National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for improved effluent compliance

  1. CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jennifer ...

  2. CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Peer Review | Department of Energy Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jennifer Senick, Rutgers View the Presentation CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review (1.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of

  3. Gross alpha analytical modifications that improve wastewater treatment compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, B.J.; Arndt, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper will propose an improvement to the gross alpha measurement that will provide more accurate gross alpha determinations and thus allow for more efficient and cost-effective treatment of site wastewaters. To evaluate the influence of salts that may be present in wastewater samples from a potentially broad range of environmental conditions, two types of efficiency curves were developed, each using a thorium-230 (Th-230) standard spike. Two different aqueous salt solutions were evaluated, one using sodium chloride, and one using salts from tap water drawn from the Bergen County, New Jersey Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW). For each curve, 13 to 17 solutions were prepared, each with the same concentration of Th-230 spike, but differing in the total amount of salt in the range of 0 to 100 mg. The attenuation coefficients were evaluated for the two salt types by plotting the natural log of the counted efficiencies vs. the weight of the sample's dried residue retained on the planchet. The results show that the range of the slopes for each of the attenuation curves varied by approximately a factor of 2.5. In order to better ensure the accuracy of results, and thus verify compliance with the gross alpha wastewater effluent criterion, projects depending on gross alpha measurements of environmental waters and wastewaters should employ gross alpha efficiency curves prepared with salts that mimic, as closely as possible, the salt content of the aqueous environmental matrix. (authors)

  4. Secretarial Memorandum on Integrating Project Management with NEPA Compliance to Improve Decision Making

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Declaring that “Compliance with [NEPA] is a pre-requisite to successful implementation of DOE programs and projects,” the Secretary has signed a memorandum on "Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance." The memo urges better use of existing tools and guidance, and highlights principles for strengthening NEPA compliance – for example, through Field and Headquarters teamwork, realistic schedules, and performance accountability.

  5. Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-06-12

    Recommendations from the DOE Field Management Council (FMC), NEPA Improvement Team, and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for improving NEPA compliance through the integration of Program ad Project Management

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  7. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  8. 300 area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1995-09-05

    This document presents the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan (MP). The MP describes how ongoing monitoring of the TEDF effluent stream for compliance with the NPDES permit will occur. The MP also includes Quality Assurance protocols to be followed.

  9. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  10. Environmental Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Federal environmental laws apply to DOE Loans and Loan Guarantees. The Loan Programs Offices (LPOs) Environmental Compliance Division is responsible for overseeing LPOs compliance with...

  11. Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal environmental laws apply to DOE Loans and Loan Guarantees. The Loan Programs Office’s (LPO’s) Environmental Compliance Division is responsible for overseeing LPO’s compliance with...

  12. Improving Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provisions in International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) through proof-of-concept ... This includes updating recommendations based on newer CBECs or BPD energy statistics. ...

  13. TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING – A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated

  14. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternative Compliance Request for 19 Site Monitoring AreaSite Combinations Exceeding Target Action Levels for Gross-Alpha Radioactivity CDV-SMA-2 16-021(c) CDV-SMA-2.51 16-010(i) ...

  15. Alternative Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternate Watch Office Germantown Watch Office When activated at senior leadership direction, the Forrestal Watch Office functions are transferred to a relocated Watch Office. This alternate Watch Office replicates the 24/7/365 mission and communications links resident in the Forrestal Watch Office. Related Topics emergency operations watch office

    Compliance Individual Permit: Alternative Compliance When permittees believe they have installed measures to minimize pollutants but are unable to

  16. 200 Area TEDF effluent sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alaconis, W.C.; Ballantyne, N.A.; Boom, R.J. [and others

    1995-06-01

    This sampling analysis sets forth the effluent sampling requirements, analytical methods, statistical analyses, and reporting requirements to satisfy the State Waste Discharge Permit No. ST4502 for the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. These requirements are listed below: Determine the variability in the effluent of all constituents for which enforcement limits, early warning values and monitoring requirements; demonstrate compliance with the permit; and verify that BAT/AKART (Best Available Technology/All know and Reasonable Treatment) source, treatment, and technology controls are being met.

  17. Millimeter wave sensor for monitoring effluents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Dieckman, Stephen L.

    1995-01-01

    A millimeter-wave sensor for detecting and measuring effluents from processing plants either remotely or on-site includes a high frequency signal source for transmitting frequency-modulated continuous waves in the millimeter or submillimeter range with a wide sweep capability and a computer-controlled detector for detecting a plurality of species of effluents on a real time basis. A high resolution spectrum of an effluent, or effluents, is generated by a deconvolution of the measured spectra resulting in a narrowing of the line widths by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude as compared with the pressure broadened spectra detected at atmospheric pressure for improved spectral specificity and measurement sensitivity. The sensor is particularly adapted for remote monitoring such as where access is limited or sensor cost restricts multiple sensors as well as for large area monitoring under nearly all weather conditions.

  18. Compliance Order on Consent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Order on Consent Compliance Order on Consent The Compliance Order on Consent provides the requirements for environmental cleanup of hazardous constituents for LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What is the Compliance Order on Consent? The Compliance Order on Consent between the State of New Mexico Environment Department and the United States Department of Energy and Los Alamos National

  19. Compliance | ARPA-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance View ARPA-E NEPA Compliance documents View the Whistleblower Protection and Nondisclosure Notice The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to making its electronic and ...

  20. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Final Hazard Category Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUTH, L.L.

    2001-06-06

    The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility was designed to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate and other liquid waste streams for treatment at the 200 East Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility has been previously classified as a Category 3 Nonreactor Nuclear Facility. As defined in Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (DOE 1992, DOE 1997), Category 3 Nuclear Facilities have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. However, based on current facility design, operations, and radioactive constituent concentrations, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences and is categorized as a Radiological Facility. This report documents the final hazard categorization process performed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. This report describes the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility. Also included is a preliminary hazard categorization, which is based on current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, a preliminary hazards and accident analysis, and a final hazard category determination. The results of the hazards and accident analysis, based on the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and the current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, demonstrate that the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. Based on the final hazard category analysis, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility is a Radiological Facility. The final hazard category determination is based on a comparative evaluation of the consequence basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities to the calculated consequences for credible releases The basis for

  1. 300 Area TEDF NPDES Permit Compliance Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-10-13

    This monitoring plan describes the activities and methods that will be employed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) in order to ensure compliance with the National Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Included in this document are a brief description of the project, the specifics of the sampling effort, including the physical location and frequency of sampling, the support required for sampling, and the Quality Assurance (QA) protocols to be followed in the sampling procedures.

  2. Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance Environmental Compliance Performance Environmental Compliance Performance Most Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup is being performed under the ...

  3. Compliance Certification Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance & Risk Assessment Compliance & Risk Assessment PPPO scientists work to identify, analyze, and mitigate environmental hazards and risks to protect human health and safety and the environment. PPPO works proactively with state and federal regulatory agencies to ensure safe, effective, and compliant cleanup at the Sites. Regulatory Compliance Regulatory Agencies.png PPPO works with multiple regulatory agencies that promote safety and environmental quality regionally and

  4. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-01

    Volume II supplements Vol. I in providing procedures, relative timing, and details to assist in achieving compliance with Federal environmental requirements. (PSB)

  5. Davis-Bacon Act Compliance Video

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Davis-Bacon Act Compliance Video

  6. Effluent and Discharges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A question on DOE O 458.1, CRD, 2.g.(4). When performing the analysis, I envision performing a settleable solids test such as Standard Methods 2540 F, Settleable Solids, and then performing gross alpha and gross beta analysis. Is this the correct interpretation of the requirement or does isotopic analysis of the settleable solids need to be performed? Yes, this is a correct interpretation of the requirement. Guidance on this topic is provided in Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T); January 1991).

