drug required to produce an observable therapeutic response. We here developed a novel chemoradiotherapeutic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid coated/uncoated platinum drug loaded, holmium-containing, wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticle. The materials were characterized with TEM, FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR, energy dispersive x-ray, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and zeta potential measurements. In vitro platinum drug release from both lipid coated and uncoated chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica are reported. Various kinetic models were used to analyze the release kinetics. The radioactivity of the chemoradiotherapeutic nanocarriers was measured after neutron-activation.

  9. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  10. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  11. Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA adduct formation and breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Russell, Marion L.; Muller, A.P.; Caleffi, M.; Eschiletti, J.; Graudenz, M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Incipient fire detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Jr., William K. (Newport News, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  14. The use of complementary and alternative medicine among breast cancer survivors : the women's healthy eating and living study perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saquib, Juliann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disparities in breast cancer treatment. J Clin Oncol 2007;based trends in cancer treatment. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005;use systemic cancer treatments across tumor characteristics

  15. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  16. The Purdue University Center for Cancer Research is continually exploring new methods of treating cancer, techniques to detect cancer and preventative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Alexander

    . Brown Mr. Donald L. Dunaway Mrs. Joyce Pahl Foley and Mr. Roger Neil Foley Mrs. Sharron S. Hillabrand. Davisson Mr. Ken C. Decker and Mrs. Kitty Decker Mr. James S. DeHaven and Mrs. Ann DeHaven Ms. Marcia L. Flynn Mrs. Sally M. Friend and Mr. James R. Friend Mrs. Bernice Heath Geiselman and Dr. Doyle Geiselman

  17. Contacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    treatments and biomarkers for cancer. The CRCTU also collaborate with a large number of academic scientificContacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University://www.birmingham.ac.uk/crctu Making a difference... A National Cancer Research Institute Accredited Trials Unit Linked Groups

  18. Contacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    scientists in the development of new treatments and biomarkers for cancer. The CRCTU also collaborateContacts @CRCTUCRCTU Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University... A National Cancer Research Institute Accredited Trials Unit Linked Groups @CRCTUCRCTU Birmingham

  19. Cancer is a genetic disease1 . Although environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Cancer is a genetic disease1 . Although environmental and other non-genetic factors have roles in many stages of tumorigenesis,it is widely accepted that cancer arises because of mutations in cancer,however,does not suffice to give rise to full-blown cancer.For progression towards malignancyandinvasion

  20. Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer cells. Vanessa Fritz, proliferation, and cancer inserm-00491405,version1-11Jun2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oncogene 2010;29(31):4369-77" DOI : 10.1038/onc.2010.182 #12;Metabolism, proliferation and cancer Fritz and Fajas 2 Abstract Cancer

  1. Cancer Cells DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103189

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Liangfang

    Cancer Cells DOI: 10.1002/anie.201103189 Self-Propelled Microrockets to Capture and Isolate Circulating Tumor Cells Weiwei Gao and Omid C. Farokhzad* cancer · micromachines · nanorobots · nanotechnology metastatic cancer.[1] Since then cancer research has proved the critical roles played by CTC

  2. lung cancer smoke-free 6 One man's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Fighting lung cancer Living smoke-free 6 One man's mission85 #12;Cure is the newsletter for the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, home to cancer care and research for the Southeast's most? For more information about care and services offered at the UF Shands Cancer Center, call 352

  3. "Skin Cancer-What to Look For" Rochester Recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    "Skin Cancer- What to Look For" Rochester Recreation Club for the Deaf May 20, 2010 #12;Supporters for the Deaf ("REAP") #12;Overview Skin Overview What is skin cancer? Who is at risk? How common is skin cancer? Signs of skin cancer Prevention Treatments #12;Skin Overview Skin is the largest organ in your body

  4. IN A CUREUF HEALTH CANCER CENTER NEWS SPRING 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    care and research for the Southeast's most comprehensive academic health center. In each issue, weIN A CUREUF HEALTH CANCER CENTER NEWS Believe SPRING 2014 PAGE6 #12;www.cancer.ufl.eduBelieve in a Cure//Spring 20142 Believe in a Cure is the newsletter for the UF Health Cancer Center, home to cancer

  5. AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY PATIENT HEALTH SERIES Lung Cancer Prevention What are the chances that I will develop lung cancer? The #1 cause of lung cancer is exposure to tobacco smoke. Your chances increase others (second-hand smoke), the greater your chances of developing lung cancer. People who have never

  6. Targeting Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides in Cancer to Improve Diagnostics and Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Amanda Lynne

    2012-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs) are multispecific transport proteins that mediate the uptake of numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds into cells. Recently, OATPs have been shown to have altered ...

