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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Leigh Raymond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs?* Leigh Raymond be inferred. #12;Can Affirmative Motivations Improve Compliance in Emissions Trading Programs? Abstract Early emissions trading programs have obtained a very high rate of compliance, in part by using continuous

2

Comply. Improve. Transform. IBM Rational solutions for compliance-driven development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to: · Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance management · Automate and document improvement · Remain flexible and responsive in a rapidly changing business climate Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance Changes in regulatory policy can have sweeping effects on how your

3

Predicting and improving dietary compliance among participants of a dietary study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. vi viii Predicting Compliant Behavior Neasuring Compliance. Improving Dietary Compliance. . Objectives. NETHODS. 3 8 ll 12 Subject Selection. Diet Prescription. Education, Feedback and Follor-up. Food Intake Analysis Survey and 24-hour... Recall. Dietary Adequacy Evaluation and Personalized Diet Portfolios. Feedback Questionnaire. Ethical Standards Data Interpretation. RESULTS 12 12 13 14 16 16 . . 17 19 19 28 21 Sample Description. Dietary Adequacy (controls vs...

Devries, Suzanne Mishael

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

SIMMONS, F.M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

BERNESKI, L.D.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Qtier-Rapor: Managing Spreadsheet Systems & Improving Corporate Performance, Compliance and Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Much of what EuSpRIG discusses is concerned with the integrity of individual spreadsheets. In businesses, interlocking spreadsheets are regularly used to fill functional gaps in core administrative systems. The growth and deployment of such integrated spreadsheet SYSTEMS raises the scale of issues to a whole new level. The correct management of spreadsheet systems is necessary to ensure that the business achieves its goals of improved performance and good corporate governance, within the constraints of legislative compliance - poor management will deliver the opposite. This paper is an anatomy of the real-life issues of the commercial use of spreadsheets in business, and demonstrates how Qtier-Rapor has been used to instil best practice in the use of integrated commercial spreadsheet systems.

Bishop, Keith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

Major, C.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

TREATMENT OF GASEOUS EFFLUENTS ISSUED FROM RECYCLING A REVIEW OF THE CURRENT PRACTICES AND PROSPECTIVE IMPROVEMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of gaseous waste management for the recycling of nuclear used fuel is to reduce by best practical means (ALARA) and below regulatory limits, the quantity of activity discharged to the environment. The industrial PUREX process recovers the fissile material U(VI) and Pu(IV) to re-use them for the fabrication of new fuel elements e.g. recycling plutonium as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel or recycling uranium for new enrichment for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Meanwhile the separation of the waste (activation and fission product) is performed as a function of their pollution in order to store and avoid any potential danger and release towards the biosphere. Raffinate, that remains after the extraction step and which contains mostly all fission products and minor actinides is vitrified, the glass package being stored temporarily at the recycling plant site. Hulls and end pieces coming from PWR recycled fuel are compacted by means of a press leading to a volume reduced to 1/5th of initial volume. An organic waste treatment step will recycle the solvent, mainly tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and some of its hydrolysis and radiolytic degradation products such as dibutyl phosphate (HDPB) and monobutyl phosphate (H2MBP). Although most scientific and technological development work focused on high level waste streams, a considerable effort is still under way in the area of intermediate and low level waste management. Current industrial practices for the treatment of gaseous effluents focusing essentially on Iodine-129 and Krypton-85 will be reviewed along with the development of novel technologies to extract, condition, and store these fission products. As an example, the current industrial practice is to discharge Kr-85, a radioactive gas, entirely to the atmosphere after dilution, but for the large recycling facilities envisioned in the near future, several techniques such as 1) cryogenic distillation and selective absorption in solvents, 2) adsorption on activated charcoal, 3) selective sorption on chemical modified zeolites, or 4) diffusion through membranes with selective permeability are potential technologies to retain the gas.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; William Kerlin; Steven Bakhtiar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alternative Compliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compliance Individual Permit: Alternative Compliance When permittees believe they have installed measures to minimize pollutants but are unable to certify completion of corrective...

11

Liquid effluent/Hanford Environmental compliance FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan/Fiscal Year Work Plan, WBS 1.2.2.1 and 1.2.2.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details the program effort to eliminate the use of the soil column for liquid effluent treatment and to manage current and future liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site, in a safe responsible cost effective and legally compliant mannger. This should be achieved through planning, public and stakeholder interaction, definition of requiremtns for generators, and provision of timely treatment, stroage, disposal capability, and waste minimization of waste streams.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

Nickels, J.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

arterial compliance volume: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paper: Improving Browsing Environment Compliance Evaluations for Websites Cyntrica Eaton heterogeneous browsing environments, the browser, browser version, and operating...

14

Statistical evaluation of effluent monitoring data for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) consists of a pair of infiltration basins that receive wastewater originating from the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the Hanford Site. TEDF has been in operation since 1995 and is regulated by State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 (Ecology 1995) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216. The permit stipulates monitoring requirements for effluent (or end-of-pipe) discharges and groundwater monitoring for TEDF. Groundwater monitoring began in 1992 prior to TEDF construction. Routine effluent monitoring in accordance with the permit requirements began in late April 1995 when the facility began operations. The State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 included a special permit condition (S.6). This condition specified a statistical study of the variability of permitted constituents in the effluent from TEDF during its first year of operation. The study was designed to (1) demonstrate compliance with the waste discharge permit; (2) determine the variability of all constituents in the effluent that have enforcement limits, early warning values, and monitoring requirements (WHC 1995); and (3) determine if concentrations of permitted constituents vary with season. Additional and more frequent sampling was conducted for the effluent variability study. Statistical evaluation results were provided in Chou and Johnson (1996). Parts of the original first year sampling and analysis plan (WHC 1995) were continued with routine monitoring required up to the present time.

CJ Chou; VG Johnson

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE NEPA Compliance Officers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NEPA Compliance Officers NEPA Compliance Officers are listed first for Program Offices, then Power Marketing Administrations, then Field Offices. Please send updates to...

17

Subproject L-045H 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study focuses on the project schedule for Project L-045H, 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility is a Department of Energy subproject of the Hanford Environmental Compliance Project. The study scope is limited to validation of the project schedule only. The primary purpose of the study is to find ways and means to accelerate the completion of the project, thereby hastening environmental compliance of the 300 Area of the Hanford site. The 300 Area'' has been utilized extensively as a laboratory area, with a diverse array of laboratory facilities installed and operational. The 300 Area Process Sewer, located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site, collects waste water from approximately 62 sources. This waste water is discharged into two 1500 feet long percolation trenches. Current environmental statutes and policies dictate that this practice be discontinued at the earliest possible date in favor of treatment and disposal practices that satisfy applicable regulations.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Environmental Compliance Performance | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compliance Environmental Compliance Performance Environmental Compliance Performance Most Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup is being performed under the...

20

Stanford University HRPP Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/13 Research Compliance Office STANFORD measures and improves, when necessary, compliance with organizational measures and improves, when necessary, the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of the Human Research to assess compliance with organizational policies and procedures and applicable laws, regulations, codes

Puglisi, Joseph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Environmental Compliance Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II supplements Vol. I in providing procedures, relative timing, and details to assist in achieving compliance with Federal environmental requirements. (PSB)

None

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

23

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

? 2 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 338 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

24

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

25

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

26

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

27

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

Pennycook, Steve

28

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE-ORO and NNSA policy to conduct operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws, regulations operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicable environmental statutes. The protection

Pennycook, Steve

29

Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the importance of integrating regulatory compliance into an organization's overall strategic IT security planning

30

Environmental Compliance Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Guide is intended to assist Department of Energy personnel by providing information on the NEPA process, the processes of other environmental statutes that bear on the NEPA process, the timing relationships between the NEPA process and these other processes, as well as timing relationships between the NEPA process and the development process for policies, programs, and projects. This information should be helpful not only in formulating environmental compliance plans but also in achieving compliance with NEPA and various other environmental statutes. The Guide is divided into three parts with related appendices: Part I provides guidance for developing environmental compliance plans for DOE actions; Part II is devoted to NEPA with detailed flowcharts depicting the compliance procedures required by CEQ regulations and Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines; and Part III contains a series of flowcharts for other Federal environmental requirements that may apply to DOE projects.

None

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ethics and Compliance Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Office of the Deputy Administrator, Compliance and Governance Section. Additional vacancies may be filled through this vacancy announcement or if they become available.

32

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1:8:1 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If YES, then...

33

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81211 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8'J 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then c omplete below. Anticipated?...

34

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 t8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 t8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

35

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

36

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1:8:1 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

37

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 334 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 :gl 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

38

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 81 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D gl D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

39

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 181 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 181 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

40

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 18 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants ? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

42

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 81 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in a n Air Quality 0 81 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

43

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D t8l D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D t8l D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

44

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 I8J D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

45

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 I8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 I8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

46

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 181 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11 122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

47

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 I NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 260...

48

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 0 Hazardous A ir Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D D Control Region? 3 Revised 821 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

49

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 18 D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 18 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

50

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations In an Air Quality 0 l:8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

51

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 336 Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D t8J 0 Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

52

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 18) 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18) 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

53

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111 22008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

54

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? I s the project subject to emission s limitations in a n Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

55

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Qua lity 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised 82J1 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

56

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 181 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 181 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 1111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

57

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality D 1:8:1 D Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY...

58

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

f8J 0 Hazardous A. ir Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 f8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 1111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

59

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D 8J D Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 1:81 D Control Region? 2 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

60

Compliance | ARPA-E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous MaterialsCompliance View ARPA-E NEPA Compliance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and DOE National Nuclear Security Administration policy to conduct its operations in compliance, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operationsEnvironmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance It is DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office

Pennycook, Steve

62

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Administration (NNSA) policy to conduct operations in compliance with federal, state, and local. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations in compliance with the letter three ORR facilities operated in compliance with the regulatory dose limits of Tennessee Rule 1200

Pennycook, Steve

63

Environmental Compliance Schofield Barracks, Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance Specialist Schofield Barracks, Hawaii POSITION An Environmental Compliance Specialist (Research Associate II Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management resource stewardship. We collaborate with our sponsors and within CSU to resolve complex environmental

64

COMPLIANCE FORMS SUMMARY APPENDIX A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach is utilized for compliance, the CF-1R forms are produced by the compliance software. Thermal Mass. Thermal Mass Worksheet (WS-1R) This worksheet is completed by the documentation author when complying is used to calculate weight-averaged U-factors for prescriptive envelope compliance. #12;Appendix

65

Environmental Compliance Issue Coordination  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for coordination of significant environmental compliance issues to ensure timely development and consistent application of Departmental environmental policy and guidance. Cancels DOE O 5400.2. Para. 5a(2) and 5a(7) canceled by DOE O 231.1.

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Within Energy Efficient Programs AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: GHG inventory, Policies...

67

DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Compliance Agreements | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Agreements Compliance Agreements This photo shows the Savannah River Sites Heavy Water Components Test Reactor during decommissioning. This photo shows the Savannah...

69

FAQS Reference Guide Environmental Compliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the June 2011 edition of DOE-STD-1156-2011, Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard.

70

Compliance Certification Application  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4 NComplexComplexedCompliance

71

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws contractors make every effort to conduct operations in compliance with the letter and intent of applicableMahon, and L. G. Shipe Abstract It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

Pennycook, Steve

72

Policy on Compliance in Athletics Policy on Compliance in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy on Compliance in Athletics 07/1/2014 Policy on Compliance in Athletics I. Purpose and Scope conference rules, and university policies and procedures. This policy applies to student with athletics rules, policies and procedures, including NCAA rules and regulations. Other terms used herein

Sridhar, Srinivas

73

Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

BOWMAN, R.C.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Advanced Oxidation Technology for Pulp Mill Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY FOR PULP MILL EFFLUENT J. ROBERT HART, MANAGER, EPRI PULP & PAPER OFFICE, ATLANTA, GA ABSTRACT The composition of effluent from various pulping processes can exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical... in Integrated Pulp and Paper Mill Effluents", 1992 169 ESL-IE-92-04-30 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 ...

Hart, J. R.

76

Environmental Compliance Management System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Oil Mist Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, (2005) (incorporated by reference, see 851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910. In the 2005 ACGIH Threshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

Lazarus, Lloyd

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effluent Treatment Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the FutureEdward TellerEffluent Treatment

80

WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP in Publication Data Main entry under title Wastewater characterization of fish processing plant effluents (Canada)); DOE FRAP 1993-39. TD899.F5W37 1994 363.73'942'0971133 C94-960159-4 #12;WASTEWATER

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent: Significant Energy Savings over Traditional Activated Sludge Treatment This report presents results for an anaerobic digestion system operated;Anaerobic Digestion of Primary Sewage Effluent Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

82

Influence of wastewater-treatment effluent on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of wastewater- treatment effluent on concentrations and fluxes of solutes in the Bush of treated effluents from wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) will increasingly affect the chemical biological processes associated with very low flow conditions, such as denitrification and sulfate reduction

83

Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance Webinar: Residential Energy Code Compliance View the Code Compliance Funding Opportunity video or see the slides below. This webinar...

84

Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Innovative compliance and enforcement approaches in Minnesota`s air program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the universe of sources subject to air regulations continues to expand, traditional compliance and enforcement approaches that evaluate compliance status and address noncompliance one source at-a-time, are becoming less useful. In addition, increasing complexity of state and federal air regulations are a drain on resources as regulatory agencies try to manage Title V Permitting, new NESHAPS standards for hazardous air pollutants and new monitoring requirements associated with Title V Permits. In order to keep pace, regulatory agencies can use alternative approaches to compliance and enforcement that maximize resources while improving rates of compliance with state and federal air requirements. This paper discusses approaches used by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency that are designed to improve compliance rates using non-conventional compliance and enforcement techniques. Approaches discussed include sector based initiatives, compliance assistance activities, and initiatives that encourage companies to conduct compliance self-assessments. Specific initiatives that have been used in 1996 and that are ongoing in 1997 are presented, including the purpose and outcome of these efforts.

Biewen, T.; Lockwood, B.; Giddings, S. [Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, St. Paul, MN (United States). Air Quality Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

Shedrow, C

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards

Pennycook, Steve

88

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, settlement agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), necessary and sufficient standards, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct

Pennycook, Steve

89

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Administration (DOE-NNSA) policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, state, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct operations agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards

Pennycook, Steve

90

Environmental Compliance 2-1 2. Environmental Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Security Administration (DOE-NNSA) policy to conduct its operations in compliance with federal, settlement agreements, executive orders, DOE orders (as incorporated into the operating contracts), work smart standards, and best management practices. DOE and its contractors make every effort to conduct

Pennycook, Steve

91

Supercritical water oxidation test bed effluent treatment study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents effluent treatment options for a 50 h Supercritical Water Test Unit. Effluent compositions are calculated for eight simulated waste streams, using different assumed cases. Variations in effluent composition with different reactor designs and operating schemes are discussed. Requirements for final effluent compositions are briefly reviewed. A comparison is made of two general schemes. The first is one in which the effluent is cooled and effluent treatment is primarily done in the liquid phase. In the second scheme, most treatment is performed with the effluent in the gas phase. Several unit operations are also discussed, including neutralization, mercury removal, and evaporation.

Barnes, C.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The College Station Residential Energy Compliance Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The City of College Station, Texas adopted a new residential Energy Compliance Code in January, 1988. The code, which strengthens compliance requirements in several areas, has received broadly based support and acceptance from all major constituent...

Claridge, D. E.; Schrock, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pushing using Compliance Dennis Nieuwenhuisen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but also exploits the power of compliance. 1 Introduction Over the years various techniques have been developed that address the problem of navigating through or interacting with a real or virtual world by an autonomous robot. An example of manipulation is a robot arm in a manufacturing plant that needs to insert

Utrecht, Universiteit

95

Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Tools for NEPA compliance: Baseline reports and compliance guides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental baseline documents and NEPA compliance guides should be carried in every NEPA implementation ``tool kit``. These two indispensable tools can play a major role in avoiding repeated violations of NEPA requirements that have occurred over the past 26 years. This paper describes these tools, discusses their contents, and explains how they are used to prepare better NEPA documents more cost-effectively. Focus is on experience at Sandia Laboratories (NM).

Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - area etf effluent Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vegetated polishing marshs (40%); effluent from polishing marshes... . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

98

Characterization of Gaseous Effluents from Modeling of LWIR Hyperspectral Measurements*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenes which contain effluent emissions from a stack or other source provides the initial foundation of the atmospheric spectral opacity (layered optical depth) from a scene containing an effluent plume layer, which

Kerekes, John

99

DOE Secretarial Memorandum on Improved Decision Making through...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Decision Making through the Integration of Program and Project Management with National Environmental Policy Act Compliance DOE Secretarial Memorandum on Improved Decision Making...

100

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNLs R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business (more)

Ullah, Kazi Wali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pollutants? NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Is the project subject to emissions limitations In an Air 0 81 0 Quality Control Region? Impacts If YES, then complete below. Anticipated?...

103

Effects of municipal effluent on algal growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a method to re- 13 move phosphorus to O. 01 ppm by using ferric chloride Alum has also been used for phosphate removal in both the secondary and tertiary processes. It has reduced *he phosphorus concentration of the ef'fluent *o O. q- 1. 0 mg...

Sung, Yeh-Min

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

3Compliance Status 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 3Compliance Status 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL County Department of Health Services. Thirty reportable spills of petroleum products or antifreeze status #12;3-22004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS DRAFT 3.2.2 New or Modified

105

TRAITEMENT DES EFFLUENTS WASTE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residence time the production of biogas (7l-78 p. 100 CH,) was 237 1 per kg dry matter, i.e. 479 1 of CH to obtain the same amount of biogas four times quicklier. The treatment yield was improved (65 p. 100 COD). The mean production was 4931 biogas/kg degraded COD. It seems to be possible to apply that procedure

Boyer, Edmond

106

DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding the Compliance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regarding the Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding the Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure...

107

2014-04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Plumbing Products 2014-04-17 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Plumbing Products This...

108

CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 This...

109

POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #35 Procedures for Compliance with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of Position POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 35 Procedures for Compliance with Nepotism and Misuse of...

110

Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices (Text Version) Curtis Framel: Good afternoon, and good...