  7. EA-1854: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste Water Treatment Modifications for Improved Effluent Compliance Project, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

  8. EA-1854: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Waste Water Treatment Modifications For Improved Effluent Compliance Project, Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for K Area Spent Fuel. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunacek, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The scope of this document includes program plans for monitoring and characterizing radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials discharged in the K Area effluents. This FEMP includes complete documentation for both airborne and liquid effluent monitoring systems that monitor radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous pollutants that could be discharged to the environment under routine and/or upset conditions. This documentation is provided for each K Area facility that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous materials that could impact public and employee safety and the environment. This FEW describes the airborne and liquid effluent paths and the associated sampling and monitoring systems of the K Area facilities. Sufficient information is provided on the effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against requirements may be performed. Adequate details are supplied such that radioactive and hazardous material source terms may be related to specific effluent streams which are, in turn, related to discharge points and finally compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  10. Environmental Compliance Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-01

    The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

  11. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility/Effluent Treatment Facility Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simiele, G.A.

    1994-09-29

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and Effluent Treatment Facility the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  12. Environmental Compliance Assistance Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-04-16

    ENVIROCAT is a database/knowledge base software system designed to assist in environment, safety and health (ES&H) regulatory compliance assessments of manufacturing processes. Materials and processes are mapped to ES&H regulations. The regulations database identifies materials'' quantities and limits of compliance. Materials are identified per descriptive name or CAS number. ENVIROCAT has an interactive user/tool capability such that a question and answer session on materials and processes is custom tailored to a particular manufacturing site.

  13. Compliance Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance » Compliance Documents Compliance Documents This photo shows the Savannah River Site’s Heavy Water Components Test Reactor during decommissioning. This photo shows the Savannah River Site's Heavy Water Components Test Reactor during decommissioning. Compliance and other legal documents illustrate and help support the development of effective compliance approaches and strategies, and can assist in promoting greater cooperation, coordination, and consistency with other EM offices,

  14. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports.

  15. Statistical Evaluation of Effluent Monitoring Data for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Charissa J; Johnson, Vernon G

    2000-03-08

    This report updates the original effluent variability study for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) and provides supporting justification for modifying the effluent monitoring portion of the discharge permit. Four years of monitoring data were evaluated and used to statistically justify changes in permit effluent monitoring conditions. As a result, the TEDF effluent composition and variability of the effluent waste stream are now well defined.

  16. Waste Treatment Plant Liquid Effluent Treatability Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2001-06-07

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) provided a forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be generated by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of 25 distinct batches of tank waste through the WTP. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) evaluated the treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERFIETF. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERFIETF treatability envelope, which provides information on the items that determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERFIETF. The WTP liquid effluent forecast is outside the current LERFlETF treatability envelope. There are several concerns that must be addressed before the WTP liquid effluents can be accepted at the LERFIETF.

  17. TITLE XVII ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE TITLE XVII ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE TITLE XVII ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE Various federal environmental laws apply to DOE loans and loan guarantees, ...

  18. - Compliance Recertification Application 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Recertification Application 2004 (CRA-2004) Table of Contents ES: Executive Summary TOC: Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Site Characterization Chapter 3: Facility Description Chapter 4: Waste Description Chapter 5: Quality Assurance Chapter 6: Containment Requirements Chapter 7: Assurance Requirements Chapter 8: Individual And Groundwater Protection Requirements Chapter 9: Peer-2004 Review Acronyms: Acronyms and Abbreviations Glossary: Glossary of Terms Index:

  19. Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-01-07

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

  20. Coach Compliance Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coach Compliance Form My team is participating in theNational Renewable Energy Laboratory's Lithium-Ion Battery Car Competition. I have reviewed the following documents with the participating students: o Safety Hazards of Batteries o Material Safety Data Sheet - Lithium Polymer Battery o Electric Battery Car Competition Rules ______________________________ ______________ Coach Signature Date Name of School: ____________________________________________ Name of Coach (Please Print):

  1. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws and regulations applicable to each program, including the requirements specific to each program that should be

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 3720 facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, M.Y.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes the effluent monitoring plan for the 3720 facility. Airborne and liquid effluents are monitored.

  3. Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covers how to access current practices, compliance best practices, and enforce best practices with energy code compliances.

  4. FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SRP radioactive waste releases. Startup through 1959 Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS;...

  5. Point-nonpoint effluent trading in watersheds: A review and critique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, M.; Solomon, B.

    1998-03-01

    The 1990s have been characterized as the decade of market incentives in US environmental policy-making. Not only is their use expanding for air pollution control, but the US Environmental Protection Agency is now also encouraging the use of market instruments for control of effluents within watersheds. After reviewing general guidelines and principles for effluent trading, this study considers the special problems of point-nonpoint (p-n) sources, the most common focus of effluent trading to date. Four case studies of p-n trading are discussed, which illustrate the promise of the policy. Although only two of these four case study programs have involved actual effluent trades thus far, they all have resulted in more cost-effective reductions of water pollution. Overall use of effluent trading to date has been modest, and suggestions are made for improvement of this innovative policy.

  6. - Compliance Recertification Application 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    documents in pdf CRA-2014 Main | References | CFR Index | Search CRA-2014 | About CRA-2014 Table of Contents Executive Summary Structure of the CRA-2014 Section 8: Approval Process for Waste Shipment From Waste Generator Sites for Disposal at the WIPP Section 15: Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s) Section 21: Inspections Section 22: Quality Assurance Section 23: Models and Computer Codes Section 24: Waste Characterization Section 25: Future State Assumptions Section 26: Expert

  7. - Compliance Recertification Application 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About | PDF Documents CRA-2014 Table of Contents Executive Summary Structure of the CRA-2014 Section 8: Approval Process for Waste Shipment From Waste Generator Sites for Disposal at the WIPP Section 15: Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s) Section 21: Inspections Section 22: Quality Assurance Section 23: Models and Computer Codes Section 24: Waste Characterization Section 25: Future State Assumptions Section 26: Expert Judgment Section 27: Peer Review Section 31: Application of

  8. Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Efficient Programs1 This document includes: A brief overview of MVE in the context of S&L programmes. Evidence of the importance of MVE within S&L programmes. A...

  9. 2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application DOE/WIPP 04-3231 March 2004 Content of the CRA As required by Title 40 CFR, Parts 191 and 194, the 2004 Compliance Recertification Application addresses a wide range of topics. It incorporates portions of the first Compliance Certification Application (CCA) and provides updates in those areas where approved changes occurred. It also presents new data and associated analyses. In addition, the appliacation responds to specific requests from EPA for

  10. Compliance Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal Facility (SRR-CWDA-2009-00017, R0), hereafter referred to as the Saltstone PA, is acceptable. PDF icon Compliance Evaluation More Documents & Publications 2009...

  11. DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

  12. Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWMAN, R.C.

    1998-11-19

    A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  13. III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III. PROGRAM-SPECIFIC COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENTS For fiscal year 2010, no DOE programs have compliance requirements that are distinct from the general compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance (General Compliance Supplement). Therefore, audits of recipients and subrecipients with fiscal years ending in 2010 should be conducted in accordance with the compliance requirements included in Part II of this guidance. For fiscal years subsequent to 2010, program-specific compliance

  14. Environment and Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Compliance Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment (GC-51) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for International and National Security Programs (GC-53) Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) Office of the Assistant General Counsel General Law (GC-56) Litigation, Regulation and Enforcement Environment and Compliance Environment

  15. Environment and Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Offices of the Deputy General...

  16. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1997-11-25

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

  17. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Charles M.; Shapiro, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

  18. 13.0 LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL 13.1 LIQUID EFFLUENT DISCHARGE RESTRICTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-1 13.0 LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL 13.1 LIQUID EFFLUENT DISCHARGE RESTRICTIONS 13.1.1 Introduction This section addresses requirements for management of restrictions for discharge of liquid effluents to the soil column at Hanford. These managerial requirements are the result, in part, of EPA's and Ecology's reviews of the Liquid Effluent Study (LES) that was submitted by DOE in August 1990. The LES included information on the 33 Phase I and Phase II liquid effluent streams and was

  19. Constructed Wetlands for Removal of Heavy Metals from NPDES Outfall Effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2002-08-29

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River Technology Center. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, necessitating treatment of nearly one million gallons of water each day plus storm runoff to meet compliance standards. A conceptual design for a constructed treatment wetland was developed as the most cost-effective alternative. A pilot study was conducted using mesocosms to confirm that the design concept would reduce copper to acceptable levels. After treatment in the mesocosms, effluent copper concentrations were routinely below permit limits, even though the influent concentrations varied widely.

  20. Oil Mist Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that “Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace”, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: “American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), ‘Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,’ (2005) (incorporated by reference, see §851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910.” In the 2005 ACGIH – Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  1. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  2. Liquid effluents program FY 1997 multi-year work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, F.T.

    1996-09-30

    This document provides the technical baseline and work breakdown structure for the liquid effluents program.

  3. Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance View the Code Compliance Funding Opportunity video or see the slides below. This webinar ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, C

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

  5. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

  6. Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Prescriptive Path compliance form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prescriptive Path compliance form Prescriptive Path compliance form This Prescriptive Path compliance form shall be submitted to: doechallengehome@newportpartnersllc.com challenge_home_prescriptive_compliance_5-12.docx (20.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program Requirements (Rev. 03) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 04) Washington DOE ZERH Program Requirements

  8. certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI Executive Order ...

  9. Cost Compliance Manager | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Compliance Manager Department: Business Operations Supervisor(s): Kristen Fischer Staff: AM 6 Requisition Number: 1600452 The Cost Compliance Manager (CCM) is responsible for monitoring compliance with Laboratory policies primarily in support of procurement operations. The position will maintain analytical tools, procedures, and reports to drive compliance and best practices with Laboratory policies and applicable laws and regulations. The CCM will oversee staff responsible for analyzing

  10. 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities -- Quality assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, L.

    1995-03-13

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance and management controls used by the 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) to perform its activities in accordance with DOE Order 5700.6C. The 200 Area LEF consists of the following facilities: Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF); Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF); Liquid Effluent Retention facility (LERF); and Truck Loading Facility -- (Project W291). The intent is to ensure that all activities such as collection of effluents, treatment, concentration of secondary wastes, verification, sampling and disposal of treated effluents and solids related with the LEF operations, conform to established requirements.

  11. Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance » Environmental Compliance Performance Environmental Compliance Performance Most Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup is being performed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) through Federal Facility Agreements as well as under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) through various consent orders, agreements, and decrees with states. These agreements and orders identify milestones associated with cleanup actions

  12. Compliance Certification Enforcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance Certification Enforcement Compliance Certification Enforcement DOE enforces the energy and water conservation regulations established by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Appliance Standards Program to ensure that residential, commercial and industrial equipment deliver the energy and cost savings required by law. To ensure that all covered products comply with the energy and water conservation standards, the enforcement office reviews manufacturers' compliance

  13. DOE NEPA Compliance Officers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Compliance Officers DOE NEPA Compliance Officers NEPA Compliance Officers are listed by program office. Field offices are listed under their primary program office. NCO_Directory_2016-07-29.pdf (94.63 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Employee Concerns Program Contact List Privacy Act Officers Contact List Field Facilities Contacts for Printing and Mail

  14. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  15. DOE Secretarial Memorandum on Improved Decision Making through the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance (DOE, 2012) | Department of Energy Memorandum on Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance (DOE, 2012) DOE Secretarial Memorandum on Improved Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance (DOE, 2012) Declaring that "Compliance

  16. Section 54: Scope of Compliance Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scope of Compliance Assessments (40 CFR § 194.54) United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Scope of Compliance Assessments (40 CFR § 194.54) Table of Contents 54.0 Scope of Compliance Assessments (40 CFR § 194.54) 54.1 Requirements 54.2 Background 54.3 1998 Certification Decision 54.4 Changes in the CRA-2004 54.5 EPA's Evaluation of Compliance for the 2004 Recertification 54.6 Changes

  17. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

  18. 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Effluent Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN, M.J.

    2000-05-18

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been developed to comply with effluent monitoring requirements at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF), as stated in Washington State Waste Discharge Permit No. ST 4502 (Ecology 2000). This permit, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216, is an April 2000 renewal of the original permit issued on April 1995.

  19. Florida small water systems compliance project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The object of the project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a coordinated effort of enforcement, training, technical assistance and outreach to improve compliance of small water systems. The project was conducted in Hillsborough County and Polk County in Florida. The effectiveness of the coordinated effort was measured by the number of violations resolved over a one year period, October 1989 to September 1990, and the costs of achieving those results were tracked by each organization participating in the project.

  20. certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) | Department of Energy certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) The current certification, compliance and enforcement regulations for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (CRE) "simply makes no sense". The regulations define the basic model as any product that has a different energy use or efficiency

  1. ATVM ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE ATVM ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE ATVM ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE Various federal environmental laws apply to DOE loans and loan guarantees, including ATVM direct loans. These laws include: NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires DOE to consider the environmental effects of proposed actions to inform agency decision making. Analyses and documentation prepared to comply with NEPA may include a Categorical Exclusion,

  2. Case History of a Clean Water Act Compliance Agreement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    A major Clean Water Act (CWA) Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement was signed on March 25, 1991 by the US Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Field Office (DOE, RFFO) and the Water Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VIII. The agreement revised the Rocky Flats Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and arose from pemittee-requested changes in effluent monitoring points and permit violations, most notably the February 22, 1989 Chromic Acid Incident. The Rocky Flats Plant, now called the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) near Golden Colorado was operated at that time by Rockwell International Corporation, who later plead guilty to six misdemeanor and felony counts of the CWA (the aforementioned NPDES permit violations) and paid a $4 million fine on March 26, 1992. The Compliance Agreement, hereafter referred to as the NPDES FFCA, called for three separate remedial action plans and contained a schedule for their submittal to the EPA. The compliance plans focussed on: (1) Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) performance upgrades, (2) source control and surface water protection, and (3) characterization of the impacts from past sludge disposal practices. Projects that implemented the compliance plans were initiated soon after submittal to the EPA and are forecast to complete in 1997 at a total cost of over $35 million. This paper presents a case history of NPDES FFCA compliance projects and highlights the successes, failures, and lessons learned.

  3. WICF Certification, Compliance and Enforcement webinar | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    14, 2011 2014-10-06 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, Freezers, Dehumidifiers, Room Air Conditioners, Clothes ...

  4. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The compliance status of these drivers is summarized in Chapter 2 of the most recently published Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report. National Environmental Policy ...

  5. FERC Compliance Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FERC Compliance HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook...

  6. FAQS Reference Guide – Environmental Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  7. Point of Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Point of Compliance More Documents & Publications Long-Term Grout Performance Concentration Averaging Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis...

  8. Arelik A.?: Compliance Determination (2010-SE-0105)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Compliance Determination after test results revealed that Arelik's Blomberg BRFB1450 refrigerator-freezer complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Federal Facility Compliance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Facility Compliance Act Order for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ... treatment of mixed waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Parties DOE; State ...

  10. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-08-18

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  11. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DB Barnett

    2000-05-17

    Seven years of groundwater monitoring at the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) have shown that the uppermost aquifer beneath the facility is unaffected by TEDF effluent. Effluent discharges have been well below permitted and expected volumes. Groundwater mounding from TEDF operations predicted by various models has not been observed, and waterlevels in TEDF wells have continued declining with the dissipation of the nearby B Pond System groundwater mound. Analytical results for constituents with enforcement limits indicate that concentrations of all these are below Practical Quantitation Limits, and some have produced no detections. Likewise, other constituents on the permit-required list have produced results that are mostly below sitewide background. Comprehensive geochemical analyses of groundwater from TEDF wells has shown that most constituents are below background levels as calculated by two Hanford Site-wide studies. Additionally, major ion proportions and anomalously low tritium activities suggest that groundwater in the aquifer beneath the TEDF has been sequestered from influences of adjoining portions of the aquifer and any discharge activities. This inference is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations which indicate an extremely slow rate of groundwater movement beneath the TEDF. Detailed evaluation of TEDF-area hydrogeology and groundwater geochemistry indicate that additional points of compliance for groundwater monitoring would be ineffective for this facility, and would produce ambiguous results. Therefore, the current groundwater monitoring well network is retained for continued monitoring. A quarterly frequency of sampling and analysis is continued for all three TEDF wells. The constituents list is refined to include only those parameters key to discerning subtle changes in groundwater chemistry, those useful in detecting general groundwater quality changes from upgradient sources, or those retained for comparison with end

  12. Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance PDF icon Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance More Documents & Publications DOE Order 350.3 CHAPTER...

  13. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-12-11

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

  16. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-10-20

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans.

  18. Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

  19. Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards Executive Order 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards The head of each Executive agency is ...

  20. Carbon Compliance Acquisition 5 Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compliance Acquisition 5 Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Compliance Acquisition 5 Limited Place: Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2M 2TD Sector: Carbon...

  1. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review Technical Assistance: ... View the Presentation PDF icon Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO ...

  2. Carbon Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited Place: United Kingdom Zip: LS12DS Product: Security broking and fund...

  3. Energy Storage System Guide for Compliance with Safety Codes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Guide for Compliance with Safety Codes and Standards 2016 Energy Storage System Guide for Compliance with Safety Codes and Standards 2016 Under the Energy Storage Safety Strategic ...

  4. New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards Concerns in Energy Innovations New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards Concerns in ...

  5. Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seamans, J.A.

    1995-06-08

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  7. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  8. WAC - 173 - 221A - Wastewater Discharge Standards and Effluent...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A - Wastewater Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 173 -...

  9. WAC - 173 - 221 - Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations for Domestic Wastewater Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  10. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  11. Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, F.J.

    1995-02-06

    This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments.

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  13. Method and means of monitoring the effluent from nuclear facilities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lattin, Kenneth R.; Erickson, Gerald L.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is detected in the effluent cooling gas from a nuclear reactor or nuclear facility by passing the effluent gas through a continuously moving adsorbent filter material which is then purged of noble gases and conveyed continuously to a detector of radioactivity. The purging operation has little or no effect upon the concentration of radioactive iodine which is adsorbed on the filter material.

  14. Self-scrubbing removal of submicron particles from gaseous effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for removal of submicron particles from gaseous effluents which contain sulfur dioxide among other substances, comprising the steps of: injecting liquid water droplets into a gaseous effluent containing submicron particles, said effluent being at a temperature higher than the bulk water dew point, said injection step cooling the effluent to approximately the bulk dew point of water and causing at least some but less than all of the water to evaporate; delaying the injection of any further substances into the effluent until the effluent and the injected water reach a substantially uniform temperature at approximately the bulk water dew point; following said delay, injecting gaseous ammonia into the resulting mixture of effluent and water in order to cause ammonium sulfite on said submicron particles, thus increasing the size of said particles, and also such as to cause water to condense onto the ammonium sulfite-coated particles, thus further increasing the size of said particles; and separating at least some of the resultant enlarged particles from the effluent.

  15. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  16. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  17. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  18. A practical exercise in assessing order compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallinan, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two orders impacting DOE nuclear safety analyses were issued in 1992: DOE 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements,'' and DOE 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.'' Both orders required submitting plans and schedules for compliance with the new requirements by 6 months from the issuance dates. These assessments resulted in a major effort by the Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) for some 30 current and future safety analyses that span three Program Secretarial Offices. Further, the local field office expressed a vital interest in determining the shape of compliance for site nuclear operations. Thus, a team of about 20 people were involved in: Interpreting and obtaining concurrence with implementation issues; identifying applicable nuclear facilities; baselining the status of compliance with previous requirements; comparing new to previous requirements; scheduling future activities to achieve compliance with the new requirements; estimating baseline and additional costs; and obtaining management approvals.

  19. Whirlpool: Compliance Determination (2010-SE-0103)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Compliance Determination to Whirlpool Corporation after DOE testing confirmed that the Maytag refrigerator-freezer model MSD2578VE comports with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  20. LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disputes citizens' lawsuit February 7, 2008 LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act LOS ALAMOS, NM, Feb. 7, 2008-Los Alamos National Laboratory officials today expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups against Los Alamos National Security LLC and the U.S. Department of Energy. "The Laboratory is in compliance with its storm water permit under the federal Clean Water Act," said Dick Watkins, associate director

  1. EPA Regulation Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPA Regulation Compliance EPA Regulation Compliance OE offers technical assistance on implementing the new and pending EPA air rules affecting the electric utility industry. Examples of typical assistance include technical information on cost and performance of the various power plant pollution retrofit control technologies; technical information on generation, demand-side or transmission alternatives for any replacement power needed for retiring generating units; and assistance to regulators

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRAZIER, T.P.

    1999-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U. S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. To ensure the long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems, an update to this facility effluent monitoring plan is required whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and is updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

  3. Problems of organizing zero-effluent production in coking plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiskii, S.V.; Kagasov, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    The basic method of protecting the environment against pollution by coking plants in the future must be the organization of zero-waste production cycles. Problems associated with the elimination of effluent are considered. In the majority of plants at present, the phenolic effluent formed during coal carbonization and chemical product processing is completely utilized within the plant as a coke quenching medium (the average rate of phenolic effluent formation is 0.4 m/sup 3//ton of dry charge, which equals the irrecoverable water losses in coke quenching operations). However, the increasing adoption of dry coke cooling is inevitably associated with increasing volumes of surplus effluent which cannot be disposed of in coke quenching towers. As a result of experiments it was concluded that: 1. The utilization of phenolic effluent in closed-cycle watercooling systems does not entirely solve the effluent disposal problem. The volume of surplus effluent depends on the volume originally formed, the rate of consuming water in circulation and the time of year. In order to dispose of surplus effluent, wet quenching must be retained for a proportion of the coke produced. 2. The greatest hazards in utilizing phenolic effluent in closed-cycle watercooling systems are corrosion and the build-up of suspended solids. The water must be filtered and biochemically purified before it is fed into the closed-cycle watercooling systems. The total ammonia content after purification should not exceed 100 to 150 mg/l. 3. Stormwater and thawed snow can be used in closed-cycle water supply systems after purification. 4. The realization of zero-effluent conditions in existing plants will require modifications to the existing water supply systems.

  4. Compliance and Special Report Orders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compliance and Special Report Orders Compliance and Special Report Orders Compliance Orders July 12, 2007 Compliance Order, Los Alamos National Security, LLC - July 12, 2007 Issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC related to the Unauthorized Reproduction and Removal of Classified Matter from the Los Alamos National Laboratory May 26, 1999 Preliminary Notice of Violation and Compliance Order, EA-1999-04 Issued to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., relating to events at the Spent Nuclear Fuels

  5. Continuous compliance demonstrations with parametric monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, W.E.; Hazel, K.R.

    1995-12-01

    Traditionally, the stationary source air compliance program has required facilities subject to air emissions standards to demonstrate their ability to comply with the emissions standards during an initial source performance tests. Demonstrating compliance at start-up, however, does not assure that a source will remain in compliance. To assure compliance after start-up, EPA`s responsibility to catch those in violation of standards. Under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA 1990), Congress, shifted the burden of assuring compliance from the administrator to the owner or operator of the source. This shift will be implemented through the Enhanced Monitoring (EM) rule. Congress put specific language in the Act to allow flexibility for innovative alternatives to continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs). Section 504(b) states that {open_quotes}continuous emissions monitoring need not be required if alternative methods are available that provide sufficient reliable and timely information for determining compliance.{close_quotes} Section 114 (a)(3) permits the Administrator to accept as Enhanced Monitoring, records on control equipment parameters, production variables or other indirect data as an alternative to direct emission measurements. This alternative, Parametric Monitoring, is acceptable if the facility can demonstrate a correlation between the applicable emission standard and the parameters being monitored. Common approaches to the use of parametric monitoring are illustrated here through a brief overview of three enhanced monitoring protocols. The first example uses boiler output to predict quantitative nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission rates from a gas-fired electric utility boiler. The second example uses parametric data collected in the operation of a venturi scrubber to determine compliance or noncompliance with a particulate emissions limitation. The third example illustrates an alternative use of parametric data collected from a venturi scrubber.

  6. Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoel, David; Griffith, Michael

    2013-07-01

    interagency 'SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT)'. The SRIT is a partnership comprised of representatives from DOE-SR (with contractor support), EPA Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and is chartered to develop a consensus understanding of SRS regulatory issues and activities. These forums and a formal environmental compliance integration process improve timely cross-functional decision making, problem solving, information sharing, and issue resolution. The SRS internal process has been formally documented in an Environmental Regulatory Integration Program Description, which is linked to the SRS Environmental Policy and agreed upon by all major contractors, subcontractors and tenants. (authors)

  7. WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (WTP) LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATABILITY EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2004-10-18

    A forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be produced by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) was provided by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI 2004). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of Tank Farm waste through the end-of-mission for the WTP. The WTP forecast is provided in the Appendices. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Both facilities are located in the 200 East Area and are operated by Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) for the US. Department of Energy (DOE). The treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERF/ETF was evaluated. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERF/ETF treatability envelope (Aromi 1997), which provides information on the items which determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERF/ETF. The format of the evaluation corresponds directly to the outline of the treatability envelope document. Except where noted, the maximum annual average concentrations over the range of the 27 year forecast was evaluated against the treatability envelope. This is an acceptable approach because the volume capacity in the LERF Basin will equalize the minimum and maximum peaks. Background information on the LERF/ETF design basis is provided in the treatability envelope document.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis J.; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2009-04-30

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  12. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J. Dennis; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2010-07-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J.; Anderson, D. C.; Hall, D. B.; Greger, P. D.; Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  15. Compliance review for the UNH Storage Tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, J.M.

    1992-05-19

    The purpose of Project S-4257, USF-UNH 150,000 Gallon Storage Tank, is to provide interim storage for the liquid uranyl nitrate (UNH) product from H-Canyon until the UNH can be processed in the new Uranium Solidification Facility (Project S-2052). NPSR was requested by Project Management and DOE-SR to perform a design compliance review for the UNH Storage Tank to support the Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and the Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE), respectively. The project was reviewed against the design criteria contained in the DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. This report documents the results of the compliance review.

  16. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  17. 5 CCR 1002-62 Colorado Regulations for Effluent Limitations ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 5 CCR 1002-62 Colorado Regulations for Effluent LimitationsLegal Abstract Regulations...

  18. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  19. Waste treatment of kraft effluents by white-rot fungi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, R.

    1996-10-01

    The residual lignin in unbleached kraft pulp is commonly removed to afford a fully bleached pulp through a multi-stage bleaching process consisting of chlorination and alkaline-extraction stages. The effluent from such a bleaching process is of growing environmental concern because it shows a dark brown color and contains numerous chlorinated organic substances. Moreover, this effluent is not easily recycled within a mill recovery system because of the potential corrosion problems created by its high chlorine content. White-rot fungi have even heavily modified lignin such as kraft lignin and atoms demonstrated that kraft bleaching effluent can be rot fungi, in particular, Trametes versicolor and this review lecture, the possibility of the application of kraft effluents will be discussed.

  20. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  1. The potential for effluent trading in the energy industries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

    1998-01-01

    In January 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a policy statement endorsing wastewater effluent trading in watersheds, hoping to promote additional interest in the subject. The policy describes five types of effluent trades: point source/point source, point source/nonpoint source, pretreatment, intraplant and nonpoint source/nonpoint source. This paper evaluates the feasibility of implementing these types of effluent trading for facilities in the oil and gas, electric power and coal industries. This paper finds that the potential for effluent trading in these industries is limited because trades would generally need to involve toxic pollutants, which can only be traded under a narrow range of circumstances. However, good potential exists for other types of water-related trades that do not directly involve effluents (e.g. wetlands mitigation banking and voluntary environmental projects). The potential for effluent trading in the energy industries and in other sectors would be enhanced if Congress amended the Clean Water Act (CWA) to formally authorize such trading.

  2. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility permit reopener run plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, A.R.

    1995-03-10

    The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) is authorized to discharge treated effluent to the Columbia River by National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit WA-002591-7. The letter accompanying the final permit noted the following: EPA recognizes that the TEDF is a new waste treatment facility for which full scale operation and effluent data has not been generated. The permit being issued by EPA contains discharge limits that are intended to force DOE`s treatment technology to the limit of its capability.`` Because of the excessively tight limits the permit contains a reopener clause which may allow limits to be renegotiated after at least one year of operation. The restrictions for reopening the permit are as follows: (1) The permittee has properly operated and maintained the TEDF for a sufficient period to stabilize treatment plant operations, but has nevertheless been unable to achieve the limitation specified in the permit. (2) Effluent data submitted by the permittee supports the effluent limitation modifications(s). (3) The permittee has submitted a formal request for the effluent limitation modification(s) to the Director. The purpose of this document is to guide plant operations for approximately one year to ensure appropriate data is collected for reopener negotiations.

  3. Department of Energy - Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Department of Energy - Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance...

  4. Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) Apply: Increase Residential Energy Code Compliance Rates (DE-FOA-0000953) April 21, 2014 - 12:32pm Addthis This ...

  5. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    458 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA ... DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick ...

  6. Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, Colorado...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, ... GJO-2000-177-TAR MAC-GWRFL 1.9 Ground Water Compliance Action Plan for the Old Rifle, ...

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  8. NPT Compliance | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NPT Compliance Maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing - especially at lower numbers - requires increased investments across the nuclear security enterprise. Maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing - especially at lower numbers - requires increased investments across the nuclear security enterprise. Maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of a smaller nuclear

  9. Compliance data system user's guide. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Table of Contents: Major Enforcement Tasks met by CDS (Compliance Data System); Major EPA Guidance with Respect to CDS; Getting Started; System Overview; Data Entry Requirements; Data Entry Procedures; Data Submission Steps; Update Processing; Retrieval Processing; Retrieval Samples; Related Systems Issues; CDS Data Element Dictionary; and Contact List of CDS Users.

  10. Rocky Flats Compliance Program; Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The primary objective of the Office of Technology Development, Rocky Flats Compliance Program (RFCP), is to develop altemative treatment technologies for mixed low-level waste (wastes containing both hazardous and radioactive components) to use in bringing the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) into compliance with Federal and state regulations and agreements. Approximately 48,000 cubic feet of untreated low-level mixed waste, for which treatment has not been specified, are stored at the RFP. The cleanup of the Rocky Flats site is driven by agreements between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH). Under these agreements, a Comprehensive Treatment and Management Plan (CTMP) was drafted to outline the mechanisms by which RFP will achieve compliance with the regulations and agreements. This document describes DOE`s strategy to treat low-level mixed waste to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and sets specific milestones related to the regulatory aspects of technology development. These milestones detail schedules for the development of technologies to treat all of the mixed wastes at the RFP. Under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the CTMP has been incorporated into Rocky Flats Plant Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP). The CSTP will become the Rocky Flats Plant site Treatment Plan in 1995 and will supersede the CTMP.

  11. Alternative Compliance Program: 10 CFR Part 490 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, T.

    2008-10-01

    Presentation explains the Alternative Compliance option under the U.S. Department of Energy's State and Alternative Fuel Provider program.

  12. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy

  13. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  14. F and H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (F/H ETF): ultrafiltration and hyperfiltration systems testing at Carre, Inc. with simulated F and H area effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, J.P.

    1984-05-23

    The F and H Area Effluent Treatment Facility is essentially a four-stage process that will decontaminate the waste water that is currently being discharged to seepage basins in the Separations Areas. The stages include pretreatment, reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and evaporation. A series of tests were performed at Carre, Inc. (Seneca, SC) from March 5 through March 13, to determine the usefulness of ultrafiltration (UF) in the pretreatment stage of the ETF. The results of that testing program indicate that UF would be an excellent means of removing entrained activity from the 200 Area process effluents. Hyperfiltration (HF) was also tested as a means of providing an improved concentration factor from the reverse osmosis stage. The results show that the membranes that were tested would not reject salt well enough at high salt concentrations to be useful in the final reverse osmosis stage. However, there are several membranes which are commercially available that would provide the needed rejection if they could be applied (dynamically) on the Carre support structure. This avenue is still being explored, as theoretically, it could eliminate the need for the F/H ETF evaporator.

  15. The feasibility of effluent trading in the energy industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    In January 1996, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a policy statement endorsing effluent trading in watersheds, hoping to spur additional interest in the subject. The policy describes five types of effluent trades - point source/point source, point source/nonpoint source, pretreatment, intraplant, and nonpoint source/nonpoint source. This report evaluates the feasibility of effluent trading for facilities in the oil and gas industry (exploration and production, refining, and distribution and marketing segments), electric power industry, and the coal industry (mines and preparation plants). Nonpoint source/nonpoint source trades are not considered since the energy industry facilities evaluated here are all point sources. EPA has administered emission trading programs in its air quality program for many years. Programs for offsets, bubbles, banking, and netting are supported by federal regulations, and the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments provide a statutory basis for trading programs to control ozone and acid rain. Different programs have had varying degrees of success, but few have come close to meeting their expectations. Few trading programs have been established under the Clean Water Act (CWA). One intraplant trading program was established by EPA in its effluent limitation guidelines (ELGs) for the iron and steel industry. The other existing effluent trading programs were established by state or local governments and have had minimal success.

  16. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

    2011-03-24

    Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

  17. Appendices - 2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please note that these document are quite large in size and have been split into smaller sections. To navigate between sections, use hyperlinks as indicated by red boxes or blue text in the Table of Contents for each section. There are also hyperlinks at the top and bottom of each section. 2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application - Appendices DOE/WIPP 04-3231 March 2004 CRA - Appendices Appendix AUD - 2004 Appendix BARRIERS Appendix DATA Appendix MON-2004 Appendix MON-2004 - Attachment A

  18. 2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application - INDEX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Back to Content Description Please note that these documents are quite large in size and have been split into smaller sections. To navigate between sections, use hyperlinks as indicated by red boxes or blue text in the Table of Contents for each section. There are also hyperlinks at the top and bottom of each section. 2004 WIPP Compliance Recertification Application - Main Volume DOE/WIPP 04-3231 March 2004 CRA - Main Letter to EPA Administrator Leavitt, from DOE Secretary Abraham Executive

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  20. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  1. Nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring program. 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.; Peterson-Wright, L.J.; Meachum, T.R.

    1993-08-01

    A monitoring program for nonradioactive parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents was initiated in October 1985 for facilities operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Program design and implementation are discussed in this report. Design and methodologies for sampling, analysis, and data management are also discussed. Monitoring results for 28 liquid effluent streams from (October 1991 through December 1992) are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1992 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

  2. Systems engineering implementation plan for the liquid effluents services program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    A graded approach is being taken by the Liquid Effluents Services Program in implementing systems engineering because of the advanced state of the program. The approach is cost-effective and takes credit for related work already completed, yet retains the benefits of systems engineering. This plan describes how the Liquid Effluents Services Program will implement systems engineering so there is a common understanding. Systems engineering work to be performed and the products of that work are identified. The relation to the current planning process and integration with the sitewide systems engineering effort is described.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  4. RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    l 0327-33 a a RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE 0 NEVADA TEST SITE (JANUARY 1986 THROUGH DECEMBER 1986) BANEL A. GONZALEZ HEALTH PHY%ICIST SePTEMl3ER 1987 WORK PERFORMED UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-ACXM-84-84NV10327 REYNOLDS ELECTRICAL & ENGINEERING CO., INC. POST OFFICE BOX 14400 LAS VEGAS, NV 89114 DOE/NV/10327-33 RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE (JANUARY 1986 THROUGH DECEMBER 1986) Daniel A. Gonzalez Health Physicist

  5. Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flannery, Philip A.; Kujawa, Stephan T.

    2000-01-01

    Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

  6. Develop Plan for Analysis of the Effluent from GCM Production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Mowry, Curtis D.

    2015-08-24

    This milestone is focused on developing a plan for the analysis of the effluent from the Sandia low temperature sintering Bi-Si-Zn oxide glass composite material (GCM) waste form for the long term storage of iodine and its capture materials.

  7. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  8. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  9. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  10. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 | Department of Energy CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 This presentation, "Industrial/Commercial/Institutional Boiler MACT - Combined Heat and Power: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy," by John Cuttica, Midwest Clean Energy Application Center, and Bruce Hedman, ICF International, is from the January 17, 2012, SEE

  11. Environmental compliance tracking for the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.C.; Qasem, J.; Killian, T.L.

    1998-12-31

    To meet the demand to track regulatory compliance requirements for oil and gas facilities, C-K Associates, Inc. and Conoco Inc. Natural Gas and Gas Products Department developed a customized relational database. The Compliance Tracking System (CTS), a Microsoft Access database, is designed to insure compliance with all applicable federally-enforceable air quality standards. Currently, compliance is insured through work practices, operating procedures, maintenance, and testing; however, associated documentation may be less formalized, especially for work practice standards and unmanned operations. Title V Operating Permits required by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments created the specific need for documentation of such compliance. Title V programs require annual compliance certification and semi-annual reports of compliance monitoring with signature by a responsible official. The CTS compiles applicable standards as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. A responsible party (primary and secondary) for each compliance action is assigned. Multiple tickler functions within the system provide notice of upcoming or past-due compliance actions. Systems flexibility is demonstrated through various sort mechanisms. Compliance items can be managed and documented through work orders generated by the CTS. This paper will present how the CTS was developed as an environmental management system and populated for a natural gas plant operating under a Title V permit. The system was expanded to include water quality, waste, and emergency reporting requirements to become a multi-discipline environmental compliance tool for the facility. Regulatory requirements were re-formatted to action items pertinent to field operations. The compliance actions were assigned to fit within current procedures whenever possible. Examples are presented for each media with emphasis on federally-enforceable Title V requirements.

  12. EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System Data Upload Templates | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System Data Upload Templates EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System Data Upload Templates These generic Excel templates are available for federal contractors and service providers to provide federal clients with reports in the format agencies are required to use. Providing data in these templates will make it easy for agencies to upload your data into the EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System. Data may be batch imported by the federal agencies into the EISA 432

  13. Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approach | Department of Energy Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project (4/28/03). The purpose of this Notice is to inform the public of the change in the approach for the

  14. plain-language-compliance-report-2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plain-language-compliance-report-2016 plain-language-compliance-report-2016 The Department of Energy sees the implementation of the Plain Writing Act as an important initiative that helps the Department share relevant information in a way that is clear, concise, and informative. The areas referenced in this report are only a few of the successes we have encountered as we continue to implement the Act. Plain Language Compliance Report 2016.pdf (182.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Plain

  15. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Rosemarie Bartlett, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory View the Presentation Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications PNNL: Codes Portfolio - 2015 Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview -

  16. Compliance Order, Los Alamos National Security, LLC - July 12, 2007 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Compliance Order, Los Alamos National Security, LLC - July 12, 2007 Compliance Order, Los Alamos National Security, LLC - July 12, 2007 July 12, 2007 Issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC related to the Unauthorized Reproduction and Removal of Classified Matter from the Los Alamos National Laboratory On July 12, 2007, the Secretary of Energy issued a Compliance Order to Los Alamos National Security, LLC requiring the contractor to implement specific corrective

  17. Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance Cross-State Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance This analysis provides first-ever assessment of the extent to which renewable energy is crossing state borders to be used to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. Two primary methods for data collection are Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) tracking and power flow estimates. Data from regional REC tracking systems, state agencies, and utility compliance reports help understand

  18. An evaluation of the whole effluent toxicity test method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osteen, D.V.

    1999-12-17

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing has become increasingly more important to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the States in the permitting of wastewater discharges from industry and municipalities. The primary purpose of the WET test is to protect aquatic life by predicting the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream. However, there are both scientific and regulatory concerns that using WET tests to regulate industrial effluents may result in either false positives and/or false negatives. In order to realistically predict the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream, the test should be as representative as possible of the conditions in the receiving stream. Studies (Rand and Petrocelli 1985) suggested several criteria for an ideal aquatic toxicity test organism, one of which is that the organism be indigenous to, or representative of, the ecosystem receiving the effluent. The other component needed in the development of a predictive test is the use of the receiving stream water or similar synthetic water as the control and dilution water in the test method. Use of an indigenous species and receiving water in the test should help reduce the variability in the method and allow the test to predict the effect of the effluent on the receiving stream. The experience with toxicity testing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has yielded inconclusive data because of the inconsistency and unreliability of the results. The SRS contention is that the WET method in its present form does not adequately mimic actual biological/chemical conditions of the receiving streams and is neither reasonable nor accurate. This paper discusses the rationale for such a position by SRS on toxicity testing in terms of historical permitting requirements, outfall effluent test results, standard test method evaluation, scientific review of alternate test species, and concerns over the test method expressed by other organizations. This paper presents the Savannah River Site

  19. An early warning system for environmental compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quayle, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a process called an early warning system. This system is used for developing a method to monitor regulatory developments as they progress through the federal or state administrative process. The components of this early warning system, methods used to identify, analyze, communicate, and act on regulations, are addressed. The communication system includes a regulatory development tracking system and the methods used to relay information to applicable personnel. This paper also discusses the use of an environmental compliance manual and shows the relationship of the analysis of changing regulatory requirements to the revision process of the manual as well as methods of maintaining the manual as a ``living document``.

  20. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  1. NMOCD - Form G-104 - Certificate of Compliance and Authorization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: NMOCD - Form G-104 - Certificate of Compliance and Authorization to Produce Geothermal Resources Author...

  2. Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium ...

  3. EPA - Permit Compliance System webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - Permit Compliance System webpage Abstract This webpage contains EPA's...

  4. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act.

  5. Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports by Diane Johnson he purpose of this DOE Standard is to...

  6. Oregon Federal and State Compliance for Historic and Archaeological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Federal and State Compliance for Historic and Archaeological Resources...

  7. Section 15: Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s) (40 CFR § 194.15) United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s) (40 CFR § 194.15) Table of Contents 15.0 Content of Compliance Recertification Application(s) (40 CFR § 194.15) 15.1 Requirements 15.2 Background 15.3 1998 Certification Decision 15.4 Changes in the CRA-2004 15.5 EPA's

  8. Compliance Order issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Compliance Order issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory Compliance Order issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory Pursuant to the authority of the Secretary of Energy under section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and 10 C.F.R. 5 824.4(b) of the Department's Procedural Rules for the Assessment of Civil Penalties for Classzjied Information Security Violations, I am today issuing the enclosed Compliance Order to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Compliance

  9. FERC Division of Hydropower Administration and Compliance | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Division of Hydropower Administration and Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FERC Division of Hydropower Administration and...

  10. Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for ASHRAE Conference, January 31, 2011 Appliance Standards Update and Review of Certification, Compliance and Enforcement Powerpoint Presentation for ASHRAE Conference, ...

  11. Federal Facility Compliance Agreement on Storage of Polychlorinated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Storage of Polychlorinated Biphenyls, August 8, 1996 State Washington Agreement Type Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) TSCA Scope Summary Address DOE and the ...

  12. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Compliance Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Parties DOE; State of California Environmental Protection Agency (Department of Toxic Substances Control) Date 1061995 SCOPE * Require compliance by the DOE with a Site...

  13. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered under the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005.

  14. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Compliance Order, September 10...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    approved STP and determine whether compliance dates should be modified. * Delay in performance shall be excused and no civil penalty assessed when performance is prevented or...

  15. STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE PAYROLL NUILBER PAYROLL PAYMENT DATE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COMPLIANCE PAYROLL NUILBER PAYROLL PAYMENT DATE CONTRACT NUMBER 382246 1 411712014 ... (Tile) (1) That I pay or supervise the payment of the persons employed by Intermach, ...

  16. New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards Concerns in Energy ... system knowledge that may limit effective implementation of new and existing standards. ...

  17. Title 36 CFR 220 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title...

  18. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Treatment Plan Compliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Agreement addressing compliance with the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 to RCRA. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * The Site Treatment Plan provides for a three-year...

  19. Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

  20. Controls of Wellbore Flow Regimes on Pump Effluent Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Martin-Hayden; plummer; Sanford Britt

    2014-01-01

    Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

  1. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  2. Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Makela, Eric J.; Fannin, Jerica D.; Sullivan, Robin S.

    2011-10-10

    This report looks at different ways to verify energy code compliance and to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted document are achieved. Conformity assessment is the body of work that ensures compliance, including activities that can ensure residential and commercial buildings satisfy energy codes and standards. This report identifies and discusses conformity-assessment activities and provides guidance for conducting assessments.

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-12-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  5. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  6. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, C.J.

    1995-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A Evaporator facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1993-03-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  10. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  11. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2004-10-25

    This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

  12. Interaction of Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Lokey, Elizabeth

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, both compliance and voluntary markets have emerged to help support the development of renewable energy resources. Both of these markets are growing rapidly and today about half of U.S. states have RPS policies in place, with a number of these policies adopted in the last several years. In addition, many states have recently increased the stringency of their RPS policies. This paper examines key market interaction issues between compliance and voluntary renewable energy markets. It provides an overview of both the compliance and voluntary markets, addressing each market's history, purpose, size, scope, and benefits while addressing issues, including double counting.

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were

  15. Keys to improving environmental performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreau, R.L.; Raught, D.L.

    1996-11-01

    Environmental protection is a mainstream issue in today`s society. Both internal and external drivers motivate the oil and ms industry to continuously improve environmental performance. Companies are integrating environmental considerations into their business plans to a greater extent, and are directing proportionally more resources toward managing these issues. This paper addresses several environmental management focus areas in Exxon`s domestic E&P sector to: (1) manage risks, (2) ensure compliance, (3) improve performance, and (4) assist in the development of balanced legislation and regulations. Specific examples of Production Department programs are discussed, along with keys to success for continued progress in improving performance.

  16. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  17. DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

  18. AT-400A compliance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    In 1993 Sandia was directed to design containers for the long-term storage and transport of nuclear weapons origin fissile material. This program was undertaken at the direction of the US Department of Energy and in cooperation with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory were tasked with developing the internal fixturing for the contents. The hardware is being supplied by AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and the packaging process has been developed at Mason and Hanger Corporation`s Pantex Plant. The unique challenge was to design a container that could be sealed with the fissile material contents; and, anytime during the next 50 years, the container could be transported with only the need for the pre-shipment leak test. This required a rigorous design capable of meeting the long-term storage and transportation requirements. This report addresses the final testing that was undertaken to demonstrate compliance with US radioactive materials transport regulations.

  19. Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the  Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

  20. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2011/FY 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-02-01

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2011/fiscal year 2012.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 4, 1995...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * If adequate funds are not available, DOE must notify NMED in writing within 30 days of learning that funds are not available and may request a revision to the compliance dates....

  2. Title 40 CFR 1507 Agency Compliance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CFR 1507 Agency ComplianceLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online...

  3. Questions and Answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions and answers about National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance for state and local projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP) in the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. Federal-facilities Hazardous-Waste Compliance Manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-09

    In the continuing effort to achieve a higher level of compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Federal facilities, the Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Office (FFHWCO) has developed the Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Manual. The manual includes an overview of the Federal-facilities hazardous-waste compliance program, relevant statutory authorities, model provisions for Federal facility agreements, enforcement and other applicable guidance, Federal facilities docket and NPL listings, data-management information, selected DOD and DOE program guidance, and organization charts and contacts. This compendium is intended to be used as a reference by Regional RCRA and CERCLA enforcement personnel and Regional Counsels, particularly as an orientation guide for new Federal facilities staff.

  5. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Compliance Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... that he or she is fully authorized to enter into the terms and conditions of this Order and to ... Go to Selected EM Cleanup and Compliance Orders EM HOME | DOE HOME | SEARCH | ...

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation Compliance Order, September 26, 1995

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. Go to Table of Contents http:www.em.doe.govffaaorrffca.html 4252001 Oak Ridge Reservation Compliance Order, September 26, 1995 Page 2 of 5...

  7. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  8. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  9. Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

  10. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  11. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  12. Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, T.

    2014-01-01

    This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

  13. Compliance, Certification and Enforcement for US Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Programs by US DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about energy and water conservation standards, ENERGY STAR, and compliance and certification enforcement.

  14. Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification or,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Alternative, Rehearing of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission | Department of Energy Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification or, in the Alternative, Rehearing of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification or, in the Alternative, Rehearing of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No. EO-05-01: Pursuant to Order No. 202-05-3, issued by the Department of

  15. General Atomics Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    General Atomics Agreement Name General Atomics Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 HWCA 95/96-017 State California Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Address LDR requirements pertaining to storage and treatment of covered waste at General Atomics Parties DOE; State of California Environmental Protection Agency (Department of Toxic Substances Control) Date 10/6/1995 SCOPE * Address LDR requirements pertaining to storage and treatment of covered waste at General

  16. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Berkeley National Laboratory Agreement Name Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 HWCA # 95/96-016 State California Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Address LDR requirements pertaining to storage and treatment of covered waste at LBNL Parties DOE; State of California Environmental Protection Agency (Department of Toxic Substances Control) Date 10/6/1995 SCOPE * Address LDR requirements pertaining to storage and treatment

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Compliance Order, September 26, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oak Ridge Reservation Compliance Order, September 26, 1995 State Tennessee Agreement Type Compliance Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Enforce the Plan and ensure that the Respondent completes all work in accordance with the schedules contained in, and/or developed pursuant to, the Plan Parties DOE; Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Date 9/26/1995 SCOPE * Approve, with modifications made by TDEC, the "Proposed Site Treatment Plan for the Oak Ridge

  18. Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) | Department of Energy Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) The Department of Energy (DOE) revised its floodplain and wetland environmental review requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public notification

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2014 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2015-05-12

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2014. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2014, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives. Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NNSS include 42 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, 236 birds, and 27 mammals. These species are protected, regulated, or considered sensitive according to state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) are the only species on the NNSS protected under the Endangered Species Act, both listed as threatened. However, only one record of the cuckoo has ever been documented on the NNSS, and there is no good habitat for this species on the NNSS. It is considered a rare migrant. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 18 projects. A total of 199.18 hectares (ha) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found during these surveys included a predator burrow, one sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), two mating speckled rattlesnakes

  20. LIQUID EFFLUENT RETENTION FACILITY (LERF) BASIN 42 STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents laboratory results obtained under test plan RPP-21533 for samples submitted by the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) from the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 42 (Reference 1). The LERF Basin 42 contains process condensate (PC) from the 242-A Evaporator and landfill leachate. The ETF processes one PC campaign approximately every 12 to 18 months. A typical PC campaign volume can range from 1.5 to 2.5 million gallons. During the September 2003 ETF Basin 42 processing campaign, a recurring problem with 'gelatinous buildup' on the outlet filters from 60A-TK-I (surge tank) was observed (Figure 1). This buildup appeared on the filters after the contents of the surge tank were adjusted to a pH of between 5 and 6 using sulfuric acid. Biological activity in the PC feed was suspected to be the cause of the gelatinous material. Due to this buildup, the filters (10 {micro}m CUNO) required daily change out to maintain process throughput.

  1. The sublethal effects of petroleum refinery effluents: Mixed function oxygenase (MFO) induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Parrott, J.; Hodson, P.; Rao, S.

    1995-12-31

    Canada uses a single biological parameter which is based on the ability of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to survive a 24 hour exposure to assess and regulate the toxicity of refinery effluents. The acute toxicity of Canadian refinery effluents is generally well controlled. Long term exposures to sublethal toxicants, which are not covered by the current regulations, could have adverse ecological effects. Since PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, can occur in refinery effluents, the authors tested the hypothesis that refinery effluents can induce mixed-function oxygenase measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) activity in fish. Two end of pipe effluent samples were collected from each of four Ontario refineries. All effluents induced EROD activity in young trout in a dose dependent manner. The EROD parameter has potential as a bioindicator of exposure to refinery effluents. The samples were also tested for toxicity to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae and to a fish cell line (Ictalurus nebulosus). Fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by six out of eight samples, and larval survival was affected by one sample. The in vitro data were less consistent: weak toxicity was detected in some samples but the dose response relationship was poor. Direct acting mutagens were detected in two effluents using the Ames Fluctuation assay.

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  3. Foundation for the future: International compliance initiatives by DOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, J.; Schlessman, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    Department of Defense installations and facilities operating in foreign nations have historically enjoyed an ambiguous environmental compliance posture. Faced with the confusion of differing compliance strategies among the U.S. military components outside the continental United States (OCONUS), Congress mandated that the Department of Defense (DOD) develop a consistent environmental compliance strategy for its operations OCONUS. That mandate is manifested in a new environmental policy for DOD components operating overseas, which is the subject of this study. Although the new DOD policy is comprehensive and establishes specific minimum environmental standards for components overseas, it also presented unforeseen challenges. This paper briefly describes the new DOD overseas environmental compliance strategy, and specifically explores the challenges and obstacles faced by the U.S. Army in Europe (USAREUR). As the Executive Agent responsible for developing the environmental {open_quotes}final governing standards{close_quotes} (FGS) for DOD components in Germany, USAREUR conducted a comprehensive comparative analysis of the minimum DOD environmental compliance criteria with those of the host nation. While the concept of the new FGS is intended to provide the consistency formerly lacking among DOD components overseas, the challenges identified during the comparative analysis revealed distinct differences in the two system (i.e., U.S. vs. German) in providing environmental {open_quotes}standards{close_quotes} for compliance. This paper presents a synopsis of the findings and the challenges encountered during the comparative analysis, and provides a case example. Our experience will show that DOD`s attempt to institute an environmental compliance strategy based on standards that are {open_quotes}more protective{close_quotes} of human health and the environment, is not a simple matter of comparison between host nation laws and DOD criteria.

  4. Update On Aquatic Toxicity/Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) Issues, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Winona L

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes recent changes in the field of aquatic toxicity/Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) testing. There are been numerous legal challenges to the validity of WET testing, both at the federal and state levels, but to date, the regulators have prevailed and WET testing is used as a regulatory tool to ensure that the biota of receiving streams are protected. The most recent ruling at the federal level was on December 10, 2004, when a federal appeals court in the District of Columbia upheld the validity of WET testing. At the state level, at the urging of the South Carolina Manufacturers Alliance, the state legislature passed a law (the South Carolina Aquatic Life Protection Act) in 2004 that requires the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the WET test. As a result, SCDHEC removed WET test limits from several NPDES permits. EPA took issue with the impact of the legislation and SCDHEC's actions, and as a result, EPA has taken over several NPDES permits from SCDHEC and threatened to revoke the state's delegated NPDES permit program. A new Act was signed into law in March 2005, which does not exclude the use of chronic toxicity testing for regulatory compliance. As a result, EPA has turned over the issuance of NPDES permits back to SCDHEC. In December 2004, the U.S. EPA issued the Draft National WET Implementation Guidance document for review and comment. The guidance contains recommendations on the determination of ''reasonable potential'' for toxicity. The EPA's ECOTOX database is a valuable resource of toxicity data for many chemicals. For those cases in which there are no toxicity data or very limited data available, the EPA has developed two models, the Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) and the Acute to Chronic Estimation (ACE), for predicting toxicity. Active areas of research include assessing the uptake of heavy metals via multiple routes of exposure, the development of

  5. Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m{sup 2} of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR {section}268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance.

  6. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  7. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

  8. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  9. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  10. Automated sample collection and processing for radionuclide effluent monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D.M.; Crandall, B.S.; Fledderman, P.D.

    1998-12-31

    In the United States, all nuclear facilities must provide for environmental monitoring of effluent points for radionuclides that have the potential for release to the environment. For the US Department of Energy (DOE) this means thousands of surface water analyses are performed each year at a cost of millions of dollars per year. Analytical costs for radiochemical analyses are often high due to the lengthy chemical separations required prior to counting for the selected analyte. At the Savannah River Site, a DOE facility located in South Carolina, a new technique has been demonstrated whereby samples are collected and processed in the field, at the time of collection, for selected radionuclides. The technique makes use of ion selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks being placed in a portable automatic aqueous sampler. Water from a surface stream or effluent sampling point is collected via an ISCO, Inc., 3710 SPX portable sampler. Weekly or biweekly (depending on the sampling requirements), the SPE disks are collected and returned to the laboratory for activity determination. The analytes that are currently being monitored by the new method are {sup 99}Tc, {sup 80}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 58}Co, and {sup 60}Co. The RAD SPE disks have been shown to be effective for the extraction of technetium, strontium, and cesium and cobalt from aqueous systems. The {sup 99}Tc and {sup 90}Sr activities are determined by direct counting of the SPE disk by gas flow beta proportional techniques; the {sup 137}Cs and radiocobalt activities are determined by direct counting of the SPE disk by gamma spectrometry. Because of the specificity of the SPE disks, there is no additional chemical separation required prior to counting the SPE disks for the selected activity determination.