  7. Improving the delivery and efficacy of a cancer therapeutic via extracellular matrix modification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mok, Wilson

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a significant source of hindrance to the transport of macromolecules in solid tumors. This thesis shows that by limiting their interstitial transport, the tumor ECM can ...

  8. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, February 1987--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, S.M.

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into six sections, each section dealing with a separate aspect of the program. The six sections are entitled (1) In Vivo Measurement of Amino Acid Transport and Protein Synthesis, (2) Angiogenesis in Human Gliomas: Correlations with Blood Flow and Transport of C-11 AIB, (3) Use of F-18 Fluoropyrimidines for Design and Evaluation of Regional and Systemic Chemotherapeutic Strategies in Human Adenocarcinomas of the Gastrointestinal Tract, (4) Enzymatic Synthesis of Metabolites Labeled with N-13 or C-11, (5) Synthesis of Amino Acids Labeled with C-11, and (6) Instrumentation: Cyclotron and Imaging Systems.

  9. Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  10. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  11. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  12. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  13. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Lin [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Department of Oncology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710038 (China); Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Fan, Daiming, E-mail: daimingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Guo, Xuegang, E-mail: xuegangguo@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  14. Leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation technology trade study update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTZEL, J.S.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a revision and update to the initial report that describes various leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) technologies that can be used to support the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. This revision focuses on the improvements in the technical performance of previously identified and useful technologies, and it introduces new technologies that might prove to be useful.

  15. An online survey to find out how people manage cancer and cancer related problems in the 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    following initial cancer treatment There are around two million people in the UK living with or beyond cancer and this number is rising by more than 3% per year. Treatments for cancer such as chemotherapy manage most problems associated with cancer and its treatment on their own as part of their daily lives

  16. Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal cell to a malignant one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal regulators of growth. Biomarkers associated with cancer were examined in human breast epithelial cells transformed by high-LET radiation in the presence of 17Ã?-estradiol. An established cancer model was used

  17. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.02.044 INDUCED SECOND CANCERS AFTER PROSTATE-CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.02.044 EDITORIAL INDUCED SECOND CANCERS AFTER PROSTATE-CANCER University Medical Center, New York, NY The absolute risks of a radiation-induced second cancer among long concern, expressed by Kendal et al. (5) in this issue, that prostate cancer patients may be unduly

  18. Cancer Stem Cells--Perspectives on Current Status and Future Directions: AACR Workshop on Cancer Stem Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahl, Geoffrey M.

    Cancer Stem Cells--Perspectives on Current Status and Future Directions: AACR Workshop on Cancer Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4 Terry Fox Laboratory BC Cancer Research Center, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 5 Moores University of California San Diego Cancer Center; 6 The Salk

  19. 2011;71:6116-6121. Published OnlineFirst August 19, 2011.Cancer Res Wei Lu, Marites P. Melancon, Chiyi Xiong, et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lihong

    photoacoustic tomography, a hybrid imaging modality, to assess the intravenous delivery of HAuNS targeted," holds great promise for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging of detecting optical contrast agents with high sensitivity and specificity (3­5). With the metal nanocomposites

  20. Energy Impacts of Productivity Improvements in Manufacturing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitrovic, B.; Muller, M. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for potential improvements in energy use in concert with examination of waste streams and potential productivity improvements. The benefits of this new approach are substantial in particular with respect to productivity improvements. Such projects are much...

  1. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  2. Personalized Email Community Detection using Collaborative Similarity Measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nawaz, Waqas; Khan, Kifayat-Ullah; Lee, Young-Koo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Email service providers have employed many email classification and prioritization systems over the last decade to improve their services. In order to assist email services, we propose a personalized email community detection method to discover the groupings of email users based on their structural and semantic intimacy. We extract the personalized social graph from a set of emails by uniquely leveraging each node with communication behavior. Subsequently, collaborative similarity measure (CSM) based intra-graph clustering approach detects personalized communities. The empirical analysis shows effectiveness of the resultant communities in terms of evaluation measures, i.e. density, entropy and f-measure. Moreover, email strainer, dynamic group prediction, and fraudulent account detection are suggested as the potential applications from both the service provider and user's point of view.

  3. Method for detecting an image of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Leroy Dean (4 Vermont Cir., Bolingbrook, IL 60440); Thomlinson, William C. (32 E. Masem, East Patchogue, NY 11772); Zhong, Zhong (Apt. I 1131 Chaping 700 E. Loop Rd., Stonybrook, NY 11790)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an absorption, refraction and scatter image of an object by independently analyzing, detecting, digitizing, and combining images acquired on a high and a low angle side of a rocking curve of a crystal analyzer. An x-ray beam which is generated by any suitable conventional apparatus can be irradiated upon either a Bragg type crystal analyzer or a Laue type crystal analyzer. Images of the absorption, refraction and scattering effects are detected, such as on an image plate, and then digitized. The digitized images are simultaneously solved, preferably on a pixel-by-pixel basis, to derive a combined visual image which has dramatically improved contrast and spatial resolution over an image acquired through conventional radiology methods.

  4. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

  5. Inhibiting Individual Notch Receptors Improves Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of any of the four human Notch receptors has been linked to diseases, particularly cancer, making the Notch pathway a compelling target for new drug studies. A research team...

  6. A Framework for Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Cancer Survivorship Curriculum for Medical Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Hauer, Karen E.; Stuber, Margaret; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Go, Vay L.; Wilkerson, LuAnn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the impact of cancer and treatment on their relation- ships,term consequences of cancer treatments. Furthermore, whileincluding details of cancer treatment and follow-up. In

  7. Cancer survivors and survivorship care: Provider expectations, post-treatment health services, and patient reported outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    you heard about cancer treatment summaries or survivorshipthe course of breast cancer treatment should patients beginduring their active cancer treatment (surgery, radiation,

  8. Breast cancer screening disparities among ethnically diverse women in California : a latent profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerry, Arianna Aldridge

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998). Reducing cervical cancer among First Nations women.K. , & Edwards, B.K. (2002). Cancer survival among US whitestreatment of primary breast cancer: A systematic review.

  9. Lung Cancer as a Second Primary Malignancy: Increasing Prevalence and Its Influence on Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quadrelli, Silvia; Lyons, Gustavo; Colt, Henri; Chimondeguy, Domingo; Silva, Carlos

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    therapy for multiple primary lung cancers. Chest. REFERENCEMR. Multiple primary lung cancers. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg.606–12. 2. Johnson BE. Second lung cancers in patients after

  10. Lung Cancer: A Classic Example of Tumor Escape and Progression While Providing Opportunities for Immunological Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer,” Annual Review ofp63 immunoreac- tivity in lung cancer: yet another player inprotein-related genes in lung cancer: correlation with drug

  11. advanced head-and-neck cancer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in skin cancer, colorectal carcinoma, testicular teratoma and liver cancer types: brain, breast, head and neck, renal, skin and testicular cancers. Conclusions: SULF1 and...

  12. Improving Inventory Control Using Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balandran, Juan

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    EMGT 835 FIELD PROJECT: Improving Inventory Control Using Forecasting By Juan Mario Balandran jmbg@hotmail.com Master of Science The University of Kansas Fall Semester, 2005 An EMGT Field Project report submitted...............................................................................................................................................10 Current Inventory Forecast Process ...........................................................................................10 Development of Alternative Forecast Process...

  13. Improvement February 28 & 29, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    HR Process Improvement Forums February 28 & 29, 2012 #12;Agenda Updates ­ New initiatives Resources Education Verification Request ­ Found in Employment Forms on the HR Web Page Researching other avenues ­ Diploma Translations ­ NM Department of Education for verification of High School diploma #12

  14. UNCONVENTIONAL METHODS FOR YIELD IMPROVEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    methods (active heating and cooling, directional solidifi- cation) Novel yield improvement techniques through a vari- ety of active heating and cooling schemes. It is envisioned that the techniques will allow techniques for decreasing the size and number of risers re- quired to produce quality castings

  15. 3, 435470, 2006 Improved surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    related to off-shore activities require the knowledge of accurate sur- face winds and sea states on fineOSD 3, 435­470, 2006 Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract near real time surface wind resolution over the Mediterranean Sea A. Bentamy, H.-L. Ayina, P

  16. Zymomonas with improved xylose utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Tao, Luan (Havertown, PA); Zhang, Yuying (New Hope, PA); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); McCutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); McCole, Laura (East Fallowfield, PA); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Strains of Zymomonas were engineered by introducing a chimeric xylose isomerase gene that contains a mutant promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. The promoter directs increased expression of xylose isomerase, and when the strain is in addition engineered for expression of xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase, improved utilization of xylose is obtained.

  17. Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved photovoltaic cells and electrodes for use therein, particularly electrodes employing amorphous silicon or polyacetylene coating are produced by a process which includes filling pinholes or porous openings in the coatings by electrochemical oxidation of selected monomers to deposit insulating polymer in the openings.

  18. What are Improvement Partnerships? "VCHIPisaperfectexampleofhowstategroupscancometogetheraroundacommongoaland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    and knowledge, IPs increase the strength and quality of health care reform efforts for the nation as a whole the will and knowledge for sustainable change across the health care delivery system. Other states have expressed measurement- based efforts and a systems approach to improve the quality of children's health care. IPs draw

  19. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  20. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study 12-LaboratoryMedical Equipment Water Efficiency Improvements...