111

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Rinsing Effluent Evaporator for Dismantling Operations - 13271  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1958 and 1997, the UP1 plant at Marcoule - located in the south of France - reprocessed and recycled nearly 20,000 MT of used fuel from special defense applications reactors, as well as fuel from the first generation of electricity generating reactors in France (natural uranium fuel, CO{sub 2}-cooled, graphite-moderated). Decommissioning and Dismantling of the UP1 plant and its associated units started in 1998. Since 2005, the UP1 facility has been operated by AREVA as the Marcoule Management and Operation contractor for French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). An important part of this decommissioning program deals with the vitrification facility of Marcoule. This facility includes 20 tanks devoted to interim storage of highly active solutions, prior to vitrification. In 2006, a rinsing program was defined as part of the tank cleanup strategy. The main objective of the rinsing phases was to decrease activity in order to limit the volume of 'long-life active' waste produced during the decommissioning operations, so the tanks can be dismantled without the need of remote operations. To enable this rinsing program, and anticipating large volumes of generated effluent, the construction of an evaporation unit proved to be essential. The main objective of this unit was to concentrate the effluent produced during tank rinsing operations by a factor of approximately 10, prior to it being treated by vitrification. The evaporator design phase was launched in September 2006. The main challenge for the Project team was the installation of this new unit within a nuclear facility still in operation and in existing compartments not initially designed for this purpose. Cold operating tests were completed in 2008, and in May 2009, the final connections to the process were activated to start the hot test phase. During the first hot test operations performed on the first batches of clean-up effluent, the evaporator had a major operating problem. Extremely large quantities of foam were produced, affecting the evaporator operation, and creating the risk of a reduction in its capacity and throughput performance. A task force of AREVA process, operations, and safety experts from Marcoule and the La Hague reprocessing complex was assembled. New operating parameters were defined and tested to improve the process. Since then, the evaporator has performed very satisfactorily. The foam buildup phenomenon has been brought under complete control. All the different types of effluents produced during cleanup operations have been concentrated, and the results obtained in terms of quality and throughput, have ensured a consistent supply to the vitrification unit. The evaporator was operated until the end of April 2012, and enabled the production of 500 cubic meters of very high activity effluent, concentrating the fission products rinsed from the storage tanks. The evaporator will now be deactivated and decommissioned, with the first rinsing and cleanup operations scheduled to begin in 2014. (authors)

Rives, Rachel [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France); Asou-Pothet, Marielle [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)] [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Treatment of gaseous effluents at nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne effluents from nuclear facilities represent the major environmental impact from such plants both under routine conditions or after plant accidents. Effective control of such emissions, therefore, constitutes a major aspect of plant design for nuclear power plants and other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. This volume brings together a number of review articles by experts in the various areas of concern and describes some of the removal systems that have been designed for power plants and, particularly, for reprocessing plants. Besides controlling the release of radionuclides, other potentially hazardous effluents, such as nitrous oxides, must be minimized, and these are included in some of the systems described. The various chapters deal with historic developments and current technology in reducing emission of fission products, noble gases, iodine, and tritium, and consider design requirements for practical installations.

Goossen, W.R.A. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Mol (Belgium). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [ed.; Eichholz, G.G.; Tedder, D.W. [eds.] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Technologies for Reducing Nutrients in Dairy Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the amount of phosphorus that the river can accept safely. These limits, or total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), require that annual loading and annual average soluble concentrations of phosphorus in the river be reduced by 50 percent. To meet these new... standards, phosphorus must be reduced from dairy effluent applied to waste application fields. Consequently, dairies will need to adopt new, more effective and more efficient waste management practices. Case studies were conducted on a Geotube ? de...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Wagner, Kevin; Gregory, Lucas

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

PSI Gibson turns compliance into a vision for the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the technologies and the decisions behind their selection to help this plant achieve compliance with environmental regulations and remain competitive. The topics of the article include an overview of retrofits on the five boilers, on-line coal analysis, low nitrogen oxide burners, use of wet scrubbers, electrostatic precipitator upgrades, addition of a distributed control and data acquisition system that interfaces with an existing on-line boiler and turbine performance monitoring system, and chemical cleaning of supercritical boilers to improve plant performance.

Makansi, J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

Greager, E.M.

1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Wiegand, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Cole, Pamala C.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Cole, Pamala C.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Cole, Pamala C.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

123

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY NEPA Review Routing Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18 0 Control Region? 4 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

124

Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compliance, Inventory, and Surveys Compliance LSUHSC's Office of Compliance functions under of Compliance. Inventory Tagged equipment is currently defined as having a purchase price of $1,000.00 or greater; shipping costs do count toward reaching this threshold. For inventory purposes, LSUHSC

125

Managing Crop Nutrients Through Soil, Manure and Effluent Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil testing is the foundation of a sound fertility management program, and manure and effluent testing can provide additional information for its effective use....

McFarland, Mark L.; Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

W-026, operational test report isokenetic stack effluent monitoring system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operational Test Report was performed to assure the Isokinetic Stack Effluent Monitoring System (ISEMS) operates in accordance with system design and specifications.

Bottenus, R.J.

1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

WAC - 173 - 221 - Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WAC - 173 - 221 - Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations for Domestic Wastewater Facilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

128

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

Crummel, G.M.

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification.

Seamans, J.A.

1995-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wide-band heterodyne receiver development for effluent measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing advanced infrared heterodyne receivers for plasma diagnostics in fusion reactors for over 20 years. Passive heterodyne radiometry in the LWIR region of the spectrum has historically been restricted by HgCdTe (MCT) detector technology to receiver bandwidths of only 2 GHz. Given typical atmospheric line widths of approximately 3 GHz, a CO{sub 2} (or isotope) laser local oscillator with an average line spacing of 50 GHz, and an MCT detector, only chemical species whose absorptions fall directly on top of laser lines can be measured. Thus, with traditional narrow-band heterodyne radiometry, much of the LWIR spectrum is missed and the less complex direct detection DIAL has been the preferred technique in remote sensing applications. Wide-band heterodyne receivers offer significant improvements in remote measurement capability. Progress at the Institute for Microstructural Sciences (IMS) at National Research Council of Canada and at ORNL in wide-band quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QIPs) and receivers is significantly enhancing the bandwidth capabilities of heterodyne radiometers. ORNL recently made measurements in the lab using QWIPs developed at IMS that demonstrate heterodyne quantum efficiencies of 5% with a heterodyne bandwidth of 7 GHz. The path forward indicates that > 10% heterodyne quantum efficiencies and 30-GHz bandwidths are achievable with current QWIP technology. With a chopped, 30-GHz passive heterodyne receiver, a much larger portion of the LWIR spectrum can now be covered. One potential advantage of wide-band heterodyne receivers for effluent measurements is to dramatically reduce the number of laser lines needed to characterize and distinguish multiple chemical species of interest. In the following paper, the authors discuss this and other implications of these new technologies to the characterization of effluents using both passive heterodyne radiometry and thermo-luminescence.

Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Liu, H.C.; Buchanan, M. [National Research Council of Canada (Canada)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integration of Environmental Compliance at the Savannah River Site - 13024  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large federal installation hosting diverse missions and multiple organizations with competing regulatory needs. Accordingly, there was a need to integrate environmental compliance strategies to ensure the consistent flow of information between Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR), the regulatory agencies and other interested parties. In order to meet this objective, DOE and major SRS contractors and tenants have committed to a strategy of collaboratively working together to ensure that a consistent, integrated, and fully coordinated approach to environmental compliance and regulator relationships is maintained. DOE-SR and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, the SRS management and operations contractor, have established an environmental compliance integration process that provides for the consistent flow down of requirements to projects, facilities, SRS contractors, and subcontractors as well as the upward flow of information to assist in the early identification and resolution of environmental regulatory issues and enhancement of compliance opportunities. In addition, this process strongly fosters teamwork to collaboratively resolve complex regulatory challenges, promote pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities to advance site missions in a manner that balances near-term actions with the long-term site vision, while being protective of human health and the environment. Communication tools are being utilized, some with enhancements, to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. SRS internal regulatory integration is accomplished through a variety of informational exchange forums (e.g., Challenges, Opportunities and Resolution (COR) Team, DOE's Joint Site Regulatory Integration Team, and the Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC)). SRS communications and problem-solving with the regulatory agencies have been enhanced through formation of an interagency 'SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT)'. The SRIT is a partnership comprised of representatives from DOE-SR (with contractor support), EPA Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and is chartered to develop a consensus understanding of SRS regulatory issues and activities. These forums and a formal environmental compliance integration process improve timely cross-functional decision making, problem solving, information sharing, and issue resolution. The SRS internal process has been formally documented in an Environmental Regulatory Integration Program Description, which is linked to the SRS Environmental Policy and agreed upon by all major contractors, subcontractors and tenants. (authors)

Hoel, David [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States)] [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States); Griffith, Michael [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Monitoring, Verification and Reporting: Improving Compliance Within Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk Municipal Comm

133

Assay of low-level plutonium effluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the plutonium recovery section at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an effluent solution is generated that contains low plutonium concentration and relatively high americium concentration. Nondestructive assay of this solution is demonstrated by measuring the passive L x-rays following alpha decay. Preliminary results indicate that an average deviation of 30% between L x-ray and alpha counting can be achieved for plutonium concentrations above 10 mg/L and Am/Pu ratios of up to 3; for plutonium concentrations less than 10 mg/L, the average deviation is 40%. The sensitivity of the L x-ray assay is approx. 1 mg Pu/L.

Hsue, S.T.; Hsue, F.; Bowersox, D.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne effluent discharged Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

calcium and sulfate as causes of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in a hard rock mining effluent Summary: conducted on a hard rock mining effluent. Characteristic of hard...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne effluent control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 7 Effluent Monitoring 4-1 4. Effluent Monitoring Summary: has a comprehensive air pollution control and monitoring program to ensure that airborne discharges... control...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid effluent streams Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an extractable acid (EA) fraction. The dairy effluent was centrifuged... . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment ... Source: US Department of the...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous waste effluents Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

washdown undergoes solids removal, is diluted with recycled wetland effluent... . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

138

Evaluation of irrigation management procedures for geothermal effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of geothermal power plant effluent disposal by surface irrigation and the resulting impact on the shallow aquifer. The study was conducted at the Raft River Experimental Geothermal Power Plant site near Malta, Idaho and at the Snake River Conservation Research Center with soils and effluent obtained from the geothermal power plant site.

Brockway, C.E.; Robbins, C.W.; Robison, C.W.; Johnson, G.S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient H. L. Schoenfuss ? 2008 ? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Many toxic effects of treated wastewater environment of treated wastewater effluent frequently differs consider- ably from that of its receiving waters

Julius, Matthew L.

140

Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent L. J. Aldrich1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent by L. J. Aldrich1 , C. L. Munster2 , V. A. Haby3 , J poultry operations. Therefore, field research was conducted at College Station and Overton, TX, to evaluate the effects of poultry lagoon effluent on soil, vegetation and surface runoff quality. Two

Mukhtar, Saqib

142

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT MODIFICATIONS FOR IMPROVED EFFLUENT COMPLIANCE................................................38 5.3.4 Effects of the Enhanced Treatment Alternative on Water Resources........................39 5.................................................................................................. 21 4.3 Alternative 3 ­ Enhanced Effluent Treatment

Ohta, Shigemi

144

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The ``Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations & Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE`` describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Conduct of Operations and Quality Assurance Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present and detail the deliverables for the Tiger Team Action Plan, Finding MF-11, and milestones in the FY92 Performance Appraisal for Conduct of Operations from Sandia National Laboratories to DOE. The Proposal for Reporting Conduct of Operations Quality Assurance Compliance to DOE'' describes what the deliverables shall be. Five major steps that result in the development of line practices are covered in this document. These line practices specify what Sandia will do to comply with the above DOE management orders. The five steps include: hazard classification; programmatic risk classification; management grouping; compliance plan; and corporate reporting.

Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

154

September 2006 A Laboratory Investigation of Compliance Behavior under Tradable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions trading programs. We test the hypotheses that both the violations of competitive risk neutral find significant differences between compliance behavior under fixed standards and emissions trading programs. Keywords: enforcement, compliance, emissions trading, permit markets, standards, command- and

Murphy, James J.

155

Lessons learned from a NUREG-0737 review of high-range effluent monitors and samplers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shortly after the onset of the accident on 3/28/79 at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, the upper range capabilities of its real-time monitors for gaseous, radioiodine and particulate effluents to the atmosphere were exceeded. Subsequently, the NRC required extended range gaseous effluent monitors and an improved capability for the obtaining of frequent samples of radioiodines and particulates at the concentrations that would be anticipated in effluent steams under accident conditions (NUREG-0578, NUREG-0660, NUREG-0737, Items II.F.1-1 + II.F.1-2). In 1983 an on-site post-implementation review of their installation and operation was initiated by the NRC Region I. The results from nineteen such reviews indicate that the licensees have adopted a variety of approaches to meet the NRC's requirements ranging from the installation of completely new commercial modules to improvised additions to existing monitors and samplers. Some advantages and drawbacks of these various approaches are summarized. 12 refs., 15 figs.

Hull, A.P.; White, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Alternative Compliance Program: 10 CFR Part 490 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation explains the Alternative Compliance option under the U.S. Department of Energy's State and Alternative Fuel Provider program.

Sears, T.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains IAN C. WRIGHT, RICHARD R. NEPTUNE. J VAN DEN BOGERT, and B. M. NIGG. The effects of ankle compliance and flexibility on ankle sprains was to examine the influence of changes in subtalar joint flexibility and compliance on ankle sprain occurrence

158

COMPLIANCE SUMMARY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 2 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPLIANCE SUMMARY 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 2 - 1 Chapter 2 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY regulations and DOE Orders. This section briefly summarizes the compliance status for existing facilities to regulatory permits. They include one SPDES permit, a Major Petroleum Facility (MPF) license, two Resource

159

Compliance Status 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide from the Central Steam Facility were all within permit limits. There were nine unexpected opacity was submitted to address the non-compliance findings. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and sulfur of the light path brought recorded opacity readings back to normal; other opacity excursions reported

160

Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Animal Subjects Human Subjects of bringing a problem forward? You may as well begin to develop these skills now, because they are part, as well as the scientific dimensions." - Dr. Bernard Rollin, University Bioethicist #12;Research

Stephens, Graeme L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CRIS Project Internal DASNR Compliance Checklist Researcher's Name: Department: Address / Phone: Project Title: Does this project involve research with: Human Subjects Yes No If yes, attach copy of IRB to Animals, Plants, or Humans Radioactive Materials or Yes No If yes, attach copy of Radiation Sa X

Ghajar, Afshin J.

163

Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-1636E Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program Manual Prepared by: Environment Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University

164

3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 3Compliance Status 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL supply met all drinking water requirements. Groundwater monitoring at the Major Petroleum Facility reported to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Twenty-two reportable

Homes, Christopher C.

165

Phosphorus reduction in dairy effluent through flocculation and precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus (P) is a pollutant in freshwater systems because it promotes eutrophication. The dairies in the North Bosque and its water body segments import more P than they export. Dairies accumulate P-rich effluent in lagoons and use...

Bragg, Amanda Leann

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBCs enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

170

Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

Cathy A. Wills

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Energy Subpoenas Compliance Data from AeroSys, Inc. DOE Requires Manufacturers to Halt Sales of Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners Violating Minimum Appliance Standards...

174

State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered under the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

40 Recipien, ..ounty of Westmoreland, PA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

176

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

068 Re ent: City of Reno, NV ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions...

177

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12 Recipient: County of Hidalgo, Texas ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Reviewer's Specific Instructions and...

178

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0847 Recipient: City of .viadison, WI ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

179

Learning & Development Policy/Compliance | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

& Development PolicyCompliance Searching for information on Department and Federal training policy and guidelines? The following websites can be of help: DOE Learning &...

180

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

56 Recipient: County of Clark ) 114.4- ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Report to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"................................................................................................................................8 DISTRIBUTED GENERATION COSTS AND SAVINGSReport to the Legislature in Compliance with Public Utilities Code Section 910 March 2013 #12...................................................................17 Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP

182

2014-10-06 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dehumidifiers, Room Air Conditioners, Clothes Washers, Clothes Dryers, and Dishwashers 2014-10-06 DOE Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Overview for Refrigerators,...

183

ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Recipient: county of Monterey, CA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific...

184

Environmental Protection- Industrial Compliance (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Industrial Compliance Section develops and administers Certificates of Approval for the Construction and/or Operation of various industrial facilities. Industries with air emissions and/or...

185

Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

186

Perception of petroleum profits tax compliance in Nigeria.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this research is to examine whether the extent of tax compliance by oil producing companies in Nigeria is determined by the knowledge, (more)

Oremade, Babatunde Timothy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

189

Determination of tritiated formaldehyde in effluents from tritium facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations suggested that formal-dehyde can be incorporated in vegetation at a very high rate. In this paper, the authors develop a methodology for determining tritiated formaldehyde (CHTO) in gaseous effluent containing HTO and HT as dominant species. CHTO being very soluble in water is collected in a solution of carrier formaldehyde. This carrier is necessary for precipitating for formaldehyde derivative of dimedone and collecting it by filtration. The precipitate, which contains the formaldehyde hydrogens, is freed from exchangeable tritium, dried in oven, and combusted to water for tritium determination. CHTO can thus be separated from HTO with a high efficiency, leading to the possibility of determining accurately 1 Bq of CHTO in as much as 5 {times} 10{sup 4} Bq of HTO. The methodology has been applied in preliminary experiments to determine the ratio of CHTO to HTO in effluent from a tritium-handling facility and effluent released from solid miscellaneous wastes.

Belot, Y.; Camus, H.; Marini, T. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DPEI/SERGD, BP 6, F-92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (FR))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

2009 Compliance Recertification Application (2009 CRA) Compliance Application Review Document (CARD) No. 53  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dissolved solids." The groundwater protection requirements limit releases to the maximum contamination level a bounding analysis of the concentrations of the contaminants to assess compliance (Subpart C of 40 CFR part is much less than the observed concentration of brine derived from the Salado anhydrite marker beds. Also

192

Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

J. M. Capron

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

Flannery, Philip A. (Ramsey, MT); Kujawa, Stephan T. (Butte, MT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and seawater. Coastal wastewater treatment plants discharge a continuous stream of low salinity effluent to the ocean cell, the net energy recovery was 0.11 kW h per m3 of wastewater effluent. When twelve cells were

Cui, Yi

196

Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Aerodynamic and functional consequences of wing compliance Andrew M. Mountcastle ?, the instantaneous shape of an insect wing is dictated by the interaction of aerodynamic forces with the inertial rever- sals--loads that well exceed the mean aerodynamic force. Although wing compliance has been

Daniel, Tom

198

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Research Integrity & Compliance Review Office (RICRO) Assistant of the Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office (RICRO) is responsible for a broad range of duties to the campus community and visitors to campus. #12; Ability to successfully plan and prepare for as well as set

199

National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, PRESCRIPTIVE HVAC ALTERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, PRESCRIPTIVE HVAC ALTERATIONS CEC-MECH-1C-ALT-HVAC (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE MECH-1C-ALT-HVAC Prescriptive HVAC Steps" column below. Note: After installation of HVAC units and/or ducts, the Installation

202

SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE UD - LEWES, DELAWARE January 2011 ` #12;SOUND COMPLIANCE MONITORING FOR THE GAMESA WIND TURBINE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES, DELAWARE A Gamesa G90 2.0-MW wind turbine operates at the University of Delaware (UD), Lewes campus on a parcel

Firestone, Jeremy

203

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report looks at different ways to verify energy code compliance and to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted document are achieved. Conformity assessment is the body of work that ensures compliance, including activities that can ensure residential and commercial buildings satisfy energy codes and standards. This report identifies and discusses conformity-assessment activities and provides guidance for conducting assessments.

Conover, David R.; Makela, Eric J.; Fannin, Jerica D.; Sullivan, Robin S.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance Cost effective reduction of legislated emissions...

205

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002 Science commissioned Pipeline, 2002 The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory Pakefield OF SURVEY 5 2.1 Pipeline description 5 2.2 Occupancy 6 2.3 Gamma dose rate measurements 7 3 SURVEY FINDINGS

206

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Clinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through the Clinical Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mandates and thus responsive to research regarding the best practices in the profession, they are subjectClinical Compliance Manual This manual was developed to guide students, staff and faculty through in this manual is to provide the reader with a comprehensible view of the Clinical Compliance Office, its

Ward, Karen

209

Controls of Wellbore Flow Regimes on Pump Effluent Composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Where well water and formation water are compositionally different or heterogeneous, pump effluent composition will vary due to partial mixing and transport induced by pumping. Investigating influences of purging and sampling methodology on composition variability requires quantification of wellbore flow regimes and mixing. As a basis for this quantification, analytical models simulating Poiseuille flow were developed to calculate flow paths and travel times. Finite element modeling was used to incorporate influences of mixing. Parabolic velocity distributions within the screened interval accelerate with cumulative inflow approaching the pump intake while an annulus of inflowing formation water contracts uniformly to displace an axial cylinder of pre-pumping well water as pumping proceeds. Increased dispersive mixing forms a more diffuse formation water annulus and the contribution of formation water to pump effluent increases more rapidly. Models incorporating viscous flow and diffusion scale mixing show that initially pump effluent is predominantly pre-pumping well water and compositions vary most rapidly. After two screen volumes of pumping, 94% of pump effluent is inflowing formation water. Where the composition of formation water and pre-pumping well water are likely to be similar, pump effluent compositions will not vary significantly and may be collected during early purging or with passive sampling. However, where these compositions are expected to be considerably different or heterogeneous, compositions would be most variable during early pumping, that is, when samples are collected during low-flow sampling. Purging of two screen volumes would be required to stabilize the content and collect a sample consisting of 94% formation water.

James Martin-Hayden; plummer; Sanford Britt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Proposed Changes to Simplify Review of the Next WIPP Compliance Re-certification Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amended Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1996, P. L. 104-201, 110 Stat. 2422 [1], requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare and submit documentation demonstrating continued compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) radioactive waste disposal standard 40 CFR Part 191 [2] every five years starting after first waste receipt in accordance with the criteria of 40 CFR 194 [3]. The DOE submitted the WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) [4] to EPA in 1996 and it was approved by EPA in 1998. The first shipment of waste was received for disposal at WIPP on March 26, 1999. Subsequently, the first Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) [5] was submitted to EPA on March 26, 2004. Reflecting on lessons learned from the previous applications, the DOE is proposing a change in the format for the next CRA due on March 26, 2009. The DOE has an objective to communicate plans, schedules and re-certification methodology as early as possible to EPA and stakeholders. With that objective in mind, the DOE began communicating the proposed new application strategy to the EPA in mid- 2006. For the 2009 CRA submittal, the DOE is proposing to align the document's format to match each section to the requirements of the WIPP compliance criteria at 40 CFR Part 194 [3] and the EPA re-certification support documents. The benefits of the revised format include improved integration of all regulatory, operational, and programmatic activities; easier access to historical information and decisions; a decreased level of effort for DOE, EPA and Stakeholder review; enhancing the likelihood of a quicker re-certification decision; and potentially reducing DOE's post-submittal CRA tasks. This paper will provide insight to those wishing to understand and be kept abreast of changes in the WIPP's certification process. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kouba, St.; Kolander, M. [Washington Group International, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

The effects of the effluent from an electrical generating station on the phytoplankton of Trinity Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Larger animals such as fish may be impinged on cooling water intake screens. Thermal effluents from power plants may, in addition, alter the suitability of the receiving waters for the growth or survival of the flora and fauna. A number of papers... be attributed to power plant operations (DeBusk-Holt 1976). Water quality improved in lower Cedar Bayou for the survival of macro-benthos and fish after power plant operations reversed the flow in that portion of the bayou (Matlock 1972; Williams 1972; Mc...

Krejci, Mark Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Compliance, Certification and Enforcement for US Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Programs by US DOE  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Information about energy and water conservation standards, ENERGY STAR, and compliance and certification enforcement.

215

Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

Sears, T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alternative Compliance: Guidelines for Preparing and Submitting a Waiver Request Application and Other Documentation Requirements (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to assist covered fleets interested in taking advantage of more flexible compliance options and to facilitate the transition from Standard Compliance to Alternative Compliance. It is designed to help fleets better understand the Alternative Compliance option and successfully complete the waiver application process.

Not Available

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Knowledge discovery in corporate email : the compliance bot meets Enron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I propose the creation of a real-time compliance "bot" - software to momentarily pause each employee's email at the moment of sending and to electronically assess whether that email is likely to create liability or ...

Waterman, K. Krasnow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environmental Compliance and Sustainability The College of William and Mary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance and Sustainability The College of William and Mary Thomas. Thanks are also in order for Professor Sarah Stafford, The College of William nautical miles1 from San Francisco? How will Blueseed demonstrate sustainability

Lewis, Robert Michael

223

Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, Staff Directory including phone number and areas of responsibility for the Energy and Waste Management Unit, Western Energy and Waste Management Unit, and the...

224

Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2011/FY 2012 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2011/fiscal year 2012.

Not Available

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 X 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 X 0 Control Region? 2 Revised 8121 0 mjt NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts If...

226

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Liner...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

l8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? I Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 l8l 0 Control Region? 2 Rev*sed on 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

227

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: T-2...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 l8l 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is t he project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 l8l 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

228

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project TitJe: Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 18 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 18 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 11122008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

229

Project Title: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 8J 0 Hazardous Air Pollutants? Is the project subject to emissions limitations in an Air Quality 0 8J 0 Control Region? 2 Revised on: 111212008 NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Impacts...

230

300 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) Authorization Envelope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the facility Authorization Envelope (AE) for the 300 Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEP )Project and identify the requirements related to the maintenance of the AE as Specified in HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The 300 LEF Project consists of two separate facilities operating under one management organization. They are the 310 Facility and the 340 Facility. The AE documents the limits of operations for all 300 LEF Project activities.

WRIGHT, E.J.; STORDEUR, R.T.

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

F/H effluent treatment facility. Technical data summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical basis for the design of the facility. Some of the sections are described with options to permit simplification of the process, depending on the effluent quality criteria that the facility will have to meet. Each part of the F/HETF process is reviewed with respect to decontamination and concentration efficiency, operability, additional waste generation, energy efficiency, and compatability with the rest of the process.

Ryan, J P; Stimson, R E

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Removal of Heavy Metals from Industrial Effluent Using Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial development results in the generation of industrial effluents, and if untreated results in water, sediment and soil pollution. (Fakayode and Onianwa, 2002 ? Fakayode, 2005). Industrial wastes and emission contain toxic and hazardous substances, most of which are detrimental to human health (Jimena et al.,2008 ? Ogunfowokan et al.,2005 ? Rajaram et al.,2008). The key pollutants include heavy metals, chemical wastes and oil spills etc. Heavy metal resistant bacteria have significant role in bioremediation of heavy metals in wastewater. The objective of this work is to study the role of bacteria in removing the heavy metals present in the industrial effluent.Five effluent samples out of nine were selected for this study due to high content of heavy metals. The heavy metals Hg and Cu were removed by Bacillus sp. The average Hg reduction was 45 % and Cu reduction was recorded as 62%. The heavy metals Cd, As and Co were removed by Pseudomonas sp. The average Cd reduction was 56%, average As reduction was 34 % and average Co reduction was recorded as 53%. The heavy metals Cd and Cu were removed by Staphylococcus sp. The average Cd reduction was 44 % and average Cu reduction was recorded as 34 %.

Manisha N; Dinesh Sharma; Arun Kumar

233

DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970`s, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

DWPF waste form compliance plan (Draft Revision)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy currently has over 100 million liters of high-level radioactive waste in storage at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In the late 1970's, the Department of Energy recognized that there were significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the high-level waste in a stable solid form. Several alternative waste forms were evaluated in terms of product quality and reliability of fabrication. This evaluation led to a decision to build the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS to convert the easily dispersed liquid waste to borosilicate glass. In accordance with the NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) process, an Environmental Impact Statement was prepared for the facility, as well as an Environmental Assessment of the alternative waste forms, and issuance of a Record of Decision (in December, 1982) on the waste form. The Department of Energy, recognizing that start-up of the DWPF would considerably precede licensing of a repository, instituted a Waste Acceptance Process to ensure that these canistered waste forms would be acceptable for eventual disposal at a federal repository. This report is a revision of the DWPF compliance plan.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, NM (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

Lewis, C.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous effluent decontamination Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aqueous effluents. This ratio... treatment, CrVI 1 Introduction Industrial aqueous pollution (heavy metals) accounts for 30 to 40% of all... of the environment 2. This...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - area treated effluent Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 4 On-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives Summary: of treated effluent over the full dispersal area. Figure 8....

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - area effluent treatment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Nature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Summary: . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity effluent separation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Nature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Summary: . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous effluents trocadores Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine 2 Nature and Transformation of Dissolved Organic Matter in Summary: . As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous effluent systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bile of Fish Summary: Mixtures of Estrogenic Contaminants in Bile of Fish Exposed to Wastewater Treatment Works Effluents... Sciences, Hatherley Laboratory, University of Exeter,...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous effluents determination Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and in addition... Mixtures of Estrogenic Contaminants in Bile of Fish Exposed to Wastewater Treatment Works Effluents... Sciences, Hatherley Laboratory, University of Exeter,...

245

Compliance status report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated through national defense-related activities. Approximately 53,700 m{sup 2} of these wastes have been generated and are currently stored at government defense installations across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been sited and constructed to meet the criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed wastes. This Compliance Status Report (CSR) provides an assessment of the progress of the WIPP Program toward compliance with long-term disposal regulations, set forth in Title 40 CFR 191 (EPA, 1993a), Subparts B and C, and Title 40 CFR {section}268.6 (EPA, 1993b), in order to focus on-going and future experimental and engineering activities. The CSR attempts to identify issues associated with the performance of the WIPP as a long-term repository and to focus on the resolution of these issues. This report will serve as a tool to focus project resources on the areas necessary to ensure complete, accurate, and timely submittal of the compliance application. This document is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Eutrophication potential of secondary and tertiary wastewater effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydroxi de or some other base. 8ecause of its low cost 1n some areas, waste pickle 11quor will probably be useful in some treatment systems. Alum has been used for phosphate removal in both the secondary (act1vated sludge) and tertiary processes.... In the secondary process, alum has reduced the effluent phosphorus concentration to 0 . 5 - 1. 0 mg/1. Tertiary alum treatment has been used at the FWOA ? Lebanon Pilot Plant, Lebanon, Oh1o (8). The pilot plant at Dallas, Texas, is investigating the use of 11...

Ivy, James Thomas

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Check-Testing of Manufacturer Self Reported Labeling Data& Compliance with MEPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China first adopted minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) in 1989. Today, there are standards for a wide range of domestic, commercial and selected industrial equipment. In 1999, China launched a voluntary endorsement label, which has grown to cover over 40 products including water-saving products. Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label that initially covered two products and in 2007 was extended to cover four products total including: air conditioners; household refrigerators; clothes washers; and unitary air conditioners. These programs have had an important impact in reducing the energy consumption of appliances in China. China has built up a strong infrastructure to develop and implement standards. Historically, however, the government's primary focus has been on the technical requirements for specifying efficiency performance. Less attention has been paid to monitoring and enforcement with a minimal commitment of resources and little expansion of administrative capacity in this area. Thus, market compliance with both mandatory standard and labeling programs has been questionable. Furthermore, actual energy savings have quite possibly been undermined as a result. The establishment of a regularized monitoring system for tracking compliance with the mandatory standard and energy information label programs in China is a major area for program improvement. Over the years, the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) has partnered with several Chinese institutions to promote energy-efficient products in China. CLASP, together with its implementing partner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), has assisted China in developing and updating the above-mentioned standards and labeling programs. Because of the increasing need for the development of a monitoring system to track compliance with the standard, CLASP, with support from Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan (IEEJ), has expanded its on-going collaboration with the China National Institute of Standards (CNIS) to include enforcement and monitoring. CNIS has already begun working on the issue of compliance. In early 2007, LBNL compiled a report, with the support of METI, summarizing the findings from these activities and indicating China's progress to date. The report concluded that although the existing legal basis for monitoring and enforcement is sufficient- with multiple laws and regulations defining the responsibility of each government agency and specifying a system of fines and penal-ties for non-compliance-compared with international best practices, there is still a big gap in China's monitoring and enforcement efforts for mandatory standards and labels. In sum, the report concludes that while the sample size is far smaller than the mid-term goal of developing a regular check testing program for 20 percent of the market for each of the three products, this study provides highly valuable feedback on manufacturer compliance rates in the absence of a large-scale national testing program. With METI/IEEJ support, CLASP could assist the China Energy Label Center (CELC) in expanding its verification testing programs to cover more models and products, and in developing a plan for ramping up the national verification testing program over the next three to five years. This is particularly important as the information labeling program gains more visibility and expands to additional product categories. CLASP could also assist CELC to plan for a round-robin testing scheme-first among three national laboratories with sub-sequent expansion of this program to other regional test laboratories--with the goal of improving the consistency of testing results from different testing laboratories.

Zhou, Nan; Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Wang, Ruohong; Egan, Christine

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide, Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a comprehensive National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide for the Sandia National Laboratories. It is based on the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations in 40 CFR Parts 1500 through 1508; the US Department of Energy (DOE) N-EPA implementing procedures in 10 CFR Part 102 1; DOE Order 5440.1E; the DOE ``Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act`` of June 1994- Sandia NEPA compliance procedures-, and other CEQ and DOE guidance. The Guide includes step-by-step procedures for preparation of Environmental Checklists/Action Descriptions Memoranda (ECL/ADMs), Environmental Assessments (EAs), and Environmental Impact Statements (EISs). It also includes sections on ``Dealing With NEPA Documentation Problems`` and ``Special N-EPA Compliance Issues.``

Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

251

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian Sampling of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile of wastewater treatment plant effluent in Boulder Creek, Colorado, and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, during the summer........................................................................................................................................................... 5 Field Measurements, Nutrients, Carbon, Major Ions, Trace Elements, and Biological Components

252

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

253

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 1998, to March 31, 2000. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, and amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office's (hereinafter the ''CAO'') compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. An issue was identified in the 1998 BECR relating to a potential cross-connection between the fire-water systems and the site domestic water system. While the CAO and its managing and operating contractor (hereinafter the ''MOC'') believe the site was always in compliance with cross-connection control requirements, hardware and procedural upgrades w ere implemented in March 1999 to strengthen its compliance posture. Further discussion of this issue is presented in section 30.2.2 herein. During this reporting period WIPP received two letters and a compliance order alleging violation of certain requirements outlined in section 9(a)(1) of the LWA. With the exception of one item, pending a final decision by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED), all alleged violations have been resolved without the assessment of fines or penalties. Non-mixed TRU waste shipments began on March 26, 1999. Shipments continued through November 26, 1999, the effective date of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF). No shipments regulated under the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit were received at WIPP during this BECR reporting period.

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation`s transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

Mewhinney, J.A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1998 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1998. Twenty-one sites for seven projects were surveyed for the presence of state or federally protected species. Three projects were in or near habitat of the threatened desert tortoise and required special clearance and transect surveys. All geospatial data collected were entered into Bechtel Nevada's Ecological Geographic Information system for use in ongoing ecosystem management of the NTS.

Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

DAVIS, W.E.

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

257

Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy (RN) and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Flotillas Diesel Engine CO2 and SOx Emission Compliance Strategy for the Royal Navy...

258

Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Increasing Child Compliance with Essential Healthcare Routines: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Generalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be effective and by assessing whether the effects of compliance training in an analogue setting will generalize to the actual healthcare setting. Keywords: demand fading, differential reinforcement, essential healthcare routines, compliance, problem behavior...

Harrison, Kelley Lynne Attix

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration compliance program Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

finance, compliance issues related to federally funded programs, operational... efficiency, strategic planning, financial modeling, and other administrative,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andr& #233

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labeling Programs in China: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer's production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andre

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

3-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 reportable spills of petroleum products occurred onsite in 2000. The majority were less than ten gallons;3-2SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS 3.1 COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL

Homes, Christopher C.

264

3-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS Brookhaven National Laboratory reportable spills of petroleum products occurred on site in 2002. Seventeen were less than 10 gallons: COMPLIANCE STATUS 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 3.1 COMPLIANCE WITH ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS Brookhaven

Homes, Christopher C.

265

Design and Verification of Instantiable Compliance Rule Graphs in Process-Aware  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

against imposed compliance rules. Tab. 1 summarizes quality compliance rules imposed on the software. Nevertheless, for quality assurance, it could be desired to verify c2 over the development process. ThusDesign and Verification of Instantiable Compliance Rule Graphs in Process-Aware Information Systems

Pfeifer, Holger

266

Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

BLACK, D.M.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE, SIGN LIGHTING CEC-SLTG-1C (Revised 10/10) CALIFORNIA Lighting) (Page 1 of 4) SLTG-1C Project Name: Date: Project Address: Location of Sign Phase of Sign Construction Type of Lighting Control Outdoor Signs New Signs New Lighting Controls Indoor Signs Sign

268

UNLV OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NETWORK ACCESS COMPLIANCE POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNLV OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NETWORK ACCESS COMPLIANCE POLICY RESPONSIBLE ADMINISTRATOR: Create a secure network environment for UNLV's computer and network resources by establishing different levels of network access to meet the needs of UNLV staff and students as well as the general public

Hemmers, Oliver

269

PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President, Energy Procurement 9/5/13 California Power Markets Symposium #12;1. PG&E Renewable Portfolio Standard 2. AB32 and Greenhouse Gas Legislation Outline #12;PG&E's Electric Generation Portfolio *Note: Other

270

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE RESPONSIBLE ADMlNISTRA TOR and supervisors, deans, directors, and department heads should read this policy. #12;DIGITAL AND MEDIA COPYRIGHT will investigate all digital and media copyright infringement complaints and take appropriate action. NOTE

Hemmers, Oliver

271

On the Effect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1995 ACC On the Effect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem Shahram Payandeh, Assistant Professor Experimental Robotics Laboratory (ERL) School of Engineering Science Simon Fraser University control of the robotic manipulator during its phase transition from free to constrained motions. One

272

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practicing in France. Investigators included post- menopausal women with a diagnosis of osteoporosis significantly the risk of osteoporotic fracture in women with post-menopausal osteoporosis [1]. NonethelessRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Compliance and treatment satisfaction of post menopausal women treated

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

273

Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through prevention, minimization, and recycling Classroom or one-on-one waste generator training, other DOE and University waste organizations Flammable waste cans, 30-gallon, 55-gallon drums (steelCompliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated

274

Money Laundering and FATF Compliance by the International Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Money Laundering and FATF Compliance by the International Community Ali Alkaabi, George Mohay.mohay@qut.edu.au, a.mccullagh@qut.edu.au, a.chantler@qut.edu.au Abstract. This paper examines the anti-money and socio-economic situation, and examine how such local factors have affected the UAE's financial and anti-money

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

TUSDM Patient Billing and HIPAA Privacy Compliance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Attachment E 14 B4133045v2 #12;1.) Definitions The following definitions are utilized throughout. Because of complex and ever-changing regulatory requirements, the Federal Government has encouraged health care providers to vigorously educate their employees and establish their own compliance program

Dennett, Daniel

276

Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System test plans releases 2.0 and 3.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Effluent Monitoring Information System (LEMIS) is being developed as the organized information repository facility in support of the liquid effluent monitoring requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement. It is necessary to provide an automated repository into which the results from liquid effluent sampling will be placed. This repository must provide for effective retention, review, and retrieval of selected sample data by authorized persons and organizations. This System Architecture document is the aggregation of the DMR P+ methodology project management deliverables. Together they represent a description of the project and its plan through four Releases, corresponding to the definition and prioritization of requirements defined by the user.

Guettler, D.A.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evaluation of the WIPP Project`s compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP`s compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA`s proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA`s responses to EEG`s comments.

Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF CARBONATE ROCK MEDIATED BY BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCED FROM HIGH-STARCH AGRICULTURAL EFFLUENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactants can be used to alter wettability of reservoir rock, increasing spontaneous imbibition and thus improving oil yields. Commercial synthetic surfactants are often prohibitively expensive and so a crude preparation of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, from Bacillus subtilis grown on high-starch industrial and agricultural effluents has been proposed as an economical alternative. To assess the effectiveness of the surfactin, it is compared to commercially available surfactants. In selecting a suitable benchmark surfactant, two metrics are examined: the ability of the surfactants to alter wettability at low concentrations, and the degree to which they are absorbed onto reservoir matrix. We review the literature to survey the adsorption models that have been developed to describe surfactant adsorption in porous media. These models are evaluated using the experimental data from this study. Crushed carbonate rock samples are cleaned and aged in crude oil. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of commercial anionic surfactants and surfactin is assessed using a two-phase separation; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption the rock is determined.

Mehdi Salehi; Stephen Johnson; Gregory Bala; Jenn-Tai Liang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

KOI-2700bA PLANET CANDIDATE WITH DUSTY EFFLUENTS ON A 22 hr ORBIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kepler planet candidate KOI-2700b (KIC 8639908b), with an orbital period of 21.84 hr, exhibits a distinctly asymmetric transit profile, likely indicative of the emission of dusty effluents, and reminiscent of KIC 1255b. ...

Barclay, Thomas

282

EA-1156: Effluent Reduction Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New...

283

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-EP-0438-1, ''A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans'', and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the third revision to the original annual report. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it is updated as necessary.

HUNACEK, G.S.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DOE-HDBK-1216-2015-Environmental Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE-HDBK-1216-2015; Environmental Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The Department of Energys (DOE) radiation protection of the public and the environment is contained within DOE Order (O) 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. This Handbook describes elements that may be used to implement the radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance requirements in DOE O 458.1.

285

Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH CHILDRESS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH...

Childress, Hannah

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory provides an information source for packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volumes 1 and 2 of the directory provide an index by model number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number. Volume 3 includes an alphabetical listing by user name for approved quality assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved quality assurance programs.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA)(Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office's (CBFO) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico. In the prior BECR, the CBFO and the management and operating contractor (MOC)committed to discuss resolution of a Letter of Violation that had been issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in August 1999, which was during the previous BECR reporting period. This Letter of Violation alleged noncompliance with hazardous waste aisle spacing, labeling, a nd tank requirements. At the time of publication of the prior BECR, resolution of the Letter of Violation was pending. On July 7, 2000, the NMED issued a letter noting that the aisle spacing and labeling concerns had been adequately addressed and that they were rescinding the violation alleging that the Exhaust Shaft Catch Basin failed to comply with the requirements for a hazardous waste tank. During the current reporting period, WIPP received a Notice of Violation and a compliance order alleging the violation of the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Regulations and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP).

Washinton TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

NONE

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance7/109THETTUFrequently

290

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. 300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. 2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

NOx Control for Utility Boiler OTR Compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) and Fuel Tech, Inc. (Fuel Tech) teamed to evaluate an integrated solution for NO{sub x} control comprised of B&W's DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner technology and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign}, a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) technology, capable of meeting a target emission limit of 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu. In a previous project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), promising results were obtained with this technology from large-scale testing in B&W's 100-million Btu/hr Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) which simulates the conditions of large coal-fired utility boilers. Under the most challenging boiler temperatures at full load conditions, NO{sub x} emissions of 0.19 lb/10{sup 6} Btu were achieved firing Powder River Basin coal while controlling ammonia slip to less than 5 ppm. At a 40 million Btu/hr firing rate, NO{sub x} emissions were as low as 0.09 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. Improved performance with this system was proposed for this new program with injection at full load via a convective pass multiple nozzle lance (MNL) in front of the superheater tubes or in the convective tube bank. Convective pass lances represent the current state-of-the-art in SNCR and needed to be evaluated in order to assess the full potential of the combined technologies. The objective of the program was to achieve a NO{sub x} level below 0.15 lb/10{sup 6} Btu (with ammonia slip of less than 5 ppm) in the CEDF using PRB coal and B&W's DRB-4Z{reg_sign} low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal (PC) burner in combination with dual zone overfire air ports and Fuel Tech's NO{sub x}OUT{reg_sign} System. Commercial installations of B&W's low-NO{sub x} burner, in combination with overfire air ports using PRB coal, have demonstrated a NO{sub x} level of 0.15 to 0.2 lb/10{sup 6} Btu under staged combustion conditions. The proposed goal of the combustion system (no SNCR) for this project is a NO{sub x} level at 0.15 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. The NO{sub x} reduction goal for SNCR is 25% from the low-NO{sub x} combustion emission levels. Therefore, overall NO{sub x} emissions would approach a level of 0.11 lb/10{sup 6} Btu in commercial installation. The goals of the program were met. At 100% load, using the MNL for very low baseline NO{sub x} (0.094 to 0.162 lb/10{sup 6} Btu depending on burner stoichiometry), an approximately 25% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved (0.071 to 0.124 lb/10{sup 6} Btu) while maintaining NH{sub 3} slip less than 6.4 ppm. At 60% load, using MNL or only wall-injectors for very low baseline NO{sub x} levels, more than 30% NO{sub x} reduction was achieved. Although site specific economic evaluation is required for each unit, our economic evaluation of DRB-4Z{reg_sign} burner and SNCR for a 500 MW{sub e} plant firing PRB shows that the least cost strategy is low-NO{sub x} burner and OFA at a cost of $210 to $525 per ton of NO{sub x} removed. Installation of SNCR allows the utilities to sell more NO{sub x} credit and it becomes economical when NO{sub x} credit cost is more than $5,275 per ton of NO{sub x}.

Hamid Farzan; Jennifer L. Sivy

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

SRS ES and H Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. The purpose of this Implementation Plan is to define the single program for all sitewide and facility 90-2 ES and H Standards Compliance efforts, which will satisfy the HQ Implementation Plan, avoid duplicate efforts, be as simple and achievable as possible, include cost-saving innovations, use a graded approach based on facility hazards and future needs of facilities, and support configuration control for facility requirements. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been designated a pilot facility for the 90-2 program and has progressed with their facility program ahead of the site-level program. The DWPF, and other Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities that progress on an enhanced schedule, will serve as pilot facilities for the site-level program. The lessons learned with their requirement identifications, and their assessments of the adequacy of and their compliance with these requirements will be used to improve the efficiency of the site-level and subsequent programs.

Hearn, W.H.

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Format and Content Guide for Title 40 CFR 191 and Title 40 CFR 268.6 Compliance Reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Format and Content Guide was followed in preparing the WIPP Compliance Status Report submitted in March 1994 and will be used for the compliance documents scheduled for submittal in the Spring of 1995. The Compliance Status Report was issued to stakeholders in March 1994 and describes the status of associated activities on compliance with the requirements in Title 40 CFR 268.6 and Title 40 CFR 191. The Compliance Status Report focuses on (1) the information required for a demonstration of compliance, (2) preliminary results, (3) the areas of the WIPP program that are either not currently mature enough, or do not provide adequate margin for a demonstration of compliance, and (4) the areas of the WIPP program that will be focused upon to provide the remaining necessary information for use in the 1995 compliance demonstration reports. The Compliance Status Report is not intended to constitute a statement of compliance or a demonstration of compliance. It is intended to report the status of progress made to date in project efforts to achieve the required level of data/information necessary for the required compliance demonstrations. Comments on the Compliance Status Report from stakeholders will likely result in a modified Format and Content Guide, as will the promulgation of the EPA`s Compliance Criteria for WIPP (40 CFR 194).

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - agarose mold compliance Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o Summary: is in compliance with any standards for mold...

296

EA-1406: Ground Water Compliance at the New Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site, Rifle, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed compliance strategy of natural flushing combined with institutional controls and continued monitoring for the New Rifle uranium mill...

297

Evaluation of the Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) compliance to DOE order 6430.1A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to evaluate the compliance of Cask Transportation Facility Modifications (CTFM) to DOE Order 6430.1A.

ARD, K.E.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

has been integrated into the engine design to target SULEV NMHC compliance Pre turbo catalysts for low NMOG Small LNT due to low absolute NOx mass reduction required...

299

Colorado - C.R.S. 40-5-101 - New Construction - Extension - Compliance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- New Construction - Extension - Compliance with Local Zoning Rules Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado -...

300

Table of Contents Page i 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Panel 7.6 California Fire Code Solar Access Requirements 7.7 Compliance and Enforcement #12;Page 7. Solar Ready ..................................................................................2 7.3 Solar Zone

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012). In 2010, energy suppliers reported 100% complianceYork. In New York, energy suppliers contracted through RPSon data reported by energy suppliers. NYSERDA estimated the

Heeter, Jenny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Title V, compliance assurance monitoring (CAM), and the use of any credible evidence (ACE): The effects on compliance and enforcement in the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Title V, facilities are required to determine the compliance status of each air emission source with all applicable requirements. In addition, facilities are required to determine the methods that will be used to demonstrate on-going compliance with these requirements. Under Title V, it is no longer the responsibility of the regulator to determine whether a facility is in compliance; it is the facility`s responsibility to continuously prove they are in compliance. The CAM rule, as drafted, will implement the Enhanced Monitoring (EM) and periodic monitoring requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). CAM will require facilities subject to Title V to develop CAM plans for specific emission units at the facility. CAM plans will include the methods that will be used to provide reasonable assurance of continuous compliance with applicable requirements. In addition, the EPA is also proposing to finalize portions of the 1993 EM rule that would allow the use of ACE to determine compliance with emission limits. Reference test methods are the only means currently available to determine compliance with emission limits. The EPA has indicated that, under the ACE rule, even data obtained via CAM will be considered credible evidence in determining the compliance status of a facility. CAM and Title V will require sources to submit large amounts of data to the regulatory agency. The data, upon submittal, are public record and can be used to indicate non-compliance under the ACE rule. Therefore, the burden shift associated with CAM and Title V, in conjunction with the use of ACE, will significantly increase the potential liability of industry. This paper discusses the implications Title V, CAM, and the ACE rule will have on industry as well as the possible effects the regulations will have on enforcement in the future. The paper will provide the perspectives of both plant managers and legal counsel.

Lowery, K.P. [Trinity Consultants Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Poffenberger, C.G. [Hogan and Hartson L.L.P., Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Subtask 1.18 - A Decision Tool for Watershed-Based Effluent Trading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Handling produced water in an economical and environmentally sound manner is vital to coalbed methane (CBM) development, which is expected to increase up to 60% in the next 10-15 years as the demand for natural gas increases. Current produced water-handling methods (e.g., shallow reinjection and infiltration impoundments) are too costly when implemented on a well-by-well basis. A watershed-based effluent credit trading approach may be a means of managing produced water at reduced cost while meeting or surpassing water quality regulations. This market-based approach allows for improved water quality management by enabling industrial, agricultural, and municipal discharge facilities to meet water quality permit requirements by purchasing pollutant reduction credits from other entities within the same watershed. An evaluation of this concept was conducted for the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). To conduct this assessment, the EERC collected and evaluated existing water quality information and developed the appropriate tools needed to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of specific trading scenarios. The accomplishments of this study include (1) an exploration of the available PRB water quantity and quality data using advanced statistical techniques, (2) development of an integrated water quality model that predicts the impacts of CBM produced water on stream salinity and sodicity, (3) development of an economic model that estimates costs and benefits from implementing potential trading options, (4) evaluation of hypothetical trading scenarios between select watersheds of the PRB, and (5) communication of the project concept and results to key state and federal agencies, industry representatives, and stakeholders of the PRB. The preliminary results of a basinwide assessment indicate that up to $684 million could be saved basinwide without compromising water quality as a result of implementing a watershed-based credit-trading approach.

Xixi Wang; Bethany A. Kurz; Marc D. Kurz

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Capitalizing on information technology to reduce environmental compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last several years environmental regulations have proliferated at a pace similar to the explosive growth of micro-computing. The new desktop computing power has encouraged compliance solutions developed in-house using PC based database tools. The result has often been numerous internally developed applications scattered throughout the company, managed or supported by personnel unfamiliar with the underlying principles of the original software. Each individual database may contain redundant and sometimes conflicting data. Expertise on these systems is often not transferable to the next system and may be lost as staff is promoted, transferred, or downsized.

Schott, J. [Entergy Services, Beaumont, TX (United States); Gloski, D.M.; Manning, L.A. [Electric Software Products, Inc., Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. DepartmenttoJune 16,AprilFrankDavis-Bacon Compliance and

307

Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring: InnovationISCNEPA Policy and Compliance Search

308

Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment of Energy June 4,Compliance

309

Generic effluent monitoring system certification for AP-40 exhauster stack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as applied to the AP-40 exhauster stack, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/AP-40 system meets all applicable performance criteria. The contaminant mixing tests were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the wind tunnel facility, 331-H Building, using a mockup of the actual stack. The particle sample transport tests were conducted by PNNL at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The AP-40 stack is typical of several 10-in. diameter stacks that discharge the filtered ventilation air from tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles. Unrelated to the performance criteria, it was found that the record sample filter holder exhibited symptoms of sample bypass around the particle collection filter. This filter holder should either be modified or replaced with a different type. 10 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.; Bussell, J.H.; Maughan, A.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Aeronautical System Center's environmental compliance assessment and management program's cost-saving initiatives support the Air Force's acquisition reform initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Management directorate of ASC (ASC/EM) has the responsibility of providing government oversight for the Government Owned Contractor Operated Aircraft and Missile plants (GOCOs). This oversight is manifested as a landlord role where Air Force provides the funding required to maintain the plant facilities including buildings and utilities as well as environmental systems. By agreement the companies operating the plants are required to operate them in accordance with environmental law. Presently the GOCOs include Air Force Plant (AFP) 6 in Marietta Ga., AFP 4 in Fort Worth, Tx., AFP 44 in Tucson, Az., AFP 42 in Palmdale, Ca., and AFP PJKS in Denver, Co. Lockheed Martin corporation operates AFPs 4,6, PJKS and a portion of AFP 42 while AFP 44 is operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. Other GOCOs at AFP 42 are Northrup-Grumman, Boeing, and Cabaco, the facilities engineer. Since 1992 the Environmental Management division has conducted its Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program assessments (ECAMP) annually at each of the plants. Using DOD's ECAMP Team Guide and teams comprised of both Air Force and consultant engineering personnel, each plant is assessed for its environmental compliance well being. In the face of rising operational costs and diminishing budgets ASC/EM performed a comprehensive review of its ECAMP. As a result, the basic ECAMP program was improved to reduce costs without compromising on quality of the effort. The program retained its emphasis in providing a snap-shot evaluation of each Air Force plant's environmental compliance health supported by complete but tailored protocol assessments.

Meanor, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Programmer`s manual for CAMCON: Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAMCON, the Compliance Assessment Methodology CONtroller, is an analysis system that assists in assessing the compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) with applicable long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency, including Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191 and 40CFR268.6, which is the portion of the Land Disposal Restrictions implementing the Resource, Conservative, and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended that states the conditions for disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. This manual provides an architectural overview of the CAMCON system. Furthermore this manual presents guidelines and presents suggestions for programmers developing the many different types of software necessary to investigate various events and physical processes of the WIPP. These guidelines include user interface requirements, minimum quality assurance requirements, coding style suggestions, and the use of numerous software libraries developed specifically for or adapted for the CAMCON system.

Rechard, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gilkey, A.P.; Rudeen, D.K.; Byle, K.A. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Iuzzolino, H.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental Compliance and Protection Program Description Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Environmental Compliance and Protection (EC and P) Program Description (PD) is to establish minimum environmental compliance requirements and natural resources protection goals for the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Oak Ridge Environmental Management Cleanup Contract (EMCC) Contract Number DE-AC05-98OR22700-M198. This PD establishes the work practices necessary to ensure protection of the environment during the performance of EMCC work activities on the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by BJC employees and subcontractor personnel. Both BJC and subcontractor personnel are required to implement this PD. A majority of the decontamination and demolition (D and D) activities and media (e.g., soil and groundwater) remediation response actions at DOE sites on the ORR are conducted under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). CERCLA activities are governed by individual CERCLA decision documents (e.g., Record of Decision [ROD] or Action Memorandum) and according to requirements stated in the Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE 1992). Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for the selected remedy are the requirements for environmental remediation responses (e.g., removal actions and remedial actions) conducted under CERCLA.

Bechtel Jacobs

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

313

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Geohydrologic evaluation for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility State-Approved Land Disposal Site: Addendum to WAC 173-240 Engineering Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a geohydrologic evaluation for the disposal of liquid effluent from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Hanford Site. This work forms an addendum to the engineering report that supports the completion of the ETF.

Ballantyne, N.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Mechanical Compliance Control System for A Pneumatic Robot Arm Kouichi Watanabe1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 2789 - Mechanical Compliance Control System for A Pneumatic Robot Arm Kouichi Watanabe1 , Hisashi position and posture of the arm. Keywords: Pneumatic actuator, Humanoid robot arm, Compliance control 1 actuators have started gaining attention as robot actuators. We focused on the robot arm using a pneumatic

Tachi, Susumu

316

3-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 3: COMPLIANCE STATUS Brookhaven National Laboratory Department of Environmental Conservation. Ten reportable spills of petroleum products occurred on site items. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Compliance Status B R O O K H A V E N N A T I O N A L L A B O R

Homes, Christopher C.

317

An Expert System for Determining Compliance with the Texas Building Energy Design Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's compliance is provided and the compliance checker must manage the data collected. To assist designers in complying with the Standard and to reduce the time required, the Center for Energy Studies (CES) at the University of Texas at Austin has developed...

Doan, E. C.; Hunn, B. D.; Jones, J. W.; Gatton, T. M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2. Accident Reporting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-2 Occupational injury - Is identified as any bodily damageNCI-Frederick Safety and Environmental Compliance Manual 03/2013 B-2-1 B-2. Accident Reporting I or reasonably could result in injury, illness, or property damage. Reporting is mandatory in order that: 1

Wlodawer, Alexander

319

Effects of complex effluents on photosynthesis in Lake Erie and Lake Huron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phytoplankton are the base of the food chain in most large lake ecosystems; if affected by environmental pollutants, significant ecosystem changes can result with potential impact on higher trophic levels. The research determined the effects of a complex effluent discharge from the River Raisin in Monroe County, Michigan, on the Lake Erie ecosystem. The river flows through southern Michigan and has large nutrient and industrial inputs, especially in the Monroe Harbor area. The functional parameters measured were bacterial uptake rate of acetate, zooplankton feeding and reproduction rates, and primary production. The results of the effects of complex effluents on gross photosynthesis, measured as carbon-14 ((14)C) uptake, are presented in the paper.

Bridgham, S.D.; McNaught, D.C.; Meadows, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An experience of use of the installation for the cleaning of gas effluents from tritium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The population and environmental protection during the operation of nuclear engineering units is a serious scientific-technical and social problem. Tritium is one of the gaseous effluents from nuclear plants, reactor fuel element processing, and also in connection with perspective thermo-nuclear power engineering development. The authors propose the use of a cleaning system for gas effluent cleaning of tritium using catalysis methods. The process of catalytic gas cleaning involves chemical transformations resulting in the removal of impurities from the reaction mixture. The technological equipment for tritium treatment is intended for production of such items on tritium bases as neutron tubes, targets, sources of initial ionization and characteristic rays, etc.

Voitenko, V.A.; Kolomiets, N.F.; Rogosin, V.N.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2010/FY 2011, EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2010/fiscal year 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state and alternative fuel provider (SFP) fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. For model year (MY) 2010, the compliance rate for the 2911 covered SFP fleets was 100%. Fleets used either Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. The 279 fleets that used Standard Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 acquisition requirements by 61%. The 12 covered fleets that complied using Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 petroleum-use-reduction requirements by 89%. Overall, DOE saw modest decreases from MY 2009 in biodiesel fuel use credits earned and in the number of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired. Compared to years before MY 2009, these rates were far lower. Because covered fleets acquired fewer new vehicles overall in MY 2010, the requirement for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), which is proportional to new acquisitions, also dropped.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (docket). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (``docket``) identifies Federal facilities that may be contaminated with hazardous substances and that must be evaluated to determine if they pose a risk to public health or the environment The docket, required by Section 120(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also provides a vehicle for making information about potentially contaminated facilities available to the public. Facilities listed on the docket must complete site assessments that provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with information needed to determine whether or not the facility should be included on he National Priorities List (NPL). This Information Brief, which revises the previous Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compiliance Docket Information Brief, provides updated information on the docket listing process, the implications of listing, and facility status after listing.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Permit compliance monitoring for the power generation industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 authorized EPA to develop regulations requiring facilities to monitor the adequacy of emission control equipment and plant operations. Furthermore, under the CAAA, EPA is required to issue regulations to require owners and operators of large industrial facilities to enhance air pollution monitoring and certify compliance with air pollution regulations. The fossil-fueled power generation industry has been targeted with the promulgation of the Acid Rain Program regulations of 40 CFR 72, and the Continuous Emissions Monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 75. The Part 75 regulations, with a few exceptions, establish requirements for monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide emissions, volumetric flow, and opacity data from affected units under the Acid Rain Program. Depending upon the type of unit and location, other applicable emission limitations may apply for particulate emissions (both total and PM-10), carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and sulfuric acid mist.

Macak, J.J. III [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States); Platt, T.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Waukegan, IL (United States); Miller, S.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Statistical aspects of determining compliance with radiation standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation surveys are an important tool used to monitor the safety of operations at nuclear fuel cycle facilities, as well as determining if contaminated sites require remedial action before license termination or unrestricted release. It is important that radiation surveys are carefully designed to provide the right quantity and quality of useful information for making valid decisions concerning public safety. The validity of survey information is especially important when low-level radiation detection techniques are required such as for environmental radiation monitoring. Thus, statistical aspects of radiation surveys are important in demonstrating compliance with radiation guidelines and for deciding when remedial action or cleanup is required. In this paper, we discuss the statistical aspects of evaluating whether guidelines are, in fact, being exceeded.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Kinnison, R.R.; Gilbert, R.O.; Watson, E.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved Quality Assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved Quality Assurance programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Comments to make future revisions of this directory more useful are invited and should be directed to the Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

IMPACT OF THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A STEAM-ELECTRIC STATION ON A MARSHLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF THERMAL EFFLUENT FROM A STEAM-ELECTRIC STATION ON A MARSHLAND NURSERY AREA DURING THE HOT the hot season from three similar marshland creeks situated at various distances from a steam for condenser cooling by power plants in le. V. Whitney Marine Laboratory ofUniversity ofFlorida at Marineland

331

Reducing effluent discharge and recovering bioenergy in an osmotic microbial fuel cell treating domestic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic wastewater Zheng Ge, Qingyun Ping, Li Xiao, Zhen He Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics cell is developed to treat domestic wastewater. Wastewater effluent can be greatly reduced due to osmotic water extraction. Bioenergy recovered from wastewater can potentially support pumping system

332

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

333

Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater Effluents Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GU, APRIL Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater wastewater effluents L. Liu1 , D. S. Smith2 , M. Bracken3 , J.B. Neethling4 , H.D. Stensel5 and S. Murthy6 levels (e.g. TPwastewater treatment plants. A few previous studies (Benisch et al., 2007

Brody, James P.

334

Cold Vacuum Drying facility effluent drains system design description (SYS 18)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility provides required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities needed for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) mission. This system design description (SDD) addresses the effluent drain system (EFS), which supports removal of water from the process bay floors. The discussion that follows is limited to piping, valves, components, and the process bay floor drain retention basin.

TRAN, Y.S.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Removing oestrogenic compounds from sewage effluent Andrew Johnson and Richard Darton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intersex roach, with oocytes in the testes, downstream of many domestic sewage effluents in the UK (figure 2). #12;3 Figures 2(a) Roach fish. 2(b) Testis of intersex roach showing presence of ova within chemicals, suggesting that these roach had been exposed to similar chemicals in the wild. Initially

Darton, Richard

336

Effluent and Material Management from Barge Work Surfaces for Large Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effluent and Material Management from Barge Work Surfaces for Large Bridge Department of Transporta:on Office of Environmental Stewardship #12;Environmental · Drill shaT slurry seUling effec:ve treatment · SoT soil and wetland func

Minnesota, University of

337

The effect of the proposed use of any credible evidence to determine compliance on utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference test methods are the only means currently available to determine compliance with air quality emission standards. All parties involved acknowledge that this excludes the use of data from continuous monitoring systems (CMS) to determine compliance with many air quality regulations. However, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is proposing to finalize portions of the 1993 Enhanced Monitoring (EM) rule that would allow the use of any credible evidence (ACE) to determine compliance with air emission limitations (including CMS data). This position has been taken by the USEPA in spite of strenuous objections that the 1993 rule has been subsequently replaced with the more relevant 1995 Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) rule. The use of ACE to determine compliance will have a significant impact on utilities due to the large number and type of air quality regulations that affect utilities; specifically, subparts D and Da of the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and regulations implementing Title IV (the Acid Rain Program) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) which require the use of CMS. These monitoring systems produce large amounts of emission data that are submitted to the USEPA, State, and/or local regulators agencies and, once submitted, become public record. Any interested party, either the regulator or the public, can use the data to show non-compliance with applicable standards; therefore, the use of ACE to determine compliance will substantially increase a utility`s liability. This paper discusses: (1) the regulatory history behind what data can be considered in determining compliance, (2) the potential implications of the ACE rule on utilities, and (3) the potential implications of the ACE rule on the development of a compliance demonstration plan for the Title V operating permit.

Lowery, K.P. [Trinity Consultants Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Facca, G.L. [IES Utilities Inc., Cedar Rapids, IA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

Hatch, C.E.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Technical assessment of compliance with workplace air sampling requirements at WRAP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Technical Assessment is to satisfy HSRCM-1, ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual'' Article 551.4 for a documented study of facility Workplace Air Monitoring (WAM) programs. HSRCM-1 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The HSRCM-1 complies with Title 10. Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). This document provides an evaluation of the compliance of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility (WRAP) WAM program to the criteria standards, requirements, and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

HACKWORTH, M.F.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Improving the Accuracy of Industrial Robots by offline Compensation of Joints Errors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level pose accuracy and to achieve a good path tracking. Unfortunately industrial robots are designed are concidered [4]. In [5], authors have worked on modeling the Cartesian compliance of an industrial robotImproving the Accuracy of Industrial Robots by offline Compensation of Joints Errors Adel Olabi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

343

Air Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regulatory authorities in making their decisions. (Abstract) Keywords-air pollution; aviation; data mining IAir Pollution Accountability and Compliance Tracking System (A-PACT System) Andrew Keller and emissions regulations for aircraft at major airports. The proposed Air Pollution Accountability

344

Sensitivity of time lapse seismic data to the compliance of hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the sensitivity of seismic waves to changes in the fracture normal and tangential compliances by analyzing the fracture sensitivity wave equation, which is derived by differentiating the elastic wave equation with ...

Fang, Xinding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oregon Strategies for Transportation Compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), a federal law enforced byof non-compliance with the MBTA as the agency carries outsystem. Although the MBTA is one of the oldest laws in the

Maguire, Chris C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Effects of Firm Size, Corporate Governance Quality, and Bad News on Disclosure Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by calls for increased compliance, size-based regulation, and continued exemption of small firms from internal control reporting requirements, we assess the incremental effects of firm size, corporate governance quality, and bad news...

Ettredge, Michael L.; Johnstone, Karla; Stone, Mary S.; Wang, Qian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Adoption of IFRS by Greek listed companies: financial statement effects, level of compliance and value relevance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Greek listed companies financial statements were affected significantly by the adoption of IFRS. The average level of compliance with IFRS mandatory disclosures approximates to 80%. The impact on net income and shareholders equity, as a result...

Tsalavoutas, Ioannis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN schedule and procedures necessary to conclude the amendment review process. At the Prehearing Conference

349

Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN-700-2009-004.PDF #12;2 Notice of Committee's Intention to Use Informal Hearing Procedures Pursuant

350

Lessons from Phase 2 compliance with the U.S. Acid Rain Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides preliminary answers to four questions concerning the behavior of agents operating under the SO2 Allowance Trading Program that could not be adequately answered until several years' data on compliance ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

What can I do with this degree? Tax Planning and Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What can I do with this degree? BUSINESS ACCOUNTING Tax Planning and Compliance Auditing energy level and detail orientation. Publicaccountingfirms Governmentagencies Banks and other financial--primary,secondary schools, colleges or private schools Financialinstitutions Trade/labor organizations Governmentagencies

Escher, Christine

352

Optimal design of a phase-in emissions trading program with voluntary compliance options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we explore the welfare implications of voluntary compliance within an emissions trading program and derive optimal permits allocations to affected and opti-in sources when the environmental regulator has ...

Montero, Juan Pablo

353

1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simplified Prescriptive Options in the Texas Residential Building Energy Code Make Compliance Easy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified Prescriptive Options in the Texas Residential Building Energy Code Make Compliance Easy Garrett A. Stone Eric M. DeVito Nelson H. Nease Partner Associate Associate Brickfield, Burchette...

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Early periphyton accumulation and composition in a wastewater effluent dominated stream: effects of season, distance from discharge, and flow regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal wastewater effluent can alter the receiving stream's algal production and community structure by affecting natural hydrologic patterns and nutrient availability. In this thesis, early succession periphyton assemblages were studied...

Murdock, Justin Neal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system.

Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

WIPP Compliance Certification Application calculations parameters. Part 1: Parameter development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico has been studied as a transuranic waste repository for the past 23 years. During this time, an extensive site characterization, design, construction, and experimental program was completed, which provided in-depth understanding of the dominant processes that are most likely to influence the containment of radionuclides for 10,000 years. Nearly 1,500 parameters were developed using information gathered from this program; the parameters were input to numerical models for WIPP Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) calculations. The CCA probabilistic codes frequently require input values that define a statistical distribution for each parameter. Developing parameter distributions begins with the assignment of an appropriate distribution type, which is dependent on the type, magnitude, and volume of data or information available. The development of the parameter distribution values may require interpretation or statistical analysis of raw data, combining raw data with literature values, scaling of lab or field data to fit code grid mesh sizes, or other transformation. Parameter development and documentation of the development process were very complicated, especially for those parameters based on empirical data; they required the integration of information from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) code sponsors, parameter task leaders (PTLs), performance assessment analysts (PAAs), and experimental principal investigators (PIs). This paper, Part 1 of two parts, contains a discussion of the parameter development process, roles and responsibilities, and lessons learned. Part 2 will discuss parameter documentation, traceability and retrievability, and lessons learned from related audits and reviews.

Howarth, S.M.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Economic Implications of Applying Effluent for Irrigation in the Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of dryland and groundwater irrigated farms. The results demonstrated increases in net returns of up to 200% using only effluent over a dryland scenario and up to 78% over one for groundwater irrigation. When net returns for scenarios using a mixture of both... FOR IRRIGATION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS Raymond F. Victurine * H.L Goodwin Ronald D. Lacewell * Respectlvely: Water Projects Manager, Catholic Relief Services (formerly, research assistant, ' Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University...

Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1994, well point water and near surface water (bucket) samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E would migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from near surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. Results of the March 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near the old F-Area effluent ditch. Six different analytes were detected in the well points at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit: d 1,2-dichloroethylene, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium. 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium were detected at levels above Primary Drinking Water Standards or Maximum Contaminant Levels list. Four analytes, 1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride, were detected at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit and least once at concentrations above the PDWS or the MCL. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets were negligible.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.; Rogers, V.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F Area effluent ditch: August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The August sampling event was the third in a series of eight events. Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from well point and near-surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. For this study, seven locations along the old F-Area effluent ditch were selected to be sampled. Well point samples were collected from all seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. A secondary objective of this project was to compare VOC concentrations between the well points installed to depths of 6 to 8 ft and the near-surface water sampling buckets installed to depths of 1 to 2 ft. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, based on the percent differences observed in tritium concentrations at that location, the resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results are consistent with the results from the three previous sampling events, and suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets may be negligible. Since the results from the two sampling methodologies are not directly comparable, further sampling of the buckets is not planned.

Cummins, C.L.; Dixon, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Degradation rates of advanced treatment effluents anticipated in the Trinity River Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique was described originally by G. v. R. Marais , who used the procedure to study the deoxygenation rates (37) of sewage effluents and river water. Reynolds and Eckenfelder (38) used the method on Houston Ship Channel waters and found... it to be effective and reliable. This method, commonly known as the "Marais Technique, " was employed as a part of all three runs. Replicate samples indicated the nutrient stock had no effect on the rates of deoxygenation, and none of the subsequent Marais runs...

Esmond, Steven Earl

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

1994 Environmental monitoring drinking water and nonradiological effluent programs annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EG&G Idaho, Inc., initiated monitoring programs for drinking water in 1988 and for nonradiological parameters and pollutants in liquid effluents in 1985. These programs were initiated for the facilities operated by EG&G Idaho for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. On October 1, 1994, Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) replaced EG&G Idaho as the prime contractor at the INEL and assumed responsibility for these programs. Section I discusses the general site characteristics, the analytical laboratories, and sampling methodology general to both programs. Section 2, the Drinking Water Program, tracks the bacteriological, chemical, and radiological parameters required by State and Federal regulations. This section describes the drinking water monitoring activities conducted at 17 LITCO-operated production wells and 11 distribution systems. It also contains all of the drinking water parameters detected and the regulatory limits exceeded during calendar year 1994. In addition, groundwater quality is discussed as it relates to contaminants identified at the wellhead for LITCO production wells. Section 3 discusses the nonradiological liquid effluent monitoring results for 27 liquid effluent streams. These streams are presented with emphasis on calendar year 1994 activities. All parameter measurements and concentrations were below the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act toxic characteristics limits.

Andersen, B.D.; Brock, T.A.; Meachum, T.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Corps Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed... The Big Fossil Watershed Study will address flood damage reduction, while identifying associated water quality, ecosystem restoration and recreational opportunities within the basin. The watershed is located in northern Tarrant County, encompasses 73...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Strategies for Compliance with Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule for Surface Water Treatment Facilities in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently created new regulations that better protect human health but that also make achieving compliance more difficult for existing water (more)

Wintle, Brian N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations...

368

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Improved aethalometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

Hansen, A.D.

1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improving pulverized coal plant performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major deliverable of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emissions Boiler Systems`` (LEBS) is the design of a large, in this case 400 MWe, commercial generating unit (CGU) which will meet the Project objectives. The overall objective of the LEBS Project is to dramatically improve environmental performance of future pulverized coal fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. The DOE specified the use of near-term technologies, i.e., advanced technologies that partially developed, to reduce NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions to be substantially less than current NSPS limits. In addition, air toxics must be in compliance and waste must be reduced and made more disposable. The design being developed by the ABB Team is projected to meet all the contract objectives and to reduce emission of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulates to one-fifth to one-tenth NSPS limits while increasing net station efficiency significantly and reducing the cost of electricity. This design and future work are described in the paper.

Regan, J.W.; Borio, R.W.; Palkes, M.; Mirolli, M. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Wesnor, J.D. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, administration facility, weigh scale, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facility for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams.

Simonds, J.

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1994, well point water and bucket samples were collected for tritium and volatile organic compounds in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The well point samples were collected from seven locations and the bucket samples from four locations. Results support that T and VOCs originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near this ditch. Based on differences in tritium contents at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths; however, when VOCs were normalized, based on differences in T, resulting well point and bucket VOCs were comparable in most cases.

Dixon, K.L.; cummins, C.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Culture of selected organisms in recirculating and flow-through systems using thermal effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M University; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Kirk Strawn Twenty species were cultured in tanks on flow-through and recirculating systems. Water source was the thermal effluent from the discharge can 1 of Houston Lighting a Power Company's Cedar Bayou..., pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Table Al Daily Temperature i Conductivity i Di s- solved Oxygen, pH and Turbidity Levels for Monitored Tanks Figures Al through A72 80 86 vu APPENDIX B ? Summary of Monthly Survival, L ngth...

Berry, Terri Layne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The contribution of knowledge bases to compliance assessment : a case study of industrial maintenance in the gas sector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particularly in the field of health, safety and environmental (HSE) risk management. Collaborative research the management of regulatory compliance. Originally oriented towards HSE issues, the long-term intention compliance management system. This paper therefore discusses the criteria for a knowledge base management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Lighting Overview Page 6-1 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lighting ­ Overview Page 6-1 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009 6 Lighting 6.1 Overview, or lighting designer can get the information they need about residential lighting in low-rise buildings and in the dwelling units of high-rise buildings. For residential buildings, all of the lighting requirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Outdoor Lighting Overview Page 6-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outdoor Lighting ­ Overview Page 6-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 6 Outdoor Lighting This chapter covers the requirements for outdoor lighting design and installation, including controls. This section applies to all outdoor lighting, whether attached to buildings, poles, structures

382

STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE AND FIELD INSPECTION ENERGY CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overall Envelope TDV Energy Unconditioned (file affidavit) Front Orientation: N, E, S, W or in Degrees, this compliance approach cannot be used). Go to Overall Envelope Approach or Performance Approach. CHECK-sloped Wood framed roofs in Climate Zones 3 and 5 are exempted solar relectance and thermal emittance or SRI

383

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Durango, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a ground water compliance strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Durango, Colorado. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment to provide the public with information concerning the potential effects of this proposed strategy.

N /A

2002-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

Colley, D.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, admin facility, weigh scale, decon building, treatment systems, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and are being constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the central Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilityyy for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams. This compliance demonstration document discusses the conceptual site model for the ICDF Complex area. Within this conceptual site model, the selection of the area for the ICDF Complex is discussed. Also, the subsurface stratigraphy in the ICDF Complex area is discussed along with the existing contamination beneath the ICDF Complex area. The designs for the various ICDF Complex facilities are also included in this compliance demonstration document. These design discussions are a summary of the design as presented in the Remedial Design/Construction Work Plans for the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond and the Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility. Each of the major facilities or systems is described including the design criteria.

J. Simonds

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

FIA-12-0020- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Hearings and Appeals granted a Motion for Reconsideration of part of a Decision we issued on March 23, 2012, relating to appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

388

FIA-12-0005- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

389

FIA-12-0004- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

390

Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project -Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project - Compliance TN #: 200840 Document Title: Blythe Solar Power Project Staff Assessment - Part B Description: Staff Assessment - Part B Amendment to the Blythe Solar Power Project BLYTHE SOLAR POWER PROJECT #12;DISCLAIMER Staff

391

Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project -Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-06C Project Title: Blythe Solar Power Project - Compliance TN #: 200629 Document Title: Blythe Solar Power Project Staff Assessment - Part A (Corrected) Description NUMBER 09-AFC-6C Staff Assessment - Part A Amendment to the Blythe Solar Power Project BLYTHE SOLAR POWER

392

Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project -Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCKETED Docket Number: 09-AFC-07C Project Title: Palen Solar Power Project - Compliance TN Solar Power Project PALEN SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM #12;DISCLAIMER Staff members SYSTEM (09-AFC-7C) FINAL STAFF ASSESSMENT ­ Part A Amendment to the Palen Solar Power Project Executive

393

Indoor Lighting Overview Page 5-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compliance Manual August 2009 5.1 Overview The primary mechanism for regulating indoor lighting energy under building's energy consumption, including lighting power, meets the energy budget. The performance approach lighting applications. Indoor lighting is one of the single largest consumers of energy (kilowatt

394

PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION (IPUC) RPS PROCUREMENT & COMPLIANCE PLAN (SBX1 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION (IPUC) RPS PROCUREMENT & COMPLIANCE PLAN (SBX1 2) CITY OF INDUSTRY California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requirements for publically owned utilities (POU Energy Resources Act, Senate Bill 2 1st Ex. Session ("SBX1 2") requires utilities to achieve 33% RPS

395

Princeton University Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs, or other aspects of its educational programs or activities. The vice provost for institutionalPrinceton University Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education action programs should be directed to the Office of the Vice Provost for Institutional Equity

396

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture of safety culture has progressively taken hold in organizations. The idea has numerous benefits and can the nature and strength of relationships between safety culture and two explanatory variables; namely

Boyer, Edmond

397

On the E ect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1995 ACC On the E ect of Compliance in Robotic Contact Tasks Problem Shahram Payandeh, Assistant Professor Experimental Robotics Laboratory ERL School of Engineering Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby Introduction Various methodologies have been proposed in the literature for stable control of the robotic

398

Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eur J Cancer Prev. Author manuscript Page /1 11 Determinants of non-compliance to recommendations on breast cancer screening among women participating in the French E3N cohort study Flamant Camille , Gauthier Estelle , Clavel-Chapelon Fran oiseç * E3N, Nutrition, hormones et cancer: pid miologie et pr

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

FORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic approach to quality management, that is a systems perspective of quality-- total quality this formalization to reason about product, process, or system-wide quality, so that better quality managementFORMAL MODELS OF QUALITY AND ISO 9000 COMPLIANCE: AN INFORMATION SYSTEMS APPROACH Henry M. Kim

Fox, Mark S.

400

Building Envelope Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Envelope ­ Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 3 Building Envelope This chapter describes the requirements for the design of the building envelope for nonresidential buildings. Loads from the building envelope, especially windows, skylights, and roofs are among the most

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

University of Kentucky Tobacco-free Initiative Implementation Guidelines for Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Kentucky Tobacco-free Initiative Implementation Guidelines for Compliance Effective November 19, 2009, the University of Kentucky (UK) Tobacco Policy is changed to create a tobacco, or controlled by UK in Fayette County, Kentucky. These guidelines are intended to assist employees, students

MacAdam, Keith

402

Status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance with 40 CFR 191B, December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper describes the 1992 preliminary comparison with Subpart B of the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), which regulates long-term releases of radioactive waste. Results of the 1992 PA are preliminary, and cannot be used to determine compliance or noncompliance with EPA regulations because portions of the modeling system and data base are incomplete. Results are consistent, however, with those of previous iterations of PA, and the SNL WIPP PA Department has high confidence that compliance with 40 CFR 191B can be demonstrated. Comparison of predicted radiation doses from the disposal system also gives high confidence that the disposal system is safe for long-term isolation.

Marietta, M.G.; Anderson, D.R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Office of Compliance Programs PRIVACY POLICY AND PROCEDURES Policy #: 2100.22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; · utilization review; · quality assurance; · billing; #12;Office of Compliance Programs PRIVACY POLICY and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Privacy, Security, Breach Notification, and Enforcement Rules at 45 CFR Part 160 and Part 164 ("HIPAA Rules") that relate to the disclosure of a patient's Protected Health Information

404

Improved wastewater treatment at Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporations`s Steubenville East Coke Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation recently improved its wastewater treatment at it`s by-products coke plant. This has led to greatly improved effluent quality. Excess ammonia liquor, along with wastewater from the light oil recovery plant, desulfurization facility, and coal pile runoff, must be treated prior to being discharged into the Ohio River. This is accomplished using a biological wastewater treatment plant to remove 99.99% of the organic contaminants and ammonia. Biologically treated, clarified wastewater is now polished in the newly constructed tertiary treatment plant.

Goshe, A.J.; Nodianos, M.J. [Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corp., Follansbee, WV (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

Rambaut, Andrew

407

Calculation of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid Equilibria for the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor Effluents using Modified Peng-Robinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of Vapor-Liquid-Liquid Equilibria for the Fischer- Tropsch Reactor Effluents using ignored the non-ideal phase equilibrium problem of a FT reactor. The rigorous calculation method is based A modified Peng­Robinson equation of state is used to develop the methods for calculating the thermodynamic

Skogestad, Sigurd

408

TRU waste certification compliance requirements for contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage for shipment to the WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable DOE Orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for certified waste retrieved from certified storage are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Apparatus for the separation of solid particulates from a gaseous effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for the separation of hot fluid cracking catalyst suspended in vaporized riser cracker effluent boiling in the motor fuel range. It consists of a disengaging chamber having a dome shaped top section; a vertical tubular cracking riser open at the upper end and positioned on the center axis of the chamber; an annular shroud encircling the upper end of the riser, the bottom of the shroud being closed to form an annular collection chamber; a plurality of cyclone separators in open lateral communication with the shroud via transverse conduit and adapted to receive and separate the converted hydrocarbon vapors from fluid cracking catalyst; a truncated cone mounted atop and integral with the shroud; and a downwardly convex baffle member spaced above the top of the cone a distance of about two diameters of the riser.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.; Murray, S.W.; Adkins, R.L.; Fritz, B.T.; Riggs, J.R.; Walters, P.W.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ecological and biomedical effects of effluents from near-term electric vehicle storage battery cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the ecological and biomedical effects due to commercialization of storage batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles is given. It deals only with the near-term batteries, namely Pb/acid, Ni/Zn, and Ni/Fe, but the complete battery cycle is considered, i.e., mining and milling of raw materials, manufacture of the batteries, cases and covers; use of the batteries in electric vehicles, including the charge-discharge cycles; recycling of spent batteries; and disposal of nonrecyclable components. The gaseous, liquid, and solid emissions from various phases of the battery cycle are identified. The effluent dispersal in the environment is modeled and ecological effects are assessed in terms of biogeochemical cycles. The metabolic and toxic responses by humans and laboratory animals to constituents of the effluents are discussed. Pertinent environmental and health regulations related to the battery industry are summarized and regulatory implications for large-scale storage battery commercialization are discussed. Each of the seven sections were abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA. Additional information is presented in the seven appendixes entitled; growth rate scenario for lead/acid battery development; changes in battery composition during discharge; dispersion of stack and fugitive emissions from battery-related operations; methodology for estimating population exposure to total suspended particulates and SO/sub 2/ resulting from central power station emissions for the daily battery charging demand of 10,000 electric vehicles; determination of As air emissions from Zn smelting; health effects: research related to EV battery technologies. (JGB)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Why did they comply while others did not? : environmental compliance of small firms and implications for regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral dissertation aims to offer new insights into the environmental compliance behavior of small firms (SFs). Specifically, the dissertation examines the impacts of two categories of factors. The first category ...

Lee, Eungkyoon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy, Product, and Ecomonic Implications of Environmental Compliance Options- Lessons Learned from a Southern California Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial plants that are faced with regulated emissions constraints may be able to choose from a complex array of compliance options. Technology options may include a number of pollution control alternatives-retrofits with more efficient equipment...

Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Faruqui, A.; Chisti, I.

414

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of selecting a ground water compliance strategy for the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This Environmental Assessment (EA) discusses two alternatives and the effects associated with each. The two alternatives are (1) natural flushing coupled with institutional controls and continued monitoring and (2) no action. The compliance strategy must meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards defined in Title 40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' Part 192, Subpart B, in areas where ground water beneath and around the site is contaminated as a result of past milling operations. It has been determined that contamination in the ground water at the Gunnison site consists of soluble residual radioactive material (RRM) as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA).

N /A

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental compliance assessment findings for Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an environmental assessment conducted at Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) in St. Charles County, Missouri, in accordance with the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Environmental Compliance Assessment Checklists. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate the compliance of the site with applicable federal and Missouri environment regulations. Assessments activities included the following: review of site records, reports ,and files; inspection of the WSSRAP storage building, other selected buildings, and the adjacent grounds; and interviews with project personnel. This assessment was conducted on August 28-30, 1989. The assessment covered five management areas as set forth in the Checklist: Hazardous Waste Management, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Management; Air Emissions; Wastewater Discharges and Petroleum Management. No samples were collected. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Sigmon, C.F.; Levine, M.B.

1990-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability 1995-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations during the 1995 to 2001 period. This study is a follow-up to the October 1997 publication entitled The Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability, that focused on the financial impacts of U.S. refining pollution abatement investment requirements in the 1988 to1995 period.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

NONE

1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental effects of a proposed action and the no action alternative to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards at the Naturita, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed surface cleanup at the site and encapsulated the tailings in a disposal cell 15 miles northwest near the former town of Uravan, Colorado. Ground water contaminants of potential concern at the Naturita site are uranium and vanadium. Uranium concentrations exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) of 0.044 milligram per liter (mg/L). Vanadium has no MCL; however, vanadium concentrations exceed the EPA Region III residential risk-based concentration of 0.33 mg/L (EPA 2002). The proposed compliance strategy for uranium and vanadium at the Naturita site is no further remediation in conjunction with the application of alternate concentration limits. Institutional controls with ground water and surface water monitoring will be implemented for these constituents as part of the compliance strategy. This compliance strategy will be protective of human health and the environment. The proposed monitoring program will begin upon regulatory concurrence with the Ground Water Compliance Action Plan (DOE 2002a). Monitoring will consist of verifying that institutional controls remain in place, collecting ground water samples to verify that concentrations of uranium and vanadium are decreasing, and collecting surface water samples to verify that contaminant concentrations do not exceed a regulatory limit or risk-based concentration. If these criteria are not met, DOE would reevaluate the proposed action and determine the need for further National Environmental Policy Act documentation. No comments were received from the public during the public comment period. Two public meetings were held during this period. Minutes of these meetings are included as Attachment 1.

None

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Program -- FY 2010 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fiscal year (FY) 2010, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Protection and Regulatory Programs Division (before March 1, 2011 known as the Environmental Management Services Department) staff performed a number of activities as part of PNNLs National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance program. These activities helped to verify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) and Richland Operations Office (RL) compliance with NEPA requirements and streamline the NEPA process for federal activities conducted at PNNL. Self-assessments were performed to address NEPA compliance and cultural and biological resource protection. The NEPA self-assessments focused on implementation within the PNNL Energy and Environment Directorate and routine maintenance activities conducted during the previous calendar year. The cultural and biological resource self-assessments were conducted in accordance with the PNSO Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan, which specifies annual monitoring of important resources to assess and document the status of the resources and the associated protective mechanisms in place to protect sensitive resources.

Weeks, Regan S.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Corporate planning for compliance with EPA`s proposed risk management program rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 20, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published in the Federal Register the proposed rule entitled Risk Management Programs for Chemical Accidental Release Prevention (40 CFR 68). Subsequently, on January 31, 1994, EPA published in the Federal Register the finalized list of 77 regulated toxic substances and 63 regulated flammable substances that are to be covered under the rule along with the associated threshold quantities for each substance. This list of substances will dictate which stationary sources will have to comply with the requirements of the proposed risk management program rule. The risk management program rule will most likely be finalized sometime after mid-1995. Covered facilities will then have a total of three years to achieve complete compliance with the requirements of the rule. This paper presents an approach for corporations with multiple sites to develop action plans for implementation of the risk management program rule. The process starts with a determination of which facilities are potentially covered, development of a matrix of requirements that each facility must comply with, and finally, common strategies that may be used in achieving compliance. Thus, a multi-facility corporation can develop a baseline compliance guideline document that individual plants can use in developing and implementing their risk management programs.

Mannan, M.; Keeney, R.C. [RMT/Jones and Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

The COMPLY computer program for demonstrating compliance with national radionuclide air emission standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed national radionuclide air emission standards for a number of source categories. One of these standards applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and non-Department of Energy facilities having the potential to release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Approximately 6000 facilities are subject to the standard, which limits the effective whole-body dose commitment to the maximally exposed individual from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. A computer program to assist the regulated community in determining compliance has been developed by the EPA's Office of Radiation Programs. The computer program COMPLY calculates the dose to an individual residing outside the facility. The program considers dose from inhalation, ingestion of contaminated food, air immersion, and ground deposition. It is based on models developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Compliance procedures provided in COMPLY are designed to reduce the burden on the regulated community. The approach begins with simple-to-use methods that are very conservative in determining compliance. The methods become progressively less conservative but more complicated at succeeding levels. Each higher level requires the input of site-specific information, but allows a more realistic estimate of dose. This paper describes the COMPLY program, and provides estimates of the work required and the degree of conservatism in the dose computed at each level.

Colli, A.; Beal, S.; Loomis, D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Further improvement of conventional diesel NOx aftertreatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Future Directions in Engines and Fuels Diesel Passenger Car Technology for Low Emissions and CO2 Compliance A View from the Bridge...

427

Plan and schedule for disposition and regulatory compliance for miscellaneous streams. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 23, 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 (Consent Order). The Consent Order lists regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site to comply with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-216 (State Waste Discharge Permit Program) or WAC 173-218 (Washington Underground Injection Control Program) where applicable. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized in the Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams Phase II Streams Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams are addressed in two RL reports: {open_quotes}Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes} (DOE-RL 1987), and {open_quotes}Annual Status of the Report of the Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes}. Miscellaneous Streams are those liquid effluent streams discharged to the ground that are not categorized as Phase I or Phase II Streams. Miscellaneous Streams discharging to the soil column at the Hanford Site are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the Consent Order. This document provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of Miscellaneous Streams. The disposition process for the Miscellaneous Streams is facilitated using a decision tree format. The decision tree and corresponding analysis for determining appropriate disposition of these streams is presented in this document.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Regulatory Guide 1.109, Revision 1, Calculation of Annual Doses To Man From Routine Releases of Reactor Effluents For The Purpose of Evaluating Compliance With 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix I  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronicNORTH LAS VEGASElyRecent

429

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Survival, growth, and behavior of selected estuarine organisms cultured in tanks receiving heated effluent from a power plant near Baytown, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURVIVAL, GROWTH, AND BEHAVIOR QF' SELECTED ESTUARINE ORGANISMS CULTURED IN TANKS RECEIVING HEATED EFFLUENT FROM A POWER PLANT NEAR BAYTOWN, TEXAS A Thesis by GAIL LEA GIBBARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SURVIVAL, GROWTH, AND BEHAVIOR OF SELECTED ESTUARINE ORGANISMS CULTURED IN TANKS RECEIVING HEATED EFFLUENT FROM A...

Gibbard, Gail Lea

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: August 1994. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds in the Wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E at the Savannah River Plant. Well point samples were collected from seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. Results of the August 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds are outcropping in the Wetlands near the old F-area effluent ditch. Four analytes (1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride) were detected at least once at concentrations above the primary Drinking Water Standards or the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Five analytes (the above chemicals plus tetrachloroethylene) were detected at least once in the near-surface water samples at concentrations greater than the method detection limit.

Cummins, C.L.; Dixon, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the...

433

Improving Dynamic Load and Generator Response PerformanceTools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a scoping study to examine research opportunities to improve the accuracy of the system dynamic load and generator models, data and performance assessment tools used by CAISO operations engineers and planning engineers, as well as those used by their counterparts at the California utilities, to establish safe operating margins. Model-based simulations are commonly used to assess the impact of credible contingencies in order to determine system operating limits (path ratings, etc.) to ensure compliance with NERC and WECC reliability requirements. Improved models and a better understanding of the impact of uncertainties in these models will increase the reliability of grid operations by allowing operators to more accurately study system voltage problems and the dynamic stability response of the system to disturbances.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Waste Water Treatment Modifications for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Actions - Isolate and restore sand filter beds (~10 acres) - Remove UV light sanitation system ­ evaluateENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Waste Water Treatment Modifications for Improved Effluent Compliance adhering to them. · Develop recharge basins for disposal of treated waste water. Polythiocarbonate

Homes, Christopher C.

435

Waste characterization for the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility in support of waste certification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) procedures define the rules concerning packages of solid Low Level Waste (LLW) that are sent to the E-area vaults (EAV). The WACs tabulate the quantities of 22 radionuclides that require manifesting in waste packages destined for each type of vault. These quantities are called the Package Administrative Criteria (PAC). If a waste package exceeds the PAC for any radionuclide in a given vault, then specific permission is needed to send to that vault. To avoid reporting insignificant quantities of the 22 listed radionuclides, the WAC defines the Minimum Reportable Quantity (MRQ) of each radionuclide as 1/1000th of the PAC. If a waste package contains less than the MRQ of a particular radionuclide, then the package`s manifest will list that radionuclide as zero. At least one radionuclide has to be reported, even if all are below the MRQ. The WAC requires that the waste no be ``hazardous`` as defined by SCDHEC/EPA regulations and also lists several miscellaneous physical/chemical requirements for the packages. This report evaluates the solid wastes generated within the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for potential impacts on waste certification.

Brown, D.F.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Identification and treatment of lithium as the primary toxicant in a groundwater treatment facility effluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 6}Li is used in manufacturing nuclear weapons, shielding, and reactor control rods. Li compounds have been used at DOE facilities and Li-contaminated waste has historically been land disposed. Seep water from burial grounds near Y-12 contain small amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons, traces of PCBs, and 10-19 mg/L Li. Seep treatment consists of oil-water separation, filtration, air stripping, and carbon adsorption. Routine biomonitoring tests using fathead minnows and {ital Ceriodaphnia}{ital dubia} are conducted. Evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that toxicity was most likely due to Li. Laboratory tests showed that 1 mg Li/L reduced the survival of both species; 0.5 mg Li/L reduced {ital Ceriodaphnia} reproduction and minnow growth. However, the toxicity was greatly reduced in presence of sodium (up to 4 mg Li/L, Na can fully negate the toxic effect of Li). Because of the low Na level discharged from the treatment facility, Li removal from the ground water was desired. SuperLig{reg_sign} columns were used (Li-selective organic macrocycle bonded to silica gel). Bench-scale tests showed that the material was very effective for removing Li from the effluent, reducing the toxicity.

Kszos, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crow, K.R. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Combustion of concentrates resulting from ultrafiltration of bleached-kraft effluents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that closed cycle concentrates were simulated by laboratory-scale ultrafiltration of (C + D) and first E-stage effluents from two bleached-kraft mills. The concentrates were found to be similar to typical kraft black liquor in carbon content, heating value, and density, Viscosities of concentrates were similar to or slightly above the values over which black liquor viscosities commonly range. Burning rates for the dried solids from the concentrates were found to be similar to burning rates reported for black liquor. Volatiles yields (percentage of initial dried solids evolving as pyrolysis gases under pyrolytic conditions) were 46-50% and were not strongly dependent on final heating temperature. Char yields (percentage of initial dried solids gasified by heterogeneous char oxidation reactions) were strongly dependent on final heating temperature, increasing from nearly zero at 600{degrees} C to 42% at 1000{degrees} C. A simplistic combustion rate model was developed to predict the overall burning rates. It should prove useful for approximating the rates of combustion of ultrafiltration concentrates. The model includes a first-order rate expression for volatiles evolution and a pseudo-first order rate expression for char burning.

Nichols, K.M. (Div. of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (US))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

200 Area effluent treatment facility process control plan 98-02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Control Plan (PCP) provides a description of the background information, key objectives, and operating criteria defining Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Campaign 98-02 as required per HNF-IP-0931 Section 37, Process Control Plans. Campaign 98-62 is expected to process approximately 18 millions gallons of groundwater with an assumption that the UP-1 groundwater pump will be shut down on June 30, 1998. This campaign will resume the UP-1 groundwater treatment operation from Campaign 97-01. The Campaign 97-01 was suspended in November 1997 to allow RCRA waste in LERF Basin 42 to be treated to meet the Land Disposal Restriction Clean Out requirements. The decision to utilize ETF as part of the selected interim remedial action of the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit is documented by the Declaration of the Record of Decision, (Ecology, EPA and DOE 1997). The treatment method was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (known as the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).

Le, E.Q.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Direct conversion of rheological compliance measurements into storage and loss moduli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We remove the need for Laplace/inverse-Laplace transformations of experimental data, by presenting a direct and straightforward mathematical procedure for obtaining frequency-dependent storage and loss moduli ($G'(\\omega)$ and $G"(\\omega)$ respectively), from time-dependent experimental measurements. The procedure is applicable to ordinary rheological creep (stress-step) measurements, as well as all microrheological techniques, whether they access a Brownian mean-square displacement, or a forced compliance. Data can be substituted directly into our simple formula, thus eliminating traditional fitting and smoothing procedures that disguise relevant experimental noise.

R M L Evans; Manlio Tassieri; Dietmar Auhl; Thomas A Waigh

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

From science to compliance: Geomechanics studies of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanical and hydrological properties of salt provide excellent bases for geological isolation of hazardous materials. Regulatory certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) testifies to the nearly ideal characteristics of bedded salt deposits in southeast New Mexico. The WIPP history includes decades of testing and scientific investigations, which have resulted in a comprehensive understanding of salt's mechanical deformational and hydrological properties over an applicable range of stresses and temperatures. Comprehensive evaluation of salt's favorable characteristics helped demonstrate regulatory compliance and ensure isolation of radioactive waste placed in a salt geological setting.

HANSEN,FRANCIS D.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

442

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 5, Chemical management, pollution prevention and other compliance programs. Draft revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance with environmental regulations and US Department of Energy Orders (DOE) relating to environmental protection is an important part of SRS`s program. Over the past few years, the number of environmental regulations has increased. The strategy to comply with new and existing environmental regulations and DOE orders is described in chapter two. In this chapter, the following environmental programs are described: Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA); and SPCC/BMP/Pollution Prevention Plans;The implementation section identifies issues and those responsible to achieve defined objectives.

Peterson, G.L. [comp.

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Frequency dependence of mass flow gain factor and cavitation compliance of cavitating inducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unsteady cavitation characteristics are analyzed based on a closed cavity model in which the length of the cavity is allowed to oscillate. It is shown that the present model blends smoothly into quasisteady calculations in the low frequency limit, unlike fixed cavity length models. Effects of incidence angle and cavitation number on cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor are shown as functions of reduce frequency. The cavity volume is evaluated by three methods and the results were used to confirm the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical calculation. By comparison with experimental data on inducers, it was shown that the present model can simulate the characteristics of unsteady cavitation qualitatively.

Otsuka, S.; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan); Kamijo, Kenjiro [National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda, Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center; Furuya, O. [AMP Technologies, Osaka (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Optimizing electric utility air toxics compliance with other titles of the Clean Air Act  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of regulatory issues under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments that could affect electric utilities. Title III contains provisions relating to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and provides special treatment for electric utilities. Generally, this discussion documents that if utility toxic emissions are regulated, one of the chief difficulties confronting utilities will be the lack of coordination between Title III and other titles of the Act. The paper concludes that if the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines that regulation of utility HAPs is warranted under Title III, savings can be realized from flexible compliance treatment.

Loeb, A.P.; South, D.W.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Compliance Evaluation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (AprilBiden2|SuperiorHighthe NaturalCommitteeComplete Set ofComplex

447

Alternative Compliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFMFusionReviewAlternate Watch Office |

448

SRS ES&H standards compliance program management plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 8, 1990, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 90-2 to the Secretary of Energy. This recommendation, based upon the DNFSB`s initial review and evaluation of the content and implementation of standards relating to the design, construction, operations, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department of Energy (DOE), called for three actions: (1) identification of specific standards that apply to design, construction, operation and decommissioning of DOE facilities; (2) assessment of the adequacy of those standards for protecting public health and safety; and (3) determination of the extent to which they have and are being implemented. This document defines the elements of the SRS program required to support the HQ program in response to DNFSB Recommendation 90-2. The objective is to ensure a consistent approach for all sitewide ES and H Standards Compliance Program efforts that satisfied the intent of Recommendation 90-2 and the HQ 90-2 Implementation Plan in a cost-effective manner. The methodology and instructions for implementation of the SRS program are contained in the Standards Compliance Program Implementation Plan. The Management Plan shall be used in conjunction with the Implementation Plan.

Hearn, W.H.

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

449

Standard 90. 1's ENVSTD: Both a compliance program and an envelope design tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1982, ASHRAE and the US Department of Energy have worked together to update ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90A-1980, Energy Conservation in Building Design.'' The new standard, ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989, Energy-Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings,'' is substantially changed in form and concept from Standard 90A-1980, especially in how it deals with exterior envelopes. In the new standard, designers can use either of two methods -- prescriptive or system performance -- to comply with building envelope requirements. Under the prescriptive method, requirements are listed in tabular form and designers must demonstrate compliance with each individual requirement. In the system performance method, designers generate the requirements for their specific building using a set of equations. The equations establish limits on permissible heating and cooling coil loads based on the local climate and the internal loads in the exterior zones of the building. A personal computer program, ENVSTD (ENVelope STanDard), has been written to simplify compliance with the system performance path of the standard. The program can also be used to evaluate the impact of varying envelope characteristics on building heating and cooling coil loads in specific locations. This paper provides examples of the impacts that the standard's envelope requirements have on envelope design. Use of the ENVSTD program as a design tool to determine the heating and cooling load impacts of various envelope strategies is also demonstrated. 7 refs., 12 figs.

Crawley, D.B.; Boulin, J.J.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Baseline Design Compliance Matrix for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the design compliance matrix (DCM) is to provide a single-source document of all design requirements associated with the fifteen subsystems that make up the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) system. It is intended to be the baseline requirement document for the RMCS system and to be used in governing all future design and design verification activities associated with it. This document is the DCM for the RMCS system used on Hanford single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This includes the Exhauster System, Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks, Universal Sampling System, Diesel Generator System, Distribution Trailer, X-Ray Cart System, Breathing Air Compressor, Nitrogen Supply Trailer, Casks and Cask Truck, Service Trailer, Core Sampling Riser Equipment, Core Sampling Support Trucks, Foot Clamp, Ramps and Platforms and Purged Camera System. Excluded items are tools such as light plants and light stands. Other items such as the breather inlet filter are covered by a different design baseline. In this case, the inlet breather filter is covered by the Tank Farms Design Compliance Matrix.

LECHELT, J.A.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Environmental compliance program FY 1999 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.8.2.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Compliance Program is developing and implementing a PHMC-wide chemical management system with the goal being to: (1) manage and control chemicals from procurement through use and final disposition; (2) develop and maintain procedures for identifying and evaluating hazards and environmental impacts present in facilities, and the hazard classification of the facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) may promulgate the final rule, 1 0 CFR 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment in FY 1999. This rule establishes controls for the release of radioactive material and limits for the amount of radiation exposure to the public and the environment. It will be applicable to activities of DOE contractors at the Hanford site. This rule is expected to replace the bulk of DOE Orders 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and 5400. 1, General Environmental Protection Program. In doing so, these Orders will be backed by the Price-Anderson enforcement procedures and carry penalties for non-compliance.

Giese, K.A.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

An automated tool for evaluating compliance and providing assistance with building energy standards during design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to encourage the maximum cost-effective level of energy efficiency in new building design, energy-efficiency standards have become more location-specific and performance-based. As a result, standards often provide more than one path for ensuring and demonstrating that a design complies, but at the cost of increased complexity. In addition, the burden of remedying a noncompliant design rests on the designers' knowledge and experience, with only general guidance provided by the standards. As part of efforts in the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project, a team at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a computer program known as the Energy Standards Intelligent Design Tool (ES-IDT). The ES-IDT is one component of a prototype computer-based building design environment. It performs automatic compliance checking for parts of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 and provides designers assistance in bringing noncomplying designs into compliance. This paper describes the ES-IDT, the functions it provides, and how it is integrated into the design process via the AEDOT prototype building design environment. 9 refs.

Quadrel, R.W.; Brambley, M.R.; Stratton, R.C.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

An automated tool for evaluating compliance and providing assistance with building energy standards during design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to encourage the maximum cost-effective level of energy efficiency in new building design, energy-efficiency standards have become more location-specific and performance-based. As a result, standards often provide more than one path for ensuring and demonstrating that a design complies, but at the cost of increased complexity. In addition, the burden of remedying a noncompliant design rests on the designers` knowledge and experience, with only general guidance provided by the standards. As part of efforts in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project, a team at DOE`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a computer program known as the Energy Standards Intelligent Design Tool (ES-IDT). The ES-IDT is one component of a prototype computer-based building design environment. It performs automatic compliance checking for parts of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 and provides designers assistance in bringing noncomplying designs into compliance. This paper describes the ES-IDT, the functions it provides, and how it is integrated into the design process via the AEDOT prototype building design environment. 9 refs.

Quadrel, R.W.; Brambley, M.R.; Stratton, R.C.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to...

455

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization report - area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 6 North and South Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) are historic disposal units located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the site under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 265.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Field Demonstration of the Performance of an Electrocoagulation System to Reduce Phosphorus and Other Substances from Dairy Lagoon Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at about 40 gallons per minute into a large mixing tank (Fig. 3). ? U n k n o w n quanti t i e s of Alum (AlS O 4 ) , lime (CaOH) , and a propri e t a r y anioni c emuls i o n polyme r were pumpe d into the large mixing tank from separa t e smalle r... s . 10 Fig. 3. Large Tank (Top) to Mix Added Alum, lime, and a Polymer (Bottom) for Chemical Pretreatment of Lagoon Effluent 11 Fig. 4. The Tri-Flow ?Mud Mixer? Fig. 5. The Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) Unit 12...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Wagner, Kevin; Gregory, Lucas

457

Report No. PA 14 of 2008 Compliance to rules governing municipal solid, bio-medical and plastic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-medical and plastic waste Objective 5: Whether effective compliance to rules/laws regulating municipal solid waste, bio-medical waste and plastic waste was taking place in the state. The United Nations Conference of 2008 54 · The Recycled Plastics Manufacture and Usage Rules were notified in 1999 with an amendment

Columbia University

458

*NIH Public Access Policy: Submission Methods and How to Demonstrate Compliance July 2010 Method A: Author publishes in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*NIH Public Access Policy: Submission Methods and How to Demonstrate Compliance July 2010 Method A: Author publishes in a journal that submits all NIH- funded final published articles to PMC; no fee. Method B: Author requests a publisher to submit an individual NIH-funded final published article to PMC

Subramanian, Venkat

459

Biodiesel Drives Florida Power & Light's EPAct Alternative Compliance Strategy; EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This success story highlights how Florida Power & Light Company has successfully complied with the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) through Alternative Compliance using biodiesel technologies and how it has become a biofuel leader, reducing petroleum use and pollutant emissions throughout Florida.

Not Available

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Improving Lives. Improving Texas. Agency Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Williams Administration Building 7101 TAMU September 2009 College Station, TX 77843-7101 Phone: 979. In the context of this broad mission, the priorities for Extension education are: Ensure a sustainable and management. Build local capacity for economic development in Texas communities. Improve the health

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

LITERATURE REVIEW ON IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON THE 2H EVAPORATOR AND THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations {le} 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have minor/major impacts are chlorination, pH adjustment, 1st mercury removal, organics removal, 2nd mercury removal, and ion exchange. For minor impacts, the general approach is to use historical process operations data/modeling software like OLI/ESP and/or monitoring/compiled process operations data to resolve any uncertainties with testing as a last resort. For major impacts (i.e., glycolate concentrations > 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM), testing is recommended. No impact is envisaged for the following ETF unit operations regardless of the glycolate concentration - filtration, reverse osmosis, ion exchange resin regeneration, and evaporation.

Adu-Wusu, K.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Alternative technologies to optical monitoring systems relating to regulatory compliance (Title V)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the development of Title III and Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments and public awareness of environmentally safe processes, particulate emissions monitoring has become a subject of great importance to the manufacturing sector. An increasing number of monitoring devices are available, and when used in the correct applications, can accurately monitor particulate emissions. This allows identification of a system problem before emissions can reach the stack and trigger non-compliance. This paper focuses on the most widely used technologies for continuous particulate monitoring, specifically the CPM product line, which has been developed to overcome common problems associated with emissions monitoring equipment. Technical data is presented in regard to the CPM operation as well as a case study of a CPM monitor in the asphalt industry.

Craney, B. [BHA Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Guidelines for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) sets forth national policy for the protection of the environment. The NEPA process is intended to help officials of the federal government make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences, and take actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. The California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA) is similar to NEPA. The California legislature established CEQA to inform both state and local governmental decision-makers and the public about potential significant environmental effects of proposed activities, to identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental impacts, and to disclose to the public the reasons why a project is approved if significant environmental effects are involved. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), complies with the provisions of both NEPA and CEQA. This document defines the responsibilities and authorities for NEPA/CEQA compliance at LBL.

Kielusiak, C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Survey of Pressure Vessel Code Compliance for Superconducting RF Cryomodules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made from niobium and cooled with liquid helium are becoming key components of many particle accelerators. The helium vessels surrounding the RF cavities, portions of the niobium cavities themselves, and also possibly the vacuum vessels containing these assemblies, generally fall under the scope of local and national pressure vessel codes. In the U.S., Department of Energy rules require national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel standards or to show ''a level of safety greater than or equal to'' that of the applicable standard. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up being treated as a low-temperature pressure vessel material. Niobium material is not a code listed material and therefore requires the designer to understand the mechanical properties for material used in each pressure vessel fabrication; compliance with pressure vessel codes therefore becomes a problem. This report summarizes the approaches that various institutions have taken in order to bring superconducting RF cryomodules into compliance with pressure vessel codes. In Japan, Germany, and the U.S., institutions building superconducting RF cavities integrated in helium vessels or procuring them from vendors have had to deal with pressure vessel requirements being applied to SRF vessels, including the niobium and niobium-titanium components of the vessels. While niobium is not an approved pressure vessel material, data from tests of material samples provide information to set allowable stresses. By means of procedures which include adherence to code welding procedures, maintaining material and fabrication records, and detailed analyses of peak stresses in the vessels, or treatment of the vacuum vessel as the pressure boundary, research laboratories around the world have found methods to demonstrate and document a level of safety equivalent to the applicable pressure vessel codes.

Peterson, Thomas; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Nicol, Tom; Theilacker, Jay; /Fermilab; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kako, Eiji; Nakai, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Jensch, Kay; Matheisen, Axel; /DESY; Mammosser, John; /Jefferson Lab

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

Proceedings of the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 22nd Annual DoD/DOE Seismic Research Symposium: Planning for Verification of and Compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), held 13-15 September 2000 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Department of Defense (DoD), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Nichols, James W., LTC [Editor

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document phase 1 assessment corrective actions/compliance schedule approval report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase I Assessment Corrective Actions/Compliance Schedule Approval Report for the subject facility, contains the corrective actions required to bring the facility into compliance as a result of an Administrative Assessment to determine whether S/RID requirements are fully addressed by existing policies, plans or procedures. These actions are delineated in the Compliance Schedule Approvals which also contain; noncompliances, risks, compensatory measures, schedules for corrective actions, justifications for approval, and resource impacts.

Biebesheimer, E.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

TRU waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of contact-handled wastes retrieved from storage to be shipped to the WIPP. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid defense wastes retrieved from storage at DOE sites meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). All applicable DOE orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for certified waste retrieved from certified storage are addressed in another document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2001). Little data are available on the use of native terrestrial ecosystems for waste- water treatmentNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem: Impact on soil physical

Johnson, Eric E.

472

A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St. Lawrence River yellow perch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Yellow perch were sampled upstream of a major municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and 4 km and 10A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St 3P8, Canada H I G H L I G H T S A multi-level biological approach was used to evaluate impacts

Bernatchez, Louis

473

Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC) Legacy Tank RH-TRU Sludge Processing and Compliance Strategy - 13255  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to safely and efficiently treat its 'legacy' transuranic (TRU) waste and mixed low-level waste (LLW) from past research and defense activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) so that the waste is prepared for safe and secure disposal. The TWPC operates an Environmental Management (EM) waste processing facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The TWPC is classified as a Hazard Category 2, non-reactor nuclear facility. This facility receives, treats, and packages low-level waste and TRU waste stored at various facilities on the ORR for eventual off-site disposal at various DOE sites and commercial facilities. The Remote Handled TRU Waste Sludge held in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) was produced as a result of the collection, treatment, and storage of liquid radioactive waste originating from the ORNL radiochemical processing and radioisotope production programs. The MVSTs contain most of the associated waste from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the ORNL's Tank Farms in Bethel Valley and the sludge (SL) and associated waste from the Old Hydro-fracture Facility tanks and other Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) tanks. The SL Processing Facility Build-outs (SL-PFB) Project is integral to the EM cleanup mission at ORNL and is being accelerated by DOE to meet updated regulatory commitments in the Site Treatment Plan. To meet these commitments a Baseline (BL) Change Proposal (BCP) is being submitted to provide continued spending authority as the project re-initiation extends across fiscal year 2012 (FY2012) into fiscal year 2013. Future waste from the ORNL Building 3019 U-233 Disposition project, in the form of U-233 dissolved in nitric acid and water, down-blended with depleted uranyl nitrate solution is also expected to be transferred to the 7856 MVST Annex Facility (formally the Capacity Increase Project (CIP) Tanks) for co-processing with the SL. The SL-PFB project will construct and install the necessary integrated systems to process the accumulated MVST Facilities SL inventory at the TWPC thus enabling safe and effective disposal of the waste. This BCP does not include work to support current MVST Facility Surveillance and Maintenance programs or the ORNL Building 3019 U-233 Disposition project, since they are not currently part of the TWPC prime contract. The purpose of the environmental compliance strategy is to identify the environmental permits and other required regulatory documents necessary for the construction and operation of the SL- PFB at the TWPC, Oak Ridge, TN. The permits and other regulatory documents identified are necessary to comply with the environmental laws and regulations of DOE Orders, and other requirements documented in the SL-PFB, Safety Design Strategy (SDS), SL-A-AD-002, R0 draft, and the Systems, Function and Requirements Document (SFRD), SL-X-AD-002, R1 draft. This compliance strategy is considered a 'living strategy' and it is anticipated that it will be revised as design progresses and more detail is known. The design basis on which this environmental permitting and compliance strategy is based is the Wastren Advantage, Inc., (WAI), TWPC, SL-PFB (WAI-BL-B.01.06) baseline. (authors)

Rogers, Ben C.; Heacker, Fred K.; Shannon, Christopher [Wastren Advantage, Inc., Transuranic Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road, Lenoir City, Tennessee 37771 (United States)] [Wastren Advantage, Inc., Transuranic Waste Processing Center, 100 WIPP Road, Lenoir City, Tennessee 37771 (United States); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recent Improvements in DDT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper will report new developments and recent improvements to DDT. "Window DDT" now will remember undefined symbols and define them on a later command. Using sequence breaks, it can change the contents of memory while ...

Edwards, D.J.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

State waste discharge permit application for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application is being made for a permit pursuant to Chapter 173--216 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), to discharge treated waste water and cooling tower blowdown from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) to land at the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). The ETF is located in the 200 East Area and the SALDS is located north of the 200 West Area. The ETF is an industrial waste water treatment plant that will initially receive waste water from the following two sources, both located in the 200 Area on the Hanford Site: (1) the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and (2) the 242-A Evaporator. The waste water discharged from these two facilities is process condensate (PC), a by-product of the concentration of waste from DSTs that is performed in the 242-A Evaporator. Because the ETF is designed as a flexible treatment system, other aqueous waste streams generated at the Hanford Site may be considered for treatment at the ETF. The origin of the waste currently contained in the DSTs is explained in Section 2.0. An overview of the concentration of these waste in the 242-A Evaporator is provided in Section 3.0. Section 4.0 describes the LERF, a storage facility for process condensate. Attachment A responds to Section B of the permit application and provides an overview of the processes that generated the wastes, storage of the wastes in double-shell tanks (DST), preliminary treatment in the 242-A Evaporator, and storage at the LERF. Attachment B addresses waste water treatment at the ETF (under construction) and the addition of cooling tower blowdown to the treated waste water prior to disposal at SALDS. Attachment C describes treated waste water disposal at the proposed SALDS.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A postmortem assessment of environmental compliance of a high-level radioactive waste repository, Hanford Site, Washington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the engineered barrier and the accessible environment. The concept of geochemical retarda'tion has been analyzed by Domenico et al. (1988) from a regulatory point of view and the following discussion is a summary of their work. As discussed previously, a...A POSTMORTEM ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE OF A HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY, HANFORD SITE, WASHINGTON A Thesis by RUDOLF HARALD WILHELM PETRINI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial...

Petrini, Rudolf Harald Wilhelm

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Appendix B 1BStandards Tables 116-A and 116-B Page 1 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Compliance Manual August 2009 TABLE 116-B DEFAULT SOLAR HEAT GAIN COEFFICIENT (SHGC) FRAME TYPE or on an existing back-up tank for a solar water-heating system, it shall have an R-value of at least R-12 or transparent panels shall use glass block values. #12;Appendix B ­ 2B§118 (d) and §118 (e) Page 2 2008

478

DOE`s approach to groundwater compliance on the UMTRA project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance with the mandate of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites requires implementation of a groundwater remedial action plan that meets the requirements of Subpart B of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s proposed groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The UMTRA Groundwater Project will ensure that unacceptable current risk or potential risk to the public health, safety and the environment resulting from the groundwater contamination attributable to the UMTRA sites, is mitigated in a timely and cost-efficient manner. For each UMTRA processing site and vicinity property where contamination exists, a groundwater remedial action plan must be developed that identifies hazardous constituents and establishes acceptable concentration limits for the hazardous constituents as either (a) alternate concentration limits (ACL), (b) maximum concentration limits (MCLs), (c) supplemental standards, or (d) background groundwater quality levels. Project optimization is a strategy that will aggressively work within the current regulatory framework using all available options to meet regulatory requirements. This strategy is outlined within.

Metzler, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Gibb, J.P. [Geraghty and Miller, Inc. (United States); Glover, W.A. [Roy F. Weston, Inc. (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Portal and perimeter monitoring systems (PPMS) for use in verifying arms control treaty compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that on site inspection is one important form of verification available to insure compliance with arms control treaties. On site inspection has been implemented in the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty with a site at Votkinsk, USSR and is planned for use in verifying the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) treaty currently in negotiation. The Raytheon Company, under contract to the Defense Nuclear Agency, is responsible for the research and development of the portal and perimeter monitoring equipment for potential verification tasks associated with future START treaties. Under DNA tasking, Raytheon has developed prototype portal and perimeter monitoring systems to satisfy short and long term monitoring requirements and has demonstrated these prototype systems at the DNA Technical On-Site Inspection (TOSI) facility at Kirtland, AFB, NM. The DNA design goals were to provide the US with a simple, modular low cost and highly reliable PPMS using available commercial off-the-shelf equipment which could be installed at potential monitoring sites with a minimum of site preparation. Testing to date indicates these design goals have been met.

Fields, V.C. (Raytheon Service Co. (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Performance Assessment in Support of the 1996 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual and computational structure of a performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is described. Important parts of thk structure are @ maintenance of a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertain, with stochastic uncefinty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 Y regulatory period fiat applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from `the imprecision with which many of the quantities rquired in tie `hdysis are known, (ii) use of Latin hypercttbe sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncefirtty, (iii) use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncetinty, and OV) efficient use of tie necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to SUPPOII the analysis. The WIPP is under development by the U.S. Department of Ener~ (DOE) for the geologic (i.e., deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, with the indicated PA supporting a ~Compliance Certification Application (CCA) by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996 for tie necessary certifications for the WIPP to begin operation. If certified, the WIPP will be the first operational faciliv in tie United States for the geologic disposal of ra&oactive waste.

Anderson, D.R.; Basabilvazo, G.; Helton, J.C.; Jow, H.-N.; Marietta, M.G.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improved effluent compliance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Check-Testing of Manufacturer Self Reported Labeling Data & Compliance with MEPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table B- 1 Refrigerator and Freezer Effective capacity ?L?energy label Refrigerators and Freezers No. Product featurecon- ditioners, refrigerators and freezers, greatly improved

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Improving steam turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the condition of a significant number of fossil steam turbines operating in the United States and the maintenance practices used to improve their performance. Through the use of steam path audits conducted by the authors` company and by several utilities, a large data base of information on turbine heat rate, casing efficiency, and maintenance practices is available to help the power generation industry understand how different maintenance practices and steam path damage impact turbine performance. The data base reveals that turbine cycle heat rate is typically 5.23% poorer than design just prior to major outages. The degraded condition of steam turbines presents an opportunity for utilities to improve heat rate and reduce emissions without increasing fuel costs. The paper describes what losses typically contribute to the 5.23% heat rate degradation and how utilities can recover steam turbine performance through maintenance actions aimed at improving steam path efficiency.

Cioffi, D.H.; Mitchell, D.R.; Whitecar, S.C. [Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT #12;Accelerated.quality.wisc.edu O F F I C E O F Q U A L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T Accelerated Improvement This guide to improving resources. You will find helpful information needed to conduct an Accelerated Improvement project

Shapiro, Vadim

484

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 201420  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CIP) 2014­20? The Campus Improvement Program (CIP) is a concept proposal for the delivery of new-Darlington campus to 2020 through land uses and building envelopes. The CIP is not a proposal for the detailed design and construction of new buildings. See point 9. 2. What are the objectives of the CIP? The CIP

Viglas, Anastasios

486

EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE STRATEGY FOR THE CLEANUP OF K BASINS AT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

K Basins, consisting of two water-filled storage basins (KW and KE) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), are part of the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site, along the shoreline of the Columbia River, situated approximately 40 km (25 miles) northwest of the City of Richland, Washington. The KW contained 964 metric tons of SNF in sealed canisters and the KE contained 1152 metric tons of SNF under water in open canisters. The cladding on much of the fuel was damaged allowing the fuel to corrode and degrade during storage underwater. An estimated 1,700 cubic feet of sludge, containing radionuclides and sediments, have accumulated in the KE basin. Various alternatives for removing and processing the SNF, sludge, debris and water were originally evaluated, by USDOE (DOE), in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) with a preferred alternative identified in the Record of Decision. The SNF, sludge, debris and water are ''hazardous substances'' under the Comprehensive, Environmental, Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Leakage of radiologically contaminated water from one of the basins and subsequent detection of increased contamination in a down-gradient monitoring well helped to form the regulatory bases for cleanup action under CERCLA. The realization that actual or threatened release of hazardous substances from the waste sites and K Basins, if not addressed in a timely manner, may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare and environment led to action under CERCLA, with EPA as the lead regulatory agency. Clean-up of the K Basins as a CERCLA site required SNF retrieval, processing, packaging, vacuum drying and transport to a vaulted storage facility for storage, in conformance with a quality assurance program approved by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Excluding the facilities built for SNF drying and vaulted storage, the scope of CERCLA interim remedial action was limited to the removal of fuel, sludge, debris and water. At present, almost all of the spent fuel has been removed from the basins and other activities to remove sludge, debris and water are scheduled to be completed in 2007. Developing environmental documentation and obtaining regulatory approvals for a project which was initiated outside CERCLA and came under CERCLA during execution, was a significant priority to the successful completion of the SNF retrieval, transfer, drying, transport and storage of fuel, within the purview of strong conduct-of-operations culture associated with nuclear facilities. Environmental requirements promulgated in the state regulations by Washington Department of Public Health for radiation were recognized as ''applicable or relevant and appropriate.'' Effective implementation of the environmental compliance strategy in a project that transitioned to CERCLA became a significant challenge involving multiple contractors. This paper provides an overview of the development and implementation of an environmental permitting and surveillance strategy that enabled us to achieve full compliance in a challenging environment, with milestones and cost constraints, while meeting the high safety standards. The details of the strategy as to how continuous rapport with the regulators, facility operators and surveillance groups helped to avoid impacts on the clean-up schedule are discussed. Highlighted are the role of engineered controls, surveillance protocols and triggers for monitoring and reporting, and active administrative controls that were established for the control of emissions, water loss and transport of waste shipments, during the different phases of the project.

AMBALAM, T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites` compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site.

Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Examination of utility Phase 1 compliance choices and state reactions to Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (N{sub x}) from electric power plants. The act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program deaned in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. A compilation of SO{sub 2} compliance activities by the 110 utility plants affected by Phase I is summarized in this report. These compliance plans are presented in a tabular form, correlated with age, capacity, and power pool data. A large number of the Phase I units (46%) have chosen to blend or switch to lower sulfur coals. This choice primarily is in response to (1) prices of low-sulfur coal and (2) the need to maintain SO{sub 2} control flexibility because of uncertain future environmental regulations (e.g., air toxics, carbon dioxide) and compliance prices. The report also discusses the responses of state legislatures and public utility commissions to the compliance requirements in Title IV. Most states have taken negligible action regarding the regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance activities. To protect mine employment, states producing high-sulfur coal have enacted regulations encouraging continued use of that coal, but for the most part, this response has had little effect on utility compliance choices.

Bailey, K.A.; Elliott, T.J.; Carlson, L.J.; South, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) IN THE SECONDARY WASTE STREAM OF THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the laboratory results of RPP-PLAN-35958, Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome (VI) to Chrome (III) in the Secondary Waste Stream With the exception of the electrochemical corrosion scans, all work was carried out at the Center for Laboratory Science (CLS) located at the Columbia Basin College. This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel.

DUNCAN JB; GUTHRIE MD

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

492

Detection of estrogen- and dioxin-like activity in pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent using in vitro bioassays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulp and paper mill effluent contains a complex mixture of compounds which adversely affect fish physiologically and at the population level. These effects include compromised reproductive fitness and the induction of mixed-function oxidase activities; two classic responses mediated by the estrogen and/or Ah receptor. In vitro recombinant receptor/reporter gene assays were used to examine pulp and paper mill black liquor and effluent for estrogenic, dioxin-like and antiestrogenic activities. Using MCF7 cells transiently transfected with a Gal4-estrogen receptor chimeric construct (Gal4-HEGO) and a Gal4-regulated luciferase reporter gene (17m5-G-Luc), it was estimated that black liquor contains 4 {+-} 2 ppb ``estrogen equivalents``, while negligible estrogenic activity was observed in a methanol-extracted pulp and paper mill effluent fraction (MF). A dioxin response element (DRE)-regulated luciferase reporter gene (pGudLucl.1) transiently transfected into Hepalclc7 wild type cells exhibited a dose-dependent increase in luciferase activity following treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDO), black liquor and MF. Based on the dose response curves, black liquor and MF contain 10 {+-} 4 ppb and 20 {+-} 6 ppt ``TCDD equivalents``, respectively. Moreover, MF exhibited significant AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. These results demonstrate the utility of these bioassays and suggest that the effects observed in fish exposed to pulp and paper mill effluent may be due to unidentified ER and AhR ligands not detected by conventional chemical analysis due to the lack of appropriate chemical standards.

Zacharewski, T.; Berhane, K.; Gillesby, B.; Burnison, K. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada). Aquatic Ecosystem Conservation Branch

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

494

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

495

Improving haul truck productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

Fiscor, S.

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

496

Improving biofuel production | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planning experimental workImproving Reusebiofuel

497

Improving catalysts | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planning experimental workImproving

498

Infrastructure Improvements - SRSCRO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planningtoAInfrastructure Improvements As the

499

EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

500

Track 10: Feedback and Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement