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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Incremental Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the

2

Incremental cost analysis of advanced concept CAES systems  

SciTech Connect

The costs of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems using thermal energy storage (TES) are compared to the costs of CAES systems without TES and simple cycle gas turbine systems. Comparisons are made in terms of the system energy costs levelized over the operating life of the systems. These are in 1985 price levels which is the assumed first year of operation for the systems.

Knutsen, C.A.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Incremental costs of higher efficiency can vary by appliance ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... consumers can also enter cost and performance attributes of specific models they are considering.

4

Incremental costs of higher efficiency can vary by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... consumers can also enter cost and performance attributes of specific models they are ...

5

Literature Review of Data on the Incremental Costs to Design and Build Low-Energy Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes findings from a literature review into the incremental costs associated with low-energy buildings. The goal of this work is to help establish as firm an analytical foundation as possible for the Building Technology Program's cost-effective net-zero energy goal in the year 2025.

Hunt, W. D.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

Incremental cost of electricity used as backup for passive heated homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of passive technologies on a north-central US utility has been studied. A method of utility cost and fuel use analysis, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to compute the long run incremental costs and incremental fuel use required for supplementary electricity to houses with Trombe walls or with direct gain features. For comparison, a reference house with no passive features and a house with an energy conservation design were also analyzed. The results show that the total long run incremental cost to the utility of providing supplementary power to the passive houses costs no more than the cost to supply electricity to heat the reference house or the conservation house. An analysis of the annual homeowner costs for the various types of heating systems suggests that the Trombe wall technology is not promising for use in this climate. The passive technologies, as modelled in this study reduced the requirements for conventional energy by about 10% (7 to 10 kilojoules/year). For all of the house types studied, the use of electricity for heating, instead of oil or gas, reduced the overall (utility plus residential) use of oil or gas by only about 30 to 40% even out through the 1990's.

Martorella, J; Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

8

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

An improved incremental training algorithm for support vector machines using active query  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an improved incremental training algorithm for support vector machines (SVMs). Instead of selecting training samples randomly, we divide them into groups and apply the k-means clustering algorithm to collect the initial set ... Keywords: Active learning, Clustering algorithm, Incremental training, Pattern classification, Support vector machine

Shouxian Cheng; Frank Y. Shih

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes US Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Kickoff Meeting, Washington DC, February 13, 2007 Michel Fouré Project Objectives z To develop a low cost (vs. perfluorosulfonated ionomers), durable membrane. z To develop a membrane capable at 80°C at low relative humidity (25-50%). z To develop a membrane capable of operating at 120°C for brief periods of time. z To elucidate membrane degradation and failure mechanisms. U:jen/slides/pres.07/FC kickoff Washington DC 2-13-07 2 Technical Barriers Addressed z Membrane Cost z Membrane Durability z Membrane capability to operate at low relative humidity. z Membrane capability to operate at 120ºC for brief period of times.

11

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry Title Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry...

12

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry Title Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry...

13

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry Title Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry...

14

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry Title Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy...

15

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tax Increment Financing (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa) Iowa) Tax Increment Financing (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Residential Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Home Weatherization Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Property Tax Incentive Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority Tax Increment Financing allows city councils or county boards of supervisors to use the property taxes resulting from the increase in taxable valuation caused by the construction of new industrial or commercial facilities to provide economic development incentives to a business or industry. Tax Increment Financing may be used to offset the cost of public improvements and utilities that will serve the new private

17

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries Energy consumption is equal to 3-8 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce...

18

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they...

19

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-54036-Revision Energy Efficiency Improvement ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making An ENERGY STAR Guide for...

20

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Title Energy Efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

268E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for...

22

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i LBNL-5342E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Concrete Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for...

23

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Plant and...

24

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

289-Revision ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry An...

25

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9-Revision ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry An ENERGY STAR ...

26

Identifying cost reduction and performance improvement opportunities through simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During difficult economic times, companies have few positive cost reducing options that simultaneously improve operational performance. This paper addresses how Deloitte Consulting partnered with Simio LLC to model multiple process improvement opportunities ...

J. Ethan Brown; David Sturrock

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

28

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy costs by implementing energy efficiency measures can2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost SavingL ABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Guarantee Program (Pennsylvania) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TIF) Guarantee Program (Pennsylvania) TIF) Guarantee Program (Pennsylvania) Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Guarantee Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Funding Source Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) State Pennsylvania Program Type Loan Program Provider Department of Community and Economic Development The Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Guarantee Program provides credit enhancement to improve market access and lower capital costs through loan guarantees to bond issuers to assist in the development and revitalization

30

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Title Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Issue 3 Pagination 357-367 Keywords dampness and mold, health, ieq improvement, offices, temperature, ventilation Abstract This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 °C, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set of non-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

31

Energy Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency Energy Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency November 28, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis Thanks to Camille Beben of the Office of Management, approvals for Department directives that used to take 14 months now take less than 6 months. | DOE photo, credit Hantz Leger. Thanks to Camille Beben of the Office of Management, approvals for Department directives that used to take 14 months now take less than 6 months. | DOE photo, credit Hantz Leger. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Former Associate Deputy Secretary "We are working every day to help develop a clean energy economy, create good jobs, and make sure America is competitive on the global stage." Mel Williams, Associate Deputy Secretary of Energy

32

ITP's Top Low- or No-Cost Improvements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITP's Top Low- or No-Cost ITP's Top Low- or No-Cost Improvements Michael B. Muller Rutgers University Keith A. Woodbury, Ph.D. University of Alabama Kelly Kissock Ph.D., P.E. University of Dayton Michael B Muller * Mechanical Engineer * Developed and maintains IAC database * Qualified Specialist and Energy Expert in - Steam, Pumps, Fans, & Process Heating * Has conducted multiple ESA, IAC, and similar style industrial energy assessments. Topics to be Covered: * Overview of: - Low/No Cost Improvements - ITP Assessments Specific LNC Improvements resulting from: * IAC Assessments * ESA: Steam * ESA: Compressed Air (Keith A. Woodbury) * ESA: Process Heating (Dr. Kelly Kissock) Why are these Opportunities Missed? * Perceived Safety/Avoiding Risk

33

Energy Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency Energy Department Employees Strive to Cut Costs, Improve Efficiency November 28, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis Thanks to Camille Beben of the Office of Management, approvals for Department directives that used to take 14 months now take less than 6 months. | DOE photo, credit Hantz Leger. Thanks to Camille Beben of the Office of Management, approvals for Department directives that used to take 14 months now take less than 6 months. | DOE photo, credit Hantz Leger. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Melvin G. Williams, Jr. Former Associate Deputy Secretary "We are working every day to help develop a clean energy economy, create good jobs, and make sure America is competitive on the global stage." Mel Williams, Associate Deputy Secretary of Energy

34

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Look beyond first cost With energy efficiency, you get what2008. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Savingincreasing energy efficiency, companies can reduce costs and

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Title Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-45618 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Xiaomin Liu, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-45618 Date Published May 4 Abstract Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential water heater energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a water heater and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers are significant. At the efficiency level examined in this paper, 35% of households with electric water heaters experience LCC savings, with an average savings of $106, while 4% show LCC losses, with an average loss of $40 compared to a pre-standard LCC average of $2,565. The remainder of the population (61%) are largely unaffected.

37

An analysis of cost improvement in chemical process technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost improvement -- sometimes called the learning curve or progress curve -- plays a crucial role in the competitiveness of the US chemical industry. More rapid cost improvement for a product results in expanding market share and larger profits. Expectations of rapid cost improvement motivate companies to invest heavily in the development and introduction of new chemical products and processes, even if production from the first pioneer facility is economically marginal. The slope of the learning curve can also indicate whether government support of new chemical processes such as synthetic fuels can be expected to have large social benefits or to simply represent a net loss to the public treasury. Despite the importance of the slope of the learning curve in the chemical process industries (CPI), little analytical investigation has been made into the factors that accelerate or retard cost improvement. This study develops such a model for the CPI. Using information from ten in-depth case studies and a database consisting of year-by-year market histories of 44 chemical products, including organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, synthetic fibers, and primary metals, the analysis explores the relationships among the rate of learning and characteristics of the technologies, the nature of markets, and management approaches. 78 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

Merrow, E.W.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Costs and benefits of energy efficiency improvements in ceiling fans  

SciTech Connect

Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, especially in developing countries with warm climates. The paper provides analysis of costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans to assess the global potential for electricity savings and green house gas (GHG) emission reductions. Ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terawatt hours per year could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize potential savings.

Shah, Nihar; Sathaye, Nakul; Phadke, Amol; Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Project Title: New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost The University of North Florida (UNF)--with project partners the University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Johnson Matthey--has recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell MEA technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a passive water recovery MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Developers at the University of North Florida identified water management components as an insurmountable barrier to achieving the required system size and weight necessary to achieve the energy density requirements of small portable power applications. UNF developed an innovative passive water recovery MEA for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) which provides a path to system simplification and optimization. The passive water recovery MEA incorporates a hydrophobic, porous, barrier layer within the cathode electrode, so that capillary pressure forces the water produced at the cathode through holes in the membrane and back to the anode. By directly transferring the water from the cathode to the anode, the balance of plant is very much simplified and the need for heavy, bulky water recovery components is eliminated. At the heart of the passive water recovery MEA is the UNF DM-1 membrane that utilizes a hydrocarbon structure to optimize performance in a DMFC system. The membrane has inherent performance advantages, such as a low methanol crossover (high overall efficiency), while maintaining a high proton conductivity (good electrochemical efficiency) when compared to perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes such as Nafion. Critically, the membrane provides an extremely low electro-osmotic drag coefficient of approximately one water molecule per proton (versus the 2-3 for Nafion) that minimizes flooding issues at the cathode, which often fatally limit open cathode MEA performance. During this successfully completed DOE program the project team met all of the project goals. The team built and tested over 1,500 MEAs with a wide range of different manufacturing chemistries and process conditions. This project demonstrated that the UNF MEA design could be fabricated with a high degree of reproducibility and repeatability. Some specific achievements include: Durability - The UNF MEA has demonstrated over 11,000 hours continuous operation in a short stack configuration. The root cause of an off-state degradation issue was successfully mitigated by modifying the manufacturing process by changing the wetting agents used in the catalyst printing. The stability of the anode electrode was increased by replacing the anode electrodes with a stabilized PtRu/C catalyst. The overall degradation rate was significantly reduced through optimization of the MEA operating conditions. Performance - The project team optimized the performance of the critical MEA sub-components. By increasing the membrane thickness, the methanol crossover was reduced, thereby increasing the fuel utilization efficiency without sacrificing any electrochemical performance. The reduction in methanol crossover increased the fuel utilization efficiency from 78% to over 90%. The liquid barrier layer was optimized to provide improved reproducibility, thereby improving stack voltage uniformity and reliability. Additionally the barrier layer water permeability was lowered without sacrificing any power density, thereby enabling increased operating temperature. Improvements in the cathode catalyst selection and coating provided an additional 10% to 20% improvement in the MEA performance at the target operating range. Cost - Commercially scalable processes were developed for all of the critical MEA components which led to improved yields and lower overall manufacturing costs. Furthermore, significant steps have been made in improving the process control, which increases MEA

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J. [University of North Florida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Project Title: New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost The University of North Florida (UNF)--with project partners the University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Johnson Matthey--has recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell MEA technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a passive water recovery MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Developers at the University of North Florida identified water management components as an insurmountable barrier to achieving the required system size and weight necessary to achieve the energy density requirements of small portable power applications. UNF developed an innovative passive water recovery MEA for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) which provides a path to system simplification and optimization. The passive water recovery MEA incorporates a hydrophobic, porous, barrier layer within the cathode electrode, so that capillary pressure forces the water produced at the cathode through holes in the membrane and back to the anode. By directly transferring the water from the cathode to the anode, the balance of plant is very much simplified and the need for heavy, bulky water recovery components is eliminated. At the heart of the passive water recovery MEA is the UNF DM-1 membrane that utilizes a hydrocarbon structure to optimize performance in a DMFC system. The membrane has inherent performance advantages, such as a low methanol crossover (high overall efficiency), while maintaining a high proton conductivity (good electrochemical efficiency) when compared to perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes such as Nafion. Critically, the membrane provides an extremely low electro-osmotic drag coefficient of approximately one water molecule per proton (versus the 2-3 for Nafion) that minimizes flooding issues at the cathode, which often fatally limit open cathode MEA performance. During this successfully completed DOE program the project team met all of the project goals. The team built and tested over 1,500 MEAs with a wide range of different manufacturing chemistries and process conditions. This project demonstrated that the UNF MEA design could be fabricated with a high degree of reproducibility and repeatability. Some specific achievements include: Durability - The UNF MEA has demonstrated over 11,000 hours continuous operation in a short stack configuration. The root cause of an off-state degradation issue was successfully mitigated by modifying the manufacturing process by changing the wetting agents used in the catalyst printing. The stability of the anode electrode was increased by replacing the anode electrodes with a stabilized PtRu/C catalyst. The overall degradation rate was significantly reduced through optimization of the MEA operating conditions. Performance - The project team optimized the performance of the critical MEA sub-components. By increasing the membrane thickness, the methanol crossover was reduced, thereby increasing the fuel utilization efficiency without sacrificing any electrochemical performance. The reduction in methanol crossover increased the fuel utilization efficiency from 78% to over 90%. The liquid barrier layer was optimized to provide improved reproducibility, thereby improving stack voltage uniformity and reliability. Additionally the barrier layer water permeability was lowered without sacrificing any power density, thereby enabling increased operating temperature. Improvements in the cathode catalyst selection and coating provided an additional 10% to 20% improvement in the MEA performance at the target operating range. Cost - Commercially scalable processes were developed for all of the critical MEA components which led to improved yields and lower overall manufacturing costs. Furthermore, significant steps have been made in improving the process control, which increases MEA

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J. [University of North Florida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Technology Improvement Pathway to Cost-effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

454 454 February 2010 Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification Preprint A. Brooker, M. Thornton, and J. Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at SAE 2010 World Congress Detroit, Michigan April 13-15, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

44

Improve Performance and Reduce Cost of Any Lithium-Ion Battery  

TM Microstructured components for high-performance lithium batteries www.porouspower.com Symmetrix - Improve Performance & Reduce Cost of Any ...

45

Cost curves: An improved method for visualizing classifier performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces cost curves, a graphical technique for visualizing the performance (error rate or expected cost) of 2-class classifiers over the full range of possible class distributions and misclassification costs. Cost curves are shown to be ... Keywords: Classifiers, Machine learning, Performance evaluation, ROC curves

Chris Drummond; Robert C. Holte

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

47

An Experiment to Improve Cost Estimation and Project Tracking for Software and Systems Integration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Experiment to Improve Cost Estimation and Project Tracking for Software and Systems Integration to improve cost estimation and project tracking. 1. Introduction In order to remain competitive, ICL (as well for integration projects, to reduce time to market and to reduce costs without detriment to the quality

Henderson, Peter

48

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these costs and increase energy efficiency. This Energyoperating costs and to improve energy efficiency to maintainUpgrades related to energy efficiency cost approximately $

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Improved Solar Power Plant Efficiency: Low Cost Solar Irradiance Sensor  

A University of Colorado research group led by Fernando Mancilla-David has developed a low cost irradiance sensor using a network modeled on a neural ...

50

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective.

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Five Low Cost Methods to Improve Energy Efficiency on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Conservation in Metals. Presentation Title, Five Low Cost Methods to...

52

Cost management improvement in the Office of Environmental Management 1991-1995. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has been proactive in meeting the cost management challenges of environmental management activities. EM recognized the need for defining and establishing good cost management practices and has, during the first half of the 1990s, initiated more than a dozen major cost-management-related activities that have resulted in: Measureable improvement in cost-and cost-related management practices; Improved communication between field and Headquarters and among field sites; Development of cost management tools; Hiring of cost professionals; Involving regulators and stakeholders early in the planning process. The purposes of this progress report are to summarize EM`s cost management initiatives, report on the results of its proactive approach to cleaning up the environment at reasonable cost, and identify future cost management needs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005a). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving59289-Revision Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving05CH11231. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Assessing initial-cost growth and subsequent long-term cost improvement in coal-to-SNG processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the study was the development of guidance that would enable gas-industry R and D managers to make more-reliable assessments of the potential for both initial-cost growth and subsequent long-run cost improvement in alternative coal-gasification technologies. The first phase of the research assessed the reasonableness of the GRI contingency methodology by comparing the results obtained from applying the GRI method and the RAND Pioneer Plant Study (PPS) method to an identical set of eight coal-to-SNG processes. The second phase of the research, which addressed the issue of cost improvement, found that between process introduction and process maturity, overall cost reductions of between 30% (for moderately innovative technologies) and 60% (for highly innovative technologies) are possible. However, these results were highly dependent on a number of key assumptions including: similarity of site characteristics for successive plants; access to prior plant's experience base; and appropriate management attitudes.

Hess, R.W.; Myers, C.W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO). 1998. PersonalBorras, T. 1998. "Improving Boilers and Furnaces." ChemicalAnalysis of the Industrial Boiler Population Prepared by

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Improve FCCU Energy Efficiency. Petroleum TechnicalACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, ACEEE,ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Volume

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Nath. 2000. Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. Hydrocarbonas well as selection of steam turbines or electric motors toand minimizing losses in the steam turbines) can result in

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improved Process Used to Treat Aqueous Mixed Waste Results in Cost Savings and Improved Worker Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an improved process implemented at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to treat aqueous mixed waste. This waste is comprised of radioactively-contaminated corrosive liquids with heavy metals. The Aqueous Mixed Waste Treatment System (AMWTS) system components include a reaction tank and a post-treatment holding tank with ancillary piping and pumps; and a control panel with pumping/mixing controls; tank level, temperature and pH/Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) indicators. The process includes a neutralization step to remove the corrosive characteristic, a chromium reduction step to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium, and a precipitation step to convert the toxic metals into an insoluble form. Once the toxic metals have precipitated, the resultant sludge is amenable to stabilization and can be reclassified as a low-level waste if the quantity of leachable toxic metals, as determined by the TCLP, is below Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). To date, six batches in eight have passed the UTS. The AMWTS is RCRA permitted and allows for the compliant treatment of mixed waste prior to final disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE) or commercial radioactive waste disposal facility. Mixed wastes eligible for treatment include corrosive liquids (pH 12.5) containing EPA-regulated toxic metals (As, Ba, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ag, Se, Hg) at concentrations greater than the RCRA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) limit. The system has also been used to treat corrosive wastes with small quantities of fissionable materials. The AMWTS is a significant engineered solution with many improvements over the more labor intensive on-site treatment method being performed within a ventilation hood used previously. The previously used treatment system allowed for batch sizes of only 15-20 gallons whereas the new AMWTS allows for the treatment of batches up to 75 gallons; thereby reducing batch labor and supply costs by 40-60% and reducing analytical testing costs by 50-75%. Reduced treatment time also reduces worker radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) levels. Additionally, the treatment system components used previously were adapted to be used with the new AMWTS. This allowed for less dependence on personnel protective equipment (PPE) than the prior system by separating the waste handling/bulking steps of the process from the treatment steps. The AMWTS also improved worker safety by incorporating more automated engineering controls such as system logic controls; personnel safety and equipment protection interlocks, off normal condition indicators/alarms, and system emergency stop controls. In a time of ever-decreasing budgets, it makes sense to rethink the use of existing treatment systems. Utilizing, and possibly retooling, equipment and infrastructure may allow for reduced treatment costs and increase worker safety. (authors)

Hodge, D.S.; Preuss, D.E.; Belcher, K.J.; Rock, C.M.; Bray, W.S.; Herman, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Incremental Nanotechnology for Structural Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Incremental Nanotechnology for Structural Materials. Author(s) , Enrique J. Lavernia. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Enrique J. Lavernia. Abstract...

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61

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

62

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid incremental cost estimates were developed based onsizing . Final incremental cost estimates ranged from $1,786Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkemas approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are packaged in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkemas approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton conductivity. Optimizing the processing of M41 was found to increase its proton conductivity by almost an order of magnitude at 50% RH. Characterization of the membrane morphology with Karren More at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the membrane morphology was complex. This technology platform was dubbed M43 and was used as a baseline in the majority of the work on the project. Although its performance was superior to M41, M43 still showed proton conductivity an order of magnitude lower than that of a PFSA membrane at 50% RH. The MEA performance of M43 could be increased by reducing the thickness from 1 to 0.6 mils. However, the performance of the thinner M43 still did not match that of a PFSA membrane.

Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

66

Improving the interaction between overlay routing and traffic engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overlay routing has been successful as an incremental method to improve Internet routing by allowing its own users to select their logical routing. In the meantime, traffic engineering (TE) are being used to reduce the whole network cost by adapting ...

Gene Moo Lee; Taehwan Choi

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

SOEC efficiency and cost improvement Part 1 and 2.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Part I: Electrochemical and X-ray Characterization of Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Cell Oxygen Electrodes on Electrolyte Substrates--The governing reaction mechanisms, and the electrode and electrolyte material compositions and structures, that controls the efficiency and durability of the solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) need to be identified and well-understood for a significant improvement in nuclear hydrogen production using high temperature steam electrolysis. ANL conducted experimental analysis of SOEC electrolyte and electrodes to progress in this objective. Our study on the oxygen electrode focused on specifically the effect of electrode crystal structure on its electrochemical performance, and the evolution of the electronic and structural properties of the electrodes while under electrochemical conditions and high temperature. We found through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments that, while different crystal orientations in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3+d} (LSM) show different initial performance and different electrochemical activation under SOEC conditions, a good mixed ionic electronic conductor La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3+d} (LSC) does not seem to exhibit similar variations. Our in-situ x-ray and electrochemical measurements at the Advanced Photon Source of ANL have identified the chemical states of the A-site elements of the doped lanthanum manganite electrodes. We found that the changes in the concentration and in the electronic state of the La and Sr (the A-site elements of the perovskite) occurring only at the top airelectrode film interface can be responsible from the electrochemical improvement of the SOEC anode under DC current. Our observation related to the La chemical state change is unexpected and probably unique to the electrochemical current-conditioning. Part II: Progress Towards the Atomic Layer Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Manganate--Lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) is the most commonly used cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and also solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) for hydrogen production through steam electrolysis. The ability to deposit LSM in the form of thin, conformal films onto high surface area support materials will enable the development of more efficient SOFC and SOEC devices. Moreover, thin, uniform LSM films prepared on flat surfaces are ideal for performing synchrotron X-ray experiments aimed at understanding the materials issues that control SOEC performance. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a very effective technology for fabricating thin, conformal films on flat surfaces as well as high surface area supports. In this study, we describe our work developing ALD methods for depositing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO{sub 2}, and mixtures of these oxides using cyclopentadienyl precursors. We have utilized in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements to explore the range of conditions for growth of these materials as well as to determine the appropriate oxygen sources. In addition, thin films of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} were deposited on Si(100) substrates and analyzed using spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine the refractive index and growth rates of these materials. Finally, mixed-oxide films La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} were prepared and analyzed with X-ray fluorescence to determine the composition of the films.

Yildiz, B.; Chang, K.-C.; Meyers, D. J.; You, H.; Carter, J. D.; Elam, J. W.; Honegger, D. A.; Libera, J. A.; Pellin, M. J.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

68

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Data Assimilation Using Incremental Analysis Updates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IAU (incremental analysis updating) process incorporates analysis increments into a model integration in a gradual manner. It does this by using analysis increments as constant forcings in a model's prognostic equations over a 6-h period ...

S. C. Bloom; L. L. Takacs; A. M. da Silva; D. Ledvina

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industrys structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Improved VSM for Incremental Text Classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a simple classification method VSM has been widely applied in text information processing field. There are some problems for traditional VSM to select a refined vector model representation

Zhen Yang; Jianjun Lei; Jian Wang; Xing Zhang; Jim Guo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such an important cost factor, energy efficiency is a verythe cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency opportunities2005). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 40-50' wide, 400-500' length § Bird density: 1 square foot/bird, 20,000 birds1 GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm per house § Heating and cooling required § Intensive ventilation to maintain air

76

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon shelf-life. The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On the Relationship between Incremental Analysis Updating and Incremental Digital Filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incremental analysis updating (IAU) refers to a method of smoothly inserting instantaneous analysis increments into a numerical model by spreading the increments over a time period. In this work, this method is shown to be identical to applying a ...

Saroja Polavarapu; Shuzhan Ren; Adam M. Clayton; David Sankey; Yves Rochon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. After describing the industry's trends, structure and production and the process's energy use, we examine energy-efficiency opportunities for corn wet millers. Where available, we provide energy savings and typical payback periods for each measure based on case studies of plants that have implemented it. Given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the industry while maintaining the quality of the products produced. Further research on the economics of the measures and their applicability to different wet milling practices is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Tax Increment Financing (TIF) (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TIF) (Nebraska) TIF) (Nebraska) Tax Increment Financing (TIF) (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type PACE Financing Provider Economic Development Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Nebraska is primarily designed to finance the public costs associated with a private development project. Essentially,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wireless Smart Sensor Development Update: Applying Technology to Reduce Fire Watch Costs and to Improve Coverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart Sensor product development for the use of fire watch improvement has been initiated by EPRI for the purposes of understanding the current state and/or industry available systems for electronically supporting the performance of existing work activities and/or providing for performance enhancement through cost effective monitoring and automation capabilities. The use of wireless technologies will allow a greater ease of deployment, reduced response time, and increased efficiency for fire watch equipm...

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Concept formation using incremental Gaussian mixture models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm for incremental concept formation based on a Bayesian framework. The algorithm, called IGMM (for Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model), uses a probabilistic approach for modeling the environment, and so, it can rely ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, EM algorithm, clustering, concept formation, finite mixtures, incremental learning, unsupervised learning

Paulo Martins Engel; Milton Roberto Heinen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

85

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost  

SciTech Connect

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: Annual Technical Report, 24 May 2006 - 25 September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar Energy has enhanced module reliability, reduced cost and improved performance of its CIGS deposition process, and reduced cost of materials and processes for contacts.

Weideman, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Load-curve responsiveness to weather and the cost-effectiveness of conservation  

SciTech Connect

A cost-benefit analysis of home-weatherization projects using average incremental power costs instead of peak or off-peak costs shows that some programs are no longer cost-effective. Weatherization improves the energy efficiency of houses and reduces demand on the utility, but a study of how monthly load curves at a Pacific Northwest utility responded to weather over a 12-month period indicates that abnormal weather shifts the entire load curve. 1 figure. (DCK)

Hellman, M.M.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

A framework for improving the cost-effectiveness of DSM program evaluations  

SciTech Connect

The prudence of utility demand-side management (DSM) investments hinges on their performance, yet evaluating performance is complicated because the energy saved by DSM programs can never be observed directly but only inferred. This study frames and begins to answer the following questions: (1) how well do current evaluation methods perform in improving confidence in the measurement of energy savings produced by DSM programs; (2) in view of this performance, how can limited evaluation resources be best allocated to maximize the value of the information they provide? The authors review three major classes of methods for estimating annual energy savings: tracking database (sometimes called engineering estimates), end-use metering, and billing analysis and examine them in light of the uncertainties in current estimates of DSM program measure lifetimes. The authors assess the accuracy and precision of each method and construct trade-off curves to examine the costs of increases in accuracy or precision. Several approaches for improving evaluations for the purpose of assessing program cost effectiveness are demonstrated. The methods can be easily generalized to other evaluation objectives, such as shared savings incentive payments.

Sonnenblick, R.; Eto, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate a 98% or greater reflective, highly diffuse, low-cost composite material that significantly improves luminaire efficiency, is able to withstand 50,000 hours or greater luminaire operation under expected LED system thermal and environmental operating extremes and meets the cost targets required to be an effective commercial solution for the Solid State Lighting industry. This project met most of the goals defined and contributed to the understanding of high reflectance, white coatings. Research under this program increased the understanding of coatings development using particle size reduction techniques and preparation of coating solutions with a broad range of particle types. The research explored scale-up of coating systems and generated understanding of processing required for high volume manufacturing applications. The work demonstrated how coating formulation and application technique can translate to material durability and LED system lifetime. The research also demonstrated improvements in lighting efficiency to be gained using high reflectance white coatings.

Teather, Eric

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Tax Incremental Financing (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incremental Financing (Connecticut) Incremental Financing (Connecticut) Tax Incremental Financing (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Bond Program Provider Connecticut Development Authority CDA provides Tax Incremental Financing for significant economic

91

Incremental validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current study examined the incremental validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in relation to the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles and Personality Assessment (more)

McCoy, Katrina.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centro Inc. Nissan Centro Inc. Nissan 321 Hill Avenue 983 Nissan Drive Nashville, TN 37210 Smyrna, TN 37167 Business: Flow Control Distributor & Representative Business: Automobile Manufacturing Brad Davis Chris Goddard Territory Manager Environmental Engineer Phone: 615-255-2220 Phone: 615-459-1633 Email: bdavis@centromemphis.com Email: chris.goddard@nissan-usa.com Nissan and Centro partner to reduce energy cost 20% through improved metering Project Scope Nissan wanted to precisely measure consumption by department in their Smyrna facility. For low pressure natural gas applications, Nissan sought a simple, reliable metering device with no moving parts. Centro determined that the Aaliant Target Flow meter and the Fox Thermal Mass Flow meter would meet

93

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry, March 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7335-Revision 7335-Revision ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry ® An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Ernst Worrell, Christina Galitsky, Eric Masanet, and Wina Graus Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency March 2008 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

94

Remote plunger removal device for small-scale incremental pressing  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale pressing of high explosives (HE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere is routinely performed using pneumatic presses. Blast shields provide protection to the operator during the pressing procedure, but safety of the operator is a concern during removal of the plunger, which is currently performed manually. To minimize this risk, very high tolerances between the plunger and the die are required. These tolerances are often very costly, especially in the case of long, relatively narrow dies. The safety issue is an even greater concern with incremental pressing in which cleaning the die between increments is difficult or impossible. To better protect press operators, a device has been designed and constructed to allow remote plunger removal in a standard HE press. In this report the authors describe this modified press that allows remote removal of the plunger.

Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formed during compression of water vapors (Maroulis andcompression limitations and the high costs of evaporation under vacuum, vapor

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

LOWER COST METHODS FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY (IOR) VIA SURFACTANT FLOODING  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the work performed in this 3-year project sponsored by DOE. The overall objective of this project is to identify new, potentially more cost-effective surfactant formulations for improved oil recovery (IOR). The general approach is to use an integrated experimental and computational chemistry effort to improve our understanding of the link between surfactant structure and performance, and from this knowledge, develop improved IOR surfactant formulations. Accomplishments for the project include: (1) completion of a literature review to assemble current and new surfactant IOR ideas, (2) Development of new atomistic-level MD (molecular dynamic) modeling methodologies to calculate IFT (interfacial tension) rigorously from first principles, (3) exploration of less computationally intensive mesoscale methods to estimate IFT, Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR), and cohesive energy density (CED) calculations, (4) experiments to screen many surfactant structures for desirable low IFT and solid adsorption behavior, and (5) further experimental characterization of the more promising new candidate formulations (based on alkyl polyglycosides (APG) and alkyl propoxy sulfate surfactants). Important findings from this project include: (1) the IFT between two pure substances may be calculated quantitatively from fundamental principles using Molecular Dynamics, the same approach can provide qualitative results for ternary systems containing a surfactant, (2) low concentrations of alkyl polyglycoside surfactants have potential for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) applications from a technical standpoint (if formulated properly with a cosurfactant, they can create a low IFT at low concentration) and also are viable economically as they are available commercially, and (3) the alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants have promising IFT performance also, plus these surfactants can have high optimal salinity and so may be attractive for use in higher salinity reservoirs. Alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants are not yet available as large volume commercial products. The results presented herein can provide the needed industrial impetus for extending application (alkyl polyglycoside) or scaling up (alkylpropoxy sulfates) of these two promising surfactants for enhanced oil recovery. Furthermore, the advanced simulations tools presented here can be used to continue to uncover new types of surfactants with promising properties such as inherent low IFT and biodegradability.

William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Seung Soon Jang; Shiang-Tai Lin; Prabal Maiti; Yongfu Wu; Stefan Iglauer; Xiaohang Zhang

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar cost reduction through technical improvements: the concepts of learning and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts of learning and experience are reviewed and their usefulness for predicting the future costs of solar technologies are evaluated. The literature review indicated that the cost estimates for solar energy technologies are typically made assuming a fixed production process, characterized by standard capacity factors, overhead, and labor costs. The learning curve is suggested as a generalization of the costs of potential solar energy systems. The concept of experience is too ambiguous to be useful for cost estimation. There is no logical reason to believe that costs will decline purely as a function of cumulative production, and experience curves do not allow the analyst to identify logical sources of cost reduction directly. The procedures for using learning and aggregated cost curves to estimate the costs of solar technologies are outlined. It is recommended that production histories of analogous products and processes are analyzed and the learning and cost curves for these surrogates are estimated. These curves, if judged applicable, can be used to predict the cost reductions in manufacturing solar energy technologies.

Krawiec, F.; Flaim, T.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Iterative and Incremental Development: A Brief History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although many view iterative and incremental development as a modern practice, its application dates as far back as the mid-1950s. Prominent software-engineering thought leaders from each succeeding decade supported IID practices, and many large projects ...

Craig Larman; Victor R. Basili

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Exergy analysis of incremental sheet forming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research in the last 15 years has led to die-less incremental forming processes that are close to realization in an industrial setup. Whereas many studies have been carried out with the intention of investigating technical ...

Dittrich, M. A.

100

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availablecosts, reduced processing time, and increased resource and energycosts and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs. Mechanical concrete reclaimer. Concrete returned tothrough a mechanical reclaimer, able to separate aggregatesobtaining a concrete reclaimer is significant and according

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of Congestion Costs. The Electricity Journal 17,Incremental Transmission Costs Due to Wind Power. Rockville,and Intermittency Really Cost? Supply Curves for Electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Identification of potential strategies, methods, and tools for improving cost estimating practices for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project cost escalation is a major problem for State Highway Agencies (SHA). This problem is evident in cost estimating procedures that may not promote consistency and accuracy of costs over the project development process. The research proposes that a relationship exists between applying good estimating practices and minimizing cost escalation from the initial planning estimate to the engineer??s estimate at final design. The objective of this research is to develop a preliminary list of strategies, methods, and tools for project cost estimation practices aimed at achieving greater consistency and accuracy between the project development phases. A literature review was conducted that assisted in identifying factors that lead to the cost escalation of projects. The information from the literature was used to discover the core estimating assumptions that are the root causes behind cost escalation and lack of project estimate consistency and accuracy. After the cost escalation factors were determined, interviews with SHAs were conducted that lead to identifying unique and/or innovative approaches that will aid the SHAs in overcoming the cost escalation factors. The main methodology used to develop a potential list of strategies, methods, and tools was first focused on linking strategies to causes of cost escalation. Global strategies were identified by means of this approach. Methods and tools that would likely be effective in implementing the strategies are therefore directed at mitigating root causes of estimate problems in a focused approach. The strategies, methods, and tools are aligned with the project development phase where they would be implemented. Thus, a preliminary list of strategies, methods, and tools is provided in this study.

Donnell, Kelly Elaine

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Joint optimization of location and inventory decisions for improving supply chain cost performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is focused on investigating the integration of inventory and facility location decisions in different supply chain settings. Facility location and inventory decisions are interdependent due to the economies of scale that are inherent in transportation and replenishment costs. The facility location decisions have an impact on the transportation and replenishment costs which, in turn, affect the optimal inventory policy. On the other hand, the inventory policy dictates the frequency of shipments to replenish inventory which, in turn, affects the number of deliveries, and, hence, the transportation costs, between the facilities. Therefore, our main research objectives are to: compare the optimal facility location, determined by minimizing total transportation costs, to the one determined by the models that also consider the timing and quantity of inventory replenishments and corresponding costs, investigate the effect of facility location decisions on optimal inventory decisions, and measure the impact of integrated decision-making on overall supply chain cost performance. Placing a special emphasis on the explicit modeling of transportation costs, we develop several novel models in mixed integer linear and nonlinear optimization programming. Based on how the underlying facility location problem is modeled, these models fall into two main groups: 1) continuous facility location problems, and 2) discrete facility location problems. For the stylistic models, the focus is on the development of analytical solutions. For the more general models, the focus is on the development of efficient algorithms. Our results demonstrate the impact of explicit transportation costs on integrated decisions, the impact of different transportation cost functions on integrated decisions in the context of continuous facility location problems of interest, the value of integrated decision-making in different supply chain settings, and the performance of solution methods that jointly optimize facility location and inventory decisions.

Keskin, Burcu Baris

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: May 24, 2006 -- July 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Global Solar Energy rapidly advances the cost and performance of commercial thin-film CIGS products using roll-to-roll processing on steel foil substrate in compact, low cost deposition equipment, with in-situ sensors for real-time intelligent process control. Substantial increases in power module efficiency, which now exceed 13%, are evident at GSE factories in two countries with a combined capacity greater than 75 MW. During 2009 the average efficiency of cell strings (3780 cm2) was increased from 7% to over 11%, with champion results exceeding 13% Continued testing of module reliability in rigid product has reaffirmed extended life expectancy for standard glass product, and has qualified additional lower-cost methods and materials. Expected lifetime for PV in flexible packages continues to increase as failure mechanisms are elucidated, and resolved by better methods and materials. Cost reduction has been achieved through better materials utilization, enhanced vendor and material qualification and selection. The largest cost gains have come as a result of higher cell conversion efficiency and yields, higher processing rates, greater automation and improved control in all process steps. These improvements are integral to this thin film PV partnership program, and all realized with the 'Gen2' manufacturing plants, processes and equipment.

Wiedeman, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems: Cost/Benefit Analysis and Opportunities for Improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine potential for reduction in the cost of saved energy (COSE) for cold-climate solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems, COSE was computed for three types of cold climate water heating systems. For each system, a series of cost-saving measures was considered: (1) balance of systems (BOS): tank, heat exchanger, and piping-valving measures; and (2) four alternative lower-cost collectors. Given all beneficial BOS measures in place, >50% reduction of COSE was achievable only with selective polymer collectors at half today's selective collector cost. In all three system types, today's metal-glass selective collector achieved the same COSE as the hypothesized non-selective polymer collector.

Burch, J.; Hillman, T.; Salasovich, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Tax Increment Financing (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana) Louisiana) Tax Increment Financing (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Sales Tax Incentive Louisiana law provides for two types of Tax Increment Financing mechanisms: (1) property tax, also known as ad valorem, and (2) sales tax. Either form may be utilized to enhance an economic development project. In these, it is assumed the project will create future increases in tax revenue above

109

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollutant emissions. Steam distribution system energyimprovements to steam distribution systems primarily focusenergy in industrial steam distribution systems. Improve

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Incremental tensor analysis: Theory and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do we find patterns in author-keyword associations, evolving over time? Or in data cubes (tensors), with product-branchcustomer sales information? And more generally, how to summarize high-order data cubes (tensors)? How to incrementally ... Keywords: Tensor, multilinear algebra, stream mining

Jimeng Sun; Dacheng Tao; Spiros Papadimitriou; Philip S. Yu; Christos Faloutsos

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/short ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

PV Inverter Products Manufacturing and Design Improvements for Cost Reduction and Performance Enhancements: Final Subcontract Report, November 2003 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of this subcontracted development work by Xantrex Technology Inc. were to: (1) Capture the newest digital signal processor (DSP) technology to create high-impact,''next generation'' power conversion equipment for the PV industry; (2) Create a common resource base for three PV product lines. This standardized approach to both hardware and software control platforms will provide significant market advantage over foreign competition; (3) Achieve cost reductions through increased volume of common components, reduced assembly labor, and the higher efficiency of producing more products with fewer design, manufacturing, and production test variations; (4) Increase PV inverter product reliability. Reduce inverter size, weight and conversion losses. The contract goals were to achieve an overall cost reduction of 10% to 20% for the three inverters and with no compromise in performance. The cost of the 10-kW inverter was reduced by 56%, and the cost of the 25-kW inverter was reduced by 53%. The 2.5-kW inverter has no basis for comparison, but should benefit equally from this design approach. Not only were the contract cost reduction goals exceeded by a wide margin, but the performance and reliability of the products were also enhanced. The conversion efficiency improvement, as reflected in the 50% conversion loss reduction, adds significant value in renewable energy applications. The size and weight reductions also add value by providing less cumbersome product solutions for system designers.

West, R.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A low-cost 3 projector display system for pain reduction and improved patient recovery times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical procedures are often associated with discomfort, pain and anxiety. Previous studies have shown that one way to reduce pain during treatment is to watch nature scenes and listen to nature sounds or escape into immersive virtual environments. This ... Keywords: head-mounted displays, immersive virtual environments, low-cost 3 projector display system, pain reduction, restorative virtual environments

Eric Fassbender; Paulo de Souza

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council of Industrial Boiler Owners, Burke, Virginia. 9.Conservation (CIPEC). 2001b. Boilers and Heaters, Improving43 5.6.1 Boiler energy efficiency

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant oil recovery performance reported in the literature. The second effort is a more fundamental study. It considers the effect of chemical structures of different naphthenic acids (NA) dissolved in decane as model oils that render calcite surfaces oil-wet to a different degree. NAs are common to crude oil and are at least partially responsible for the frequent observation that carbonate reservoirs are oil-wet. Because pure NA compounds are used, trends in wetting behavior can be related to NA molecular structure as measured by solid adsorption, contact angle and our novel, simple flotation test with calcite. Experiments with different surfactants and NA-treated calcite powder provide information about mechanisms responsible for sought after reversal to a water-wet state. Key findings include: (1) more hydrophobic NA's are more prone to induce oil-wetting, and (2) recovery of the model oil from limestone core was better with cationic surfactants, but one nonionic surfactant, Igepal CO-530, also had favorable results. This portion of the project included theoretical calculations to investigate key basic properties of several NAs such as their acidic strength and their relative water/oil solubility, and relate this to their chemical structure. The third category of this project focused on the recovery of a light crude oil from West Texas (McElroy Field) from a carbonate rock (limestone outcrop). For this effort, the first item was to establish a suite of surfactants that would be compatible with the McElroy Field brine. Those were examined further for their ability to recover oil by imbibition. Results demonstrate several types of promising candida

William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Using Electronic Adjustable Speed Drives for Efficiency Improvement and Cost Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. industry and utilities have been using ac adjustable speed drives (ASDs) for more than 50 years. ASDs utilize power electronics technology to control the flow of power to an ac motor, thereby controlling the motors speed and rate of energy consumption while modulating process flow through the fan or pump driven by the motor. Industrial ASD applications have typically been those requiring extremely precise speed control, such as in fiber spinning operations with multiple motors. However, controlling process flow by varying the speed in many systems does not require the fast-responding, precise wide speed range regenerative drives frequently needed for traditional variable speed applications. Often the required speed range is small and there is limited or no requirement for speed of response and speed control precision. Electronic ASDs have come a long way since their introduction some ten years ago. These drives, which match motor speed to the job with the help of semiconductor devices and switching circuits, have become progressively more efficient and versatile. The cost of electronic ASDs has declined rapidly over the last three years. Pending technology advances promise to make the drives even more attractive in the future, both from a performance as well as a cost standpoint.

Friedman, N. R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Improve Industrial Temperature Measurement Precision for Cost-Effective Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature measurement and energy efficiencies have always been tightly interrelated. Recent years have seen substantial advancements in the ability to make industrial temperature measurements with absolute accuracy. This capability should continue to have a great impact on industrial energy efficiency. "Absolute Accuracy" is a new concept in industrial temperature measurement. Making a measurement with "Absolute Accuracy" has enormous advantages in major industrial processes from heat-transfer to combustion thermal efficiency. Absolute measurement accuracy is especially critical when one temperature measurement is to be compared to another temperature measurement or if the measurement is to be used as part of a calculation formula such as BTU usage or compensated flow. The thermocouple and the RTD sensor continue to be the workhorse sensors for industrial measurements, but the precision measurement capability of the RTD sensor is showing real value in new installations. For temperature measurements under 1,000F, the RTD is extremely stable and repeatable in almost all measurement conditions. There have been significant advances in the ability to accurately read these sensors, particularly in industrial applications where the temperature sensor is installed in a remote location. Four-wire sensor measurement techniques can now be used for reading RTD's in industrial applications. These four-wire measurement techniques have improved the practical measurement accuracy in industrial applications to better than 0.1C. This is at least ten times better than any practical industrial temperature measurement accuracy made prior to 1980. These significant accuracy improvements have been matched by similar improvements in measurement stability, particularly from smart temperature transmitters. Measurement accuracy and stability improvements have allowed for similar advances in process control strategies and in precision energy use studies. Until recently, the inaccuracy of process temperature measurements have stymied implementation of sophisticated control algorithms. With the advent of precise, stable temperature measurements, a number of process control strategies can be implemented using real-time enthalpy balances for control of batch and continuous reactions. These control strategies can result in very significant improvements in both throughput and quality. Similar improvements can be made where it is important to compare an industrial temperature measurements. These comparisons are frequent in energy use studies to identify and isolate potential energy savings. This article examines the advances in remote temperature measurement techniques for the process and utility industries. It offers several examples of the significance of the on-line control techniques.

Lewis, C. W.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in start-up time and energy costs. The energy savings areload factor, running time, local energy costs, and available

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Acid-sludge characterization and remediation improve well productivity and save costs in the Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect

Many oil wells in the Permian Basin have reported sludging problems associated with acid stimulations. The acid sludge is similar among wells and was identified as a viscous emulsion stabilized by asphaltene-rich organic solids. The sludging tendency of the oil increased with the concentrations of asphaltenes and resins, base number of the oil, and ferric ion content in the acid. Only three out of nine commercial acid systems tested were effective in preventing acid-sludge formation; they all use the same novel iron control technology, i.e., catalytic reduction of ferric ions. Several commercial and generic solvent systems were effective in dissolving acid sludge, including mixtures of an aromatic solvent (e.g., xylene) with either isopropyl alcohol (2:1 volume ratio), or ethylene glycol-monobutylether (EGMBE) (2:1 to 3:1 volume ratios). Selection of acid formulations and solvent systems was based on cost effectiveness and operation safety. Field implementation proved successful. If the results of this study had been implemented earlier in the lives of some of the Permian Basin properties, the recovery of 574 BOPD of lost or deferred production from 99 wells could have been realized. This would have resulted in an estimated increased revenue of over US $3 million in 1 year.

Wong, T.C. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States); Hwang, R.J.; Beaty, D.W. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Dolan, J.D.; McCarty, R.A.; Franzen, A.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Midland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An Exploratory Initiative for Improving Low-Cost Housing in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1996 the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University released a report indicating that the population of Texas would double in the next 30 years and that a majority of the 18 million new Texans would be have low to very-low incomes. In order to house that many low income persons, it is apparent that a significant number of affordable housing units must be built in a relatively short time frame. Based on these predictions, our interdisciplinary team made a proposal in the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) Strategic Initiatives Program to explore technologies related to the production of affordable housing. The purpose of the work is to identify opportunities for research into systems, materials, and processes that might contribute to the development of a low-cost housing industry in Texas that could meet state housing needs and might create export possibilities. The proposal was funded by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, the Center for Housing and Urban Development, and the College of Architecture Research Fund. This report summarizes the results of the effort.

McKittrick, T. L.; Haberl, J. S.; Graham, C. W.; Claridge, D. E.; Swain, W. B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

Recanati, Catherine

127

Improving Incremental Balance in the GSI 3DVAR Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gridpoint statistical interpolation (GSI) analysis system is a unified global/regional three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) analysis code that has been under development for several years at the National Centers for ...

Daryl T. Kleist; David F. Parrish; John C. Derber; Russ Treadon; Ronald M. Errico; Runhua Yang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

One-Axis Trackers -- Improved Reliability, Durability, Performance, and Cost Reduction; Final Subcontract Technical Status Report, 2 May 2006 - 31 August 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this subcontract is to reduce the total cost of electricity generated by single-axis tracking solar energy systems for utility and other large-scale commercial applications by improving performance and reliability and by reducing installation time, cost, and environmental impact.

Shingleton, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Deferred incremental refresh of XML materialized views: algorithms and performance evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The view mechanism can provide the user with an appropriate portion of database through data filtering and integration. Views are often materialized for query performance improvement, and in that case, their consistency needs to be maintained against ... Keywords: XML, deferred incremental view refresh, materialized view, semistructured data

Hyunchul Kang; Hosang Sung; ChanHo Moon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Incremental Scale Up of Isasmelt - The Key to Its Success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ISASMELT top submerged lance (TSL) process is a good example of a metallurgical process that was developed using incremental scale up.

132

Incremental-like Bundle Methods with Application to Energy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 18, 2008 ... Incremental-like Bundle Methods with Application to Energy Planning. Grgory Emiel (gemiel ***at*** impa.br) Claudia Sagastizbal (sagastiz...

133

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availableto significant energy cost savings over time (U.S. EPA/DOEcosts and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Incremental spectral clustering by efficiently updating the eigen-system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the spectral clustering method has gained attentions because of its superior performance. To the best of our knowledge, the existing spectral clustering algorithms cannot incrementally update the clustering results given a small change ... Keywords: Graph, Incidence vector/matrix, Incremental clustering, Spectral clustering, Web-blogs

Huazhong Ning; Wei Xu; Yun Chi; Yihong Gong; Thomas S. Huang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Efficient Algorithms for Incremental Update of Frequent Sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the works proposed so far on mining frequent sequences assume that the underlying database is static. However, in real life, the database is modified from time to time. This paper studies the problem of incremental update of frequent sequences ... Keywords: data mining, incremental update, sequence

Minghua Zhang; Ben Kao; David Wai-Lok Cheung; Chi Lap Yip

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CITOM: An incremental construction of multilingual topic maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the CITOM approach for an incremental construction of multilingual Topic Maps. Our main goal is to facilitate user's navigation across documents available in different languages. Our approach takes into account three types of information ... Keywords: Incremental construction, Information retrieval, Multilingual documents, Thesaurus, Topic Map (TM)

Nebrasse Ellouze; Nadira Lammari; Elisabeth Mtais

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An incremental structured part model for image classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art image classification methods usually require many training samples to achieve good performance. To tackle this problem, we present a novel incremental method in this paper, which learns a part model to classify objects using only ... Keywords: image classification, incremental learning, semantic parts, structural relationship

Huigang Zhang; Xiao Bai; Jian Cheng; Jun Zhou; Huijie Zhao

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availablecosts, reduced processing time, and increased resource and energycosts and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate, Phase II: 26 September 2007 - 25 September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar's CIGS manufacturing cost has decreased by increased automation, higher materials utilization, and greater capacity with higher rates in all tools.

Wiedeman, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lom and Associates. (1998). Energy Guide: Energy Efficiencya cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energyThe information in this Energy Guide is intended to help

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-499  

SciTech Connect

Under this CRADA NREL will support Creare's project for the Department of Energy entitled 'Improved Battery Pack Thermal Management to Reduce Cost and Increase Energy Density' which involves the development of an air-flow based cooling product that increases energy density, safety, and reliability of hybrid electric vehicle battery packs.

Smith, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Larger Turbines and the Future Cost of Wind Energy (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The move to larger turbines has been observed in the United States and around the world. Turbine scaling increases energy capture while reducing general project infrastructure costs and landscape impacts, each of which of can reduce the cost of wind energy. However, scaling in the absence of innovation, can increase turbine costs. The ability of turbine designers and manufacturers to continue to scale turbines, while simultaneously reducing costs, is an important factor in long-term viability of the industry. This research seeks to better understand how technology innovation can allow the continued development of larger turbines on taller towers while also achieving lower cost of energy. Modeling incremental technology improvements identified over the past decade demonstrates that cost reductions on the order of 10%, and capacity factor improvements on the order of 5% (for sites with annual mean wind speed of 7.25 m/s at 50m), are achievable for turbines up to 3.5 MW. However, to achieve a 10% cost reduction and a 10% capacity factor improvement for turbines up to 5 MW, additional technology innovations must be developed and implemented.

Lantz, E.; Hand, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remaining errors in this Energy Guide are the responsibilityThe views expressed in this Energy Guide do not necessarilya cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Specifications to Improve Power Quality Immunity in Electronic Systems for Industrial Applications: Suggestions for Higher Quality a nd Lower Cost Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the work described in this report is to provide suggestions for a specification language that will allow end-users to integrate successfully electronic industrial equipment with the existing electrical systems. Cost effective solutions to improve system reliability and performance are specifically addressed. The intention is to eliminate disruptions induced by power quality-related problems and incompatibilities between process equipment and the electrical environment. Most of these technique...

2000-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

A project to improve the capabilities of minorities in energy fields and a cost benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project being reported in this document had three components: (1) a research project to carry out cost-benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant at Tuskegee University, (2) seminars to improve the high-technology capabilities of minority persons, and (3) a class in energy management. The report provides a background on the three components listed above. The results from the research on the ethyl alcohol plant, are discussed, along with the seminars, and details of the energy management class.

Sara, T.S.; Jones, M. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Greenhouse GasIn: Energy Guide. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in theS. (2000). Barriers to Energy Efficiency in the UK Brewing

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filter technology may be an improvement from the traditional cross-flowfilter membranes are shaped like tubes and are configured according to the cross-flow

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wind shielding. Building insulation. Adding insulationguidelines for building insulation, for example, Californiafor improving building insulation. Low-emittance windows can

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass wool) insulation for buildings, roofing, and panels.for fiberglass insulation are building batting (39%),roof improve the insulation of the building against both hot

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters of moving substrate, while ensuring uniform properties; enhance health and safety by reducing selenium waste generation through modifications to the reactor and Se delivery method. - Back Contact Deposition - Reduce back-contact cost and increase operation yield by using improved back-contact materials.

Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S. (Global Solar Energy, L.L.C.)

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

Kraft, E.H.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Incremental and Nonbinary CSP Solver: The Hyperpolyhedron Search Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Incremental and Non­binary CSP Solver: The Hyperpolyhedron Search Algorithm Miguel A. Salido and scheduling can be expressed in a natural way as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP). It is well known that a non­binary CSP can be transformed into an equivalent binary CSP using some of the actual techniques

Rossi, Francesca

158

AgentCubes: Incremental 3D end-user development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D game development can be an enticing way to attract K-12 students to computer science, but designing and programming 3D games is far from trivial. Students need to achieve a certain level of 3D fluency in modeling, animation, and programming to be ... Keywords: Computational thinking, End-user development, Game design, IT fluency, Incremental 3D, Visual programming

Andri Ioannidou; Alexander Repenning; David C. Webb

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Raging incrementalism: harnessing change with open-source software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Change is a bitter fact of life for system developers and, to a large extent, conventional practices are aimed at arresting change and minimizing its effects. We take the opposite view and are exploring system engineering practices that harness the forces ... Keywords: open source, raging incrementalism, representational state transfer

John C. Georgas; Michael M. Gorlick; Richard N. Taylor

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cost-effective ways to improve the fabrication and installation of solar heating and cooling systems for residences. Final report, June 1, 1977-September 30, 1978  

SciTech Connect

A Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory study investigating cost-effective ways of improving fabrication and installation of residential solar energy heating systems is documented. The study entailed on-site observation of twelve installations focusing on the phase of mounting and manifolding of solar collectors. Time lapse photography and work measurement techniques were employed to record these installations. Generic collector types studied included air and liquid panels both internally and externally manifolded. Principal findings of the study synthesized from field observations, analysis of photographic data, time studies, and discussion with installation personnel and manufacturers' representatives are presented in the technical report.

Thayer, S.B.; Jacobs, P.; Weaver, N.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cost-effective ways to improve the fabrication and installation of solar heating and cooling systems for residences. Final report, June 1, 1977-September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory study investigating cost-effective ways of improving fabrication and installation of residential solar energy heating systems is documented. The study entailed on-site observation of twelve installations focusing on the phase of mounting and manifolding of solar collectors. Time lapse photography and work measurement techniques were employed to record these installations. Generic collector types studied included air and liquid panels both internally and externally manifolded. Principal findings of the study synthesized from field observations, analysis of photographic data, time studies, and discussion with installation personnel and manufacturers' representatives are presented in the technical report.

Thayer, S.B.; Jacobs, P.; Weaver, N.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

163

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Improvement Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006 J. Cohen and T. Schweizer Princeton Energy Resources International (PERI) Rockville, Maryland A. Laxson, S. Butterfield, S. Schreck, and L. Fingersh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Veers and T. Ashwill Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Technical Report NREL/TP-500-41036 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

164

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams November 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $30.6 million in Recovery Act funding for the selection of seven hydropower projects that modernize hydropower infrastructure by increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impacts at existing facilities. The expanded hydro generation projects have estimated incremental costs of less than 4 cents per kWh on average. The selections announced today will deploy innovative technologies such as high-efficiency, fish-friendly turbines, improved water intakes, and

166

Improving the Cost-Effectiveness of Artificial Visual Baits for Controlling the Tsetse Fly Glossina fuscipes fuscipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsetse flies, which transmit sleeping sickness to humans and nagana to cattle, are commonly controlled by stationary artificial baits consisting of traps or insecticide-treated screens known as targets. In Kenya the use of electrocuting sampling devices showed that the numbers of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Newstead) visiting a biconical trap were nearly double those visiting a black target of 100 cm6100 cm. However, only 40 % of the males and 21 % of the females entered the trap, whereas 71 % and 34%, respectively, alighted on the target. The greater number visiting the trap appeared to be due to its being largely blue, rather than being three-dimensional or raised above the ground. Through a series of variations of target design we show that a blue-and-black panel of cloth (0.06 m 2) flanked by a panel (0.06 m 2) of fine black netting, placed at ground level, would be about ten times more cost-effective than traps or large targets in control campaigns. This finding has important implications for controlling all subspecies of G. fuscipes, which are currently responsible for more than 90 % of sleeping sickness cases.

Jenny M. Lindh; Steve J. Torr; Glyn A. Vale; Mike J. Lehane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

168

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry - An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

779E 779E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Ernst Worrell, Paul Blinde, Maarten Neelis, Eliane Blomen, and Eric Masanet Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

169

Effect of tax, financing, and operating-cost incentives on retiree homeowners' current and potential decisions to purchase energy-saving improvements  

SciTech Connect

This study focused on retiree homeowners to determine their level of participation, causes of non-participation and the effect of selected incentive modifications on investment decisions. A descriptive-elemental approach was taken to explore three research questions. Fifty semi-structured interviews selected through restricted probability were conducted in Sun City, California. Findings were keyed to sex, age, education and income and statistically analyzed using the chi-square test. Retiree homeowners had coped with rising utility costs through modified usage practice rather than through energy-saving investments. Concerns over access to funding, required initial payout, return on investment, future prices of energy and risk were highest among those of least education or income. A desire to retain an existing life style was important to those of higher education and income. Level of awareness of incentive features was also a major decision factor. The analysis indicated that energy-saving investments will increase if retiree homeowners are offered shared-cost obligation by the individual, government, and utility; exemption from sales tax for all energy-saving-item sales and service; state tax exemption for federal tax credits; exemption of energy-saving improvements from property tax; continued federal tax credit; investment loans sufficiently available to meet demand; energy-producing equipment available for rent or lease at reasonable rates.

Long, A.W. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Generation of pornographic blacklist and its incremental update using an inverse chi-square based method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presented an inverse chi-square based web content classification system that works along with an incremental update mechanism for incremental generation of pornographic blacklist. The proposed system, as indicated from the experimental results, ... Keywords: Incremental update, Inverse chi-square function, Pornographic blacklist, Web content classification

Lung-Hao Lee; Cheng-Jye Luh

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

173

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10) System improvements Improved load management MaintenanceSystems Motor management plan Strategic motor selection Maintenance

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availableshowed that energy costs were lower and that the time of thecosts and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management system, using sub- metering, achieved over a 5%Ross, 1989). Although sub-metering is usually very costly towith metering in mind, sub-metering costs very little. The

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formed during compression of water vapors (Maroulis andcompression limitations and the high costs of evaporation under vacuum, vapor

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage and energy cost over time using net presentlower energy costs substantially. (5) Real-Time Monitoring:costs: demand = $10 per kW per month (all 12 months of the year); energy consumption = 7 per kWh (all times

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load factor, running time, local energy costs, and availablecosts, reduced processing time, and increased resource and energycosts and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. (1994). Understand Steam Generator Performance. Chemical1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costs at awho rebuilt their steam turbine generators at their Burns

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lom and Associates (1998). Energy Guide: Energy Efficiencyindustrydefined in this Energy Guide as facilities engageda cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of Methodologies for Real-Time Incremental Heat Rate Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced staffing, tighter budgets, ISOs, and increased competition have created the need for maintaining up-to-date incremental heat rate information. Combining recent advances in analytics with modern performance monitoring packages and data historians may provide the capability for closer-to-real-time incremental heat rate determination. Many power generating companies either rely on historic data or slow and labor intensive testing to establish incremental heat rate curves. Those curves are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Steady State Forces in Single Incremental Sheet Forming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incremental sheet forming process is a relatively new method of forming which is increasingly being used in the industry. Complex shapes can be manufactured using this method and the forming operation doesn't require any dies. High strains of over 300 % can also be achieved. Incremental sheet forming method is used to manufacture many different components presently. Prototype examples include car headlights, tubs, train body panels and medical products. The work done in the thesis deals with the prediction of the steady state forces acting on the tool during forming. Prediction of forces generated would help to design the machine against excessive vibrations. It would help the user to protect the tool and the material blank from failure. An efficient design ensures that the tool would not get deflected out of its path while forming, improving the accuracy of the finished part. To study the forces, experiments were conducted by forming pyramid and cone shapes. An experimental arrangement was set up and experimental data was collected using a data acquisition system. The effect that the various process parameters, like the thickness of the sheet, wall angle of the part and tool diameter had on the steady state force were studied. A three dimensional model was developed using commercial finite element software ABAQUS using a new modeling technique to simulate the deformation of the sheet metal blank during incremental sheet forming. The steady state forces generated for any shape, with any set of parameters used, could be predicted using the numerical model. The advantage of having a numerical model is that the forces can be predicted without doing experiments. The model was used to predict the steady state forces developed during forming of pyramid and cone shapes. The results were compared and were seen to be reasonably close to the experimental results. Later, the numerical model was validated by forming arbitrary shapes and comparing the value obtained from simulations to the value of the measured steady state forces. The results obtained from the numerical model were seen to match very well with the experimental forces for the new shapes. The numerical model developed using the new technique was seen to predict forces to a reasonable extent with less computational time as compared to the models currently available.

Nair, Mahesh

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Energy, Waste, and Productivity ImprovementsExcessive blowdown will waste energy, water, and chemicals.Assessment of Energy, Waste, and Productivity Improvements

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Tax Increment Financing Program (TIF) (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The District offers several innovative public financing tools where developers can use bond financing or bank loans to fund a portion of their construction costs. The funds are repaid over time...

187

Exploring Cost-Effective, High Performance Residential Retrofits for Affordable Housing in the Hot Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, a Department of Energy Building America team led by the Florida Solar Energy Center began working with partners to find cost-effective paths for improving the energy performance of existing homes in the hot humid climate. A test-in energy audit and energy use modeling of the partners proposed renovation package was performed for 41 affordable and middle income foreclosed homes in Florida and Alabama. HERS1 Indices ranged from 92 to 184 with modeled energy savings ranging from 3% to 50% (average of 26%). Analyses and recommendations were discussed with partners to encourage more efficient retrofits, highlight health and safety issues, and gather feedback on incremental cost of high performance measures. Ten completed renovations have modeled energy savings ranging from 9% to 48% (average 31%.) This paper presents the projects process including our findings thus far and highlights of the first home to meet the target HERS Index of 70.

McIlvaine, J.; Sutherland, K.; Chandra, S.; Schleith, K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Exploring Cost-Effective, High Performance Residential Retrofits for Affordable Housing in the Hot Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, a Department of Energy Building America team led by the Florida Solar Energy Center began working with partners to find cost-effective paths for improving the energy performance of existing homes in the hot humid climate. A test-in energy audit and energy use modeling of the partner's proposed renovation package was performed for 41 affordable and middle income foreclosed homes in Florida and Alabama. HERS1 Indices ranged from 92 to 184 with modeled energy savings ranging from 3% to 50% (average of 26%). Analyses and recommendations were discussed with partners to encourage more efficient retrofits, highlight health and safety issues, and gather feedback on incremental cost of high performance measures. Ten completed renovations have modeled energy savings ranging from 9% to 48% (average 31%.) This paper presents the project's process including our findings thus far and highlights of the first home to meet the target HERS Index of 70.

McIlvaine, Janet; Sutherland, Karen; Schleith, Kevin; Chandra, Subrato

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006) Teaming Up to Save Energy Guide. U.S. Environmentala cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energyThe information in this Energy Guide is intended to help

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Incremental Impacts of Energy Efficiency Policy Initiatives Relative to the 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incremental Impacts of Energy Efficiency Policy Initiatives Relative to the 2009 Integrated Energy Policy Report Adopted Demand Forecast ATTACHMENT A: TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared For: California Energy;Incremental Impacts of Energy Efficiency Policy Initiatives Relative to the 2009 Integrated Energy Policy

192

Bi-parameter incremental unknowns ADI iterative methods for elliptic problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bi-parameter incremental unknowns (IU) alternating directional implicit (ADI) iterative methods are proposed for solving elliptic problems. Condition numbers of the coefficient matrices for these iterative schemes are carefully estimated. Theoretical ... Keywords: Bi-parameter ADI iterative method, Condition number, Convergence analysis, Incremental unknowns

Aili Yang; Yujiang Wu; Yongqing Wu; Dawei Ren

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fuzzy incremental control algorithm of loop heat pipe cooling system for spacecraft applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and high precision thermal control technologies are essential for the safe flight of advanced spacecraft. A fuzzy incremental control strategy is proposed for control of an LHP space cooling system comprising a loop heat pipe and a variable ... Keywords: Fuzzy incremental control, Loop heat pipe, Modeling and simulation, Space cooling system

Su-Jun Dong; Yun-Ze Li; Jin Wang; Jun Wang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Incorporating site-level knowledge for incremental crawling of web forums: a list-wise strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study in this paper the problem of incremental crawling of web forums, which is a very fundamental yet challenging step in many web applications. Traditional approaches mainly focus on scheduling the revisiting strategy of each individual page. However, ... Keywords: incremental crawling, sitemap, web forum

Jiang-Ming Yang; Rui Cai; Chunsong Wang; Hua Huang; Lei Zhang; Wei-Ying Ma

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

An incremental deployment algorithm for wireless sensor networks using one or multiple autonomous agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper studies the deployment problem of wireless sensor networks using one or multiple autonomous agents. An online incremental algorithm based on Voronoi partition is proposed to solve the problem, for which each agent deploys sensors one-at-a-time ... Keywords: Autonomous agent, Incremental deployment, Sensor network

Zhiyun Lin; Sijian Zhang; Gangfeng Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or design of improved production cost models. to assess thelearning which lowers production costs, and resourcewhich increases production costs. Each of these modules are

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Improving Control System Cyber-State Awareness using Known Secure Sensor Measurements  

SciTech Connect

AbstractThis paper presents design and simulation of a low cost and low false alarm rate method for improved cyber-state awareness of critical control systems - the Known Secure Sensor Measurements (KSSM) method. The KSSM concept relies on physical measurements to detect malicious falsification of the control systems state. The KSSM method can be incrementally integrated with already installed control systems for enhanced resilience. This paper reviews the previously developed theoretical KSSM concept and then describes a simulation of the KSSM system. A simulated control system network is integrated with the KSSM components. The effectiveness of detection of various intrusion scenarios is demonstrated on several control system network topologies.

Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

199

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary management of Tinnitus at a specialized Tinnitus centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) will be quantified using the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses will be used to show the impact of variation in non-stochastic input parameters on the incremental cost- utility ratio, such as discount rate, unit prices, and design issues... using integral cost calcu- lations. Costs from productivity loss will be quantified using the friction cost method, as recommended in the Netherlands [28]. Ethical considerations Patients will be informed verbally and in written format about the research...

Cima, Rilana; Joore, Manuela; Maes, Iris; Scheyen, Dyon; El Refaie, Amr El; Baguley, David M; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Anteunis, Lucien

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of Large High-Voltage PV Modules with Improved Reliability and Lower Cost: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2006--31 August 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective was to provide NREL with technical results that enhance its capability to improve PV manufacturing technology by developing a PV module with specified characteristics.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005a), the recovery of steam condensate was identified as a2000). By using steam condensate instead of low pressureimprovement Return condensate Steam trap maintenance Improve

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (2000c). New steam turbine saves chemical manufacturer $demand. Back-pressure steam turbines which may be used to

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costscan be driven by a steam turbine or an electric motor. Hot

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

helped to improve the Energy Guide substantially. We wouldremaining errors in this Energy Guide are the responsibilityThe views expressed in this Energy Guide do not necessarily

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of renewable energy production facilities in theRenewable Energy. Best Practices Program. Compressed Air System Optimization Project Improves Production

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wind shielding. Building insulation. Adding insulationguidelines for building insulation, for example, Californiafor improving building insulation. Low emittance windows can

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wind shielding. Building insulation. Adding insulationguidelines for building insulation, for example, Californiafor improving building insulation. Low emittance windows can

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capital costs and improving efficiency have lead to substantially improved electrolysis production costs compared to DOE's H2A assessment of 2005 technology costs (forecourt...

210

Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Laboratory for Measurement and Testing Techniques, Helmholtzstrasse 18, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Impact of incremental changes in meteorology on thermal compliance and power system operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the TVA reservoir and power supply systems to extreme meteorology was evaluated using a series of mathematical models to simulate the relationship between incremental changes in meteorology, associated changes in water temperature, and power plant generation. Single variable analysis techniques were applied at selected TVA facilities for representative average and extreme weather conditions. In the analysis, base case simulations were first conducted for each representative year using observed meteorology (i.e., the no change condition). The impacts of changes in meteorology were subsequently analyzed by uniformly constant at their respective base case values. Project results are generally presented in terms of deviations from base case conditions for each representative year. Based on an analysis of natural flow and air temperature patterns at Chickamauga Dam, 1974 was selected to represent extreme cold-wet conditions; 1965 as reflecting average conditions; and 1986 as an example of an extremely hot-dry year. The extreme years (i.e., 1974 and 1986) were used to illustrate sensitivities beyond historical conditions; while the average year provided a basis for comparison. Observed reservoir conditions, such as inflows, dam releases, and reservoir elevations for each representative year, were used in the analysis and were assumed to remain constant in all simulations. Therefore, the Lake Improvement Plan (which was implemented in 1991) and its consequent effects on reservoir operations were not incorporated in the assessment. In the model simulations, computed water temperatures were based on vertically well-mixed conditions in the reservoirs.

Miller, B.A.; Alavian, V.; Bender, M.D. [and others

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 * November 2010 5 * November 2010 Energy transfer improvements from the 10-kW wind turbine tested by NREL. The graph shows successive improvement, including the latest preliminary third generation improvement in the green shaded area. Increased Energy Transfer: NREL continues to improve energy transfer from a 10-kW solar PV array, comparing directly coupling the PV array to the electrolyzer stack with a connection through a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) power electronics package designed at NREL. The experimental testing (above) revealed that direct coupling outperformed power electronics when solar irradiance levels are below 500 W/m 2 while the MPPT power converter delivered more energy to the stacks between 500 and 1,100 W/m 2 . These findings

213

Street as structure : an approach to the incremental development of Fort Point Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work seeks to create an approach to the incremental development of a warehouse district in the City of Boston. The focus of the thesis is on the generation of rules and an implementation process that will organize the ...

Powers, Darleen D

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation of cost-effective energy efficiency measuresW. , 2007. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost SavingE. , 2003. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and WinDS). The authors and general location of the 40 detailed transmission studies included in our review are illustrated in Figure ES-1. As discussed in the body of the report, these studies vary considerably in scope, authorship, objectives, methodology, and tools. Though we recognize this diversity and are cognizant that comparisons among these studies are therefore somewhat inappropriate, we nonetheless emphasize such simple comparisons in this report. We do so in order to improve our understanding of the range of transmission costs needed to access greater quantities of wind, and to highlight some of the drivers of those costs. In so doing, we gloss over many important details and differences among the studies in our sample. In emphasizing simple comparisons, our analysis focuses primarily on the unit cost of transmission implied by each of the studies. The unit cost of transmission for wind in $/kW terms on a capacity-weighted basis is estimated by simply dividing the total transmission cost in a study by the total amount of incremental generation capacity (wind and non-wind) modeled in that study. In so doing, this metric assumes that within any individual study all incremental generation capacity imposes transmission costs in proportion to its nameplate capacity rating. The limitations to this approach are described in some detail in the body of the report.

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

217

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in improving energy transfer within a wind turbine-based hydrogen production system. Work was performed by the Wind2H2 Project team at the National Wind Technology Center in partnership with Xcel Energy.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Methodology for Costing Ancillary Services from Hydro Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the unique flexibility of Hydro resources, Hydro resource owners perceive a unique opportunity to profit from emerging markets for Ancillary Services (A/S) service products. Effective pricing and profitability measurement tools, however, are not widely available. This report creates a framework for defining A/S products and develops a methodology for calculating total incremental costs of providing A/S in terms of five cost elements.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Specifications to Improve Power Quality Immunity in Electronic Systems for Industrial Applications -- A Downloadable Web Product: Su ggestions for Higher Quality and Lower Cost Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help improve power quality performance in electronic process equipment, this technical progress report is made available to users for download in PDF (192K). Key power quality issues are presented to provide a systematic approach to integrating electronic equipment into the industrial environment. As with the traditional hardcopy version (1000693), the goal is to provide suggestions for a specification language that will allow end-users to integrate electronic industrial equipment with the existing el...

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Using decision analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer  

SciTech Connect

Background: The specific aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of a 70-year-old with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods: A Markov model was designed with the following states; posttreatment, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and death. Transition probabilities from one state to another were calculated from rates derived from the literature for IMRT and 3D-CRT. Utility values for each health state were obtained from preliminary studies of preferences conducted at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The analysis took a payer's perspective. Expected mean costs, cost-effectiveness scatterplots, and cost acceptability curves were calculated with commercially available software. Results: The expected mean cost of patients undergoing IMRT was $47,931 with a survival of 6.27 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The expected mean cost of patients having 3D-CRT was $21,865 with a survival of 5.62 QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness comparing IMRT with CRT was $40,101/QALYs. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 55.1% probability of IMRT being cost-effective at a $50,000/QALY willingness to pay. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was found to be cost-effective, however, at the upper limits of acceptability. The results, however, are dependent on the assumptions of improved biochemical disease-free survival with fewer patients undergoing subsequent salvage therapy and improved quality of life after the treatment. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, decision analysis can help inform physicians and health policy experts on the cost-effectiveness of emerging technologies.

Konski, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: andre.konski@fccc.edu; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Department of Population Sciences, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kulkarni, Sachin M.S. [Department of Population Sciences, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beck, J. Robert [Department of Information and Science Technologies, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

222

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Policy Instruments for Energy-Efficiency Improvements inand Graus, W. , 2007. Energy Efficiency Improvement and CostWorrell, E. , 2003. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental improvements and better economics in EOR operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how environmental improvements in EOR technology continues to advance. Successful EOR requires the injection of a fluid which produces incremental oil for the least overall cost. When the net volumetric costs of EOR injection fluids are compared at reservoir conditions, it is clear that only a few liquids or compressed gases can be used to displace crude oil on a barrel for barrel basis. Although high-concentration surfactants have the potential for very efficient displacements, reservoir heterogeneity increases the economic uncertainty of the process, especially at today's oil prices. Water is always the cheapest fluid to inject, even with small amounts of polymer added, and polymer flooding can be cost- effective for new waterfloods. However, polymer flooding is not efficient for displacing tertiary oil. Water converted to steam still accounts for most of the EOR production in the U.S.A., but low oil prices and stricter environmental regulations now restrain large expansions and new projects. Cogeneration of steam and electricity improves the economics markedly for thermal EOR projects, and gas-fired boilers reduce the emissions to the atmosphere. By firing the cogeneration boilers with coal or gas, the more plentiful fossil fuels are converted into much-needed liquid fuels efficiently and economically.

Taber, J.J. (New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (USA). New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E cient Incremental Algorithms for the Sparse Resultant and the Mixed Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the algorithm is presented and empirical results are reported which suggest that it is the fastest mixed volumeE cient Incremental Algorithms for the Sparse Resultant and the Mixed Volume IOANNIS Z. EMIRISzAND JOHN F. CANNYx zProjet SAFIR, I.N.R.I.A., B.P. 93, 06902 Sophia-Antipolis, France. emiris

O'Brien, James F.

228

Simplified and Regular Physical Parameterizations for Incremental Four-Dimensional Variational Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of physical parameterizations has been developed for inclusion in incremental four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var). The goal for this physical package is that it be simple, regular (for the efficiency of the minimization in 4D-...

Marta Janiskov; Jean-Nol Thpaut; Jean-Franois Geleyn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Variance Optimal Hedging for continuous time processes with independent increments and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a large class of vanilla contingent claims, we establish an explicit F\\"ollmer-Schweizer decomposition when the underlying is a process with independent increments (PII) and an exponential of a PII process. This allows to provide an efficient algorithm for solving the mean variance hedging problem. Applications to models derived from the electricity market are performed.

Goutte, Stphane; Russo, Francesco

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discussionon least?costenergyefficiencystrategiestheupfrontcostsand improvementsinenergyefficiency,bothCostEstimates 16 EnergyEfficiency

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Learning generative visual models from few training examples: An incremental Bayesian approach tested on 101 object categories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current computational approaches to learning visual object categories require thousands of training images, are slow, cannot learn in an incremental manner and cannot incorporate prior information into the learning process. In addition, no algorithm ... Keywords: Bayesian model, Categorization, Generative model, Incremental learning, Object recognition

Li Fei-Fei; Rob Fergus; Pietro Perona

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The effect of moving from a plan-driven to an incremental software development approach with agile practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far, only few in-depth studies focused on the direct comparison of process models in general, and between plan-driven and incremental/agile approaches in particular. That is, it is not made explicit what the effect is of moving from one model to another ... Keywords: Agile, Case study, Incremental, Migration, Plan-driven

Kai Petersen; Claes Wohlin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Report Tunneling Cost Reduction Study prepared for Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories has a need to review the costs of constructing the very long tunnels which would be required for housing the equipment for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) project. Current tunneling costs are high, and the identification of potential means of significantly reducing them, and thereby helping to keep overall project costs within an acceptable budget, has assumed great importance. Fermilab has contracted with The Robbins Company to provide an up-to-date appraisal of tunneling technology, and to review the potential for substantially improving currently the state-of-practice performance and construction costs in particular. The Robbins Company was chosen for this task because of its long and successful experience in hard rock mechanical tunnel boring. In the past 40 years, Robbins has manufactured over 250 tunneling machines, the vast majority for hard rock applications. In addition to also supplying back-up equipment, Robbins has recently established a division dedicated to the manufacture of continuous conveying equipment for the efficient support of tunneling operations. The study extends beyond the tunnel boring machine (TBM) itself, and into the critical area of the logistics of the support of the machine as it advances, including manpower. It is restricted to proven methods using conventional technology, and its potential for incremental but meaningful improvement, rather than examining exotic and undeveloped means of rock excavation that have been proposed from time to time by the technical community. This is the first phase of what is expected to be a number of studies in increasing depth of technical detail, and as such has been restricted to the issues connected with the initial 34 kilometer circumference booster tunnel, and not the proposed 500 kilometer circumference tunnel housing the VLHC itself. The booster tunnel is entirely sited within low to medium strength limestone and dolomite formations, typical of the Chicago area. The rock is generally competent with widely spaced jointing, and slowdown of the operation for the installation of rock support is expected to be minimal. The tunneling system will have to be equipped with the necessary equipment for an efficient response to poor rock conditions however. Because the ground conditions are expected to be very favorable, a state-of-the-art TBM should have no difficulty in excavating at a high penetration rate of 10 meters per hour or more in rock of the average of the range of strengths stated to exist. Disc cutter changes will be few as the rock has very low abrasivity. However, experience has shown that overall tunneling rates are a relatively low percentage of the machine's penetration rate capability. Therefore the main focus of improvement is guaranteeing that the support systems, including mucking and advance of the utilities do not impede the operation. Improved mechanization of the support systems, along with automation where practicable to reduce manpower, is seen as the best means of raising the overall speed of the operation, and reducing its cost. The first phase of the study is mainly involved with establishing the baseline for current performance, and in identifying areas of improvement. It contains information on existing machine design concepts and provides data on many aspects of the mechanical tunneling process, including costs and labor requirements. While it contains suggestions for technical improvements of the various system, the time limitations of this phase have not permitted any detailed concept development. This should be a major part of the next phase.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

235

Costs in the Norwegian Payment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate social and private cost for the use and production of payment services in Norway for 2007. The calculations include banks, merchants and households cost for cash, cards and giro payments. The social cost is calculated to be 0.49 % of GDP, or NOK 11.16 billion. Costs are also calculated on a per-service basis. The results are compared with data from earlier cost surveys by Norges Bank. The unit costs of the most popular services have decreased over the years. Efficiency and productivity of banks payment service operations has improved. We also make comparisons between frameworks, methodologies, and results from cost surveys in five European countries.

Olaf Gresvik; Harald Haare; Norges Bank; Sigbjrn Atle Berg; Gunnvald Grnvik; Asbjrn Enge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Capturing Value in a Global Innovation Network: A Comparison of Radical and Incremental Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of factory cost Storage Display Chips* Battery Assemblyof factory cost Storage Display Chips* Battery SoftwareCost: 30GB Video iPod and HP nc6230 notebook Software Storage Display Processors Assembly Battery

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L; Linden, Greg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

On undrained test using Rowe's relation and Incremental Modelling: Generalisation of the notion of Characteristic State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is recalled that stress-strain incremental modelling is a common feature of most theoretical description of the mechanical behaviour of granular material. An other commonly accepted characteristics of the mechanical behaviour of granular material is the Rowe's relation which links the dilatancy K to the ratio B of vertical-to-lateral stress during a test at constant lateral stress, i.e. B =(1+M)(1+K). Using an incremental modelling, this law shall be interpreted as a pseudo-Poisson coefficient. We combine these two features to solve the problem of an axial compression under undrained condition. We demonstrate that the sample is submitted to a bifurcation of the transcritical type when it reaches the q=Mp line. This allows extending the notion of the characteristic state introduced by Luong to other situations and to anisotropic systems. We show also that these undrained tests are quite appropriate to study the characteristic-state behaviour.

P. Evesque

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow Dynamics Across the North American Grid  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The presentation "Understanding the Impacts of Incremental Gas Supply on the Flow Dynamics Across the North American Grid" was given at the Canadian Institute's BC LNG Forum on November 20, 2006. The presentation provides an overview of EIA's long-term natural gas projections under reference case and sensitivity cases from the Annual Energy Outlook 2006, with special emphasis on natural gas flows in the West Coast.

Information Center

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

239

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

240

Calculating Cycling Wear and Tear Costs: Methodology and Data Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes development of a methodology and database that utilities can use to calculate unit-specific incremental costs for cycling operation of fossil-fueled power plants. The three-level approach will allow users to choose an easy-to-use solution based on a pure "top-down" approach of peer-unit average values, a modified top-down approach, or a detailed "bottom-up" approach based on equipment condition assessment and engineering analysis.

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Correlating Cycle Duty with Cost at Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report is part of the ongoing EPRI Cycling Impacts Program to develop a range of analysis and simulation-capable planning tools. The objectives are to better determine cycling impacts (including incremental costs), reliability impact, component level effects, and impacts and other elements needed to better plan and manage operational and financial aspects of power generation. This report documents early efforts to establish strong correlations between the cycle duty of a produc...

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental control costs for oil shale processes  

SciTech Connect

The studies reported herein are intended to provide more certainty regarding estimates of the costs of controlling environmental residuals from oil shale technologies being readied for commercial application. The need for this study was evident from earlier work conducted by the Office of Environment for the Department of Energy Oil Shale Commercialization Planning, Environmental Readiness Assessment in mid-1978. At that time there was little reliable information on the costs for controlling residuals and for safe handling of wastes from oil shale processes. The uncertainties in estimating costs of complying with yet-to-be-defined environmental standards and regulations for oil shale facilities are a critical element that will affect the decision on proceeding with shale oil production. Until the regulatory requirements are fully clarified and processes and controls are investigated and tested in units of larger size, it will not be possible to provide definitive answers to the cost question. Thus, the objective of this work was to establish ranges of possible control costs per barrel of shale oil produced, reflecting various regulatory, technical, and financing assumptions. Two separate reports make up the bulk of this document. One report, prepared by the Denver Research Institute, is a relatively rigorous engineering treatment of the subject, based on regulatory assumptions and technical judgements as to best available control technologies and practices. The other report examines the incremental cost effect of more conservative technical and financing alternatives. An overview section is included that synthesizes the products of the separate studies and addresses two variations to the assumptions.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects -Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009UCSC Major Capital Improvement Projects - Anticipated Construction Times Showing Total Project Costs 11/20/07 2007-8 July 2008-9 July 2009-10 July 2010-11 July 2011-12 July 2012-13 July 2013-14 July

California at Santa Cruz, University of

244

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

247

The implementation of a 3D characteristics solver for the generation of incremental cross sections for reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor  

SciTech Connect

We are presenting issues related to the generation of consistent incremental cross sections for the reactivity devices in a CANDU reactor. Such calculations involve the solution of the neutron transport equation over complex 3D geometries representing a single vertical reactivity device inserted mid-way between two horizontal fuel channels. The DRAGON lattice code has recently been upgraded and can handle the exact geometry of such configurations for trajectory-based transport solvers. Within this framework, the detailed representation of the reactivity devices implies an increase in the number of regions when the strongly absorbing regions and fuel clusters are described without cylinderization. In this paper, a solution based on the characteristics method is compared with the standard procedure, based on the collision probabilities method. The coherence of both solvers is highlighted and a comparison of their computational costs is presented. (authors)

Le Tellier, R.; Hebert, A.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079 suce. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Que. H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

249

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

An Examination of the Incremental Balance in a Global Ensemble-Based 3D-Var Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the modification to the balance properties of the analysis increments in a global three-dimensional variational data assimilation scheme when using flow-dependent background-error covariances derived from an operational ...

Jean-Franois Caron; Luc Fillion

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Incremental reference resolution: the task, metrics for evaluation, and a Bayesian filtering model that is sensitive to disfluencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we do two things: a) we discuss in general terms the task of incremental reference resolution (IRR), in particular resolution of exophoric reference, and specify metrics for measuring the performance of dialogue system components tackling ...

David Schlangen; Timo Baumann; Michaela Atterer

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of ...

253

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

How to Fit simply Soil Mechanics Behaviour with Incremental Modelling and to Describe Drained Cyclic Behaviours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proposed recently a new incremental modelling to describe the mechanics of soil. It is based on two parameters called the pseudo Young modulus E=1/Co and the pseudo Poisson coefficient n, which both evolve during compression. Evolution of n is known since it shall fit the Rowe's law of dilatancy, but Co has to be evaluated from experiment. In this paper we proposed a way to evaluate the Co variation from other mechanical modelling. The way cyclic behaviour of drained sample can be modelled is also described.

P. Evesque

2005-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Using a Stochastic Kinetic Energy Backscatter Scheme to Improve MOGREPS Probabilistic Forecast Skill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved stochastic kinetic energy backscatter scheme, version 2 (SKEB2) has been developed for the Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS). Wind increments at each model time step are derived from a streamfunction ...

Warren J. Tennant; Glenn J. Shutts; Alberto Arribas; Simon A. Thompson

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moment both costs and energy efficiency are too uncertain toW. (2008). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Savingenergy densities, costs, cycle times and efficiencies. A

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential and costs of energy- efficiency improvements bypotentials and the cost of energy-efficiency measures andand Cost Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Light-Duty Natural-Gas-Fueled Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and make recommendations concerning technologies that promise to improve the efilciency of compressed natural gas (CNG) light-duty vehicles. Technical targets for CNG automotive technology given in the March 1998 OffIce of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan were used as guidance for this effort. The technical target that necessitates this current study is to validate technologies that enable CNG light vehicles to have at least 10% greater - fuel economy (on a miles per gallon equivalent basis) than equivalent gasoline vehicles by 2006. Other tar- gets important to natural gas (NG) automotive technology and this study are to: (1) increase CNG vehicle range to 380 miles, (2) reduce the incremental vehicle cost (CNG vs gasoline) to $1500, and (3) meet the California ultra low-emission vehicle (ULEV) and Federal Tier 2 emission standards expected to be in effect in 2004.

Staunton, R.H.; Thomas, J.F.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

262

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

264

Optimal Project Feature Weights in Analogy-Based Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Project Feature Weights in Analogy-Based Cost Estimation: Improvement and Limitations, IEEE Abstract--Cost estimation is a vital task in most important software project decisions as measured by standard metrics. Index Terms--Software cost estimation, analogy-based cost estimation, project

265

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

268

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Title Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S. Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59745 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., Victor H. Franco, Stephen Meyers, James E. McMahon, Michael A. McNeil, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-59745 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This paper presents analysis of the life-cycle costs for individual households and the aggregate energy and economic impacts from potential energy efficiency improvements in U.S. residential furnaces. Most homes in the US are heated by a central furnace attached to ducts for distributing heated air and fueled by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blower is significant, comparable to the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance. Since the same blower unit is also used during the summer to circulate cooled air in centrally air conditioned homes, electricity savings occur year round. Estimates are provided of the potential electricity savings from more efficient fans and motors. Current regulations require new residential gas-fired furnaces (not including mobile home furnaces) to meet or exceed 78% annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE), but in fact nearly all furnaces sold are at 80% AFUE or higher. The possibilities for higher fuel efficiency fall into two groups: more efficient non-condensing furnaces (81% AFUE) and condensing furnaces (90-96% AFUE). There are also options to increase the efficiency of the furnace blower. This paper reports the projected national energy and economic impacts of requiring higher efficiency furnaces in the future. Energy savings vary with climate, with the result that condensing furnaces offer larger energy savings in colder climates. The range of impacts for a statistical sample of households and the percent of households with net savings in life cycle cost are shown. Gas furnaces are somewhat unusual in that the technology does not easily permit incremental change to the AFUE above 80%. Achieving significant energy savings requires use of condensing technology, which yields a large efficiency gain (to 90% or higher AFUE), but has a higher cost. With respect to electricity efficiency design options, the ECM has a negative effect on the average LCC. The current extra cost of this technology more than offsets the sizable electricity savings.

269

Estimating Well Costs for Enhanced Geothermal System Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the work reported was to investigate the costs of drilling and completing wells and to relate those costs to the economic viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This is part of a larger parametric study of major cost components in an EGS. The possibility of improving the economics of EGS can be determined by analyzing the major cost components of the system, which include well drilling and completion. Determining what costs in developing an EGS are most sensitive will determine the areas of research to reduce those costs. The results of the well cost analysis will help determine the cost of a well for EGS development.

K. K. Bloomfield; P. T. Laney

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Automotive System Cost Modeling Tool (ASCM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology vehicles (i.e., diesel, hybrid, and fuel cell) developed for improved fuel economy remains either be done through Argonne National laboratory's hybrid vehicle cost model algorithm (adapted the Tool Can Help Answer · What is the life cycle cost of today's midsize hybrid vehicle? · How does

271

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

272

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

273

Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

El-Khoury, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Stock prices and the cost of environmental regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent environmental regulations have used market incentives to reduce compliance costs and improve efficiency. In most cases, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) selects an emissions cap using the predicted costs ...

Linn, Joshua

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cutting Industrial Solar System Costs in Half  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there are technical, social, environmental and institutional barriers to the widespread use of solar systems, the principle barrier is economic. For commercial and industrial firms to turn to this alternate energy source, the first cost must be sharply reduced so that the annual savings that are achievable will provide an attractive return on the incremental investment. This paper discusses one proven method of combining the energy efficiency of high temperature industrial heat pumps with solar collectors that result in an installed first cost that approximates one half of that of conventional solar systems. This technology is now available for producing up to 220 F hot water for industrial process heat, space heating, and service hot water heating. The basic principles of the technology are reviewed, including the typical operating characteristics of the industrial heat pumps and the solar collectors, plus the generic application schematics comparing this approach with conventional solar collector only systems. Several case histories are reviewed, including an industrial plant, townhouse project, and hospital. Not only is a lower first cost demonstrated, but the combination uses small solar arrays, ideal where roof area is limited, and use less expensive solar collectors.

Niess, R. C.; Weinstein, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

277

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

THE POLITICS OF NON-INCREMENTAL SCHOOL FINANCE REFORM: A CASE STUDY ANALYSIS OF VERMONT'S ACT 60 AS A TEST OF MAZZONI'S ARENA MODEL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research, grounded in political theory, had two major purposes: 1) to explain a case of non-incremental policy change within the realm of school finance (more)

Curtis, Kimberly Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payerfunded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An incremental learning algorithm based on the K-associated graph for non-stationary data classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-stationary classification problems concern the changes on data distribution over a classifier lifetime. To face this problem, learning algorithms must conciliate essential, but difficult to gather, attributes like good classification performance, ... Keywords: Concept drift, Graph-based learning, Incremental learning, K-associated graph, Non-stationary classification, Purity measure

JoO Roberto Bertini, Jr, Liang Zhao, Alneu A. Lopes

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Taxonomic knowledge structure discovery from imagery-based data using the neural associative incremental learning (NAIL) algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important component of higher level fusion is knowledge discovery. One form of knowledge is a set of relationships between concepts. This paper addresses the automated discovery of ontological knowledge representations such as taxonomies/thesauri ... Keywords: Associative learning, Incremental learning, Information fusion, Knowledge structure, Multi-target classification, Ontology learning, Taxonomy

Bradley J. Rhodes

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

285

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Applications Development  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of petascale and exascale machines makes it increasingly difficult to develop applications that can take advantage of them. Future systems are expected to feature billion-way parallelism, complex heterogeneous compute nodes and poor availability of memory (Peter Kogge, 2008). This new challenge for application development is motivating a significant amount of research and development on new programming models and runtime systems designed to simplify large-scale application development. Unfortunately, DoE has significant multi-decadal investment in a large family of mission-critical scientific applications. Scaling these applications to exascale machines will require a significant investment that will dwarf the costs of hardware procurement. A key reason for the difficulty in transitioning today's applications to exascale hardware is their reliance on explicit programming techniques, such as the Message Passing Interface (MPI) programming model to enable parallelism. MPI provides a portable and high performance message-passing system that enables scalable performance on a wide variety of platforms. However, it also forces developers to lock the details of parallelization together with application logic, making it very difficult to adapt the application to significant changes in the underlying system. Further, MPI's explicit interface makes it difficult to separate the application's synchronization and communication structure, reducing the amount of support that can be provided by compiler and run-time tools. This is in contrast to the recent research on more implicit parallel programming models such as Chapel, OpenMP and OpenCL, which promise to provide significantly more flexibility at the cost of reimplementing significant portions of the application. We are developing CoMPI, a novel compiler-driven approach to enable existing MPI applications to scale to exascale systems with minimal modifications that can be made incrementally over the application's lifetime. It includes: (1) New set of source code annotations, inserted either manually or automatically, that will clarify the application's use of MPI to the compiler infrastructure, enabling greater accuracy where needed; (2) A compiler transformation framework that leverages these annotations to transform the original MPI source code to improve its performance and scalability; (3) Novel MPI runtime implementation techniques that will provide a rich set of functionality extensions to be used by applications that have been transformed by our compiler; and (4) A novel compiler analysis that leverages simple user annotations to automatically extract the application's communication structure and synthesize most complex code annotations.

Bronevetsky, G; Quinlan, D; Lumsdaine, A; Hoefler, T

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Assessing the Battery Cost at Which Plug-In Hybrid Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles Become Cost-Effective  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validated diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid medium-duty parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reductions and cost implications of hybrid and plug-in hybrid diesel variants. The hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants are run on a field data-derived design matrix to analyze the effect of drive cycle, distance, engine downsizing, battery replacements, and battery energy on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. For an array of diesel fuel costs, the battery cost per kilowatt-hour at which the hybridized configuration becomes cost-effective is calculated. This builds on a previous analysis that found the fuel savings from medium duty plug-in hybrids more than offset the vehicles' incremental price under future battery and fuel cost projections, but that they seldom did so under present day cost assumptions in the absence of purchase incentives. The results also highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle specific daily distance and kinetic intensity.

Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J. D.; Brooker, A. D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

290

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

291

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

292

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

293

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

294

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

295

Understanding the cost of power interruptions to U.S. electricity consumers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is designed so that its cost estimate can be improved asin data used for cost estimates. At the other extreme,Typically, outage-cost estimates are based on surveys that

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Eto, Joseph H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

298

Cost estimate for muddy water palladium production facility at Mound  

SciTech Connect

An economic feasibility study was performed on the ''Muddy Water'' low-chlorine content palladium powder production process developed by Mound. The total capital investment and total operating costs (dollars per gram) were determined for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg in 1-kg increments. The report includes a brief description of the Muddy Water process, the process flow diagram, and material balances for the various production batch sizes. Two types of facilities were evaluated--one for production of new, ''virgin'' palladium powder, and one for recycling existing material. The total capital investment for virgin facilities ranged from $600,000 --$1.3 million for production batch sizes of 1--10 kg, respectively. The range for recycle facilities was $1--$2.3 million. The total operating cost for 100% acceptable powder production in the virgin facilities ranged from $23 per gram for a 1-kg production batch size to $8 per gram for a 10-kg batch size. Similarly for recycle facilities, the total operating cost ranged from $34 per gram to $5 per gram. The total operating cost versus product acceptability (ranging from 50%--100% acceptability) was also evaluated for both virgin and recycle facilities. Because production sizes studied vary widely and because scale-up factors are unknown for batch sizes greater than 1 kg, all costs are ''order-of-magnitude'' estimates. All costs reported are in 1987 dollars.

McAdams, R.K.

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Low cost manufacturing of light trapping features on multi-crystalline silicon solar cells : jet etching method and cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted in order to determine low cost methods to improve the light trapping ability of multi-crystalline solar cells. We focused our work on improving current wet etching methods to achieve the ...

Berrada Sounni, Amine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cost-effective, energy- efficiency technologies andhigh investment costs of energy efficiency measures: Evenpotential and costs of energy-efficiency improvements by

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

305

Generalized linear model-based expert system for estimating the cost of transportation projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely effective cost management requires reliable cost estimates at every stage of project development. While underestimation of transportation costs seems to be a global trend, improving early cost prediction accuracy in estimates is difficult. This ... Keywords: Cost management, Expert system, Generalized linear model, Relational database, Transportation projects

Jui-Sheng Chou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. The most cost-effective hydrogen tower design would use substantially all of its volume for hydrogen storage and be designed at its crossover pressure. An 84-m tall hydrogen tower for a 1.5-MW turbine would cost an additional $84,000 (beyond the cost of the conventional tower) and would store 950 kg of hydrogen. The resulting incremental storage cost of $88/kg is approximately 30% of that for conventional pressure vessels.

Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Incremental Correction for the Dynamical Downscaling of Ensemble Mean Atmospheric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was motivated by the need for an improved method compared to the conventional brute-force approach to ensemble downscaling. That method simply applies dynamical downscaling to each ensemble member. It obtains a reliable forecast by ...

Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effect of automotive electrical system changes on fuel consumption using incremental efficiency methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a continuous increase in automotive electric power usage. Future projections show no sign of it decreasing. Therefore, the automotive industry has a need to either improve the current 12 Volt automotive ...

Hardin, Christopher William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Incrementally verifiable computation or proofs of knowledge imply time/space efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probabilistically checkable proof (PCP) system enables proofs to be verified in time polylogarithmic in the length of a classical proof. Computationally sound (CS) proofs improve upon PCPs by additionally shortening the length of the transmitted proof ...

Paul Valiant

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Incremental Correction for the Dynamical Downscaling of Ensemble Mean Atmospheric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was motivated by the need for an improved method compared to the conventional brute force approach to ensemble downscaling. That method simply applies dynamical downscaling to each ensemble member. It obtains a reliable forecast by ...

Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

316

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy Evolution of Texture in...

318

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

319

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

320

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

322

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given companys cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

324

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

325

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Enhanced stability at a lower cost negativeelectrodes...

327

NETL: Gasification Systems - Studies to Improve Plant Availability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost Project No.: DE-FE0007859 General Electric Company (GE) is studying the feasibility of improving plant...

328

Selecting the incremental use of the fuel cycle and regional reference environments  

SciTech Connect

To demonstrate the accounting framework and give some practical meaning to the concept of external costs of various stages of the fuel cycle, we will apply the approach to a limited number of case studies. These case studies will emphasize two of the major sectors for which energy sources are needed: electricity production and transportation. Because the intent here is to illustrate the approach and not to derive sweeping generalizations or comparisons, criteria and proposed selections for the two sectors were not constrained to be identical. However, applications to either sector require the resolution of a number of general issues. 1 fig.

Cantor, R.; Curlee, R.; Hillsman, E.

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and...

330

Tradeoffs associated with increasing water yield from the Edwards Plateau, Texas: balancing private costs and public benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Aquifer supplies water to approximately 2 million people in central Texas and is recharged by rangelands on the Edwards Plateau, Texas. Since water yields increase from rangelands when brush is controlled, citizens of the region have a vested interest in the management of rangeland vegetation. In 1985 legislation was passed which recognized the relationship between reducing brush and increasing water yields, and encouraged brush control on private ranches to increase stream and aquifer recharge. No funds were appropriated to implement the legislation, due partially to insufficient scientific evidence needed to target rangelands where brush control was most likely to improve water yields. Data collected since 1985 have strengthened the scientific basis for estimating how water yields are likely to increase in response to incremental levels of brush removal for sites in the Edwards Plateau. An objective of this thesis was to estimate ranchers' willingness to participate in a cost-sharing program that would facilitate brush control designed to increase water yield. The cost-share offers varied according to the current ranch brush cover and were designed to enable ranchers to control brush for 10 years at no net cost. Survey data analysis addressed two issues fundamental to the design and implementation of policy to promote brush control on privately-owned Texas rangelands. First, a demographic profile of the ranchers most likely to participate in a cost-share program was developed. Second, these data were used to estimate how much land participants are likely to enroll in the brush control cost-sharing scenario examined in this study. Probit and Cragg models were used to estimate landowners' willingness to participate and the number of acres prospective participants were willing to enroll in the proposed program, respectively. Results suggest that an estimated 66% of landowner's who match the demographic profile of the survey respondents are willing to participate in a similar cost-sharing program. Landowners most likely to be willing to participate earn more than 50% of their household income from ranching, derive most of their ranch income from livestock enterprises, own ranches larger than 2,000 acres, and own ranches more than 75 miles from Austin or San Antonio.

Garriga, Matthew David

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

2011 Heat Rate Improvement Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rising cost of fuel and the strong possibility of CO2 emissions regulations and limitations in the near future, utilities and power generation companies are focusing on power plant heat rate and performance. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 17th Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist attendees in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and sustaining heat rate improve...

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation_Final2.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor

335

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Engineering and cost analysis of a dry cooling system augmented with a thermal storage pond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An engineering and cost study of the capacitive thermal storage pond added to a state-of-the-art dry cooling system is described. The purpose of the study was to assess the potential for reducing the cost of all-dry cooling for thermal electric power plants using a dry cooling system that includes a thermal storage pond. Using the modified BNW-I computer code, the effect of varying significant design parameters was investigated. The parametric study included studying the effects of varying turbine type, pond size, replacement energy costing, capacity penalty methodology, pond location with respect to the dry cooling tower, design temperature, and site location (meteorology). Incremental power production costs for dry cooling (i.e., the portion of the cost of bus-bar electricity from the plant which is attributable to the cost of building and operating the heat rejection system) with a thermal storage pond system were determined for meteorologies of both Wyodak, Wyoming and Phoenix, Arizona. For Wyodak the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 2.81 mills/kWh as compared to 2.55 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. For Phoenix the incremental cost of dry cooling with a thermal storage pond was 3.66 mills/kWh as compared to 4.31 mills/kWh for a system without a thermal storage pond. If the use of a modified conventional turbine with the dry-cooled system is stipulated in order to stay with proven technology for large turbines, then results of this study show that in extremely hot climates the thermal storage pond can reduce the cost of dry cooling. If no cost penalty is assigned to high back pressure turbines and it can be used, then the thermal storage pond has no advantage in hot climates. However, collateral use of the pond for makeup or emergency cooling water storage may decreae the cost. (LCL)

Drost, M.K.; Allemann, R.T.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

338

Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Nontoxic quantum dot research improves solar cells Solar cells made with low-cost, nontoxic copper-based quantum dots can achieve...

339

AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improving Organizational Memories Through User Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benefits of an organizational memory are ultimately determined by the usefulness of the organizational memory as perceived by its users. Therefore, an improvement of an organizational memory should be measured in the added perceived usefulness. Unfortunately, the perceived usefulness has many impact factors (e.g., the precision of the user query, the urgency with which the user needs information, the coverage of the underlying knowledge base, the quality of the schema used to store knowledge, and the quality of the implementation). Hence, it is difficult to identify good starting points for improvement. This paper presents the goal-oriented method OMI (Organizational Memory Improvement) for improving an organizational memory incrementally from the user's point of view. It has been developed through several case studies and consists of a general usage model, a set of indicators for improvement potential, and a cause-effect model. At each step of the general usage model of OMI, pro...

Klaus-Dieter Althoff; Markus Nick; Carsten Tautz

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Directions for improved fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts.

Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cost-Benefit Assessment of Cycle Alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this technical update report represents an in-depth study to evaluate the different methods used to improve cycle alignment. The study outlines the cost and benefits of using these different methods and describes their application. The collection and assemblage of this information will provide a reference for plant engineering and management personnel in their attempts to improve steam plant efficiency by implementing a systematic cycle alignment program. Through the use of t...

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

345

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

346

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1990--30 April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed under a three-phase subcontract. The objectives of the program include (1) achievement of active-area efficiencies of greater than 14% on small cells; (2) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 13% on 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules; (3) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 12.5% on 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules; and achievement of greater than 20-year module life (based on life testing extrapolations) with no greater than 10% efficiency degradation. The results obtained and described herein include the following: (1) efficiencies of 12.7% were achieved on small-area devices; (2) 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved greater than 8% aperture-area efficiency, but work for further efficiency improvement was redirected toward the 0.37-M{sup 2} (4 if) modules; (3) 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved 26.5-W output, which calculates to 8.0% aperture-area efficiency; (4) consistent prototype production was focused on and substantially achieved within Phase 2; (5) life testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory showed no inherent stability problems with the CdTe technology, and the accuracy of module measurement was satisfactorily resolved; and (6) a ``cradle-to-cradle`` recycling program was begun based upon the philosophy that the establishment of such mechanisms will be required to ensure maximum recapture and recycling of all manufacturing waste materials and/or modules returned from the field.

Albright, S.P.; Johnson, S.X. [Golden Photon, Inc., CO (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

User's manual: GCOST: A gas cost-of-service program: Version 1. 0  

SciTech Connect

The process of rate design for a gas distribution utility requires the use of cost-of-service studies. A cost-of-service study finds the various costs of serving all of a utility's customers, and allocates these costs to individual customer classes. Costs include investments in plant and equipment, operating expenses, and taxes. There are two distinct approaches that underlie cost-of-service studies. One approach is based on marginal costs and the other on embedded costs. The marginal-cost allocation can be defined as the incremental cost of adding a single customer to the system. The embedded cost is the customer's share of historical costs. Of the two approaches, the latter is easier to implement and traditionally has been used for rate-making purposes. GCOST is designed to perform cost-of-service studies using the traditional embedded cost approach. It accepts accounting, financial, and operating data as user input. It then allocates the various items of utility plant and operating expenses to each customer class according to user-specified methods. For each cost item or account, the user has the option of specifying an allocation method or formula. This flexibility allows the user to experiment with different combinations of allocation methods. GCOST is interfaced with a database management program, which is used to prepare input data files prior to running GCOST. The user has the choice of either using DBMGR, developed by NRRI, or the commercial software dBASE III PLUS, as the database management program. GCOST is designed for use on an IBM Personal Computer XT, AT, or compatible system.

Harunuzzaman, M.; Iyyuni, G.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EPRI's Twelfth Heat Rate Improvement Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Twelfth Heat Rate Improvement Conference, sponsored by EPRI's Heat Rate and Cost Optimization Value Package, is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist utilities in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and maintaining heat rate improvement. The last conference was held in Baltimore in September 1998.

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

351

A program to accelerate the deployment of CO{sub 2} capture and storage: rational, objectives and cost  

SciTech Connect

This White Paper, the first of a series, analyzes one strategy for accelerating the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) by the coal-fueled electricity generation industry. This strategy involves providing reimbursement for the incremental costs of installing and operating CCS systems, with reimbursement provided for retrofitting existing coal-fuelled electricity generation plants with CCS, incorporating CCS into new plants, and launching large-scale demonstrations of geologic storage of carbon. 14 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs., 3 apps.

Vello A. Kuuskraa [Advanced Resources International, Inc. (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

353

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility and success of petroleum development projects depend to a large degree on well construction costs. Well construction cost estimates often contain high levels of uncertainty. In many cases, these costs have been estimated using deterministic methods that do not reliably account for uncertainty, leading to biased estimates. The primary objective of this work was to improve the reliability of deterministic well construction cost estimates by incorporating probabilistic methods into the estimation process. The method uses historical well cost estimates and actual well costs to develop probabilistic correction factors that can be applied to future well cost estimates. These factors can be applied to the entire well cost or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated well cost using this methodology was significantly more accurate than average estimated well cost using deterministic methods. Systematic use of this methodology can provide for more accurate and efficient allocation of capital for drilling campaigns, which should have significant impacts on reservoir development and profitability.

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

355

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

356

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

357

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

358

Analysis of electricity production costs from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

The economics of the geopressured geothermal resource along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is assessed. Geopressured waters are nearly under twice the normal hydrostatic pressure and believed to be saturated with methane. The costs of generating electricity from this resource are estimated based on the description and conceptual development plans provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Methane content and selling prices are the most important factors affecting the commercial potential of geopressured resources--so it is important that electrical generation be viewed as a by-product of methane production. On the same incremental cost basis, the cost of electricity generated from the geohydraulic energy is potentially competitive with conventional energy sources. This would require development of a small commercial high pressure, hydraulic turbine to extract geohydraulic energy at the wellhead in plants of about 3 MW capacity. Price/quantity relationships are developed for electricity generation from geopressured resources for each of three development plans proposed by USGS. Studies, based on field constructed plants, indicated an optimum power plant size in the range of 20 to 60 MWe, depending on water temperature. However, if standardized thermal conversion power plants could be factory produced in the 6 MWe range competitively with larger field constructed plants, then the optimum plant size might be reduced to single wellhead units.Wellhead units would completely eliminate fluid transmission costs, but would probably incur higher costs for heat rejection, power plant operation, and electrical transmission. The upper cost target for competitive wellhead plants would be on the order of $800/kW in 1975 dollars.

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small independent producer to identify efficiently candidate reservoirs and also to predict the performance of horizontal well applications.

Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Service Provider Competition: Delay Cost Structure, Segmentation, and Cost Advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model competition between two providers who serve delay-sensitive customers. We compare a generalized delay cost structure, where a customer's delay cost depends on her service valuation, with the traditional additive delay cost structure, where the ... Keywords: delay cost structure, service competition, value-based market segmentation

Maxim Afanasyev; Haim Mendelson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Title Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-19734 Year of Publication 1985 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Russell Johnson, Stephen E. Selkowitz, and Deborah J. Connell Conference Name 2nd Annual Symposium on Improving Building Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates Date Published 09/1985 Conference Location Texas A&M University Call Number LBL-19734 Abstract Fenestration performance in nonresidentialsbuildings in hot climates is often a large coolingsload liability. Proper fenestration design andsthe use of daylight-responsive dimming controls onselectric lights can, in addition to drasticallysreducing lighting energy, lower cooling loads,speak electrical demand, operating costs, chillerssizes, and first costs. Using the building energyssimulation programs DOE-2.1B and DOE-2.1C , wesfirst discuss lighting energy savings from daylighting.sThe effects of fenestration parametersson cooling loads, total energy use, peak demand,schiller sizes, and initial and operating costs aresalso discussed. The impact of daylighting, asscompared to electric lighting, on cooling requirementssis discussed as a function of glazingscharacteristics, location, and shading systems.

365

Portable top drive cuts horizontal drilling costs  

SciTech Connect

Economic analysis of a seven-well, long-reach horizontal drilling program into an unconsolidated, heavy-oil-bearing reservoir in Winter field near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border in Canada reveals that -- in the right application -- renting a portable top drive drilling system can reduce total drilling costs. Use of the portable top drive combined with other cost-saving measures enabled Saskoil, one of Canada`s larger independents, to drill more cheaply, on a cost-per-meter basis, in 1993 than in 1992. This was despite significant rental rates for drilling rigs and directional drilling services caused by increased demand in Western Canada. Total cost savings of 10% on wells that would otherwise cost in the (C) $500,000 range are believed realistic. Based on this year`s performance, Saskoil recommends top drive for the company`s future horizontal wells in this area. This article describes the operator`s horizontal well program, advantages of top drive in that program and how it was installed and applied. Estimated time savings for six wells, plus other ways top drive can cut costs and improve operations are discussed.

Jackson, B. [Saskoil, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Yager, D. [Tesco Drilling Tech., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reducing Enzyme Costs Increases Market Potential of Biofuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research has led to improvements in sugar yields and dramatically reduced ethanol production costs. The importance of this research was recognized in 2004 by an R&D 100...

367

Brush Busters: How to Estimate Costs for Controlling Small Cedar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple directions help you determine the density of cedar on rangeland or improved pastures, and then estimate the cost of controlling these plants with any of the three Brush Busters methods.

Ueckert, Darrell; McGinty, Allan

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Multidisciplinary structural design and optimization for performance, cost, and flexibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing cost and improving performance are two key factors in structural design. In the aerospace and automotive industries, this is particularly true with respect to design criteria such as strength, stiffness, mass, ...

Nadir, William David, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Role of Data Communications in Hybrid Cloud Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid adoption of cloud services in recent years has been driven by multiple factors, such as faster time-to-market and improved scalability enabled by public cloud infrastructure. Hybrid clouds, combining the in-house capacities with on-demand capacity ... Keywords: hybrid cloud, cost model, data communications cost

Oleksiy Mazhelis; Pasi Tyrvainen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recent Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy from U.S. Wind Power Projects Ryan Wiser This analysis was funded by the Wind & Water Power Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy factor trends fails to convey recent improvements in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from wind

371

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

Narumanchi, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvements, including all stages of project engineering: scope development, cost estimation, system designFACILITIES ENGINEER ­ WEST CHICAGO OVERVIEW: Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing

Heller, Barbara

376

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultramar Inc. Sunoco Inc. ExxonMobil Willaims Shell BPBrian Eidt and staff at ExxonMobil, F.L. Oaks (MarathonVicksburg Newell (Congo) ExxonMobil Baton Rouge Baytown

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels in the graph. Source: Petroleum Supply Annual, Energypetroleum products, refineries are still a substantial sourceadded produced by petroleum refineries. Source: U.S. Census,

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pharmaceutical Industry Pharmaceutical Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

380

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breweries Breweries Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors...

382

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Generation 74 18.1 Combined Heat and Power Generation (as feedstock, and power generation. In the view of Katzer et

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency of Crude Oil Distillation. Heat TransferMitigation of Fouling in Crude Oil Pre-Heat Trains. Proc. 24Mitigation of Fouling in Crude Oil Preheat Trains. Proc. 24

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Distribution .Process Integration Steam Distribution Power Generation7 summarizes the steam distribution system measures. Steam,

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Improved Solar Power Plant Efficiency: Low Cost Vaccine ...  

Background Photovoltaic (PV) systems are of great interest to the efforts of sustainable energy. Solar irradiance is a measure of the suns ...

386

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Repair Flash Steam Recovery/ Condensate Return CondensateRecover flash steam Return condensate Distillation OptimizedFlash Steam. When a steam trap purges condensate from a

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Energy Technologies Laboratory, U.S. Department ofProfitability. Energy Information Administration, U.S.1999, Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

230 Improving Pump Efficiency and Lowering Life Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandblasting combined with coating the internal pump casing restores the remaining 50%. This study ..... 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies.

389

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, October 1997.U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Panchal, C.B. andU.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC. U.S. DOE-OIT.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies, National Energy Technologies Laboratory, U.S.22 nd Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX,Oil Refining Ltd. , Energy technology Support Unit, Harwell,

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of natural gas as feedstock, and power generation. InNatural gas is used for the production of hydrogen, fuel for co-generation of heat and power (

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MTC. Marano, J.J. , 2003. Refinery Technology Profiles:Deep Desulfurization of Oil Refinery Streams: A Review. FuelSavings for Flying J Refinery. Oil & Gas Journal, December 2

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Technology Profiles: Gasification and SupportingGasification.to be carried out. 18.5 Gasification Gasification provides

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Improving Costs and Efficiency of PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles by ...  

Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower emissions. Running the vehicles motor on hydrogen rather than gasoline ...

395

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an entrained bed gasifier. Due to the limited oxygenof power in an Integrated Gasifier Combined Cycle (IGCC). In

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and G.E. Handwerk. 1994. Petroleum Refining: Technology andFCCU Energy Efficiency. Petroleum Technical Quarterly,Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry, Office of

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991). Shenoy, U. 1994. Heat Exchanger Network Synthesis.Retrofit Analysis of a Heat Exchanger Network of a FluidD.C King. 2002. Emerging Heat Exchanger Technologies for the

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report, July, 1999.energy use by the energy price paid by the household.energy consumption, energy price, discount rate, and central

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. 1994. "Understand Steam Generator Performance." Chemicaland two heat recovery steam generators (boilers). The system

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies, National Energy Technologies Laboratory, U.S.Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC, June

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in steam generation, distribution and end-use are possible.that steam generation, distribution, and cogeneration offerIntegration Steam Distribution Power Generation Power

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspropyrgos Refinery Combined Cycle Cogeneration System.refineries operate combined cycles with higher efficiencies.in an Integrated Gasifier Combined Cycle (IGCC). In this

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiencesmanagement programs. This Energy Guide describes researchpetroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, WA. Report No. PNNL- 7. U.S. Department of Energy,National Laboratory (PNNL) using the Building Loads andADL), and David Winiarski (PNNL). This work was supported by

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28 6.1 Energy Management Systems (EMS) and99 Appendix C: Energy Management System Assessment for Bestthe Global Energy Management System (GEMS) of ExxonMobil has

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recover heat from processes and transfer heat to the processProcess Integration.. 43 9.1 Heat Transferoptimization of heat transfer among processes is therefore

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requiring cooling, absorption cooling can be combined within combination with absorption cooling has been demonstrated

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ENERGY STAR energy management matrix to evaluate andManagement Assessment Matrix ENERGY STAR Guidelines ForSTAR Guidelines For Energy Management Assessment Matrix 0 -

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for major household appliances. Any new or amended standardcosts), lifetime of the appliance, and a discount rate. LCCconsumers use in purchasing appliances. Consumers purchase

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asphalt Hydrogen Coke Sulfur Capacity Distribution (Barrelstill gas, natural gas, and coke. Other CO2 Emissions (MtCE)Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Coke Still Gas Residual Fuel oil

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

costs | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Varnish cache server costs Dataset Summary Description This dataset represents a historical repository of all the numerical data from the smartgrid.gov website condensed into spreadsheets to enable analysis of the data. Below are a couple of things worth noting: Source Smartgrid.gov Date Released March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Date Updated March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Keywords AMI costs distribution smart grid transmission Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 4Q12 (xlsx, 112.1 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 3Q12 (xlsx, 107.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 2Q12 (xlsx, 111.9 KiB)

412

Cost Study Manual | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual Update 62912. Memo regarding Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Newsletter-June 1999 Build...

413

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

Whisnant, R.A. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of a right-of-way cost estimation and cost estimate management process framework for highway projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Escalation of right-of-way (ROW) costs have been shown to be a prime contributor to project cost escalation in the highway industry. Two problems contribute to ROW cost escalation: 1) the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process generally lacks structure and definition as compared to other areas of cost estimation; and 2) there is a lack of integration and communication between those responsible for ROW cost estimating and those responsible for general project cost estimating. The research for this thesis was preceded by a literature review to establish the basis for the study. Data collection was completed through interviews of seven state highway agencies (SHAs) and two local public agencies (LPAs). The findings of the research are presented in a set of ROW flowcharts which document the steps, inputs, and outputs of the ROW cost estimation and cost estimate management process. Three ROW cost estimates and a cost management process take place throughout project development. An effort was made from the onset of the research to relate the ROW cost estimating and cost estimate management process to the first four project development phases (planning, programming. preliminary design, and final design). There are five flowcharts produced as a result of this research: 1) an agency-level flowchart showing all cost estimates and the interaction of ROW with the project development process; 2) a conceptual ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during planning; 3) a baseline ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during programming; 4) an update ROW cost estimating flowchart which depicts the required steps during preliminary design to include a cost estimate management loop; and 5) a ROW cost management flowchart which depicts the required steps during final design. Although selected SHA contacts provided input following the development of the flowcharts, the flowcharts were only validated to a limited extent due to time and budget constraints. These flowcharts attempt to address the two contributing problems to ROW cost escalation by providing structure to the ROW cost estimation process and by developing the ROW process flowcharts linked to the project development process. Based on the input provided by SHA contacts, the flowcharts appear to have the potential to provide guidance to SHAs in improving the accuracy of ROW cost estimates through addressing these two problems.

Lucas, Matthew Allen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 model energy code in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This is an analysis of cost effectiveness the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family houses and multifamily housing units in New Jersey. Goal was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to the alternate allowed in the 1993 Building Officials & Code Administrators (BOCA) National Energy Conservation Code -- American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90A-1980 -- based on a comparison of the costs and benefits associated with complying with each. This comparison was performed for Camden, New Brunswick; Somerville, and Sparta. The analysis was done for two different scenarios: a ``move-up`` home buyer purchasing a single-family house and a ``first-time`` financially limited home buyer purchasing a multifamily unit. For the single-family home buyer, compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1028 to $1564, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $206 to $313 (at 20% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was from 1 to 5 years. The home buyer who paid 20% down had recovered increases in down payments and mortgage payments in energy cost savings by the end of the fifth year or sooner and thereafter will save more money each year. For the multifamily unit home buyer first costs were estimated to increase by $121 to $223, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $12 to $22 (at 10% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was 1 to 3 years.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The importance of vehicle costs, fuel prices, and fuel efficiency to HEV market success.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Toyota's introduction of a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) named ''Prius'' in Japan and Honda's proposed introduction of an HEV in the United States have generated considerable interest in the long-term viability of such fuel-efficient vehicles. A performance and cost projection model developed entirely at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is used here to estimate costs. ANL staff developed fuel economy estimates by extending conventional vehicle (CV) modeling done primarily under the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. Together, these estimates are employed to analyze dollar costs vs. benefits of two of many possible HEV technologies. We project incremental costs and fuel savings for a Prius-type low-performance hybrid (14.3 seconds zero to 60 mph acceleration, 260 time) and a higher-performance ''mild'' hybrid vehicle, or MHV (11 seconds 260 time). Each HEV is compared to a U.S. Toyota Corolla with automatic transmission (11 seconds 260 time). The base incremental retail price range, projected a decade hence, is $3,200-$3,750, before considering battery replacement cost. Historical data are analyzed to evaluate the effect of fuel price on consumer preferences for vehicle fuel economy, performance, and size. The relationship between fuel price, the level of change in fuel price, and consumer attitude toward higher fuel efficiency is also evaluated. A recent survey on the value of higher fuel efficiency is presented and U.S. commercial viability of the hybrids is evaluated using discount rates of 2090 and 870. Our analysis, with our current HEV cost estimates and current fuel savings estimates, implies that the U.S. market for such HEVS would be quite limited.

Santini, D. J.; Patterson, P. D.; Vyas, A. D.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Photovoltaic Cz Silicon Module Improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work focused on reducing the cost per watt of Cz silicon photovoltaic modules under Phase II of Siemens Solar Industries' DOE/NREL PVMaT 4A subcontract is described in this report. New module designs were deployed in this phase of the contract, improvements in yield of over 10% were realized, and further implementation of Statistical Process Control was achieved during this phase. Module configurations representing a 12% cost reduction per watt were implemented in small scale production under Phase II of this contract. Yield improvements are described in detail, yield sensitivity to wafer thickness is quantified, and the deployment of SPC in critical process steps is reported here.

Jester, T. L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cost-effective ceramics program in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 5-year Cost-Effective Ceramics for Heat Engines program began in 1993. This effort reflects the realization that the problems with reliability of structural ceramics have been largely overcome, but the high cost of structural ceramics is limited their use in commercial applications. The technical causes of high cost were identified, and a technical plan developed. The work elements in the program include the following: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, standards development, and low-expansion ceramics.

Schulz, R.B. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operating Costs with an Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School ener- gy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002-and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and 2006. Improving a school's energy efficiency doesn't have to cost millions. In fact, schools can cut their energy expenses by 5 to 20 percent simply by efficiently managing and operating physical plants. This holds true regardless of the age of a school building. A smart O&M program can improve an existing school's energy performance An O&M program can be a simple initiative or a

424

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

425

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 - 12:19pm Addthis Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE’s vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were reduced by greater than 60 percent. Judy McLemore from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant led efforts to reduce the DOE's vehicle fleet by 20 percent, improving sustainability and saving money. Under her leadership, greenhouse gas emissions associated with business travel were reduced by 63 percent and travel costs were

426

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation using cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Use of Incremental Pricing in Coal Supply and Transportation Agreements to Achieve Power Sales: Report Series of Fuel and Power Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased power market competition is transforming into increased fuel supply competition. This report examines the role that "incremental pricing" for coal supply and transportation services plays in permitting power generators to achieve greater power sales. Surprisingly, the outlook for using such mechanisms for this purpose is more restricted than one might expect.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gasoline prices rise due to increased crude oil costs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, as a result of vehicle fuel economy improvements, costs-per-mile-driven are not at record highs. Further, gasoline prices vary significantly by region, ...

432

O&M First! Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs Heating accounts for a significant energy load and usually presents a number of opportunities to improve performance and...

433

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis.In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

Asgarian, Behrouz [K.N. Toosi University of Technology Tehran Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power plant expenses, it is imperative to develop and deploy a tool that can help plants benchmark operating performance. This paper introduces a benchmarking methodology designed to meet this need. The "Energy Conversion Index" (ECI) ratios the "value" of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." Variable cost performance is benchmarked by comparing the index from one period of time to the index of another comparable period of time. Savings (or costs) attributable to excellent (or poor) performance can easily be calculated by using the former period's index to project the current period's cost.

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Cost effective multimedia courseware development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia technology offers considerable potential for education though the costs of production of courseware are prohibitive especially in a rapidly changing discipline such as computer science. This paper proposes a cost-effective technique which ...

C. J. Pilgrim; Y. K. Leung; D. D. Grant

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Overview and Low Cost Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... The major reason that there is not more widespread use of titanium and its alloys is the high cost. Developments in reducing the cost of titanium...

438

Cost and Impacts of Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Policies RESULTS 2010-2025 and long-run impacts 2010-2025 GovernmentIndustry Costs Hydrogen production, infrastructure & cost HyTrans merges the early transition...

439

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improvement incremental cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

3800 Green Series Cost Elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stoller - Legacy ManagementSustainable Acquisition (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Series Cost Elements01/30/2012 (Rev. 4)

443

Empirical Methods of Cost Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

444

Bifacial Efficiency at Monofacial Cost  

solar cells; photovoltaics; PV; bifacial efficiency; Monofacial Cost, Bifacial Cells; bifacial Modules; industry growth forum; gamma solar Created ...

445

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS 1 California Institute of Technology Issuing Authority: Office is that portion of the total cost of an externally funded project that is not funded by the sponsor. Depending as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Tai, Yu-Chong

446

Recovery Act: Electrochromic Glazing Technology: Improved Performance, Lower Price  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependency of the US on energy imports and anticipated further increases in energy prices reinforce the concerns about meeting the energy demand in the future and one element of a secure energy future is conservation. It is estimated that the buildings sector represents 40% of the US's total energy consumption. And buildings produce as much as one third of the greenhouse gas emissions primarily through fossil fuel usage during their operational phase. A significant fraction of this energy usage is simply due to inefficient window technology. Electrochromic (EC) windows allow electronic control of their optical properties so that the transparency to light can be adjusted from clear to dark. This ability to control the amount of solar energy allowed into the building can be advantageously used to minimize lighting, heating and air conditioning costs. Currently, the penetration of EC windows into the marketplace is extremely small, and consequently there is a huge opportunity for energy savings if this market can be expanded. In order to increase the potential energy savings it is necessary to increase the quantity of EC windows in operation. Additionally, any incremental improvement in the energy performance of each window will add to the potential energy savings. The overall goals of this project were therefore to improve the energy performance and lower the cost of dynamic (EC) smart windows for residential and commercial building applications. This project is obviously of benefit to the public by addressing two major areas: lowering the cost and improving the energy performance of EC glazings. The high level goals for these activities were: (i) to improve the range between the clear and the tinted state, (ii) reduce the price of EC windows by utilizing lower cost materials, (iii) lowering the U-Value1 SAGE Electrochromics Inc. is the only company in the US which has a track record of producing EC windows, and presently has a small operational factory in Faribault MN which is shipping products throughout the world. There is a much larger factory currently under construction close by. This project was targeted specifically to address the issues outlined above, with a view to implementation on the new high volume manufacturing facility. Each of the Tasks which were addressed in this project is relatively straightforward to implement in this new facility and so the benefits of the work will be realized quickly. , and (iv) ensure the proposed changes have no detrimental effect to the proven durability of the window. The research described here has helped to understand and provide solutions to several interesting and previously unresolved issues of the technology as well as make progress in areas which will have a significant impact on energy saving. In particular several materials improvements have been made, and tasks related to throughput and yield improvements have been completed. All of this has been accomplished without any detrimental effect on the proven durability of the SageGlass EC device. The project was divided into four main areas: 1. Improvement of the Properties of the EC device by material enhancements (Task 2); 2. Reduce the cost of production by improving the efficiency and yields of some key manufacturing processes (Task 3); 3. Further reduce the cost by significant modifications to the structure of the device (Task 4); 4. Ensure the durability of the EC device is not affected by any of the changes resulting from these activities (Task 5). A detailed description of the activities carried out in these areas is given in the following report, along with the aims and goals of the work. We will see that we have completed Tasks 2 and 3 fully, and the durability of the resulting device structure has been unaffected. Some of Task 4 was not carried out because of difficulties with integrating the installation of the required targets into the production coater due to external constraints not related to this project. We will also see that the durability of the devices produced as a result of this work was

Burdis, Mark; Sbar, Neil

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

A novel framework for information technology based agricultural information dissemination system to improve crop productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indian farming community is facing a multitude of problems to maximize crop productivity. In spite of successful research on new agricultural practices concerning crop cultivation, the majority of farmers is not getting upper-bound yield due to several reasons. One of the reasons is that expert/scientific advice regarding crop cultivation is not reaching farming community in a timely manner. It is true that India possesses a valuable agricultural knowledge and expertise. However, a wide information gap exists between the research level and practice. Indian farmers need timely expert advice to make them more productive and competitive. In this paper, we made an effort to present a solution to bridge the information gap by exploiting advances in Information Technology (IT). We propose a framework of a cost-effective agricultural information dissemination system (AgrIDS) to disseminate expert agriculture knowledge to the farming community to improve the crop productivity. Some of the crucial benefits of AgrIDS are as follows. It is a scalable system which can be incrementally developed and extended to cover all the farmers (crops) of India in a cost effective manner. It enables the farmer to cultivate a crop with expertise, as that of an agricultural expert, by disseminating both crop and location specific expert advice in a personalized and timely manner. With AgrIDS, the lag period between research effort to practice can be reduced significantly. Finally, the proposed system assumes a great importance due to the trend of globalization, as it aims to provide expert advice which is crucial to for the Indian farmer to harvest different kinds of crop varieties based on the demand in the world market. 1

P. Krishna Reddy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: News Release - Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Natural Gas Compression Technology Improves Transport and Efficiencies, Lowers Operating Costs Innovative Compressor Design Can Extend Productive Life of Stripper Wells,...

450

Austin Energy - Free Home Energy Improvements Program (Texas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

measures at no cost to its low-income and disabled residents through its Free Home Energy Improvements Program. Certain income levels must be met for residents to...

451

NETL: Gasification - Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in IGCC Plants General Electric Company Project Number: FE0007859 Project Description General...

452

Energy efficiency improvements in Chinese compressed air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Systems, Paper #071 Energy efficiency improvements into increase industrial energy efficiency. As a result, morein use. Over time, energy efficiency decreases and the cost

McKane, Aimee; Li, Li; Li, Yuqi; Taranto, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Process Improvement in Biotech : Dealing with High Complexity Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Across numerous conventional manufacturing sites, process improvement initiatives have been shown to increase production capabilities while decreasing costs - all without a required system- wide overhaul of the manufacturing ...

Artzi, Hadas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

NETL: News Release -DOE-Funded Technology Improves Directional...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy-funded technology has demonstrated the capability to dramatically reduce costs and improve safety and efficiency in drilling America's oil and natural gas wells....

455

Development of design & technology package for cost effective housing in Gujrat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: Improve quality of life in rural areas through intervention of infrastructure and housing improvement. Provide methods of building better and cost-effective houses at a quicker pace. Devise strategies of withdrawing ...

Chaudhry, Rajive

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

17.2 - Cost Participation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17.2 (June 2004) 17.2 (June 2004) 1 Cost Participation [Reference: FAR 35.003(b), DEAR 917.70] Overview This section discusses DOE treatment of cost participation by organizations performing research, development, and demonstration projects under DOE prime contracts. This section does not cover efforts and projects performed for DOE by other Federal agencies. Background Cost participation is a generic term denoting any situation where the Government does not fully reimburse the contractor for all allowable costs necessary to accomplish the project or effort under the contract. The term includes, but is not limited to: * Cost Sharing * Cost Matching * Cost Limitation, which may be direct or indirect * Participation in-kind

457

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â??bottom-upâ? costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA?® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

2007 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the rising cost of fuel and the growing possibility of carbon taxes in the not-too-distant future, utilities are once again focusing on the heat rate and performance of coal-fired power plants. The fifteenth Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in this series of meetings designed to assist utilities in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and maintaining heat rate improvement.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

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461

A Hybrid Forming System: Electrical-Assisted Double Side Incremental Forming (EADSIF) Process for Enhanced Formability and Geometrical Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to establish the scientific bases, engineering technologies and energy/emission impact of a novel dieless forming process, Double side Incremental Forming (DSIF), and to explore the effectiveness of its hybrid variation, Electrical-Assisted Double Side Incremental Forming (EADSIF), on increasing the formability of metallic sheets. The scope of this project includes: (1) the analysis of environmental performance of the proposed new process as compared to conventional sheet metal forming processes; (2) the experimental investigation of the process capabilities of DSIF and EADSIF via the self-designed and newly established lab-scale EADSIF equipment; (3) the development of the essential software in executing the new proposed process, i.e., the toolpath generation algorithms; and finally (4) the exploration of the electricity effect on material deformation. The major accomplishments, findings and conclusions obtained through this one and a half years exploratory project are: (1) The first industrial medium-size-scale DSIF machine using two hexapods, capable of handling a sheet area up to 675 mm x 675 mm, was successfully completed at Ford. (2) The lab-scale of the DSIF machine was designed, fabricated and assembled to form a workpiece up to 250 mm x 250 mm. (3) Parts with arbitrary freeform double-curvatures using the genetic, not geometric-specific tooling were successfully formed using both machines. (4) The methodology of the life cycle analysis of DSIF was developed and energy consumption was measured and compared to conventional forming processes. It was found that the DSIF process can achieve 40% to 90% saving when the number of parts produced is less than 50. Sensitivity analysis was performed and showed that even at very large number of produced parts (greater than 2000), incremental forming saves at least 5% of the energy used in conventional forming. (5) It was proposed to use the offset between the two universal tools in DSIF to actively create a squeezing effect on sheet metal and therefore, increase the geometric accuracy. The idea was confirmed through both experimental and numerical validations. (6) A novel toolpath strategy, i.e., the so-called In-to-out toolpath or accumulative toolpath, was proposed to further increase formability and geometric accuracy compared to the SPIF configuration. A dimensional form accuracy of 1 mm can be achieved using the new strategy. (7) The effect of electricity on magnesium alloy was experimentally investigated. It was found that the formability has a ridge with respect to the applied current density and pulse duration. This finding implies that there are multiple choices of process parameters that are workable depending on the desired microstructure. The above results demonstrated that DSIF/EADSIF is a promising forming technology that can create impacts in revolutionizing how the prototyping and small volume production of sheet metals will be fabricated, i.e., it can (1) eliminate the need of casting and machining of drawing dies; (2) tailor material utilization to function requirement therefore achieving a light weight product; (3) reduce the amount of sheet metal scraps; and (4) shorten the engineering and manufacturing time for sheet metal parts from the current 8 {approx} 25 weeks to less than 1 week after the technology is fully developed. DSIF/EADSIF can be implemented in aerospace, automotive and appliance industries, or be used for producing personalized and point-of-use products in medical industry. Our analysis has shown that once developed, verified and demonstrated, the implementation and growth of DSIF will increase U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, advance machine tool and software industries, and create opportunities for emerging clean energy and low-carbon economy with estimated energy savings of 11 TBtu and CO2 reduction of 1 million tons per year. The work has been disseminated into three (3) journal articles and two (2) provisional patent submissions. A new company has been spun off from this research group aiming to c

Jian Cao; Z. Cedric Xia; Timothy G. Gutowski; John Roth

2012-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

Integrated modelling of risk and uncertainty underlying the cost and effectiveness of water quality measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an overview of the most important sources of uncertainty when analysing the least cost way to improve water quality. The estimation of the cost-effectiveness of water quality measures is surrounded by environmental, economic ... Keywords: Cost-effectiveness, Integrated modelling, Risk, Uncertainty, Water quality

Roy Brouwer; Chris De Blois

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant total capital cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed breakdown of the capital cost of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California is presented. The total capital requirements of the pilot plant are given in four cost breakdown structures: (1) project costs (research and development, design, factory, construction, and start-up); (2) plant system costs (land, structures and improvements, collector system, receiver system, thermal transport system, thermal storage system, turbine-generator plant system, electrical plant system, miscellaneous plant equipment, and plant level); (3) elements of work costs (sitework/earthwork, concrete work, metal work, architectural work, process equipment, piping and electrical work); and (4) recurring and non-recurring costs. For all four structures, the total capital cost is the same ($141,200,000); however, the allocation of costs within each structure is different. These cost breakdown structures have been correlated to show the interaction and the assignment of costs for specific areas.

Norris, H.F. Jr.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Financing; A Cost Effective Alternative When Upgrading Energy Efficient Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 1990's, many organizations are attempting to do more, faster, with less cost and improved quality. In many cases, this involves improving the efficiency of their systems. Increased competition is creating pressure to continuously improve in order to effectively compete in the marketplace. One obvious method of reducing costs and improving productivity is to upgrade old, antiquated equipment such as lighting to more modern energy efficient systems. Most projects provide a return on investment to the owner in several years, through energy and demand savings, Power Utility rebates, maintenance savings and increased productivity, however, the initial capital expense required is cost prohibitive. Budget constraints, a lengthy and complicated approval process and large up-front capital requirements are only a few "road blocks" to improvement. In order to make an equipment acquisition, every company must consider how they will pay for it! How do companies acquire the equipment they need to be more competitive? One cost effective solution -FINANCING! There are numerous benefits to both the end user customer (Lessee) and the installing contractor from utilizing financing to upgrade or retrofit to energy efficient systems. It is possible to provide design, material, installation, maintenance and soft costs as well as positive cash flow to the end user by structuring financing terms and payments around the energy savings. A wide array of programs and services are offered by many different financial organizations.

Ertle, J. M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Operations Improvement Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976-1981 timeframe. The first 20% of energy savings, versus the 1972 reference, had already been captured or was in progress via conventional energy conservation methods. The site energy surveys identified attractive investments to save a second 20% of energy use. In early 1982, Exxon Corp. started to apply this same technology to its major facilities to define attractive NO INVESTMENT and LOW INVESTMENT operational improvement savings which could be implemented quickly. This presentation covers Exxon's approach to site energy optimization and the Operations Improvement Survey Program. The Program has identified at many sites, an average of 5% reduction in today's energy costs at No/Low investment plus additional savings in the feedstock and energy supply areas.

Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Improving PPM Using Dictionaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to improve traditional character-based PPM text compression algorithms. Consider a text file as a sequence of alternating words and non-words, the basic idea of our algorithm is to encode non-words and prefixes of words using character-based context models and encode suffixes of words using dictionary models. By using dictionary models, the algorithm can encode multiple characters as a whole, and thus enhance the compression efficiency. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are: 1) it does not require any text preprocessing; 2) it does not need any explicit codeword to identify switch between context and dictionary models; 3) it can be applied to any character-based PPM algorithms without incurring much additional computational cost. Test results show that significant improvements can be obtained over character-based PPM, especially in low order cases.

Hu, Yichuan; Zhang,; Khan, Farooq; Li, Ying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys