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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POOL BEACH MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECTPool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvements ProjectPool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvements Project

Elwany, Hany; Flick, Reinhard; Nichols, Jean; Lindquist, Anne-Lise

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

4

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and its impact on the environment: 21 67.7 Understanding of rangeland watersheds: 26 83.9 Understanding of collection and storage of harvested rainwater: 24 77.4 Understanding of filtration and sanitation of harvested rainwater: 27 87.1 Understanding... % Knowledge Gain Understanding of how rainwater addresses water quality and quantity issues: 27.6 Understanding of stormwater and its impact on the environment: 32.1 Understanding of rangeland watersheds: 42.4 Understanding of collection and storage...

Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan

6

Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream using Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (Zambia) as a model system aims at defining optimized turbine withdrawal. The water depth of turbine withdrawals was varied in a set of simulations to optimize outflow water quality

Wehrli, Bernhard

7

Improvement of Drinking Water Quality in Developing Countries: Microbial and Geogenic Contamination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improvement of Drinking Water Quality in Developing Countries: Microbial and Geogenic Contamination for chemical and micro- biological treatment of drinking water at the household scale. The course will cover in developing and emerging coun- tries, who wish to learn more about household drinking water quality

Wehrli, Bernhard

8

Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Wilbarger, and Fisher counties exceeded the federal safe drinking water standard (10 mg/L NO3-N). This high concentration is a concern because although 90% of the water pumped from the aquifer is used for irrigation, it is also used as a municipal water...

Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

9

TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS As water quality has improved over the past three decades in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS Overview As water quality has improved over the past three decades in North America, diffuse sources of pollution such as storm- water runoff and sediments are now recognized as long-term, widespread pollutant sources to aquatic systems. Substantial impacts on the ecosystem from sediment

10

General Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this water quality rule is to protect, maintain and improve the quality of waters of the State. Any applicant for a federal license, permit or project to conduct any activity...

11

Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Water quality trading is a tool for achieving water quality improvements. Under the right circumstances, trading has the potential to yield both environmental and economic benefits, while...

12

Geosynthetic Filters for Water Quality Improvement of Urban Storm Water Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water treatment are retention ponds, detention basins, wetland ponds, and grass swales (Strecker et al are common subsurface storm water runoff treatment systems used in urban areas. Large subsurface fil- ters the treatment system (SEMCOG 2008). Removal of filtration media such as sand is highly labor

Aydilek, Ahmet

13

Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water heater. Scale buildup in pipes and re duced water flow. Hard water due to calcium and magnesiumHousehold Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension Many areas have water containing impurities from natural or artificial sources. These impurities may

Liskiewicz, Maciej

14

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

15

COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of Dr.William F. Hunt.) In North were compared to permeable pavement exfiltrate quality for pH and concentrations of total nitrogen (TN capabilities in reducing runoff, but are not credited for improving water quality. To further test

Hunt, William F.

16

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

17

Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

popul ati o n . There are an estima te d 9,000 septic tanks located around Lake Granbur y , with absorpt i o n fields install e d on small lots in close proximi t y to the lake. Most of the i nhabit e d areas around the lake exist on man-ma d e... Upon the Water Quality of the Lake Study identi fi e d the most notab l e area of c oncer n to be in the man- ma d e coves. In 1995 a study titled, Survey of Conditions and Impact of Septic Tank Pollution on the Water Quality in Lake Granbury...

Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan; Kalisek, Danielle; Harris, B.L.

18

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

19

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition InformationInteractionsWater

20

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste to beswim WatchingWaterW

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

State Water Quality (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and...

22

Improving Stormwater Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water resources. Stormwater, when produced by rain or snowmelt flowing over the land, captures debris, chemicals, hazardous wastes, and/or sediment. These contaminants then make their way to drainage systems that flow directly into rivers, lakes..., wetlands, or bays. The polluted stormwa- ter runoff can affect the health of plants, fish, animals, and people, as well as reduce the recreational value of water resources. Urbanization also has a major impact on the quality of local streams because...

Garcia, Raul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Water Quality (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state. The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

24

Water Quality Improvements: How do we know if we're doing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buffer grassland 250 m buffer Targeted Wetland crop to switchgrassPresettlement Conservation Tillage We or irritation Value of avoided water treatment Value of commercial fishing Fish abundance and productivity, illness or irritation Value of avoided water treatment #12;Trout angling Nitrogen Water clarity/ Algal

Farritor, Shane

25

Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution control program. The WQCA identifies the responsibilities and extent of authority for the Commissioner of the Water Quality...

26

Water Quality Improvement Policies: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of Proposition O in Los Angeles, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental strategies, management policies, and programs in response to increasingly stringent waterenvironmental nonpro?t applicants Selected experts working on storm-water managementEnvironmental Management (2009) 43:514–522 DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9262-8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Water

Park, Mi-Hyun; Stenstrom, Michael; Pincetl, Stephanie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Treatment of drinking water to improve its sanitary or bacteriological quality is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 gallons), such an approach can be wasteful, increasing energy costs for the well pump to refill the tank Chlorine Amounts To sanitize water properly, enough chlorine needs to be added to a storage tank to reach bacteria have been properly destroyed by the sanitation process, submit water samples from a faucet served

28

BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT VALUATION METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that, with further development of the region, there may be pesticide or heavy metal leaching problems of the Canadian Department of the Environment. #12;Executive Summary Nitrate pollution is a problem in many exmple of groundwater pollution. This aquifer is the primary source of municipal water for the District

29

Water Quality Control (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state of Texas is to promote the quality of the state's water by regulating existing industries, taking into consideration the economic development of the state, and by...

30

Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

Pitt, Robert E.

31

Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

32

Improving water quality with a "territorial" agri-environmental policy? Insights from the new generation AES in South-West France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improving water quality with a "territorial" agri-environmental policy? Insights from the new with the Local Agri-Environmental Schemes (LAES), the French contractual policy instrument within the European underlie the French agri-environmental policy, from a retrospective of the successive national schemes set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

34

Texas Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Texas Surface Water Quality Standards 30 TAC Chapter 307 Lori Hamilton Water Quality Standards of the water quality standards for a water body will be conducted Types of UAAs Aquatic Life Use (ALU) UAAs 2 procedures in conjunction with Standards revision Before Conducting a UAA Coordinate with your TCEQ project

35

Water Quality Standards Implementation (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality regulates Oklahoma's Water Quality Standards. The law states the requirements and standards for point source discharges. It also establishes...

36

Water Quality Regulations (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of these regulations is to establish water quality standards for the state's surface waters. These standards are intended to restore, preserve and enhance the physical, chemical and...

37

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency...

39

Data quality improvements for FAA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective communication among air safety professionals is only as good as the information being communicated. Data sharing cannot be effective unless the data are relevant to aviation safety problems, and decisions based on faulty data are likely to be invalid. The validity of aviation safety data depends on satisfying two primary characteristics. Data must accurately represent or conform to the real world (conformance), and it must be relevant or useful to addressing the problems at hand (utility). The FAA, in efforts to implement the Safety Performance Analysis System (SPAS), identified significant problems in the quality of the data which SPAS and FAA air safety professionals would use in defining the state of aviation safety in the US. These finding were reinforced by Department of Transportation Inspector General and General Accounting Office investigations into FAA surveillance of air transport operations. Many recent efforts to improve data quality have been centered on technological solutions to the problems. They concentrate on reducing errors in the data (conformance), but they cannot adequately address the relationship of data to need (utility). Sandia National Laboratories, working with the FAA`s Airport and Aircraft Safety Research and Development Division and the Flight Standards Service, has been involved in four programs to assist FAA in addressing their data quality problems. The Sandia approach has been data-driven rather than technology-driven. In other words, the focus has been on first establishing the data requirements by analyzing the FAA`s surveillance and decision-making processes. This process analysis looked at both the data requirements and the methods used to gather the data in order to address both the conformance and utility problems inherent in existing FAA data systems. This paper discusses Sandia`s data quality programs and their potential improvements to the safety analysis processes and surveillance programs of the FAA.

Perry, R.; Marlman, K.; Olson, D.; Werner, P.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Water Quality Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act establishes the Water Quality Control Commission and states the powers and duties of the commission. Rules are stated for adoption of regulations and standards and information is provided...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recreational uses. ?The Commission will seek substantial additional public comment on any proposed changes to the standards before adopting them into the state admin- istrative code,? Davenport said. ?Because of the com- plexity and regulatory importance... Conservation Board?s state watershed coordinator, said the standards for contact recreation, with only a few exceptions, are uniformly applied regardless of water body type or the actual level of recreation use. ?Because a minimum of 10 water samples over a...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde L. Munster The Upper North Bosque River (UNBR) watershed is under a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) mandate to reduce Phosphorus (P) due to excess nutrients in the watershed. To address... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

Stewart, George Russell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act...

44

Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes the requirements governing the discharge or deposit of sewage, industrial wastes and other wastes into waters and establishes water quality standards.

45

North Central Texas Water Quality Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source pollution sources in the watershed. The District has already initiated efforts to address the water quality issues, developing a water quality monitoring program to collect data for these reservoirs and their associated watersheds. The District... has collected water quality data for nearly 40 parameters since 1989. Effluent discharges from the wastewater treatment plans and nonpoint source pollution from urban and agricultural runoff are reported as the major causes for water quality...

Berthold, T. Allen

46

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality Certification Website Abstract This website...

48

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study 12-LaboratoryMedical Equipment Water Efficiency Improvements...

49

Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and ManagementSensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and ManagementSensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and Management

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

51

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Management Module No. 12 Water Quality Considerations and Regulations by Susan Mc Management Competency Area II: Nutrient movement in soil and water. Objectives After completing this module issues 3.Become familiar with federal and state water quality regulations 4.Identify Best Management

Lawrence, Rick L.

52

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem;#12;Optimal soil PO concentrations for plant growth ~0.20 mg/L #12;For flowing waters ~0.01 to 0.10 mg/L #12

53

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid, depending on the soil, the local landscape, and weather conditions

54

Federal, State, and Local Water Quality Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and non-point pollution is causing many water bodies to fail state water quality standards. Since in many cases these polluted water bodies are vital to communi- ties as both a source of drinking water-5-23.1. These two laws are intended to protect water bodies from excessive point and non-point pollution

Rosemond, Amy Daum

55

Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

56

Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

57

Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Montana Water Quality Permit Application, Nondegradation Authorization, and Permit FeesPermitting...

58

Chemical drinking water quality in Ghana: Water costs and scope for advanced treatment   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To reduce child mortality and improve health in Ghana boreholes and wells are being installed across the country by the private sector, NGOs and the Ghanaian government. Water quality is not generally monitored once a ...

Rossiter, Helfrid M.A.; Owusu, Peter A; Awuah, Esi; MacDonald, Alan M; Schäfer, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Pesticide Properties that Affect Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to keep our water supplies safe from pesticide contamination, we must understand which pesticide properties affect water quality, and how. The subject is complex, as properties such as pesticide class, formulation, toxicity, dose, effective...

Stevenson, Douglas; Baumann, Paul A.; Jackman, John A.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes five wells dedicated to pumping drinking water and the Water Treatment Facility in Bldg. 624 (see-step process to remove iron at the Water Treatment Facil- ity (see photo essay on page 4). While being2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report This special edition of the Brookhaven Bulletin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into storm drains, or suspicious activi- ties that may cause environmental harm to the Storm Water Quality was created for the Storm Water Management Program http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Contact us at: cleanwater Management Program and UCSC Storm Water Management Plan at cleanwater.ucsc.edu Storm Water Management: 1

California at Santa Cruz, University of

62

USHER: Improving Data Quality with Dynamic Forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract — Data quality is a critical problem in modern databases. Data entry forms present the first and arguably best opportunity for detecting and mitigating errors, but there has been little research into automatic methods for improving data quality at entry time. In this paper, we propose USHER, an endto-end system for form design, entry, and data quality assurance. Using previous form submissions, USHER learns a probabilistic model over the questions of the form. USHER then applies this model at every step of the data entry process to improve data quality. Before entry, it induces a form layout that captures the most important data values of a form instance as quickly as possible. During entry, it dynamically adapts the form to the values being entered, and enables real-time feedback to guide the data enterer toward their intended values. After entry, it re-asks questions that it deems likely to have been entered incorrectly. We evaluate all three components of USHER using two real-world data sets. Our results demonstrate that each component has the potential to improve data quality considerably, at a reduced cost when compared to current practice. I.

Kuang Chen; Harr Chen; Neil Conway; Joseph M. Hellerstein; Tapan S. Parikh

63

assessing water quality: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Woodland Creation to Mitigating the Impacts of Agriculture on Water Quality Renewable Energy Websites Summary: on Water Quality The report Woodland for Water:...

64

assess water quality: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Woodland Creation to Mitigating the Impacts of Agriculture on Water Quality Renewable Energy Websites Summary: on Water Quality The report Woodland for Water:...

65

Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water were created to embody both state and federal law. State law mandates the protection of public health and welfare and the...

66

Water Control and Improvement Districts (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is authorized to review and establish local water districts throughout the state of Texas. The Water Code gives the Commission the right of...

67

Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study. Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular Replacement Study....

68

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

Ma, Lena

69

Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea B.; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth A.; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; Chir., B; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson,M.B., Peter

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

National Cancer Institute; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; B.Chir., M.B.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., M.S., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson, Peter

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected.

Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly Ph.D., Andrea; Jewell Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan M.D., Renata; Hayes M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut Ph.D.,, Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova Ph.D., Olga; Riegman Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo M.S., Edward; Somiari Ph.D., Stella; Watson M.B., Peter; Weier Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu Ph.D., Claire; Vaught Ph.D., Jim

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference "Water Quality Challenges in the Great Plains" is the theme of this year's University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water, Law, Policy and Science conference. The fifth annual UNL conference is April 22 and 23 at Lincoln

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

73

Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

FAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon and Carbon Sequestration...................................10 CRP EffectsFAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program FAPRI-UMC Report #01

75

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water Efficiency Improvements at Various U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Sites Water...

76

Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Water Quality Greenland Meadows is a retail shopping center built in 2008 by Newton, Mass.- based New England Development in Greenland, N.H. The development is located Development and Community Decisions can be found at http://www.unh.edu/unhsc/ftl/ Greenland Meadows features

77

Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress

78

Slag pit practices to improve slag quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slag quality had deteriorated recently. Without the explicit approval for slag quality by the Illinois Department of Transportation, the slag would not be saleable. Disposal of slag to landfills was going to be an expensive solution and rife with environmental concerns. A slag quality control program embarked on in mid-1994 restored slag quality to desired specifications. This paper describes the changes in slag pit practice adopted following extensive tests performed on cooling slag under controlled conditions.

Mertdogan, A. [Metal Enterprises, Research and Technology, Inc., Homewood, IL (United States); Gambol, F.C.; Spaeth, J.R.; Zbos, J.; Batka, R. [Acme Steel Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Tolliver, D. [Heckett MultiServ, Whiting, IN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optical parametric osicllators with improved beam quality  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having an optical pump, which generates a pump beam at a pump frequency greater than a desired signal frequency, a nonlinear optical medium oriented so that a signal wave at the desired signal frequency and a corresponding idler wave are produced when the pump beam (wave) propagates through the nonlinear optical medium, resulting in beam walk off of the signal and idler waves, and an optical cavity which directs the signal wave to repeatedly pass through the nonlinear optical medium, said optical cavity comprising an equivalently even number of non-planar mirrors that produce image rotation on each pass through the nonlinear optical medium. Utilizing beam walk off where the signal wave and said idler wave have nonparallel Poynting vectors in the nonlinear medium and image rotation, a correlation zone of distance equal to approximately .rho.L.sub.crystal is created which, through multiple passes through the nonlinear medium, improves the beam quality of the OPO output.

Smith, Arlee V.; Alford, William J.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the research project was to advance the concept of real-time water quality management in the San Joaquin Basin by developing an application to drainage of seasonal wetlands in the Grassland Water District. Real-time water quality management is defined as the coordination of reservoir releases, return flows and river diversions to improve water quality conditions in the San Joaquin River and ensure compliance with State water quality objectives. Real-time water quality management is achieved through information exchange and cooperation between shakeholders who contribute or withdraw flow and salt load to or from the San Joaquin River. This project complements a larger scale project that was undertaken by members of the Water Quality Subcommittee of the San Joaquin River Management Program (SJRMP) and which produced forecasts of flow, salt load and San Joaquin River assimilative capacity between 1999 and 2003. These forecasts can help those entities exporting salt load to the River to develop salt load targets as a mechanism for improving compliance with salinity objectives. The mass balance model developed by this project is the decision support tool that helps to establish these salt load targets. A second important outcome of this project was the development and application of a methodology for assessing potential impacts of real-time wetland salinity management. Drawdown schedules are typically tied to weather conditions and are optimized in traditional practices to maximize food sources for over-wintering wildfowl as well as providing a biological control (through germination temperature) of undesirable weeds that compete with the more proteinaceous moist soil plants such as swamp timothy, watergrass and smartweed. This methodology combines high resolution remote sensing, ground-truthing vegetation surveys using established survey protocols and soil salinity mapping using rapid, automated electromagnetic sensor technology. This survey methodology could be complemented with biological surveys of bird use and invertebrates to produce a robust long-term monitoring strategy for habitat health and sustainability.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josphine R.; Taylor, Christophe M.; Marciochi, Don; Lower, Scott; Woodruff, Veronica; Wright, Diane; Poole, Tim

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

82

Quality improvement and control based on defect reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the quality improvement in a printing process at a food packaging company now experiencing hundreds of printing defects. Methodologies of Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC), and ...

Dai, Qi, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Stanford University HRPP Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/13 Research Compliance Office STANFORD measures and improves, when necessary, compliance with organizational measures and improves, when necessary, the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of the Human Research to assess compliance with organizational policies and procedures and applicable laws, regulations, codes

Puglisi, Joseph

84

South Asia transboundary water quality monitoring workshop summary report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in several regions as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group made up of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and the United States convened in Kathmandu, Nepal, from February 17-23,2002. The workshop was held to further develop the South Asia Transboundary Water Quality Monitoring (SATWQM) project. The project is sponsored in part by the CMC located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico through funding provided by the US. Department of State, Regional Environmental Affairs Office, American Embassy, Kathmandu, Nepal, and the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This report summarizes the SATWQM project, the workshop objectives, process and results. The long-term interests of the participants are to develop systems for sharing regional environmental information as a means of building confidence and improving relations among South Asian countries. The more immediate interests of the group are focused on activities that foster regional sharing of water quality data in the Ganges and Indus River basins. Issues of concern to the SATWQM network participants include studying the impacts from untreated sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural run-off, salinity increases in fresh waters, the siltation and shifting of river channels, and the environmental degradation of critical habitats such as wetlands, protected forests, and endangered aquatic species conservation areas. The workshop focused on five objectives: (1) a deepened understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of additional regional and national government and non-government organizations in South Asia involved in river water quality monitoring; (3) identification of sites within the region at which water quality data are to be collected; (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process; and, (5) training of partners in the use of water quality monitoring equipment.

Betsill, Jeffrey David; Littlefield, Adriane C.; Luetters, Frederick O.; Rajen, Gaurav

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Optimal water quality management in surface water systems and energy recovery in water distribution networks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Two of the most important environmental challenges in the 21st century are to protect the quality of fresh water resources and to utilize renewable energy… (more)

Telci, Ilker Tonguc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Water Quality, Resources and Technology | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality, Resources and Technology Water is an increasingly valuable natural resource. By identifying typical sources and distribution of microbial communities in waterways,...

87

Implementation and Testing of Water Quality Lucy Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Fellowship Program #12;1 BACKGROUND In Arizona, due the market development of realtime water quality sensors. These sensors are convenient in detecting aspects of the sensors in their implementations, have not been well studied. The water quality sensors

Fay, Noah

88

Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

89

USHER: Improving data quality with dynamic forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data quality is a critical problem in modern databases. Data entry forms present the first and arguably best opportunity for detecting and mitigating errors, but there has been little research into automatic methods for ...

Chen, Harr

90

Grass Upland Water Quality Wednesday November 21st 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grass Upland Water Quality Workshop Wednesday November 21st 2007 Water Quality in the Uplands financial support to farming could protect rural economies while reducing this damage to water. Help farmers · Unnatural spates ­ potential downstream flooding little water retention on land uneven flows lack

Quinton, John

91

Water Quality: Its Relationship to Livestock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concen- trations. Examples are iron, copper, cobalt, zinc, iodide and manganese. These elements do not seem to accumu- late in meat or milk to the extent that they would cause a problem. The most common water quality problems affecting livestock... 0.002 0.01 0.01 Molybdenum Not established No limit Nickel 1.0 Nitrate-N 10.0 100 300 Nitrite-N 10 10 Salinity See Table 2 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Sulfate e 250 Total Dissolved Solids e 500 Vanadium 0.1 1.0 Zinc 5.0 25...

Faries Jr., Floron C.; Sweeten, John M.; Reagor, John C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

How intense quality control improves hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not unlike the subject of Forced Closure, Intense Quality Control is probably misnamed. What actually is discussed in this article is pilot testing of the fracturing fluids actually pumped at in-situ conditions of temperature and shear. Presented here is development of the need for onsite testing, equipment used, shear and viscosity curves from several jobs showing what went wrong that would otherwise not have been known, and a discussion of borate gel fluids.

Ely, J.W. [Ely and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Predicting Air Quality: Improvements through advanced methods to integrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Air Quality: Improvements through advanced methods to integrate models and measurements of Mathematics and Statistics, Portland, OR 97207, USA Abstract Air quality prediction plays an important role chemical transport models can predict pollution in an urban air shed with spatial resolution less than

Sandu, Adrian

94

SEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and disinfect anyy microorganisms that may be present The majority of Recycled water produced in ArizonaSEASONAL RECLAIMED WATER QUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OFQUALITY; AN ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY Ch h M R k Ph D W t Q lit S i li tChannah M. Rock, Ph.D., Water Quality Specialist James Walworth, Ph

Fay, Noah

95

Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Quality for Livestock Max Irsik DVM, MAB Beef Cattle Extension Veterinarian University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Water is an essential nutrient for humans and livestock and drinking water is the primary source of water for most cattle. The most important aspect of water

Watson, Craig A.

97

One of John Dempsey Hospital's new quality improvement tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of John Dempsey Hospital's new quality improvement tools borrows lessons learned from the nuclear power industry, manufac turing and aviation. "Safety is a science. Reliability is a science, is a former Navy pilot. "We're learning specific tools based on high reliability tech niques to improve

Oliver, Douglas L.

98

Chapter 10 Water Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes procedures to protect the surface waters of the Commonwealth, and thus protect water resources. It states the designated uses of surface water and...

99

Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage Water Heater .point for modeling storage water heaters. The algorithmsfired, natural draft storage water heater. Figure 1 shows a

Lutz, Jim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement Overview Tasked with improving cost and quality throughout the Volvo diesel engine

Demirel, Melik C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

publication 426-042 Urban Water-Quality Management Winterizing the Water Garden Lynnette Swanson. Prepare the pond for the winter months by managing the plants, cleaning the pond, and monitoring the water Traci Gilland, Extension Agent, Portsmouth Water gardens require maintenance throughout the year

Liskiewicz, Maciej

102

An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 In January 2004, District of Columbia residents learned the drinking water supplied by the D.C. Water immediately responded by forming the Interagency Task Force on Lead in Drinking Water (The Task Force

District of Columbia, University of the

103

Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The… (more)

Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Water quality and business aspects of sachet-vended water in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial water quality analyses were conducted on 15 samples of factory-produced sachet water and 15 samples of hand-tied sachet water, sold in Tamale, Ghana. The tests included the membrane filtration (MF) test using ...

Okioga, Teshamulwa (Teshamulwa Irene)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Joanne Yee, Storm Water Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Like us on Facebook at UCSC Storm Water Management Program Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu (831) 459, Volume 5, Number 1 Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

106

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Joanne Yee, Storm Water Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Like us on Facebook at UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Management Program Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu (831) 459, Volume 5, Number 1 Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

107

Water Quality and Quantity Concerns Population growth, increasing water demands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, private water well screening, and soil nutrient management. Water conservation programs of Agri, efficient use, sustainable practices, watershed management and environmental stewardship. Through 660 and utilizing water-conservation practices will be essential to sustain the state's water supply

108

Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These standards establish the designated uses and antidegradation categories of the State's surface waters, classify surface waters based on those uses (i.e., stream classifications), and specify...

109

2010 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement Awardflash2007-42attachment1.pdfmodule 4Department0 Quality Assurance Improvement

110

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is imple- menting the Storm Water Manage- ment Plan (SWMP), which identifies many Best Management Practices Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu Like us on Facebook at UCSC Storm Water Management Program (831) 459--4520 In this Issue: Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

111

Solving Water Quality Problems in the Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If your drinking water comes from a private water well, there are certain procedures you can follow to make sure the water is safe. This publication explains how to get your water tested and, if treatment is necessary, to select the correct...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Storm Water Quality Please report any concerns,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 4594520 http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Volunteer and intern with the Storm Water Management Program the Campus Stewardship Program Like us on Facebook at UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Management Program Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water Management Plan

California at Santa Cruz, University of

113

Project Hanford management contract quality improvement project management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 13, 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Manager transmitted a letter to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) describing several DOE-RL identified failed opportunities for FDH to improve the Quality Assurance (QA) Program and its implementation. In addition, DOE-RL identified specific Quality Program performance deficiencies. FDH was requested to establish a periodic reporting mechanism for the corrective action program. In a July 17, 1998 response to DOE-RL, FDH agreed with the DOE concerns and committed to perform a comprehensive review of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) QA Program during July and August, 1998. As a result, the Project Hanford Management Contract Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) (FDH-3508) was issued on October 21, 1998. The plan identified corrective actions based upon the results of an in-depth Quality Program Assessment. Immediately following the scheduled October 22, 1998, DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH-10) Enforcement Conference, FDH initiated efforts to effectively implement the QIP corrective actions. A Quality Improvement Project (QI Project) leadership team was assembled to prepare a Project Management Plan for this project. The management plan was specifically designed to engage a core team and the support of representatives from FDH and the major subcontractors (MSCs) to implement the QIP initiatives; identify, correct, and provide feedback as to the root cause for deficiency; and close out the corrective actions. The QI Project will manage and communicate progress of the process.

ADAMS, D.E.

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Didactic and Experiential Quality Improvement Curriculum for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Didactic and Experiential Quality Improvement Curriculum for Psychiatry Residents Claudia L described QI didactic instruction, followed by engagement in QI activities.4 Curricula that combine didactic been underrepresented. Methods We developed a didactic and experiential QI curriculum within a US

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

115

Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control Daniel J. Tylavsky--Eventually all large transformers will be dynamically loaded using models updated regularly from field measured data. Models obtained from measured data give more accurate results than models based on transformer

116

The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and local information needs and decisions related to water-quality management and policy (httpThe Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality National Water-Quality

117

Name ___________________________________________ The laboratory website provides access to multiple water use and water quality publications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to lower water pH) 4. R + Metals + Titration for Drip Irrigation $42.50 per sample 5. R + Metals + Heavy water use and water quality publications. Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Texas AgriLife Extension Service W14 WATER SAMPLE INFORMATION FORM Please submit

118

COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER QUALITY: A CASE STUDY IN TEXAS David Dearmont and Resources Portland State University P O Box 751 Portland OR 97207-0751 October, 1997 Draft of paper in Water Resources Research, 34(4), 849-854, 1998. #12;2 CHEMICAL COSTS OF WATER TREATMENT DUE TO DIMINISHED WATER

McCarl, Bruce A.

119

Cotton production and water quality: Economic and environmental effects of pollution prevention. Agricultural economic report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cotton production, compared with other crops, is less likely to cause erosion-induced water-quality problems because cotton acreage is not the major source of erosion in most regions. For cotton production, the most widespread potential damages to water quality are nitrates from fertilizer polluting ground water and pesticides contaminating surface water. This damage could be reduced by restricting chemical and fertilizer use on all cotton production, but doing so could reduce cotton yields and raise cotton prices. The same level of water-quality improvement could be achieved at less cost by targeting the chemical use or erosion restrictions only to cotton farms with the most vulnerable soils. Data come from a 1989 USDA survey of cotton producers.

Crutchfield, S.R.; Ribaudo, M.O.; Hansen, L.T.; Quiroga, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Simulation of a Smart Water Heater. ” In Workshop inFreezers, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Room and Central AirNovember. ADL. 1982b. Water Heater Computer Model User’s

Lutz, Jim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Improving Home Indoor Air Quality There are three general ways of improving air quality in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of back-drafting from combustion appliances such as gas water heaters that might be located in the garage they can do damage. Do not use unvented fossil-fuel-based space heaters, e.g., kerosene heaters, under any faulty gas wall heaters and other combustion appliances. Consider hiring a qualified professional to test

Lightsey, Glenn

123

Water Quality Guide for Livestock and Poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication discusses some of the most common contaminants in the drinking water of livestock and poultry. A table lists the Maximum Contaminant Level of some harmful substances....

Mukhtar, Saqib

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geothermal Direct-Use — Meeting Water Quality Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal direct-use applications—such as greenhouses, district and space heating, and aquaculture—can easily meet local and federal water quality standards, which help protect our environment.

125

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the classification. The overall accuracy was 85%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.80. Additionally, field sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to examine the relationship between impervious surfaces and water quality in a rainfall simulation parking...

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

COLLABORATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER QUALITY POLLUTION PATTERNS: WORKING WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Management Title of Research Project: Collaborative Investigations of Water Quality Pollution: Chair: Jennifer Silver Phd Candidate in Resource and Environmental Management (REM) ___________________________________________ Dr. Evelyn Pinkerton Senior Supervisor Professor of Resource and Environmental Management, SFU

127

Challenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenges for Water Quality Best Management Practices Andrew Sharpley Department of Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs, basing fertilizer applications on soil test recommendations, and transportation from surplus to deficit

128

New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface...

129

Diesel fuel quality is improving in most European countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Associated Octel Co. Ltd. has surveyed the quality of 96 European winter-grade fuels, collected between November 1991 and February 1992. With the continuing interest in exhaust emissions, the trend toward lower sulfur and higher cetane quality has been maintained in most regions. Concerns about the reliability of the cold filter plugging point (CFPP) test as a measure of low-temperature operability are reflected in closer control of fuel cloud point. Octel reported great differences in fuel stability, corrosion, and foaming tendency of gas oil products within many marketing areas. Additive packages are widely used to improve these properties and reduce exhaust emissions. The article describes the changes in quality since Octel's last survey.

Not Available

1993-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

131

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards are established pursuant to the provisions of Subchapter 2 of the Arkansas Water and Air Pollution Control Act (Act 472 of the Acts of Arkansas...

132

Water Scarcity, Climate Change, and Water Quality: Three Economic Essays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percent being used for municipal purposes, 54 percent for irrigation, 10 percent for industry, and the rest for steam electric and livestock (see Figure 2-1). Ground water accounts for approximately 60 percent of water used, and 79 percent of ground............................................................................................. 125 3.3.4 Regression results ......................................................................... 125 3.3.5 Climate change impacts on water supply...................................... 129 3.4 Climate change impact on municipal water demand...

Cai, Yongxia

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Water Quality Modeling Hydraulics and Hydrology Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ Streamflows ­ Lake basin ­ Meteorology (wind/sun/precip...) · Outputs: ­ Vertical Temperature distribution ­ E. Coli · Temperature changes ­ Long term and short term · Lake circulation ­ Lake circulation ­ Outputs: · Oxygen distribution in water column · Nutrient distribution in water column (N

134

Water Quality Impacts of Bunker Silos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water) as well as feed particles and soil transported by flow. #12;Management and Disposal Options 1 Engineering Department UW ­ Madison with assistance from Larry D. Geohring Biological and Environmental Engineering Department Cornell University Area Soil and Soil & Water Meetings November 28 ­ December 7, 2006

Balser, Teri C.

135

2012 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement Awardflash2007-42attachment1.pdfmodule(EE)2012 Nuclear Energy2012 Quality Assurance

136

Conceptual design of a regional water quality screening model. [RFF; Reach; HANFORD; ARQUAL; SEAS; NASQUAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This water quality assessment methodology is intended to predict concentrations at future times and to estimate the impacts on water quality of energy-related activities (including industrial boilers). Estimates of impacts on water quality at future times are based on incremental changes in pollutant inputs to the body water. Important features of the model are: use of measured concentrations to account for existing conditions; consideration of incremental changes in pollutant loads; emphasis on the energy sector and industrial boilers; analysis restricted to streams only; no attempt to fully account for pollutant behavior; and flexible design, so that future improvements can be incorporated. The basic approach is very similar to the one used by Argonne's ARQUAL model but will allow more complex pollutant behavior and more flexibility in use. (PSB)

Davis, M J

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examined the functionality of a porous pavement storm-water management system in coastal New Hampshire headings: Stormwater management; Runoff; Porous media; Pavements; Cold regions; Best Management Practice; Water quality; Water treatment. Author keywords: Storm-water management; Runoff; Porous pavements; Cold

138

Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking water treatment and distribution systems must comply with US EPA water quality regula trihalomethanes (THMs). Drinking water providers do frequent, costly testing for THMs. Field real-time sensors PROJECT GOALS The goal of this project was to bring a team of experts in drinking water, polymers

Fay, Noah

139

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for protecting public drinking water (CALFED 2000), are alsobest management options for drinking water sourced from theDelta Authority. 2004. Drinking water quality program multi-

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: applying water quality Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Best Management Practices Water Quality Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Youth Water Camp: Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 24 A plant chemist directs Water Camp youth in basic water analysis at a local power plant during a tour. Story by Danielle Supercinski Ward County 4-H program educates students about water conservation, quality In January... 1991, a committee of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (now Texas AgriLife Extension Service) and Upper Pecos Soil and Water Conservation District person- nel met on the development of a 4-H water camp educating youth on water issues...

Supercinski, Danielle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Water Quality Modeling in Kranji Catchment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the process and results of applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to characterize bacterial fate and transport in the Kranji Catchment of Singapore. The goal of this process is to predict ...

Granger, Erika C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study details the Exchange (formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service), which took a leadership role in kitchen appliance upgrades to improve water efficiency by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization's overall sustainability plan and objectives.

144

Social Perceptions of Drinking Water Quality in South Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were examined, notably trying to assess the gap in social perceptions between key water managers and the colonia residents. A semi-structured interview methodology was used upon the key water managers in order...

Garcia, Victor

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Water quality for secondary and tertiary oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key element in many secondary and tertiary oil recovery processes is the injection of water into an oil-bearing formation. Water is the fluid which displaces the oil in the pore space of the rock. A successful waterflood requires more than the availability of water and the pumps and piping to inject the water into the formation. It requires an understanding of how water enters the oil bearing formation and what happens once the injected water comes into contact with the rock or sand, the oil, and the water already in the reservoir. Problems in injectivity will arise unless care and constant monitoring are exercised in the water system for a flood operation. This study examines water availability and quality in relation to waterflooding.

Michnick, M.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities Case study details the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Exchange (formerly the Army and Air Force...

147

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study 11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy...

148

Improvements and assessments of water auditing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tasks by default are considered ?unaccounted-for-water?. The object of task four is to identify potential water losses and estimate the volumes of each type of loss. These losses can include accounting errors, unauthorized connections, evaporation... from the system (leaks). There are two additional phrases associated with the Manual M36 audit. ? Accounted-for-water is defined as ?water that is either metered or used for an authorized, unmetered use? (AWWA 1999). ? Unaccounted-for...

Meyer, Sarah Ruth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water quality parameter measurement using spectral signatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the photography, and Richard Carter of the Data Processing Center of Texas A4M who digitized the scanner data. As- sistance in preparing and editing the manuscript were provided by my committee members, Dr. W. P. James, and Dr. J. P, German, with special... water shown in figure I-1. I=rom cultures of various phytoplankton, he obtained the signatures shown in figure I-2. Figures I- 1 (P. 10) and I- 2 (p . II) indicate that water has a minimum attenuation and phytoplankton a maximum attenuation at short...

White, Paul Edward

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Expansion and Improvement of Solar Water Heating Technology in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development of high-quality and attractive-looking model designs for integrating solar water heaters (SWH) into buildings in China. Coordinates: 39.90601, 116.387909 Show...

151

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of the three sample stations are located where the stream regularly receives industrial and sanitary waste effluents. These stations exhibited a low diversity of macroinvertebrates and slightly degraded water quality. The last sample station, located approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from the nearest wastewater outfall, appears to be in a zone of recovery where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams in the Los Alamos area. A large increase in macroinvertebrate diversity was also observed at the third station. These results indicate that effluents discharged into Sandia Canyon have a marked effect on water quality and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities.

Bennett, K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality improvement Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: for the project in order to effectively improve air quality. Including air pollution as a screening criterion... ... the improvements will be undertaken in a...

153

Surveys on Mathematics for Industry 5 (1995) 2733 Improving manufacturing quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that Quality Engineering is part of a more embracing concept, total quality management. Section 3 on PlannedSurveys on Mathematics for Industry 5 (1995) 27­33 Improving manufacturing quality through planned experimentation is a powerful tool to improve quality of industrial manufacturing processes, in an environment

Pukelsheim, Friedrich

154

Water Use and Water Quality Issues Bryan Swistock Webinar Presentation February 19, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

whether the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing may threaten the nation's increasingly precious) that are being investigated for treatment and/or re-use of frac water. Issues that must be overcomeWater Use and Water Quality Issues Bryan Swistock Webinar Presentation February 19, 2009 Questions

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

155

ADEQ Water Quality Forms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of TheFixed Logo: ACOREState

156

Alaska Water Quality Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasilInformation 5-01 EndStatutes: Title 38 Jump

157

Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary Institute;Contribution 517 Monitoring and Managing Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary San Francisco Estuary information generated each year on water quality in the Estu- ary accessible to water quality managers

158

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Potential Effects of Organic Carbon Production on Ecosystems and Drinking Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations, disinfectantsand implications for drinking water quality and the Deltaand control in drinking water. American Chemical Society,

Brown, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

IMPROVING CALIFORNIA WATER MANAGEMENT: OPTIMIZING VALUE AND FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are: 1) "Shortage" is an imprecise and outmoded concept for water management in California. Economicv IMPROVING CALIFORNIA WATER MANAGEMENT: OPTIMIZING VALUE AND FLEXIBILITY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY October of California http://cee.engr.ucdavis.edu/faculty/lund/CALVIN/ "When the well's dry, we know the worth of water

Pasternack, Gregory B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method to improve optical parametric oscillator beam quality  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to improving optical parametric oscillator (OPO) beam quality having an optical pump, which generates a pump beam at a pump frequency greater than a desired signal frequency, a nonlinear optical medium oriented so that a signal wave at the desired signal frequency and a corresponding idler wave are produced when the pump beam (wave) propagates through the nonlinear optical medium, resulting in beam walk off of the signal and idler waves, and an optical cavity which directs the signal wave to repeatedly pass through the nonlinear optical medium, said optical cavity comprising an equivalently even number of non-planar mirrors that produce image rotation on each pass through the nonlinear optical medium. Utilizing beam walk off where the signal wave and said idler wave have nonparallel Poynting vectors in the nonlinear medium and image rotation, a correlation zone of distance equal to approximately .rho.L.sub.crystal is created which, through multiple passes through the nonlinear medium, improves the beam quality of the OPO output.

Smith, Arlee V.; Alford, William J.; Bowers, Mark S.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

Review of Wildfire Effects on Chemical Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande Fire of May 2000 burned almost 43,000 acres of forested land within the Pajarito Plateau watershed in northern New Mexico. Runoff events after the fire were monitored and sampled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Changes in the composition of runoff water were noted when compared to runoff water composition of the previous 20 years. In order to understand the chemical water quality changes noted in runoff water after the Cerro Grande Fire, a summary of the reported effects of fire on runoff water chemistry and on soils that contribute to runoff water chemistry was compiled. The focus of this report is chemical water quality, so it does not address changes in sediment transport or water quantity associated with fires. Within the general inorganic parameters, increases of dissolved calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and pH in runoff water have been observed as a result of fire. However, the dissolved sodium, carbon, and sulfate have been observed to increase and decrease as a result of fire. Metals have been much less studied, but manganese, copper, zinc, and cesium-137 have been observed to increase as a result of fire.

Kelly Bitner; Bruce Gallaher; Ken Mullen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality problems exist, affecting the environment and economy. Texas needs solutions. At the Texas Water Resources Institute, we help solve these pressing water

164

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Discharge indices for water quality loads Richard M. Vogel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: effective discharge, transport, sediment, constituents, rating curve, half-load Citation: Vogel, R. M., J. RDischarge indices for water quality loads Richard M. Vogel Department of Civil and Environmental load is ultimately the quantity of interest, we define a new index, the half-load discharge, which

Vogel, Richard M.

166

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing treatment plant. American Water Woks Association Water Quality Technology.plant, representing an existing treatment configuration, to add alternative disinfection and other technologies.

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Improving the Execution and Influence of a Quality Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ISO 9001 certification, or specific tools associated with quality management systems. While this view does not harm the role of quality, it does not strengthen it either. The lack of engagement underutilizes the Quality team and systems for continual...

Heery, John J. Jr.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal conversion siting on coal mined lands: water quality issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siting of new technology coal conversion facilities on land disturbed by coal mining results in both environmental benefits and unique water quality issues. Proximity to mining reduces transportation requirements and restores disrupted land to productive use. Uncertainties may exist, however, in both understanding the existing site environment and assessing the impact of the new technology. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assessing the water-related impacts of proposed coal conversion facilities located in areas disturbed by surface and underground coal mining. Past mining practices, leaving highly permeable and unstable fill, may affect the design and quality of data from monitoring programs. Current mining and dewatering, or past underground mining may alter groundwater or surface water flow patterns or affect solid waste disposal stability. Potential acid-forming material influences the siting of waste disposal areas and the design of grading operations. These and other problems are considered in relation to the uncertainties and potentially unique problems inherent in developing new technologies.

Triegel, E.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Assessment of Potential Contribution of Woodland Creation to Mitigating the Impacts of Agriculture on Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANTS WATER TRE WATER QUALITY MONITORING NETWORK I Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) hasEF) promotes basin-wide pollution control strategies. It liaises with State Water Pollution Control BoardsWater Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute

170

Improved association in a classical density functional theory for water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a modification to our recently published statistical associating fluid theory-based classical density functional theory for water. We have recently developed and tested a functional for the averaged radial distribution function at contact of the hard-sphere fluid that is dramatically more accurate at interfaces than earlier approximations. We now incorporate this improved functional into the association term of our free energy functional for water, improving its description of hydrogen bonding. We examine the effect of this improvement by studying two hard solutes (a hard hydrophobic rod and a hard sphere) and a Lennard-Jones approximation of a krypton atom solute. The improved functional leads to a moderate change in the density profile and a large decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds broken in the vicinity of the hard solutes. We find an improvement of the partial radial distribution for a krypton atom in water when compared with experiment.

Krebs, Eric J.; Schulte, Jeff B.; Roundy, David [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Physico-chemical water quality in Ghana: Prospects for water supply technology implementation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S/cm and turbidity from 0 to >542 NTU. Many water samples analysed breached the drinking water quality guidelines. High levels of heavy metals were found and also locations high in sulphate and nitrate. In some regions chemical contaminants such as fluoride occur...

Schäfer, Andrea; Rossiter, H.M.A.; Owusu, P.A.; Richards, B.S.; Awuah, E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

ISO9000 BASED ADVANCED QUALITY APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improvement, Modelling 1. INTRODUCTION The importance of Total Quality Management TQM has been considerably in order to advance towards total quality. Advance can be developed on different levelsISO9000 BASED ADVANCED QUALITY APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES DEEB

Boyer, Edmond

173

Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement Seminar Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information presented at the Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement (SWSRI) Seminar held June 24-25, 2002, in San Diego, California. The bi-annual seminar--sponsored by EPRI--provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experiences regarding the monitoring, repair, and replacement of service water system components.

None

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

Allen, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

An alternative approach to achieving water quality-based limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since May 1982, members of the Iron and Steel Industry have been required to meet effluent limits based on Best Available Technology (BAT) for a process water discharge to receiving stream. US Steel Clairton Works has been successful in meeting these limits in the last three years; however, the current regulatory thrust is toward more stringent limits based on water quality. In cases of smaller streams such as the receiving stream for Clairton Works` process outfall, these limits can be very rigid. This paper will discuss the alternative approaches investigated to meet the new more stringent limits including the solution chosen.

Hart, C.M.; Graeser, W.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Texas Stream Team: Ambassadors for Texas water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tx H2O | pg. 23 Story by Kathy Wythe Ambassadors for Texas water Roger Miranda of Texas Commission on Environmental Quality volunteers as a certified trainer for Texas Stream Team. Photo by Robert Sams, Texas Stream Team Texas stream... team continued tx H2O | pg. 24 An African proverb says it takes a village to raise a child. However, the Texas Stream Team would say it takes a group of citizens to monitor Texas waters. The Texas Stream Team, formerly Texas Watch, is based...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Montana 2012 Final Water Quality Integrated Report: Appendix A | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. PlacesEnergy Information Water Quality

179

Understanding the role of trading in water quality management : based on U.S. experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research demonstrates an overview of the performance of water quality trading programs currently implemented within the U.S. The role of trading in water quality management is identified through systematical comparisons ...

Pharino, Chanathip

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Catalytic microwave torrefaction and pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellet to improve biofuel quality .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aims of this dissertation were to understand the effects of torrefaction as pretreatment on biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis for improving biofuel quality, and… (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process Abstract: The study investigates water quality pollution impacts on urbanization by analyzing temporal, more populations were moved from rural area into urban area, and more costs were input in water quality

Yu, Qian

182

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities improved water Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 5 > >> 1 Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment Summary: to the states for rural water supply and sanitation activities. Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) is involved......

184

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-158NP Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

185

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-151NP Household Water Quality in Albemarle County, Virginia APRIL 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

186

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University BSE-162NP Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia OCTOBER 2013 VIRGINIA HOUSEHOLD WATER QUALITY PROGRAM Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

187

Concept Paper for Real-Time Temperature and Water Quality Management for San Joaquin River Riparian Habitat Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report. Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR RiparianReal-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian HabitatPaper Real-time Water Quality Management for SJR Riparian

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9/14/12 1 Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health;9/14/12 2 Air Quality Engineering H Air Quality Engineering H #12;9/14/12 3 Really? Air pollution running out of coffins and florists were running out of flowers. -- BBC #12;9/14/12 4 Air pollution

Levinson, David M.

189

SCOPES'05 Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Risk-Based Quality Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of cost, usage, quality, defect, performance, etc. "80:20" rule or Pareto's principle. Units-uniform attention/effort in ­ testing UBST ­ other focused quality assurance · Usage-based statistical testingSCOPES'05 Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Risk-Based Quality Improvement for Embedded Systems Jeff Tian

Tian, Jeff

190

V2G Technology for Designing Active Filter System to Improve Wind Power Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V2G Technology for Designing Active Filter System to Improve Wind Power Quality F. R. Islam, H. R factor correction and harmonics current compensation. Index Terms--PHEVs, V2G, Wind Power, Battery Scheme to design active filter is proposed here to improve the quality of wind power output. Harmonics is one

Pota, Himanshu Roy

191

Design a PV-AF system using V2G Technology to Improve Power Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--PHEVs, PV-AF, Active filter, Battery scheme I. INTRODUCTION Plug in Hybrid Electrical Vehicles (PHEVsDesign a PV-AF system using V2G Technology to Improve Power Quality F. R. Islam, and H. R. Pota a photovoltaic shunt active filter (PV- AF) system to improve power quality of photovoltaic generation. A system

Pota, Himanshu Roy

192

Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

193

Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ organic nitrogen Silicate Heavy metals ­ water column aluminum arsenic cadmium chromium copper1 Water Quality 101 Dr. Mike Mallin and Matthew McIver Aquatic Ecology Laboratory UNCW-Center for Marine Science Common Water Quality Sampling Parameters and Analytical Procedures Water temperature

Mallin, Michael

194

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U regarding the quality of municipal drinking water supplies The Arizona Republic. 2007. Thirsty Arizona. Vol of bottled and tap water used by residents in Nogales, AZ according to the EPA primary drinking water

Fay, Noah

195

Water Quality Issues facing Indigenous Peoples in North America and Siberia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reverence for water resources in both communities, and that both communities have defined protocols for their interactions with water resources. Each community is facing threats to their water quality from different sources of pollution, and may benefit from...

Mehl, Heidi Elizabeth

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Health and productivity benefits of improved indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two studies completed for a national contractor`s association on the health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The original study documented the general health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The second study expanded the scope to include medical cost reductions for specific illnesses from improved IAQ. General information on the objectives, assumptions, definitions, and results of the studies are presented, followed by detailed information on research methodology, building inventory and wellness categories, health and medical effects of poor IAQ, health cost benefits, productivity benefits, recommended improvements, and conclusions and future improvements.

Dorgan, C.B. [Dorgan Associates, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Dorgan, C.E.; Kanarek, M.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Willman, A.J. [Quantum Technology, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biofuels and water quality: challenges and opportunities for simulation modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of the various impacts of biofuel feedstock production on hydrology and water quality is complex. Mathematical models can be used to efficiently evaluate various what if scenarios related to biofeedstock production and their impacts on hydrology and water quality at various spatial and temporal scales. Currently available models, although having the potential to serve such purposes, have many limitations. In this paper, we review the strengths and weaknesses of such models in light of short- and long term biofeedstock production scenarios. The representation of processes in the currently available models and how these processes need to be modified to fully evaluate various complex biofeedstock production scenarios are discussed. Similarly, issues related to availability of data that are needed to parameterize and evaluate these models are presented. We have presented a vision for the development of decision support tools and ecosystem services that can be used to make watershed management decisions to minimize any potentially adverse environmental impacts while meeting biofeedstock demands. We also discuss a case study of biofeedstock impact simulation in relation to watershed management policy implications for various state and federal agencies in the USA.

Engel, Bernard A. [Purdue University; Chaubey, Indrajeet [Purdue University; Thomas, Mark [Purdue University; Saraswat, Dharmendra [University of Arkansas; Murphy, Patrick [Purdue University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Standards, Guidance and Practices for Improved Data Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid 1980s, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been involved with numerous projects to collect operational reactor data, develop data tools, and trend and analyze that data for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because the data are used in subsequent risk analyses, the NRC must have confidence in the quality of the data delivered. The NRC tasked the INL to establish a comprehensive data quality assurance program. A key element of that effort was to establish a set of requirements based on industry and government standards, guidance and good practices. This paper discusses where these were found, the process of extracting the requirements and recommendations from the source materials, and the consolidation of them into a concise set of 22 standards, guidance and practices for technical data quality. While this set was created specifically for the data programs within the NRC’s Office of Research, they have broad application to many high-technology industries.

Martin B. Sattison

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

APPROACHES TO EVALUATE WATER QUALITY MODEL PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY FOR ADAPTIVE TMDL IMPLEMENTATION1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is particularly handy for that task. (KEY TERMS: total maximum daily load; water quality model; ecological quality management and decisions such as total maximum daily load (TMDL) determinations (NRC 2001). ModelsAPPROACHES TO EVALUATE WATER QUALITY MODEL PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY FOR ADAPTIVE TMDL IMPLEMENTATION1

200

"Improving drinking water quality via identification and removal of certain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as biomass feedstocks that are more sustainable than terrestrial fuel crops. Focus on algae-derived energy

Acton, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Power Quality Improvement in Microgrid Using Advanced Active Power Conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract:- Wind energy conversion systems are now occupying important space in the research of renewable energy sources with microgrid. The main challenge in wind power generation is power quality problem and their connection with the distribution network in microgrid. The main factor behind poor

unknown authors

202

Vehicle Technologies Office: Improving Biodiesel and Other Fuels' Quality  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For biofuels to succeed in the marketplace, they must be easy to use with a minimum of problems. The Vehicle Technologies Office has collaborated with industry to test biofuel samples and improve...

203

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND URBAN PLANNING WRRI Technical Completion Report No. 346 Gwendolyn A. Aldrich Janie Chermak Jennifer A. Thacher NEW MEXICO WATER-0001 Telephone (505) 646-4337 FAX (505) 646-6418 email: nmwrri@wrri.nmsu.edu #12;WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE

Johnson, Eric E.

204

2-3. Generic Approaches Towards Water Quality Monitoring Based on Paleolimnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorus analysis of Lake St-Charles, the principal drinking water supply for Québec City, #12;62 R environmental records for lake and river ecosystems provide a valuable generic tool for water quality management by way of water quality research on three ecosystems in Québec, Canada. Lake St-Augustin is a small lake

Vincent, Warwick F.

205

PURPOSE: This product provides simulation capabilities to allow water resource managers to meet operational and water quality objectives in a basin wide approach under the System-Wide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manage- ment System (CWMS). ERDC TN-SWWRP-11-2 February 2011 Meeting Water Quality and Water Control operational and water quality objectives in a basin wide approach under the System-Wide Water Resources the impact of water quality in reservoir operations system decision-making. As a result, integration

US Army Corps of Engineers

206

Steps taken at Malelane refinery to improve refined sugar quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The refinery at Malelane has in the past produced refined sugar for the consumer market. A decision was taken by the management of Transvaal Sugar (TSB) to produce a quality of refined sugar that would also be acceptable to the industrial and the export markets. The processes that were evaluated and implemented at the Malelane refinery during the past three seasons to achieve this objective, are described.

M Moodley; Pm Schorn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Improving the Quality of Texas Beef In the early 1990s, the National Beef Quality Audit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cattle. Analysis of responses representing 98,000 head of cattle indicated a potential increase in net and quantified the quality defects that hurt consumer confidence and led to reduced demand and sales for all beef economic uncertainty. Extension's Response Created in 1993 as a result of the National Beef Quality Audit

208

Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

Bohac, C.E.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

V2G Technology to Improve Wind Power Quality and Stability F. R. Islam and H. R. Pota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V2G Technology to Improve Wind Power Quality and Stability F. R. Islam and H. R. Pota Abstract an implementation of V2G technology is proposed here to improve the quality and stability of wind power output

Pota, Himanshu Roy

210

Assessment of genetic markers for the improvement of beef quality and consistency   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the genetic control of beef quality in a commercial population of Aberdeen Angus-sired cattle with a view to trait improvement. The population studied included 500 ...

Gill, Jennifer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Managing variability to improve quality, capacity and cost in the perioperative process at Massachusetts General Hospital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The widely held assumption is that to improve access and quality of health care, we need to spend more. In fact, that is not necessarily true. The results of this project, performed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), ...

Price, Devon J. (Devon Jameson)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Partnering: an in-depth comparison of its elements to quality improvement principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIIrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering PARTNERING: AN IN-DEPTH COMPARISON OF ITS ELEMENTS TO QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PRINCIPLES A Thesis by ANTHONY DAVID LOZADA Approved as to style and content by: Donald A...

Lozada, Anthony David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modifying yolk fatty acid composition to improve the health quality of shell eggs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODIFYING YOLK FATTY ACID COMPOSITION TO IMPROVE THE HEALTH QUALITY OF SHELL EGGS A Thesis by MARY ELIZABETH VAN ELSWYK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Nutrition MODIFYING YOLK FATTY ACID COMPOSITION TO IMPROVE THE HEALTH QUALITY OF SHELL EGGS A Thesis by MARY ELIZABETH VAN ELSWYK Approved as to style and content by: Pamela S. Har s (Chair...

Van Elswyk, Mary Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Estimating Marginal Cost of Quality Improvements: The Case of the UK Electricity Distribution Companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of operational and capital expenditures (Totex) as the dependent variable. Improving quality of services involves operating cost (Opex) and capital cost (Capex) for the utilities. Due to the presence of possible trade-offs between Opex and Capex (Giannakis et... saving Opex than by an equal amount of Capex reduction (Ofgem, 2003a). Hence, in order to examine existence of different strategies in the UK utilities to improve quality, and to ascertain whether the current regulation has distorted the allocation...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Orea, Luis; Pollitt, Michael G.

215

Using metadata to improve spatial dataset quality during updates Christelle Pierkot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Using metadata to improve spatial dataset quality during updates Christelle Pierkot LIRMM, D and degrade the dataset's quality. Within this broad issue, we limit our scope to the updating of geographic their integration into different datasets. In this context, our objective is to propose solutions to allow coherent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOEElectricalonJustice Environmental Justice SelectedIndependentQuality

217

West Village Community: Quality Management Processes and Preliminary Heat Pump Water Heater Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

West Village, a multi-use project underway at the University of California Davis, represents a ground-breaking sustainable community incorporating energy efficiency measures and on-site renewable generation to achieve community-level Zero Net Energy (ZNE) goals. The project when complete will provide housing for students, faculty, and staff with a vision to minimize the community's impact on energy use by reducing building energy use, providing on-site generation, and encouraging alternative forms of transportation. This focus of this research is on the 192 student apartments that were completed in 2011 under Phase I of the West Village multi-year project. The numerous aggressive energy efficiency measures implemented result in estimated source energy savings of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. There are two primary objectives of this research. The first is to evaluate performance and efficiency of the central heat pump water heaters as a strategy to provide efficient electric water heating for net-zero all-electric buildings and where natural gas is not available on site. In addition, effectiveness of the quality assurance and quality control processes implemented to ensure proper system commissioning and to meet program participation requirements is evaluated. Recommendations for improvements that could improve successful implementation for large-scale, high performance communities are identified.

Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.; German, A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

assessing water-quality conditions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Richards, Chad Edward 2005-02-17 26 TECHNOLOGY Assessment of Physico-chemical Water Quality Parameters of Surajkund Pondin...

219

Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regime on vernal pool hydrology. Freshwater Biology 50:and L. Stromberg. (1998). Hydrology of vernal pools on non-Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools

Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - awwa water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relevant Coursework: Principles of Environmental Chemistry Water and Wastewater Treatment... EPA quality control mandates Worked with Operations department to help achieve...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Using quality improvement methodologies to enhance cross departmental collaboration and quality cost reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research and project implementations described in this study took place during a seven-month period in 2004 at a distribution transformer factory in Germany. The purpose of this research is to show how quality management ...

Kilburn-Peterson, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Application of Specialized Optimization Techniques in Water Quantity and Quality Management with Respect to Planning for the Trinity River Basi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the disposal of wastes. Thus, there is a clear interaction between quantity and quality of water. However, largely due to the agency structure in state and federal government, water quality management and water development activities are usually separated...

Meier Jr., W. L.; Shih, C. S.

223

2014 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Oak RidgeLoadthe4

224

Water quality prediction for recreational use of Kranji Reservoir, Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singapore has been making efforts in relieving its water shortage problems and has been making great progress through its holistic water management. Via the Active, Beautiful, Clean Waters (ABC Waters) Programme, Singapore's ...

Zhang, Yangyue

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

2015 Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 HouseCoveredAirDepartment ofof EnergyEvents

228

Improving NMR Protein Structure Quality by Rosetta Refinement: A Molecular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219Improvements to theSurfaceReplacement

229

Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power Devices Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power Devices April 16, 2014 - 1:56pm...

230

Blazing and grazing: influences of fire and bison on tallgrass prairie stream water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blazing and grazing: influences of fire and bison on tallgrass prairie stream water quality Danelle for maintaining and managing tallgrass prairie, but we know little about their influences on water-quality dynamics in streams. We analyzed 2 y of data on total suspended solids (TSS), total N (TN), and total P (TP

Dodds, Walter

231

Risk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Water quality; Risk; Monte Carlo; Sensitivity analysis; Eutrophication 1. Introduction 1.1. Motivation recognised in the development of some decision-support tools, for example, QUAL2E- UNCAS (Brown and BarnwellRisk-based modelling of surface water quality: a case study of the Charles River, Massachusetts

Wagener, Thorsten

232

Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

Lund, Jay R.

233

Interaction of Water Management and Riparian Ecosystems: Attitudes, Practices, and Effects1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydroelectric power, provide irrigation water, improve wa ter quality, conserve and develop fish, wildlife

234

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Does enhanced regulation improve EIA report quality? Lessons from South Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, various EIA systems have been subjected to system review processes with a view to improve performance. Many of these reviews resulted in some form of legislative reform. The South African Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) regulations were modified in 2006 with the express intent to improve EIA effectiveness. In order to evaluate to what extent the desired outcome was achieved, the quality of EIA reports produced under the 2006 regulations was investigated for comparative analysis with the preceding regime. A sample of EIA reports from the two legislative regimes was reviewed using an adapted version of a well established method known colloquially as the 'Lee and Colley' review package. Despite some improvements in certain aspects, overall report quality has decreased slightly from the 1997 EIA regime. It therefore appears that the modifications to the regulations, often heralded as the solution to improvements in performance have not resulted in improved quality of EIA reports. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EIA regulations in South Africa were revised and became more comprehensive in 2006. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The report quality of a sample of EIAs was reviewed using the Lee and Colley review package. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Report quality showed a slight decline from the previous regulatory regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EIA good practice needs flexibility rather than over-detailed regulation.

Sandham, L.A., E-mail: luke.sandham@nwu.ac.za [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Heerden, A.J. van [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Jones, C.E. [School of Environment and Development, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Retief, F.P.; Morrison-Saunders, A.N. [Environmental Assessment Research Group, School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Improved water-cooled cyclone constructions in CFBs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of CFB boilers has advanced in comparison with early designs. One improvement has been the use of water or steam cooled cyclones, which allows the use of thin refractories and minimizes maintenance needs. Cooled cyclones are also tolerant of wide load variations when the main fuel is biologically based, and coal or some other fuel is used as a back-up. With uncooled cyclones, load changes with high volatile fuels can mean significant temperature transients in the refractory, due to post-combustion phenomena in the cyclone. Kvaerner's development of water-cooled cyclones for CFBs began in the early 1980s. The first boiler with this design was delivered in 1985 in Sweden. Since then, Kvaerner Pulping has delivered over twenty units with cooled cyclones, in capacity ranging from small units up to 400 MW{sub th}. Among these units, Kvaerner has developed unconventional solutions for CFBs, in order to simplify the constructions and to increase the reliability for different applications. The first of them was CYMIC{reg{underscore}sign}, which has its water-cooled cyclone built inside the boiler furnace. There are two commercial CYMIC boilers in operation and one in project stages. The largest CYMIC in operation is a 185 MW{sub th} industrial boiler burning various fuels. For even larger scale units Kvaerner developed the Integrated Cylindrical Cyclone and Loopseal (ICCL) assembly. One of these installations is in operation in USA, having steaming capacity of over 500 t/h. The design bases of these new solutions are quite different in comparison with conventional cyclones. Therefore, an important part of the development has been cold model testing and mathematical modeling of the cyclones. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in water-cooled cyclone construction. The new solutions, their full-scale experience, and a comparison of the actual experience with the preliminary modeling work are introduced.

Alliston, M.G.; Luomaharju, T.; Kokko, A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Analyzing risk and uncertainty for improving water distribution system security from malevolent water supply contamination events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Fig. 4.11. Tank level time series. Initial Storage Tank Level 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Head (m) PDF Val u e Tank Level Time Series 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 0 10203040506070 Hours H ead ( m ) 29 In the case... ANALYZING RISK AND UNCERTAINTY FOR IMPROVING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SECURITY FROM MALEVOLENT WATER SUPPLY CONTAMINATION EVENTS A Thesis by JACOB MANUEL TORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M...

Torres, Jacob Manuel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

240

High Electric Demand Days: Clean Energy Strategies for Improving Air Quality  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by Art Diem of the State and Local Capacity Building Branch in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was part of the July 2008 Webcast sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative that was titled Role of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Improving Air Quality and Addressing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals on High Electric Demand Days.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Water Use and Quality Assessment | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy security and climate change, and not on the possible effects increased biofuel production may have on the quality and quantity of local and regional freshwater...

242

Water-Quality Trading: Can We Get the Price of Pollution Right?1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water-Quality Trading: Can We Get the Price of Pollution Right?1 Yoshifumi Konishi Faculty for pollution can work for air. Should they not work for water pollution too? The U.S. Environmental Protection known (Mauzerall et al., 2005). Spatial dependence is likely even more prominent for water pollution

Weiblen, George D

243

In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual-ity, North Carolina Department of Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roofs, and Water Harvesting (AG-588-6). As the use of permeable pavement increases in North Carolina In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual- ity, North Carolina Department of Environment: permeable pave- ment runoff reduction, clogging, long-term hydrology, and water quality. In this update

Hunt, William F.

244

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

LA-UR-00-949 Perched Zone Monitoring Well 1995 Analytical Water Quality and Hydrology Group, ESH-18  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hydrology Group, ESH-18 Mary Mullen Ecology Group, ESH-20 David B. Rogers Water Quality and Hydrology Group

246

How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

de Leon, Alex R.

247

"Improving the quality of life through the mitigation and prevention of injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pedestrian accidents using Madymo models and Optimization Techniques. Crash Investigations The Crash Injury trauma to ballistics and blast. Our unique skills allow us to examine and prevent injuries from"Improving the quality of life through the mitigation and prevention of injury made possible

Acton, Scott

248

How to Improve Geospatial Data Usability: From Metadata to Quality-Aware GIS Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to Improve Geospatial Data Usability: From Metadata to Quality-Aware GIS Community R. Devillers), Canada 3 ­ Industrial Research Chair in Geospatial Databases for Decision Support, Laval University, retrieve and analyze geospatial data. The field grew exponentially and, in the last two decades

249

New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health, Co- benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing-by-state changes in harmful air pollution, it is the first study to quantify and map the co-benefits of power plant

Mohan, Chilukuri K.

250

NASA's DISCOVER-AQ and UMD's RAMMPP: Policy relevant science for improving air quality in Maryland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA's DISCOVER-AQ and UMD's RAMMPP: Policy relevant science for improving air quality in Maryland's air? · Krotkov (11 am) Using OMI (and OMPS) for SO2 emissions. · Kollonige ­ Model sensitivity & O3 In 2010, Maryland implemented the "Healthy Air Act" 4 #12;Power Plant Emissions in Maryland. The following

Jacob, Daniel J.

251

A Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary pollutant effects on aquatic life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary 2011 pollutant effects on aquatic life pulse goals of Bay water quality managers is to ensure that pollutants do not interfere with the abilityA Report of the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary

252

Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study discusses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) successful water conservation program, which reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories.

253

An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 9, 2014 ... Abstract: This study investigates a pump scheduling problem for the collection, transfer and storage of water in water supply systems in urban ...

Jonathan De La Vega

2014-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.

RAJEN,GAURAV; BIRINGER,KENT L.; BETSILL,J. DAVID

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for environmental management, and in particular, waterenvironmental management efforts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), with a special focus on water-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Water Quality Modeling and Monitoring in the California North Delta Area Raffi Jirair Moughamian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulic model of the northern part of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the North Delta). It was produced A water quality model, including salinity and temperature, has been linked to a one-dimensional, MIKE 11 Description.................................................................................20 Hydrodynamics

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient water quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ambient water quality Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Episodic Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay System...

259

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The battle of bacteria: Agencies, stakeholders focusing on restoring water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to watershed stakeholders, who will determine the next steps in managing water quality in the tributaries. The TMDL task force was also charged with developing a roadmap for scientific research on how bacteria behave under different conditions. Tailored...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Improving the assessment of ICESat water altimetry accuracy accounting for autocorrelation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the inland water volume. Due to the lack of data and the heterogeneity of water level stations, remoteImproving the assessment of ICESat water altimetry accuracy accounting for autocorrelation Hani Montpellier, France Abstract 1 Given that water resources are scarce and are strained by competing de- mands

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

Improvement in urban storm water management: analysing the innovation process through the three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOYER 1 Improvement in urban storm water management: analysing the innovation process through to associate hard sciences and social sciences. Keywords Storm water management; observatories; innovation management is a good example: inefficient water networks in the city (regarding waste water as well as storm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Water quantity and quality model for the evaluation of water-management strategies in the Netherlands: application to the province of Friesland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Netherlands have a rather complex water-management system consisting of a number of major rivers, canals, lakes and ditches. Water-quantity management on a regional scale is necessary for an effective water-quality policy. To support water management, a computer model was developed that includes both water quality and water quantity, based on three submodels: ABOPOL for the water movement, DELWAQ for the calculation of water quality variables and BLOOM-II for the phytoplankton growth. The northern province of Friesland was chosen as a test case for the integrated model to be developed, where water quality is highly related to the water distribution and the main trade-off is minimizing the intake of (eutrophicated) alien water in order to minimize external nutrient load and maximizing the intake in order to flush channels and lakes. The results of the application of these models to this and to a number of hypothetical future situations are described.

Brinkman, J.J.; Griffioen, P.S.; Groot, S.; Los, F.J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

266

Effects of Original Vegatation on Reservoir Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to undertake an initial step that would lead to a better understanding of the effects of nutrients released from vegetation inundated by water at newly constructed reservoirs. Specifically, a series of leaching studies...

Ball, J.; Weldon, C.; Crocker, B.

267

Decentralization and Environmental Quality: An International Analysis of Water Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Political institutions and pollution control, Review ofAccounting Of?ce. Water Pollution: Differences in IssuingReal Story of the War on Air Pollution. Washington, DC: Cato

Sigman, Hilary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Forage, soil and water quality responses to animal waste application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result in a net surplus of P and potential nutrient escape to surface waters (Dudzinsky et al. , 1983). Dairy effluent poses a lesser risk of phosphorus loading than does poultry litter since the concentration of nutrients in dairy effluent averages...

Johnson, Andrew Floyd

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler...

Bloom, D.

270

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water Quality: Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model for Predicting Daily Peak Visitation and Implications for Recreation Management and Water carrying capacity. Keywords Visitation model Á Recreation management Á Water quality Á River visitation Á Clark, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA 123 Environmental Management DOI 10.1007/s00267-008-9079-5 #12

271

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER QUALITY CHANGES AS A RESULT OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN A ROCKY MOUNTAIN WATERSHED1 Xixi Wang, Assefa M. Melesse, Michael E. McClain, and Wanhong Yang2 ABSTRACT: Coalbed methane (CBM the Powder River. (KEY TERMS: coalbed methane, produced water; Montana; natural gas; pattern analysis

McClain, Michael

272

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Cooperation with the National Park Service Water Quality Program Biogeochemical Processes in an Urban, Restored Wetland of San Francisco Bay, California, 2007­ 2009: Methods and Data for Plant, Sediment, and Water Parameters By Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Mark C. Marvin-DiPasquale, Jennifer L. Agee, Le

273

IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Tissue-based water quality biosensors for detecting chemical warfare agents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water quality sensor for detecting the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent includes: a cell; apparatus for introducing water into the cell and discharging water from the cell adapted for analyzing photosynthetic activity of naturally occurring, free-living, indigenous photosynthetic organisms in water; a fluorometer for measuring photosynthetic activity of naturally occurring, free-living, indigenous photosynthetic organisms drawn into the cell; and an electronics package that analyzes raw data from the fluorometer and emits a signal indicating the presence of at least one chemical or biological warfare agent in the water.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN); Sanders, Charlene A. (Knoxville, TN)

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

Real-Time Water Quality Management in the Grassland Water District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grassland Water District. Solar Panel with 12-volt batteryWater District. Power Solar Panel with 12-volt batteryWater District. Power Solar Panel with 12-volt battery

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

FORSCOM installation characterization and ranking for water efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 11, 1994, President Clinton signed Executive Order 12902-Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation at Federal Facilities. Section 302 of the Executive Order calls for energy and water prioritization surveys of federal facilities to be conducted. The surveys will be used to establish priorities for conducting comprehensive facility audits. In response to the requirements of the Executive Order, the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to initiate a broad study of the water savings potential at each of its major installations. This report provides an assessment of the water, sewer, energy (for hot water production and pumping), and associated cost savings potential at ten of the major FORSCOM installations. This assessment is meant to be a {open_quotes}first pass{close_quotes} estimate of the water savings potential, to assist FORSCOM in prioritizing installations for detailed water audits and potential water efficient retrofits. In addition, the end uses (toilets, sinks, showerheads, irrigation, etc.) with the greatest water savings potential are identified at each installation. This report is organized in the following manner. Following this Introduction, Section 2 provides important background information pertaining to the water analysis. Section 3 describes the methodology employed in the analysis, and Section 4 summarizes the study results. Section 5 prioritizes the installations based on both water/sewer savings and cost associated with water, sewer, and energy savings. Section 6 provides recommendations on where to start detailed water audits, as well as other recommendations. References are listed in Section 7. The appendices provide specific information on the analysis results and methodology, along with a discussion of special issues.

Fitzpatrick, Q.K.; McMordie, K.L.; Di Massa, F.V. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

An Improved Stochastic Optimization Model for Water Supply ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conservation of energy and water resources so that they are available for ..... activated during the planning period may be used as an alternative measure to ...

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Z .The Science of the Total Environment 260 2000 1 9 Assessing water quality impacts and cleanup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .The Science of the Total Environment 260 2000 1 9 Assessing water quality impacts and cleanup a California Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay St., Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612, USA b of the Total En¨ironment 260 2000 1 92 quality trends can be more accurately measured by changes

Kirchner, James W.

280

Technical Note/ Improved Water Table Dynamics in MODFLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

series of ground water simulation codes, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, is possi- bly the most storage as well as the physical dimensions of the sat- urated region. The change in storage is modeled of the cell. While the change in storage occurs at the water table, the influence is applied to the entire

Barrash, Warren

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas <RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water

282

RAPID/Geothermal/Water Quality/Alaska | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory andInformationRAPID/Geothermal/Water

283

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity (5m 2 ), water Cherenkov detectors (tanks) will be deployed around the pond to effectively extend its from the Milagro pond. 2 Water Tank Detector & Array The criteria for selecting a detector design

California at Santa Cruz, University of

284

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT TESTING OF AN IMPROVED (1 HIGH-EFFICIENCY WATER HEATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT TESTING OF AN IMPROVED (1 HIGH-EFFICIENCY WATER HEATER (2} (3) (21 icense in and to any copyright covering the drticle. This paper describes a high-efficiency water heater which uses a design approach quite different from the conventional center-flue water heater. While high

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

285

Microsoft Word - S05072_WaterQualityComplStrategy.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . :theWaterNRCGJTaskReview

286

ADEQ 401 Water Quality Forms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of TheFixed Logo: ACORE Name:Forms Jump

287

Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECM Summary ECMWear |CharacteristicsEffectsWaterWeb) |

288

ARM 17-30 - Water Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,InformationWind Energy JumpEnergyApplication Process0

289

Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Investigating organizational quality improvement systems, patient empowerment, organizational culture, professional involvement and the quality of care in European hospitals: the 'Deepening our Understanding of Quality Improvement in Europe (DUQuE)' project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boncz I, Gulacsi L: Quality management and patient safety:on quality assessment and quality management in Europeandevelopment of hospital quality management systems in the

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Improving Heating System Operations Using Water Re-Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to solve the imbalance problem of a heating system, brought about by consumer demand and regulation, and save the electricity energy consumed by a circulation pump, a water mixing and pressure difference control heating system is proposed...

Li, F.; Han, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Improved Water and Nutrient Management Through HighFrequency Irrigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High frequency irrigation implies the uniform, frequent application of water to crops. The fequency may range from several irrigations per week to daily irrigation to even several irrigations per day in greenhouse and nursery settings. Most...

Howell, T. A.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Redden, D. L.; McFarland, M. J.

293

Factors Influencing the Adoption of Water Quality Best Management Practices by Texas Beef Cattle Producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of variance ATTAINS Assessment, TMDL Tracking and Implementation System BMP Best management practice CWA Clean Water Act DOI Diffusion of innovations EPA Environmental Protection Agency EQIP Environmental Quality Incentives Program GCSP... quality. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Assessment, TMDL Tracking and Implementation System (ATTAINS) database (2013), Texas has approximately 191,000 miles of streams and rivers; nearly 2 million acres of lakes...

Peterson, Jennifer

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Improvements of oil-in-water analysis for produced water using membrane filtration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The accuracy of oil-in-water analysis for produced water is increasingly crucial as the regulations for disposal of this water are getting more stringent world wide.… (more)

Khor, Ee Huey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Reliability improvement project decision making : water cooling system redesign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deciding on which reliability & performance improvement projects to launch or to reject has historically been an extremely challenging responsibility of Teradyne management. Incorrect decisions can lead to major customer ...

Devine, Paul (Paul S.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Deep in the Forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy... of Texas Forest Service. Deep in the forests Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices Winter 2011 tx H2O 21 ] Deep in the forests of East Texas and sca#27;ered in pockets of other parts of the state are more than...

Wythe, Kathy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Deep in the forests: Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Kathy Wythe The Texas Forest Service works with forestry professionals to implement best management practices to help protect water quality, which is critical for people and wildlife to survive. Photo courtesy... of Texas Forest Service. Deep in the forests Program works to protect water quality through forestry practices Winter 2011 tx H2O 21 ] Deep in the forests of East Texas and sca#27;ered in pockets of other parts of the state are more than...

Wythe, Kathy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Cherokee Reservoir: supplement to factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several rates and/or measurements were assumed in preparation of the Factors Affecting Water Quality in Cherokee Reservoir report prepared by Iwanski, et al. (1980). The following discussions and data were generated to support future modeling efforts of Cherokee Reservoir water quality. These discussions are not wholly intended to define conclusions or new findings, but rather lend support to assumed parameters in the modeling effort. The data include: (1) long-term BOD analyses; (2) limiting nutrient studies algal assays; (3) phytoplankton biomass; (4) primary productivity; and (5) solids transport. 10 references, 3 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Poppe, W.L.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Potential climate change effects on Great Lakes hydrodynamics and water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of climate change has become increasingly recognized as a major environmental concern. Its impact can affect many socio-economic and ecosystem components. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of the climate change effects on lake hydrodynamics and water quality. Most of the engineering cases covered deal with the ability of existing infrastructure to cope with extreme weather conditions. The aim is to provide sufficient case studies to illustrate the advancement in modeling research on lake hydrodynamics, thermal stratification, pollutant transport and water quality by highlighting the climate change aspects in the application of these techniques.

Lam, D.C.L.; Schertzer, W.M. [eds.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Water quality changes as a result of coalbed methane development in a Rocky mountain watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development raises serious environmental concerns. In response, concerted efforts have been made to collect chemistry, salinity, and sodicity data on CBM produced water. However, little information on changes of stream water quality resulting from directly and/or indirectly received CBM produced water is available in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine changes in stream water quality, particularly sodicity and salinity, due to CBM development in the Powder River watershed, which is located in the Rocky Mountain Region and traverses the states of Wyoming and Montana. To this end, a retrospective analysis of water quality trends and patterns was conducted using data collected from as early as 1946 up to and including 2002 at four U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations along the Powder River. Trend analysis was conducted using linear regression and Seasonal Kendall tests, whereas, Tukey's test for multiple comparisons was used to detect changes in the spatial pattern. The results indicated that the CBM development adversely affected the water quality in the Powder River. First, the development elevated the stream sodicity, as indicated by a significant increase trend of the sodium adsorption ratio. Second, the development tended to shrink the water quality differences among the three downstream stations but to widen the differences between these stations and the farthest upstream station. In contrast, the development had only a minor influence on stream salinity. Hence, the CBM development is likely an important factor that can be managed to lower the stream sodicity. The management may need to take into account that the effects of the CBMdevelopment were different from one location to another along the Powder River.

Wang, X.; Melesse, A.M.; McClain, M.E.; Yang, W. [Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX (USA)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effect of FeO-content and potentials for quality improvements of iron ore pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FeO-content strongly influences the physical and metallurgical properties of iron ore pellets. A wide range of FeO-contents within the pellet deliveries to the Germany market is evaluated. Investigations include the effect of pellet size. The paper concludes potentials for quality improvement of iron ore pellets. Most of the German blast furnaces are operated with high injection rates either of oil or of coal resulting in a decrease of coke consumption down to a level of about 300 kg/t hot metal. As the retention time of the burden increases, blast furnace operators demand higher quality burden material, basically with respect to strength before and during reduction.

Kortmann, H.A.; Mertins, E.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Coupling of ecological and water quality models for improved water resource and fish management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years new ideas for nutrient management to control eutrophication in estuarine environments have been under consideration. One popular approach being considered in the Chesapeake Bay Program is called the “top down” approach based...

Tillman, Dorothy Hamlin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water quality in the vicinity of Fenton Hill: Progress report, 1983 and 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water quality data have been collected since 1974 from established surface and groundwater stations at and in the vicinity of Fenton Hill (Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Demonstration Site) located in the Jemez Mountains. This is part of a continued program of environmental studies. There has been a slight variation in chemical quality of water from the surface and groundwater stations; however, these variations are within normal seasonal fluctuations. Water supply at the site is pumped from the aquifer in the Abiquiu Tuff. Cumulative production from 1976 through 1984 has been 41.5 x 10/sup 6/ gal. The water level in the supply well declined from 365 ft in 1976 to 379 ft in 1984.

Purtymun, W.D.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Becker, N.M.; Williams, M.C.; Maes, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

Yang Haihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Hu Wei, E-mail: huw@enzemed.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Luo Wei [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A water quality characterization of a tidally influenced flood control canal of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H), specific conductance, sulfide, total organic carbon (TOC), and turbidity samples were collected at seven stations in HBDC and from the effluent of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTP) discharging into HBDC in order to detect significant... to MWTP outfall. Specific conductance patterns mirrored salinity trends. TOC levels showed a steady bayward decrease. Turbidity levels were consistently highest in bottom waters. No trends were apparent for COD, pH, and sulfide. HBDC water quality...

Polasek, Jeffrey Steven

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Towards benchmarking an in-stream water quality model Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 623633, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The project Benchmark Models for the Water Framework Directive (BMW, project website address http:// www.environment. This latter process is benchmarking. The BMW project considers models, primarily of water quality, categorised

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Annual water quality data report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth Annual Water Quality Data Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP project is operated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic radioactive wastes generated by the defense activities of the United States Government. This report presents water quality data collected from January 1988 through December 1988 from 16 designated pre-operational (WIPP facility) monitoring wells, two additional wells, and 10 privately-owned wells in the vicinity of the WIPP. Additionally, water samples were collected from the Air Intake Shaft during shaft construction activities at the WIPP. This report lists pertinent information regarding the monitoring wells sampled, sampling zone, dates pumped, and types of samples collected during 1988. Comparative data from previous samplings of all wells can be found in Uhland and Randall (1986), Uhland et al. (1987), Randall et al. (1988), as well as in this report. The data reported by the Water Quality Sampling Program in this and previous reports indicate that serial sampling is a very useful tool in determining sample representativeness from wells in the WIPP vicinity. Serial sample field chemistry data are demonstrated to be highly accurate and precise as indicated by the excellent overall average percent spike recovery values and low RPD values reported for the sampling events. Serial sample field chemistry data and laboratory water quality parameter analyses gathered by the WQSP since January 1985 are the foundation for a pre-operational water quality baseline at the WIPP. 32 refs., 66 figs., 96 tabs.

Lyon, M.L. (International Technology Corp., Torrance, CA (USA)) [International Technology Corp., Torrance, CA (USA)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

Lutz, James D.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane contamination is usually due to natural causes; however, it can also be the result of drilling activities, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases

Wang, Z. Jane

312

YSI Blue-Green Algae (BGA) Sensors Spatial Water Quality Mapping of the Potomac River Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

YSI Blue-Green Algae (BGA) Sensors Spatial Water Quality Mapping of the Potomac River Estuary Visit integrated Yellow Spring Instruments (YSI) blue- green algae (BGA) sensors into our system to evaluate of Microcystis aeruginosa. We compared interpolated results of traditional chlorophyll sensors with the BGA data

Boynton, Walter R.

313

Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Yellow 33, Final report. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Yellow 33, a quinoline dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and its use and of human health. 87 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. INTRODUCTION The safe disposal of large

Jackson, Robert B.

315

An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security Anastassia. Small Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University ms35@andrew.cmu.edu Jeanne VanBriesen Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Carnegie

Ailamaki, Anastassia

316

Synthesis of gold nano-particles in a microfluidic platform for water quality monitoring applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for in-situ synthesis of gold nano-particles was developed. The long term goal is to develop a portable hand-held diagnostic platform for monitoring water quality (e.g., detecting metal ion pollutants...

Datta, Sayak

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The predominant factors which affect spoil water quality have not been completely identified to date. Therefore, the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas was chosen as a test site to evaluate the potential factors that can affect the geochemical...

Wise, Clifton Farrell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected by Hydropower Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix E Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Water Quality Parameters Affected have reappeared as management agencies have reinstituted spill as a means of aiding downstream fish passage throughout the system. The WDOE has set a TDG standard of 110 percent of saturation for all

319

UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QAIP is subordinate to the latest issue of the UMTRA Project TAC Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The QAIP addresses technical aspects of the TAC UMTRA Project surface and ground water programs. The QAIP is authorized and approved by the TAC Project Manager and QA manager. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance functions as management tools to ensure that all Project organization activities are carried out in a manner that will protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project and meet or exceed contract requirements.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Analysis of strategies for improving uranium utilization in pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic procedures have been devised and applied to evaluate core design and fuel management strategies for improving uranium utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors operated on a once-through fuel cycle. A principal ...

Sefcik, Joseph A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Enhancing e-waste estimates: Improving data quality by multivariate Input–Output Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • A multivariate Input–Output Analysis method for e-waste estimates is proposed. • Applying multivariate analysis to consolidate data can enhance e-waste estimates. • We examine the influence of model selection and data quality on e-waste estimates. • Datasets of all e-waste related variables in a Dutch case study have been provided. • Accurate modeling of time-variant lifespan distributions is critical for estimate. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (or e-waste) is one of the fastest growing waste streams, which encompasses a wide and increasing spectrum of products. Accurate estimation of e-waste generation is difficult, mainly due to lack of high quality data referred to market and socio-economic dynamics. This paper addresses how to enhance e-waste estimates by providing techniques to increase data quality. An advanced, flexible and multivariate Input–Output Analysis (IOA) method is proposed. It links all three pillars in IOA (product sales, stock and lifespan profiles) to construct mathematical relationships between various data points. By applying this method, the data consolidation steps can generate more accurate time-series datasets from available data pool. This can consequently increase the reliability of e-waste estimates compared to the approach without data processing. A case study in the Netherlands is used to apply the advanced IOA model. As a result, for the first time ever, complete datasets of all three variables for estimating all types of e-waste have been obtained. The result of this study also demonstrates significant disparity between various estimation models, arising from the use of data under different conditions. It shows the importance of applying multivariate approach and multiple sources to improve data quality for modelling, specifically using appropriate time-varying lifespan parameters. Following the case study, a roadmap with a procedural guideline is provided to enhance e-waste estimation studies.

Wang, Feng, E-mail: fwang@unu.edu [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Huisman, Jaco [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Stevels, Ab [Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Baldé, Cornelis Peter [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Statistics Netherlands, Henri Faasdreef 312, 2492 JP Den Haag (Netherlands)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Water quality analysis of the piped water supply in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United Nation's Millennium Development Goal Target 7.C is to "halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water". While the UN claimed to have met this goal, studies ...

Hansen, Allison Jean

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Abstract--A physically based, spatially-distributed water quality model is being developed to simulate spatial and temporal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--A physically based, spatially-distributed water quality model is being developed, and water quality were used to estimate nonpoint source loading potential in the study watersheds. Animal to the monitored total phosphorous load indicates that both point and nonpoint sources are major contributors

325

High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly accessible data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly Colin Vincent,6 Kathryn Lehto,6 Simon Grant,2 Jeremy Williams,7 Margaret Neal,1 Heather Wickham,1 Sarah-element high- frequency water quality data set that is openly accessible to the research community. The data

Kirchner, James W.

326

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

Katz, Richard

327

It's worth the work: Proposed water quality standards move Texas closer to cleaner waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are realizing that applying a single standard of primary contact recreation to hundreds of different surface water bodies may not be realistic or beneficial. While public interest is high in having an ambitious standard as possible, Jim Davenport, technical...- ation and non-contact recreation?to four, adding two more levels: secondary contact 1 and 2 (see definitions on page 19). The agency is also proposing different numerical criteria for E. coli that will be applicable in fresh water based...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND); Hammond, Peter James (York, GB); Clifford, Anthony Alan (Leeds, GB)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Improving the efficiency of water splitting in dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the efficiency of water splitting in dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic studied this problem in dye-sensitized solar cells where a molecular dye and a porous TiO2 electrode act been demonstrated using dye-sensitized electrodes. The quantum yield for water splitting in these dye

330

Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved estimates of the total correlation energy in the ground state of the water molecule Arne National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Received 1 October 1996; accepted 5 February 1997 Two new calculations of the electronic energy of the ground state of the water molecule yield energies lower than those

Anderson, James B.

331

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from the Standpoint of Agricultural Economists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the Water Component of an Agricultural Climate Change Assessment : Issues from The National Global Climate Change Research Program is supporting appraisals of water and agriculture among assessment. Key Terms; Economics, Climate Change Assessment, Agriculture, Irrigation, Water use tradeoffs

McCarl, Bruce A.

332

Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ISEMP program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the spring 2008, PNW redeployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. This resumed previous data collection that was interrupted by river ice in early December 2007. Instruments were again removed from the river in early December 2008. This annual report covers the period from December 2007 through December 2008. The highest pH values occurred during the low-flow period from midsummer through the following midspring then dropped sharply during the annual snowmelt runoff period from late spring through early summer. Water temperature began rapidly increasing during the receding limb of the annual snowmelt hydrograph. Highest mean monthly temperatures occurred in July and August, while instantaneous maxima occurred during the period July-September. Dissolved oxygen reached its lowest levels during the period of highest water temperature in July-September. Specific conductivity remained very low at all sites throughout the year.

Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy [PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

UMTRA project technical assistance contractor quality assurance implementation plan for surface and ground water, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) Quality Assurance Implementation Plan (QAIP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The QAIP outlines the primary requirements for integrating quality functions for TAC technical activities applied to the surface and ground water phases of the UMTRA Project. The QA program is designed to use monitoring, audit, and surveillance activities as management tools to ensure that UMTRA Project activities are carried out in amanner to protect public health and safety, promote the success of the UMTRA Project, and meet or exceed contract requirements.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sigma PDCA Total Quality Management Not sure Other, pleaseManag, Kelly D. Applying quality management in healthcare: aAct (PDCA), total quality management (TQM), Six Sigma and

DelliFraine, Jami L; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Water quality and urban runoff in selected canal communities along the Texas coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at points along the canal. There are data included in this report on monthly canal water quality for the seven study areas. Samples were analyzed for coli- forms, nitrite, nitrate, Kjeldahl nitrogen (organic nitrogen), phos- phates, TOC, BOD , dissolved..., temperature and salinity profiles, and Rhodamine dye dis- placement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the sources of pollu- tional loading within the study communities . These data along with information from the literature on coastal canals...

Messenger, Allen Lester

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Supplier selection and supplier management improvements at an analytical instrument manufacturing company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the challenges of improving the quality of parts received from suppliers at Waters, an analytical instrument manufacturing company. Preliminary analysis identified improvement opportunities at evaluation ...

He, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

E-mail: whare@udc.eduhttp://www.udc.edu//wrri Integrating Water Quality Monitoring and Modeling as a Tool for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system Ground water quality Storm water Wastewater treatment plant Rainfall runoff Environmental and biological water quality parameters in water and wastewater. Examples are: (1) Senion2, (2) Titrino, (3) p the research and training needs of our faculty, students as well as water and wastewater operators. The main

District of Columbia, University of the

339

5 CCR 1002-42 Site Specific Water Quality Standards for Ground Water | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 |44 Basic Standards

340

University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. The following reportUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions, and drinking water initiatives. Faculty

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Water quality effects of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field trials were constructed to investigate the effect on water quality of tire chip fills placed above the groundwater table. Control wells were used to distinguish the substances naturally present in groundwater from those that leached from tire chips. There was no evidence that tire chips increased the level of substances that have a primary drinking water standard. In addition, there was no evidence that tire chips increased the levels of aluminum, zinc, chloride or sulfate which have secondary (aesthetic) drinking water standards. Under some conditions iron levels may exceed their secondary standard. It is likely that manganese levels will exceed their secondary standard, however, manganese is naturally present in groundwater in many areas. Two sets of samples were tested for organics. Results were below the method detection limit for all compounds.

Humphrey, D.N.; Katz, L.E. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

Parajuli, Prem B.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Improving Crop Yield and Water Productivity by Ecological Sanitation and Water Harvesting in South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville 3209, South Africa *S Supporting Information and fertility constraints in rain- fed smallholder agriculture in South Africa, namely in situ water harvesting significantly increased maize yields by 12% and transpiration by 2% on average across South Africa. In situ

Wehrli, Bernhard

344

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMERCIAL HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS USING CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in Japan, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such a product in the U.S. has been slow. This trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but remains in the commercial sector. Barriers to heat pump water heater acceptance in the commercial market have historically been performance, reliability and first/operating costs. The use of carbon dioxide (R744) as the refrigerant in such a system can improve performance for relatively small increase in initial cost and make this technology more appealing. What makes R744 an excellent candidate for use in heat pump water heaters is not only the wide range of ambient temperatures within which it can operate, but also the excellent ability to match water to refrigerant temperatures on the high side, resulting in very high exit water temperatures of up to 82�ºC (180�ºF), as required by sanitary codes in the U.S.(Food Code, 2005), in a single pass, temperatures that are much more difficult to reach with other refrigerants. This can be especially attractive in applications where this water is used for the purpose of sanitation. While reliability has also been of concern historically, dramatic improvements have been made over the last several years through research done in the automotive industry and commercialization of R744 technology in residential water heating mainly in Japan. This paper presents the performance results from the development of an R744 commercial heat pump water heater of approximately 35kW and a comparison to a baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system which could result in possible energy savings of up to 20%.

BOWERS C.D.; ELBEL S.; PETERSEN M.; HRNJAK P.S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Authority of states of use section 401 water quality certification to deny or condition Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licenses. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis discusses a recent United States Supreme Court case that will have a profound influence on the licensure of hydroelectric projects and the related ability of States to protect the quality of their waters. On October 4, 1993, the Supreme Court granted a Writ of Certiorari to resolve a conflict among the state courts of last resort. This case involves two fundamental and competing national interests: the nation's thirst for cheap, dependable power versus its equally strong desire to improve the quality of its water resources. It also involves two underlying regulatory regimes that overlap and conflict with each other in some ways. This case illustrates how those two national interests and their underlying regulatory regimes cannot always be reconciled. It also demonstrates how Congress, with its muddled ways of passing legislation, can create conflicts between federal and state regulatory agencies.

Hart, E.O.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lean/Toyota Production System Six Sigma PDCA Total QualityIs health care ready for Six Sigma quality? Milbank Q. DeanHarry M, Schroeder R. Six Sigma 2000; New York: Doubleday

DelliFraine, Jami L; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 117 1981 Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas, Interim Report M.G. DeHaven W.H. Blackburn R.W. Knight A.T. Weichert...

DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

348

Effect of Forest Site Preparation and Livestock Grazing on Stormflow and Water Quality in the South East  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Texas. However, little is known about the influence of intensive forest practices or livestock grazing on water quality, yield or site productivity in Texas. This is the only instrumented watershed study in Texas or Louisiana that is currently evaluating...

Hunter, T. K.; Blackburn, W. H.; Weichert, A. T.; Dobrowolski, J. P.

349

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

PHS 650-section 052: Healthcare Quality Improvement and Evaluation for Vulnerable Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can contribute to global health system reform and realization of the Millennium Development Goals. II. Learning Objectives To understand how quality health care has been defined and implemented with vulnerable health care quality" BMJ 2004; 328: 1124-9 Bloom BS. "Crossing the quality chasm: a new health system

Sheridan, Jennifer

353

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from furnaces and water heaters.  Some protocols caution with pilot lights,  and water heaters; and installation of natural draft gas water heaters in an internal closet on 

Noris, Federico

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

355

PROGRESS REPORT OF FY 2004 ACTIVITIES: IMPROVED WATER VAPOR AND CLOUD RETRIEVALS AT THE NSA/AAO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud coverage, with a focus on the Arctic conditions of cold temperatures and low concentrations of water vapor. The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Although several technologies have been investigated to measure these column amounts, microwave radiometers (MWR) have been used operationally by the ARM program for passive retrievals of these quantities: precipitable water vapor (PWV) and integrated water liquid (IWL). The technology of PWV and IWL retrievals has advanced steadily since the basic 2-channel MWR was first deployed at ARM CART sites Important advances are the development and refinement of the tipcal calibration method [1,2], and improvement of forward model radiative transfer algorithms [3,4]. However, the concern still remains that current instruments deployed by ARM may be inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and IWL. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important because of the possibility of scaling and/or quality control of radiosondes by the water amount. Extremely dry conditions, with PWV less than 3 mm, commonly occur in Polar Regions during the winter months. Accurate measurements of the PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve our understanding of the regional radiation energy budgets. The results of a 1999 experiment conducted at the ARM North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site during March of 1999 [5] have shown that the strength associated with the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line makes radiometry in this frequency regime suitable for measuring low amounts of PWV. As a portion of our research, we conducted another millimeter wave radiometric experiment at the NSA/AAO in March-April 2004. This experiment relied heavily on our experiences of the 1999 experiment. Particular attention was paid to issues of radiometric calibration and radiosonde intercomparisons. Our theoretical and experimental work also supplements efforts by industry (F. Solheim, Private Communication) to develop sub-millimeter radiometers for ARM deployment. In addition to quantitative improvement of water vapor measurements at cold temperature, the impact of adding millimeter-wave window channels to improve the sensitivity to arctic clouds was studied. We also deployed an Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) during this experiment, both for measuring continuous day-night statistics of the study of cloud coverage and identifying conditions suitable for tipcal analysis. This system provided the first capability of determining spatial cloud statistics continuously in both day and night at the NSA site and has been used to demonstrate that biases exist in inferring cloud statistics from either zenith-pointing active sensors (lidars or radars) or sky imagers that rely on scattered sunlight in daytime and star maps at night [6].

E. R. Westwater; V. V. Leuskiy; M. Klein; A. J. Gasiewski; and J. A. Shaw

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High Quality Graphene Formation on Improved 3C-SiC Epilayer Michael Walker,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UG-32 High Quality Graphene Formation on Improved 3C-SiC Epilayer Michael Walker,1 excellent electronic, mechanical, photonic properties and 2D nature, graphene is believed to be able to push the semiconductor industry into the beyond- CMOS era. Among all the synthesis methods, the Graphene-On-Silicon (GOS

357

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

State of ISRAEL Water Resources Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supply System #12;State of ISRAEL Complexity of the water distribution system · Different Sources to the main system: ground water, surface water, desalinated water · Utilization of the different sources. Water wells purification and aquifers water quality improvement. Increasing capacity of waste water

Einat, Aharonov

359

Water Pollution Control (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for water supplies, for the propagation of wildlife,...

360

Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The public policy of the state of Missouri is to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for public water supplies and for domestic, agricultural,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sewage sludge application effects on runoff water quality in a semiarid grassland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the concerns of land application of sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) to rangeland is its effect on the amount and quality of runoff water. In this study, we applied three treatments consisting of 0, 22, and 41 Mg ha{sup -1} of municipal sewage sludge to Larim gravelly sandy loam (Ustollic Argiustoll) and Altvan sandy loam (Aridic Argiustoll) soils in paired plots on two slope gradients (8 and 15%). We used a one-time application of simulated rainfall for 30 min at a rate of 100 mm h{sup -1} and collected and analyzed the runoff. Results are described. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Harris-Pierce, R.L.; Redente, E.F.; Barbarick, K.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Computeer-based decision support tools for evaluation of actions affecting flow and water quality in the San Joaquin Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a preliminary effort to draw together some of the important simulation models that are available to Reclamation or that have been developed by Reclamation since 1987. This document has also attempted to lay out a framework by which these models might be used both for the purposes for which they were originally intended and to support the analysis of other issues that relate to the hydrology and to salt and water quality management within the San Joaquin Valley. To be successful as components of a larger Decision Support System the models should to be linked together using custom designed interfaces that permit data sharing between models and that are easy to use. Several initiatives are currently underway within Reclamation to develop GIS - based and graphics - based decision support systems to improve the general level of understanding of the models currently in use, to standardize the methodology used in making planning and operations studies and to permit improved data analysis, interpretation and display. The decision support systems should allow greater participation in the planning process, allow the analysis of innovative actions that are currently difficult to study with present models and should lead to better integrated and more comprehensive plans and policy decisions in future years.

Quinn, N.W.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tracking Non-point Fecal Pollution in the Guadalupe River: Distinguishing Urban and Rural Influences upon Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Assistant Professor University of Houston - Victoria Non-point fecal pollution is a problem in water bodiesTracking Non-point Fecal Pollution in the Guadalupe River: Distinguishing Urban and Rural Influences upon Water Quality Matthew Boyett University of Houston - Victoria boyettmr@uhv.edu Dmitri Sobolev

364

Small Drains, Big Problems: The Impact of Dry Weather Runoff on Shoreline Water Quality at Enclosed Beaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we present field measurements and modeling studies aimed at evaluating the impact of small storm is minimal and human contact likely. Outdoor water conservation and urban retrofits that minimize the volume beach water quality in Newport Bay and other urban-impacted enclosed beaches. INTRODUCTION Enclosed

AghaKouchak, Amir

365

A modeling approach to evaluate the impacts of water quality management plans implemented in a watershed in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

best management practices (BMPs) have been implemented through Water Quality Management Plans (WQMPs; Best management practices Software availability Name of the software: Soil and Water Assessment Tool. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.05.013 www.elsevier.com/locate/envsoft Environmental Modelling & Software

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - attendance improves quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

skills... by the University's Said Business School); Career Planning; Quality Management (ISO 9001) and Environmental... , Tokyo & Milan and the 2009 tour is to China). All EPSRC...

367

Improved Quality Control Processing of Peptide-centric LC-MS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

measures), LC-MS analyses with poor quality pep-tide abundance data can bias downstream statistical analyses and hence the biological interpretation for an otherwise high...

368

Water quality criteria for colored smokes: Solvent Green 3: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Solvent Green 3, an anthraquinone dye used in colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. Sufficient data to determine the toxicity of Solvent Green 3 in freshwater aquatic organisms are lacking. The 96-hr TL/sub 50/ for Pimephales promelas is >100 mg/L. Solvent Green 3, at a concentration of 10 mg/L, causes a transient reduction in growth of the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum. No data are available concerning the chronic toxicity or bioaccumulation of Solvent Green 3 in aquatic organisms. No data are available on any of the toxicity parameters for Solvent Green 3 in humans. No data on the pharmacokinetics of Solvent Green 3 administered orally in laboratory animals are available. Solvent Green 3 has a low order of toxicity whether administered by the oral, dermal, or inhalation route. The acute oral LD/sub 50/ is >3.16 g/kg in rats, but may be as high as 15 g/kg, >1 g/kg in dogs, and 10 g/kg in rabbits. Sufficient pertinent data were not available for deriving a water quality criterion for the protection of human health. 83 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Improving Air Quality with Solar Energy; U.S. DOE Clean Energy and Air Quality Integration Initiative Fact Sheet Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219Improvements to the SHDOM RadiativeAir

370

Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

Baughn, D.C. [MCI/Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porous pavement is formed of asphalt or cement concrete (Brown, 1996) or which is loosely packed so that water

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Improving Data Quality With Dynamic Forms Kuang Chen, Harr Chen, Neil Conway, Heather Dolan, Joseph M. Hellerstein, and Tapan S. Parikh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propose a new data-driven approach to form design, execution (filling) and quality assurance. We, applying principles for data encodings, constraints, and validation rules. For electronic forms, qualityImproving Data Quality With Dynamic Forms Kuang Chen, Harr Chen, Neil Conway, Heather Dolan, Joseph

373

Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River, 2002-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has been applied. This model uses field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data varied in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors were small and within expected ranges, although, as additional 2003 field data becomes available, model parameters may be improved to minimize differences between observed and simulated values. A two-dimensional, laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible; however, vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model was applied to each reservoir independently to simulate the time period between May 1 and October 1, 2002. Differences between observed and simulated data were small, although improvements to model coefficients may be performed as additional thermal data, collected in the reservoirs during 2003, becomes available.

Cook, C.; Richmond, M.; Coleman, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Lake Whitney Comprehensive Water Quality Assessment, Phase 1B- Physical and Biological Assessment (USDOE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Baylor University Center for Reservoir and Aquatic Systems Research (CRASR) has conducted a phased, comprehensive evaluation of Lake Whitney to determine its suitability for use as a regional water supply reservoir. The area along the Interstate 35 corridor between Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex and the Waco / Temple Centroplex represents one of the fastest growth areas in the State of Texas and reliable water supplies are critical to sustainable growth. Lake Whitney is situated midway between these two metropolitan areas. Currently, the City of Whitney as well as all of Bosque and Hill counties obtain their potable water from the Trinity Sands aquifer. Additionally, parts of the adjoining McLennan and Burleson counties utilize the Trinity sands aquifer system as a supplement to their surface water supplies. Population growth coupled with increasing demands on this aquifer system in both the Metroplex and Centroplex have resulted in a rapid depletion of groundwater in these rural areas. The Lake Whitney reservoir represents both a potentially local and regional solution for an area experiencing high levels of growth. Because of the large scope of this project as well as the local, regional and national implications, we have designed a multifaceted approach that will lead to the solution of numerous issues related to the feasibility of using Lake Whitney as a water resource to the region. Phase IA (USEPA, QAPP Study Elements 1-4) of this research focused on the physical limnology of the reservoir (bathymetry and fine scale salinity determination) and develops hydrodynamic watershed and reservoir models to evaluate how salinity would be expected to change with varying hydrologic and climatic factors. To this end, we implemented a basic water quality modeling program in collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add to the developing long-term database on Lake Whitney. Finally, we conducted an initial assessment of knowledge of watershed and water quality related issues by local residents and stakeholders of Lake Whitney and design an intervention educational program to address any deficiencies discovered. Phase IA was funded primarily from EPA Cooperative Agreement X7-9769 8901-0. Phase IC (USEPA, QAPP Study Element 5) of this research focused on the ambient toxicity of the reservoir with respect to periodic blooms of golden algae. Phase IC was funded primarily from Cooperative Agreement EM-96638001. Phase 1B (USDOE, Study Elements 6-11) complemented work being done via EPA funding on study elements 1-5 and added five new study elements: 6) Salinity Transport in the Brazos Watershed to Lake Whitney; 7) Bacterial Assessment; 8) Organic Contaminant Analysis on Lake Whitney; 9) Plankton Photosynthesis; 10) Lake Whitney Resident Knowledge Assessment; and 11) Engineering Scoping Perspective: Recommendations for Use.

Doyle, Robert D; Byars, Bruce W

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Water quality criteria for colored smokes: 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of 1,4-diamino-2,3-dihydroanthraquinone (DDA), and anthraquinone dye used in violet-colored smoke grenades, were reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines were used in an attempt to generate water quality criteria for the protection of human health and of aquatic life and its uses. DDA will readily oxidize to 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone (DAA) in air or during combustion of the smoke grenade. The dye is insoluble in water; however, no information is available concerning its transformation or transport in soil, water, and sediments. No data are available concerning the toxic effects of DDA in aquatic organisms; therefore, a Criterion maximum Concentration and a Criterion Continuous Concentration cannot be determined. Toxicity studies following the USEPA guidelines are recommended. DDA is a weak mutagen in the Salmonella Reversin Assay, but the combustion or oxidation product, DAA is a strong mutagen in the same test. Violet smoke is noncarcinogenic in the SENCAR Mouse Skin Tumor Bioassay. 63 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.; Ross, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Improving transport fuel quality in China: Implications for the refining sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reviews the state of the Chinese refining system and examines the relative costs of 10 scenarios to increase petroleum product quality to Euro III, IV, and V levels.

Yamaguchi, Nancy; Fridley, David; Xiaoming, Ke

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421431 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales 421 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421­431 (2002) © EGS Assessing environmental impacts on stream water the environmental sciences, there are major management issues over the impact of man on the water quality

Boyer, Edmond

379

Studien-und Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stuttgart fr den auslandsorientierten Studiengang Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering (WASTE) mit Abschluss Master Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) beschlossen. Der Rektor hat Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) überblickt werden, die Fähigkeit

Reyle, Uwe

380

Guidelines for Developing Soil and Water Management Programs: Irrigated Pecans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The book describes the performance of pecan trees; water testing; determining how water quality may affect tree growth; improving drainage; selecting an irrigation system, and water conditioning to manage nutrients. It also describes how to estimate...

Miyamoto, S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling studies and applications designed to preserve or improve groundwater quality. ChargedUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction into the following four thematic areas: groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions

382

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

383

Corps Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed... The Big Fossil Watershed Study will address flood damage reduction, while identifying associated water quality, ecosystem restoration and recreational opportunities within the basin. The watershed is located in northern Tarrant County, encompasses 73...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

UV Disinfection Equipment Marketing Plan. "The Impact of New Water Quality Effluent Standards and Whole Body Contact Classification of Missouri Waters"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 State of Missouri Regulatory Impact Report for Proposed Rule Amendment 10 CSR 20-7.03 Water Quality Standards, Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Water Protection and Soil Conservation Division, Water Protection Program, http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env..., USEPA, Region 7, letter from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) that approved and disapproved parts of Missouri?s WQS, U, Kansas City, Kansas, Sept. 8, 2000. http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/wpp/rules/usepa_2000_letter-pgs1- 14.pdf, http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env...

Koehler, Paul

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Value of Public Transportation for Improving the Quality of Life for the Rural Elderly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community is no longer able to drive, issues that come with living in a rural area may be exacerbated, and the individual may experience a decrease in their quality of life. Although individuals may be able to use public transportation most existing options...

Israel, Alicia Ann

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preliminary evaluation of VTA effectiveness to protect runoff water quality on small pork production facilities in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or Robertson County sites on the following dates: • January 9, 2013 • February 10, 2013 • March 10, 2013 • April 3, 2013 • May 9, 2013 • May 16, 2013 • May 21, 2013 • June 3, 2013 • June 10, 2013 • July 15, 2013 Results from the analysis... Research Service Texas Water Resources Institute TR-452 November 2013 Preliminary evaluation of VTA effectiveness to protect runoff water quality on small pork production facilities in Texas STATE NONPOINT SOURCE GRANT PROGRAM TSSWCB PROJECT...

Wagner, K.; Harmel, D.; Higgs, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Iowa State Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, prioritize water quality improvement need, and establish total maximum daily loads or TMDLs for such impaired Congressional District: Iowa 3rd Research Category: Not Applicable Focus Category: Water Quality, Models, Law, Institutions, and Policy Descriptors: TMDL, water quality, GIS, modeling, environmental policy Principal

388

Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

Pacsi, Adam P

389

Division of Water, Parts 700-750 and Parts 800-941: Classes and Standards of Quality and Purity (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections describe general standards of water quality and purity as well as standards for specific water bodies (Parts 800-941). The regulations provide classifications for different types of...

390

An improved simple polarisable water model for use in biomolecular simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accuracy of biomolecular simulations depends to some degree on the accuracy of the water model used to solvate the biomolecules. Because many biomolecules such as proteins are electrostatically rather inhomogeneous, containing apolar, polar, and charged moieties or side chains, a water model should be able to represent the polarisation response to a local electrostatic field, while being compatible with the force field used to model the biomolecules or protein. The two polarisable water models, COS/G2 and COS/D, that are compatible with the GROMOS biomolecular force fields leave room for improvement. The COS/G2 model has a slightly too large dielectric permittivity and the COS/D model displays a much too slow dynamics. The proposed COS/D2 model has four interaction sites: only one Lennard-Jones interaction site, the oxygen atom, and three permanent charge sites, the two hydrogens, and one massless off-atom site that also serves as charge-on-spring (COS) polarisable site with a damped or sub-linear dependence of the induced dipole on the electric field strength for large values of the latter. These properties make it a cheap and yet realistic water model for biomolecular solvation.

Bachmann, Stephan J.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van, E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Soil and water dynamics in a microcatchment system for range improvement in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

desert environments since it can be applied in granular form and allowed to melt to seal pores in the soil surface. Frasier et al. (1979), using a sprinkler system to create runoff on a four year old paraffin coated catchment area, found a runoff...SOIL AND WATER DYNAMICS IN A MICROCATCHMENT SYSTEM FOR RANGE IMPROVEMENT IN WEST TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN JAY MARANZ Submitted to the office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Maranz, Steven Jay

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Remote Sensing of Soil and Water Quality in Agroecosystems Vincent de Paul Obade & Rattan Lal & Jiquan Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reflection radiometer ASD Analytical spectral device AVIRIS Airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer near real-time information on soil and water quality in the context of major land use practices SPOT Satellites pour l'observation de la terre or earth-observing satellites SWIR Short-wave infrared

Chen, Jiquan

393

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organized in cooperation with TU Vienna, (Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management) Analysis, Evaluation and Design of Sustainable Waste Management Systems Goal The objective of the ISWA-TU Vienna Summer School (iTOOL) is to provide advanced knowledge in the field of waste management

Szmolyan, Peter

394

Education Program for Improved Water Quality in Copano Bay Task Two Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimation methods are provided in the following sections. Cattle County cattle numbers (tables 3 and 4) in the watershed were estimated using the five- year average number of beef cows as published by the 2004?2008 Texas Agricultural Statistics...,540 Goliad 887 37.8% 335 1.25 419 Karnes 973 3.7% 36 1.25 45 Refugio 692 62.7% 434 1.25 543 San Patricio 662 64.3% 426 1.25 533 Total 4,651 - 2,479 - 3,100 Goats The 2005?2008 Texas Agricultural Statistics were used for estimating goat numbers...

Wagner, Kevin; Moench, Emily

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NMS 74-6 Environmental Improvement of Water Quality | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformationInformationCompletion

396

Education Program for Improved Water Quality in Copano Bay Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Copano Bay watershed covers approximately 1.4 million acres encompassing portions of Karnes, Bee, Goliad, Refugio, San Patricio and Aransas counties. Copano Bay and its main tributaries, the Mission and Aransas rivers, were placed on the Texas...

Berthold, A.; Moench, E.; Wagner, K.; Paschal, J.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

O'Geen, Anthony T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Improvement and Energy Conservation in Buildings J.R. Gosselin Q. Chen* Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT indoor air quality (Sherman and Matson, 1997). Indoor air quality (IAQ) is important since up to 90

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

399

Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Health and water quality monitoring of Pure Home Water's ceramic filter dissemination in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pure Home Water (PHW) is a social enterprise that promotes and disseminates household drinking water technologies in the Northern Region of Ghana. Currently their main product is a pot-shaped Potters for Peace-type ceramic ...

Johnson, Sophie M. (Sophie Marie)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effect of drought and fires on the quality of water in Lithuanian rivers Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 423427 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the surface water. Keywords: heavy metals, river water quality, Lithuania Introduction Increasingly, negative of secondary heavy metal pollution (Crossland and LaPoint, 1992). These processes may make water bodies unsuitable for human consumption and toxic to organisms living in the water. Heavy metals are harmful

Boyer, Edmond

402

GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

§ Propane vs natural gas § Fuel management § Utility company § Capacity, NEVADA 7 § High energy baseline (propane) § Open space for underground loop, 2013 ¢ LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 8 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT 1 gallon propane 0.8 gallon water CO, NO, SO2

403

assistance improves intracorporeal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County Final Report Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Service for funding the Providing Assistance to Improve...

404

Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

Swift, T.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Giprokoks proposals for improvement in air quality at coke battery 1A of Radlin coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke battery 1A, which uses rammed batch, has gone into production at Radlin coke plant (Poland), on the basis of Giprokoks designs. Up-to-date dust-trapping methods are used for the first time within the aspiration systems in the coal-preparation shop and in improving dust collection within the production buildings.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Appendix A: Continuous Quality Improvement Matrix Student Learning Outcomes Relevant Experiences Measures Use of Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in considering equity vs. efficiency tradeoffs within real world situations. Average = 4.64/6 Individual faculty on this measure. It is possible that new elective courses may be neccesary at some point in the future to improve performance on this goal. #12;Student Learning Outcomes Relevant Experiences Measures Use of Results equity vs

Gering, Jon C.

409

Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Yang, Yu (Greenville, NC); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Kitchen Appliance Upgrades Improve Water Efficiency at DOD Exchange Facilities: Best Management Practice Case Study #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Exchange, formerly the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), is a joint military activity and the U.S. Department of Defense?s (DOD) oldest and largest retailer. The Exchange is taking a leadership role in water efficiency improvements in their commercial kitchens by integrating water efficiency concepts into the organization?s overall sustainability plan and objectives.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

MONITORING A TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA BLOOM IN LAKE BOURGET (FRANCE) AND ITS CONSEQUENCES FOR WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the turbidity of the water in treatment units providing drinking water. These central supplies obtain their lake of Feuillade et al. [3]. The samples were taken in the water treatment units, before (water intake in treatment unit) and at the end of the treatment steps (in water reaching the consumers). Intracellular

Jacquet, Stéphan

412

Water Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak, Bruce A. McCarl, Allan J. Sommer, Brian C. Murray, Timothy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greenhouse gas (GHG) emission offset strategies in U.S. agriculture by linking a national level agriculturalWater Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak sector model (ASMGHG) to a national level water quality model (NWPCAM). The simulated policy scenario

McCarl, Bruce A.

413

Impacts of motor vehicle operation on water quality - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contribution of heavy metals to storm water from automotiveheavy metals can make highway runoff chronically toxic to receiving waters.heavy metals (such as Pb, Zn, or Cu) or hydrocarbon loadings of surface water

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

415

Playing it safe: Program improves quality of athletic fields and parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Who knew that water conservation and athletes? safety were interconnected? Since #26;#19;#19;#21;, the Sports Athletic Field Education program (SAFE) has been evaluating athletic #18;elds and parks across Texas to determine ways to make them...;#19;#19;#21; with the help of Ron Woolley, now regional program director of Agriculture and Natural Resources for AgriLife Extension, said Dr. James McAfee, associate professor and Extension turfgrass specialist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center...

Orth, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supplyheat pump water heaters). http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/CSA 4.3- 2004 Gas Water Heaters - Volume III, Storage

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1996-1998 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the 1996-1998 Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research for increasing hatchery salmon postrelease survival and producing fish with more wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology prior to release. Experiments were conducted evaluating automatic subsurface feeders; natural diets; exercise systems; seminatural raceway habitat enriched with cover, structure, and substrate; and predator avoidance conditioning for hatchery salmonids. Automatic subsurface feed delivery systems did not affect chinook salmon depth distribution or vulnerability to avian predators. Live-food diets only marginally improved the ability of chinook salmon to capture prey in stream enclosures. A prototype exercise system that can be retrofitted to raceways was developed, however, initial testing indicated that severe amounts of exercise may increase in culture mortality. Rearing chinook salmon in seminatural raceway habitat with gravel substrate, woody debris structure, and overhead cover improved coloration and postrelease survival without impacting in-culture health or survival. Steelhead fry reared in enriched environments with structure, cover, and point source feeders dominated and outcompeted conventionally reared fish. Exposing chinook salmon to caged predators increased their postrelease survival. Chinook salmon showed an antipredator response to chemical stimuli from injured conspecifics and exhibited acquired predator recognition following exposure to paired predator-prey stimuli. The report also includes the 1997 Natural Rearing System Workshop proceedings.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Improvement of the quality of graphene-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the transfer of graphene onto InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The graphene is first grown on Cu foils by chemical vapor deposition and then polymer Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) is deposited on the top of graphene/Cu. High quality graphene sheet has been obtained by lowering the dissolving rate of PMMA using vapor processing. Uncapped as well as capped graphene InAs/GaAs QDs have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We gather from this that the average shifts ?? of QDs Raman peaks are reduced compared to those previously observed in graphene and GaAs capped QDs. The encapsulation by graphene makes the indium atomic concentration intact in the QDs by the reduction of the strain effect of graphene on QDs and the migration of In atoms towards the surface. This gives us a new hetero-structure graphene–InAs/GaAs QDs wherein the graphene plays a key role as a cap layer.

Othmen, Riadh, E-mail: othmenriadh@yahoo.fr; Rezgui, Kamel; Ajlani, Hosni; Oueslati, Meherzi [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, Campus, 2092 El Manar Tunis (Tunisia); Cavanna, Antonella; Madouri, Ali [CNRS/LPN, Route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Arezki, Hakim; Gunes, Fethullah [Laboratoire de Génie Electrique de Paris, 11, rue Joliot Curie Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

Systems Level Engineering of Plant Cell Wall Biosynthesis to Improve Biofuel Feedstock Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our new regulatory model of cell wall biosynthesis proposes original network architecture with several newly incorporated components. The mapped set of protein-DNA interactions will serve as a foundation for 1) understanding the regulation of a complex and integral plant component and 2) the manipulation of crop species for biofuel and biotechnology purposes. This study revealed interesting and novel aspects of grass growth and development and further enforce the importance of a grass model system. By functionally characterizing a suite of genes, we have begun to improve the sparse model for transcription regulation of biomass accumulation in grasses. In the process, we have advanced methodology and brachy molecular genetic tools that will serve as valuable community resource.

Hazen, Samuel

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The mineral content of water as a variable in the quality control of reconstituted non-fat dry milk products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LibK?ARr '< A 4 M CuLLEftE ?F TEXAf. THE MINERAL CONTENT OF WATER AS A VARIABLE IN THE QUALITY CONTROL OF RECONSTITUTED NONFAT DRY MILK PRODUCTS By JOHN 0. KAPSAUS A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...). This is the CO2 evolved in the milk, which has been reconstituted with the respective level of bicarbonate water, in the uninoculated tube. (E) CO2 produced from the action of the apparent milk acidity on the bicarbonate. This is the CO2 calculated from...

Kapsalis, John G.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to {+-}1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of {+-}0.2 F for copper components and {+-}0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design.

Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management... Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up...

Richards, Chad Edward

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Cross-well bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

Taylor, Archie R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence.

Leong, Cheng Nang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)]. E-mail: Cheng_Nang_Leong@mail.nhg.com.sg; Shakespeare, Thomas Philip [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Back, Michael F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Lee, Khai Mun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Lu, Jiade Jay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Wynne, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Lim, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Tang, Johann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Zhang Xiaojian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) alternatives in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ghana's water quality and sanitation condition are very poor. Pure Home Water (PHW), a local non-profit organization has been successfully improving the supply of safe drinking water in the northern region by producing and ...

Wong, TengKe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U.S.-Mexico Border.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Risk perception, drinking water source and quality in a low-income Latino community along the U Dental Association (ADA) is concerned that individuals who primarily drink bottled water may, elucidated why Latinos perceive tap water to be unsafe for drinking, and identified whether individuals have

Fay, Noah

430

Preventing Water Quality Contamination through the Texas Well Owners Network (TWON): Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Tex*A*Syst materials, additional TWON Fact Sheets were developed: ? Hydraulic Fracturing and Your Private Water Well (ESC-012) ? Protect Your Water Well During Drought (ESC-014) A TWON curriculum, including a handbook for participants...

Boellstorff, D.; Gholson, D.; Kalisek, D.; Smith, J.; Gerlich, R.; Wagner, K.; McFarland, M.; Mukhtar, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source dischargers. However, most U.S. water bodies are unmonitored ...

Wallace, Katherine Hay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Ceramic filter manufacturing in Northern Ghana : water storage and quality control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2009, Pure Home Water (PHW), a Ghana based non-profit organization working to provide affordable and safe drinking water to people in the Northern Region of Ghana, began the construction of a ceramic pot filter (CPF) ...

Kleiman, Shanti Lisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Legacy of historic mining and water quality in a heavily mined Scottish river catchment   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mine abandonment and the discharge of contaminated mine water is recognised globally as a major source of surface water and groundwater pollution. Contamination generally arises from the oxidation of sulphide minerals, ...

Haunch, Simon

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume III, Storage Water Heaters With Input Ratings AboveVolume III, Storage Water Heaters With Input Ratings AboveVolume III, Storage Water Heaters With Input Ratings Above

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Feasibility Study of the Effects of Water Quality on Soil Properties in the Red River Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on permeability of soil to water. The effects of specific ions such as Na or lack of salts in the water can reduce permeability to the extent that crops are not adequately supplied with water and yields are reduced. As pointed out by Rhoades and Ingvalson...

Gerard, C. J.; Hipp, B. W.; Runkles, J. R.; Bordovsky, D. J.; McCully, W. G.

436

The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issues: · Drinking Water and Human Health · Environmental Restoration · Waste Management · Nutrient to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention and Pesticide Management · Pollution Assessment and Prevention · Watershed Management · Water Quantity

437

How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hill. 1996. “Energy test procedures for appliances. ” EnergyWater Efficiency Test Procedures Jim Lutz, Peter Biermayer,Water Efficiency Test Procedures Jim Lutz, Peter Biermayer,

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Water quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post-burn monitoring of the ground water near to the Hoe creek underground coal gasification site showed that a broad range of gasification products had been introduced into the water system. Although many of these contaminants were eventually absorbed by the surrounding coal, some chemicals continued to appear in the water in concentrations higher than pre-test levels for several years after gasification. Possible mechanisms by which the contaminants entered the ground water include: (1) leakage of pyrolysis products; (2) post-burn leaching of coal ash and overburden rubble by returning ground water; and (3) dissolution of minerals outside the cavity by the CO/SUB/2 generated during gasification.

Wang, F.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Improvement of the Performance for an Absorption Refrigeration System with Lithium bromide-water as Refrigerant by Increasing Absorption Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-10-4 Improvement of the Performance for an Absorption Refrigerating System with Lithium bromide-water as Refrigerant by Increasing Absorption... in order to lay a theoretical foundation of improving the performance of whole LBAC. 2. THE PRINCIPLE OF ENHANCING ABSORPTION EFFICIENCY OF THE ABSORBER It is well known that the absorption of ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC...

Xie, G.; Sheng, G.; Li, G.; Pan, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Towards an Integration of the Lean Enterprise System, Total Quality Management, Six Sigma and Related Enterprise Process Improvement Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lean enterprise system, total quality management, six sigma, theory of constraints, agile manufacturing,

Bozdogan, Kirkor

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive biomass production in emerging bioenergy systems could increase nonpoint-source sediment and nutrient losses and impair surface and groundwater quality. Recycling biochar, a charcoal byproduct from pyrolysis of biomass, provides potential...

Husmoen, Derek Howard

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Design and installation of continuous flow and water quality monitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower San Joaquin River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¼ mile south of Hwy 140. Solar Panel with 12-volt batteryMarshall Road Reservoir. Solar Panel with 12-volt batteryflows from adjacent fields. Solar Panel with 12-volt battery

Quinn, Nigel W.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Trading pollution for water quality : assessing the effects of market-based instruments in three basins .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since its passage in 1972, the majority of pollution reduction under the federal Clean Water Act has resulted from technology-based limits imposed on point source… (more)

Wallace, Katherine Hay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The impact of Texas water quality laws on dairy firm profitability and survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Francis Schmucker, B. A. , Texas Tech University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David J. Leatham Dairy waste management is one of the most important issues faced by Texas dairy producers. The Texas Water Commission regulations state there shall... be no discharge of waste and/or waste water into the waters of the State of Texas. The regulations also require a dairy having 250 or more milking cows to have a Texas Water Commission permit to operate. Dairy managers should therefore determine the least...

Schmucker, John Francis

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Global impacts of conversions from natural to agricultural ecosystems on water resources: Quantity versus quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for $90% of global freshwater consumption. Irrigation based on surface water reduced streamflow and raised is a critical issue because 1.1 billion of the world's 6 billion people lack access to safe drinking water [World Health Organization, 2003]. Agricultural food pro- duction accounted for an average of $90

Scanlon, Bridget R.

448

Designing of a prototype heat-sealer to manufacture solar water sterilization pouches for use in developing nations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water purification proves to be a difficult task in many developing nations. The SODIS (SOlar water DISinfection) process is a method which improves the microbiological quality of water making it safer for drinking and ...

Quinlan, Saundra S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Towards improved partnerships in the water sector in the Middle East : A case study of Jordan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on the use of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the water sector in Jordan, a Middle East pioneer with respect to experimenting with different approaches to delivering water services in both ...

Odeh, Nancy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Municipal Water and Environmental Management Problems," (4) "Quantification of Water Quality Improvements applications to help manage water and environmental issues in wetland and riparian areas, landfills, and parks, and several large water management agencies and purveyors in the state with specific water resources problems

451

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

452

Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision{sup TM} image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p < 10{sup -8}), 1.64 (p < 10{sup -13}), 2.66 (p < 10{sup -9}), respectively. For all imaging doses, soft tissue contrast was more easily differentiated on IBL + SPA head and neck and pelvic images than TBL + LFB and IBL + LFB. IBL + SPA thoracic images were comparable to IBL + LFB images, but less noisy than TBL + LFB images at all imaging doses considered. The mean MTFs over all imaging doses were comparable, at within 3%, for all imaging system configurations for both the head- and pelvis-sized phantoms. Conclusions: Since CNR scales with the square root of imaging dose, changing from TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB and IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA reduces the imaging dose required to obtain a given CNR by factors of 0.38 and 0.37, respectively. MTFs were comparable between imaging system configurations. IBL + SPA patient image quality was always better than that of the TBL + LFB system and as good as or better than that of the IBL + LFB system, for a given dose.

Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Inc., Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hydrological and water quality characteristics of three rock glaciers: Blanca Massif, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interstitially or as discrete lenses. The geometry of a rock glacier is conducive not only to the formation and growth of ice, but also to the entrapment of water in the fluid state. It is the ice and the trapped water that are important in providing a source... and the trapped water that are important in providing a source for maintaining flow of many alpine streams during the summer. In many alpine areas of the world, streams flow from the frontal slopes of rock glaciers. Although rock glaciers have been studied...

DeMorett, Joseph Lawrence

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

DOE JGI Quality Metrics; Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

DOE JGI's Alex Copeland on "DOE JGI Quality Metrics" and Michigan State University's C. Titus Brown on "Approaches to Scaling and Improving Metagenome Assembly" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI]; Brown, C Titus [Michigan State University

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 7 Improving Cooling Tower Efficiency ? Two Improvements in Capacity/Performance 1. Filtration for water quality control Side stream filtration Make up water quality...-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 2 Types of Cooling Towers Forced Draft Towers ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 3 Types...

Turpish, W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Signatures of Restoration and Management Changes in the Water Quality of a Central California Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beck, N.G. , and K.W. Bruland. 2000. Diel biogeochemicalA.T. Fisher, and K.W. Bruland. 2001. Modeling water, heat,1984; Nixon 1995; Beck and Bruland 2000; Beck et al. 2001;

Gee, Alison K.; Wasson, Kerstin; Shaw, Susan L.; Haskins, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

On Managing Texas Rural Water Supply Systems: A Socioeconomic Analysis and Quality Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The study uses a set of indicators to identify effectiveness and efficiency of rural water projects. Such measures for analysis and appraisal of these projects may contribute to more informed and intelligent planning for the future. The study is also...

Singh, R.N.

458

Improved water allocation utilizing probabilistic climate forecasts: Short-term water contracts in a risk management framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thus, integrated supply and demand management can be achieved. In this paper, a single period multiuser, forecast consumers, water managers and reservoir operators, have difficulty interpreting such products in a risk management framework A. Sankarasubramanian,1 Upmanu Lall,2 Francisco Assis Souza Filho,3

Arumugam, Sankar

459

The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water. The results are linked to within-catchment information to describe the influence of conifer harvesting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

460

Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Maragaret

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Pecos River Basin WPP. TWRI is currently managing two projects to improve the water quality of Buck Creek, a small creek in the Texas Panhandle?s Red River Basin. Both of these projects are funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation... the water body and educating landowners on the benefits and usefulness of certain best management practices. ?Developing landowner- and stakeholder-driven plans to restore water quality is a great approach to addressing water quality impairments...

Foust, Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Analysis and forecast improvements from simulated satellite water vapor profiles and rainfall using a global data assimilation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential improvements of analyses and forecasts from the use of satellite-observed rainfall and water vapor measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Sensor Microwave (SSM) T-1 and T-2 instruments are investigated in a series of observing system simulation experiments using the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (formerly Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) data assimilation system. Simulated SSM radiances are used directly in a radiance retrieval step following the conventional optimum interpolation analysis. Simulated rainfall rates in the tropics are used in a moist initialization procedure to improve the initial specification of divergence, moisture, and temperature. Results show improved analyses and forecasts of relative humidity and winds compared to the control experiment in the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere. Forecast improvements are generally restricted to the first 1-3 days of the forecast. 27 refs., 11 figs.

Nehrkorn, T.; Hoffman, R.N.; Louis, J.F.; Isaacs, R.G.; Moncet, J.L. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Implementation of a Geographic Information System for municipal water quality assurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Northwest Agencies with ARC/INFO Projects. . . . . . 64 I: INTRODUCTION The difficult task of watershed management involves maximizing the quality and quantity of wata for domestic, industrial, and transport uses while maintaining conditions favorable... to its ability to work with the AutoCAD drawings, the TPUW forester chose to have the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRI) ARC/INFO coverages from WADNR converted to ArcCAD format. ArcCAD is a computer-aided design (CAD) system which...

Murphy, Eileen Marie

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power Devices  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department announces two projects as part of a larger effort to deploy innovative technologies for clean, domestic power generation from water power resources.

466

A.A.C. R18-11: Water Quality Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of The Transiel Method OnAand1: Water

467

ARM 17-30-101 - Water Quality: 401 Certification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,InformationWind Energy JumpEnergyApplicationWater

468

File:06MTFShortTermWaterQualityStandardForTurbidity318Authorization.pdf |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation,EnergyMTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdfOpen

469

Improving stroke care: Quality of care and health education in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??abstractThis thesis focuses on the applicability of results of clinical trials of stroke and TIA patients in everyday practice and on measurement of quality of… (more)

E. Maasland (Lisette)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Water quality modeling for the Kennet and Avon Canal, a navigational canal in an inland catchment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...........................................................128 Figure 46. The outlet of Wilton Water Reservoir next to the Crofton Pumping Station. ....................................................................................................................................131 17 Figure 47. Control... waterways, cruiseways (for amenity use only), and remainder waterways, only 2000 miles (3220 km) remained (Kennet and Avon Canal Trust Ltd. 1981). Of these, 570 miles (917 km) were classified as ‘remainder’ waterways: not legally abandoned...

Zeckoski, Rebecca

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Influence of Spray Water Quality on Herbicide www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for crop protection products applications, constituting more than 95% of the spray volume. The properties calcium, magnesium, iron, aluminum, zinc, manganese, sodium, potassium, cesium, and lithium can influence. Cations dissolved in water can interact with the herbicide structure and can form complexes

472

Engineers, are focused on advanced water quality modeling on the Cumberland River in Kentucky and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin to protect aquatic life. ORNL is providing an assessment of the effects of climate change on water availability for federal hydropower and on marketing of hydropower by increased understanding the role of climate variability and change. Collaborating with the Hydropower

473

Water Quality at Caddo Lake, Center for Invasive Species Eradication: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Giant salvinia, a highly invasive aquatic fern native to South America, poses a serious threat to Texas’ waters and has done so since its discovery in the state in the 1990s. If left unmanaged, giant salvinia can cause a multitude of impacts...

Gregory, L.; Knutson, A.; Ederton, E.; Mukherjee, A.; Baumann, P.; Masser, M.; Wagner, K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Appendix A. ASA's WQMAP WQMAP (Water Quality Mapping and Analysis Program) is a proprietary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based personal computer. Color graphics and animation are used to display model prediction. The system-dimensional conservation of water mass, momentum, salt and energy equations on a spherical, non-orthogonal, boundary, energy, dissolved constituents, turbulent #12;294 kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Implicit

Chen, Changsheng

475

Freshwater mussels and water quality: A review of the effects of hydrologic and instream habitat alterations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43212 ABSTRACT: Hydraulic impacts represent a suite of habitat. These hydraulic impacts thus overlap each other to one degree or another. I have attempted to break them down to divert water to mills and turbines, where its seemingly limitless power ground grain, cut lumber

Watters, G. Thomas

476

How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Heaters With Input Ratings Above 75,000 Btu per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous” [ANSI Z21.10.3a] American National StandardsWater Heaters With Input Ratings Above 75,000 Btu Per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous” [ANSI Z21.10.3a] American National Standards

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY IN VARIABLE SOURCE AREAS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nutrient transport from a greater distance has to be considered in water management during events with wet and subsurface runoff generation and chemical transport and how these processes can be captured in ungaged basins was instrumented (trenched) in the southern tier of New York, U.S. Water flux from different soil layers

Walter, M.Todd

478

Montana Ground Water Assessment Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes a program to systematically assess and monitor the state's ground water and to disseminate the information to interested persons in order to improve the quality of ground...

479

Quality indexes based on water measurements for low and medium energy x-ray beams: A theoretical study with PENELOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose : To study the use of quality indexes based on ratios of absorbed doses in water at two different depths to characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies. Methods : A total of 55 x-ray beam spectra were generated with the codes XCOMP5R and SPEKCALC and used as input of a series of Monte Carlo simulations performed with PENELOPE, in which the percentage depth doses in water and thek{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} factors, defined in the TRS-398 protocol, were determined for each beam. Some of these calculations were performed by simulating the ionization chamber PTW 30010. Results : The authors found that the relation betweenk{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} and the ratios of absorbed doses at two depths is almost linear. A set of ratios statistically compatible with that showing the best fit has been determined. Conclusions : The results of this study point out which of these ratios of absorbed doses in water could be used to better characterize x-ray beams of low and medium energies.

Chica, U. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)] [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain and FISRAD S.A.S Carrera 64 a No 22-41, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A. M., E-mail: lallena@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Vilches, M. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario “San Cecilio”, Avda. Dr. Olóriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

I.C. 39-3602 - Water Quality--Definitions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe SecondInformation 3 -2 - Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve water quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Water-quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the ground water. However, field studies, conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Hoe Creek site, have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer, and contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have provided opportunities to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than the water in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, valuable lessons ere learned concerning groundwater monitoring. A suggested monitoring strategy is discussed.

Wang, F T; Mead, S W; Stuermer, D H

1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

Modeling and Diagnostics of Fuel Cell Porous Media for Improving Water Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a fuel cell is operating at high current density, water accumulation is a significant cause of performance and component degradation. Investigating the water transport inside the fuel cell is a challenging task due to opacity of the components, the randomness of the porous materials, and the difficulty in gain access to the interior for measurement due to the small dimensions of components. Numerical simulation can provide a good insight of the evolution of the water transport under different working condition. However, the validation of those simulations is remains an issue due the same experimental obstacles associated with in-situ measurements. The discussion herein will focus on pore-network modeling of the water transport on the PTL and the insights gained from simulations as well as in the validation technique. The implications of a recently published criterion to characterize PTL, based on percolation theory, and validate numerical simulation are discussed.

Allen, Jeff; M'edici, Ezequiel

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Improving the technology of creating water-coal fuel from lignites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the preparation of coal-water fuel slurries from lignite. The heat of combustion as related to the preparation of the lignite was investigated. The hydrobarothermal processing of suspensions of lignites was studied in autoclaves.

Gorlov, E.G.; Golovin, G.S.; Zotova, O.V. [Rossiiskaya Akadeiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Spirasol : improvements to semi-continuous solar disinfection water treatment systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was carried out to determine the feasibility of an original point of use solar water disinfection system created by the author and named "Spirasol." The study primarily focused on the comparison of ...

Loux, Brian Michael, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Being water-sensi-ve to improve `liveability' Prof David Pannell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants ­ keeps them out of waterways & estuaries · Stormwater management · Na;es 2012 Combining water sources · Groundwater · Dams · Desal · Recycling · Rainwater

486

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Fish condition as an indicator of water quality in upper Galveston Bay system, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (Chairman of Committee) (Efead of Department) L-- ( Nle n ) b l) Annnst 1972 'LBSTMC T 1-'ish C!l!!di tion a in lnclicator of V/ater Guality in Ifpper GalvosLon Bay Syste!n, Telcas, (!&:, !gust 1972) Gary Car! . on hiatlock, B. A. , Uniuerst&qr of Te...!cas at Austin Dli-ecto!1 by: Dr. K!rk Stravim Tho Fnvironmcntal Prot" ctioil I)cjo!icy has; ':pr, !s!Sd coi!c. em thait "h! e v/aLer quality of Tr in! ty Bay viou lc bo elect!! ?Ocl a:!! Cs u It of !ious on Lightir g Llr!d Povi r Cornpu, ly's Cedar. )Baton...

Matlock, Gary C

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

489

49 A.R.S. 321 et seq.: Water Quality Appeals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive Jump to:Species |2008 |44 Tech Inc.Program

490

ARS Title 49-200 Water Quality Control | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,InformationWind EnergyPublic Utilities and20249 The

491

Improved methods for water shutoff. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the US, more than 20 billion barrels of water are produced each year during oilfield operations. There is a tremendous economic incentive to reduce water production if that can be accomplished without significantly sacrificing hydrocarbon production. In an earlier project, the authors determined that the ability of blocking agents to reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil is critical to the success of these blocking treatments in production wells if zones are not protected during placement of the blocking agent. This research project has three objectives: (1) to identify chemical blocking agents that will during placement, flow readily through fractures without penetrating significantly into porous rock and without screening out or developing excessive pressure gradients and at a predictable and controllable time, become immobile and resist breakdown upon exposure to moderate to high pressure gradients; (2) to identify schemes that optimize placement of blocking agents; and (3) to explain why gels and other chemical blocking agents reduce permeability to one phase (e.g., water) more than that of another phase (e.g., oil or gas). Chapter 2 examines the validity of using water/oil ratio plots to distinguish between coning and channeling water production mechanisms. Chapter 3 develops a method to size gelant treatments in hydraulically fractured production wells. Chapter 4 identifies characteristics of naturally fractured reservoirs where gel treatments have the greatest potential. Chapter 5 reports experimental results from studies of gel properties in fractures. Finally, Chapter 6, the authors investigate the mechanism responsible for gels reducing the permeability to water more than that to oil.

Seright, R.S.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy is Associated With Improved Global Quality of Life Among Long-term Survivors of Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the long-term quality of life among patients treated with and without intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: University of Washington Quality of Life instrument scores were reviewed for 155 patients previously treated with radiation therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. All patients were disease free and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Eighty-four patients (54%) were treated with IMRT. The remaining 71 patients (46%) were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) by use of initial opposed lateral fields matched to a low anterior neck field. Results: The mean global quality of life scores were 67.5 and 80.1 for the IMRT patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively, compared with 55.4 and 57.0 for the 3D CRT patients, respectively (p < 0.001). At 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy, the proportion of patients who rated their global quality of life as 'very good' or 'outstanding' was 51% and 41% among patients treated by IMRT and 3DCRT, respectively (p = 0.11). At 2 years, the corresponding percentages increased to 73% and 49%, respectively (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis accounting for sex, age, radiation intent (definitive vs. postoperative), radiation dose, T stage, primary site, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and neck dissection, the use of IMRT was the only variable independently associated with improved quality of life (p = 0.01). Conclusion: The early quality of life improvements associated with IMRT not only are maintained but apparently become more magnified over time. These data provide powerful evidence attesting to the long-term benefits of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Vazquez, Esther G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

WATER-QUALITY CONDITIONS DURING LOW FLOW IN THE LOWER YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER BASIN, PENNSYLVANIA, OCTOBER 5-7, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1998, a chemical synoptic survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, in the Lower Youghiogheny River Basin in Pennsylvania to give a snap-shot of present (1998) water quality during low-flow conditions. Water samples from 38 sites--12 mainstem sites, 22 tributaries, and 4 mine discharges that discharge directly to the Youghiogheny River--were used to identify sources of contaminants from mining operations. Specific conductance, water temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured in the field at each site and concentrations of major ions and trace elements were measured in the laboratory. Unaccounted for gains and losses in streamflow were measured during the study. Unaccounted for losses in streamflow might be attributed to water loss through streambed fractures. Extensive mine tunnels are present in the basin and loss of water to these tunnels seems likely. Unaccounted for gains in streamflow may be from unmeasured tributaries or surface seeps, but most of the gains are suspected to come from artesian flow through fractures in the streambed from underground mine pools. Influent flows of rust-colored water were noted in some river sections. The pH values for all the samples collected during this survey were above 5.8, and most (33 of 38 samples) were above 7.0. Samples from the four mine-discharge sites also had pH values between 6.3 and 6.7. The lowest pH (5.8) was in a tributary, Galley Run. All 38 sampling sites had net alkalinity. The alkalinity load in the Youghiogheny River increased between Connellsville and McKeesport from 35 to 79 tons per day. Above Smithton, the measured alkalinity load in the Lower Youghiogheny River agreed well with the estimated alkalinity load. Below Smithton, measured alkalinity loads in the Lower Youghiogheny River are greater than calculated loads, resulting in unaccounted for gains in alkalinity. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed. Approximately one-third of the load of total alkalinity in the Youghiogheny River at McKeesport is attributed to Sewickley Creek, which contributes 14 tons per day. Sulfate concentrations in the Youghiogheny River steadily increase from 33 milligrams per liter at Connellsville to 77 milligrams per liter near McKeesport. The measured concentrations of sulfate exceeded Pennsylvania water-quality standards at four tributary sites (Galley Run, Hickman Run, Sewickley Creek, and Gillespie Run) and all four mine-discharge sites but not at any main-stem sites. A large increase in sulfate load between West Newton and Sutersville can be attributed almost entirely to the contribution from Sewickley Creek (49 tons per day). Approximately 25 percent of the load measured between Connellsville and McKeesport is unaccounted for. These gains are believed to be from seeps in the streambed from underground mine pools. Similar patterns also were observed for loads of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. Unmeasured inputs from mine rainage are believed to be the source of these loads. Elevated concentrations (above background levels) of chemicals associated with drainage from coal-mining operations were measured in samples from tributaries, especially from Galley Run, Gillespie Run, and Sewickley Creek, and from the mine-discharge sites. The synoptic survey conducted for this study was successful in identifying generalized reaches of the Youghiogheny River where unaccounted for loads of constituents associated with mining activities are entering the river. However, the survey was not able to pinpoint the location of these loads. Remote-sensing techniques, such as thermal infrared imaging by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, could be useful for determining the precise locations of these inputs.

James I. Sams, III, Karl T. Schroeder; Terry E. Ackman; J. Kent Crawford; Kim L. Otto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Design and Evaluation of a Low-Cost Point-of-Use Ultraviolet Water Disinfection Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of small quantities of by-products, such as dichloromethane in the former and benzene in the later, after quality along with sufficient provision of water supply and improved hygiene and sanitation (2). We socioeconomic, temporal and geographic scales. Water quality may be improved through more effective central

Kammen, Daniel M.

495

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Can carbon finance contribute to the promotion of solar water heating in Bolivia?   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential applications of renewable energy can contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions while improving the quality of life for households. Thermosiphon solar water heaters are passive systems using solar energy to supply hot water...

Hayek, Niklas

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

497

Development of methods for evaluating options for improving the air quality in Santiago, Chile and its environs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Officials from both the Santiago metropolitan air quality commission (La Comision Especial de Descontaminacion de le Region Metropolitana) and a government-owned copper development company (La Empresa Nacional de Mineria (ENAMI)) have asked assistance to deal with the air quality problems in Santiago and associated with smelter emissions. Two smelter sites are examined. One smelter, Ventanas, is located on the Pacific coast to the northwest of Santiago, while the other, Paipote, is located several hundred kilometers to the north. The Ventanas emissions may potentially affect Santiago air quality. Several advantages of working with the smelters in the early phases of the project are: (1) the meteorological and air quality monitoring in the vicinity of the smelters allows for model validation; (2) the development of a useful emission inventory is easier, (3) the smelters pose a simpler problem, which when resolved, will provide an early benefit to our Chilean colleagues, and (4) important experience is gained in preparation to delve deeper into Santiago`s air pollution problems. Our goals for this phase of the project include: determining the smelters impact on air quality in surrounding communities; evaluating whether air pollution from the smelters reaches Santiago; and helping Chilean scientists meet a national decree to have air quality models for smelters.

Williams, M.D.; Brown, M.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

DEVELOPMENT OF POLYMER GEL SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE VOLUMETRIC SWEEP AND REDUCE PRODUCING WATER/OIL RATIOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the first year of a three-year research program that is aimed at the understanding of the chemistry of gelation and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work has focused on a widely-applied system in field applications, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. The initial reaction between chromium acetate and one polymer is referred to as the uptake reaction. The uptake reaction was studied as functions of chromium and polymer concentrations and pH values. Experimental data were regressed to determine a rate equation that describes the uptake reaction of chromium by polyacrylamide. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as the reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A statistical model that describes the growth of pre-gel aggregates was developed using the theory of branching processes. The model gives molecular weight averages that are expressed as functions of the conversion of the reactive sites on chromium acetate or on the polymer molecule. Results of the application of the model correlate well with experimental data of viscosity and weight-average molecular weight and gives insights into the gelation process. A third study addresses the flow of water and oil in rock material after a gel treatment. Previous works have shown that gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. Increased pressure gradients during oil flow decreased the oil permeability and the water permeability that was measured afterward. Lower pressure gradients that were applied subsequently moderately affected water permeabilities but did not affect oil permeabilities. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels.

G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Rajeev Jain; Tuan Nguyen

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Sustainable Water Practices at Pomona's Parks: Improving Irrigation Use and Stormwater Runoff Retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, however, it falls short of the abundant use of other renewable resources such as wind and solar energy use at parks. This would prevent the problems created by traditional runoff and landscape design, it is a necessary step towards a more sustainable future. #12;2 Water Problems and Urban Parks The human body

Young, Terence

500

Systematic Improvement of a Classical Molecular Model of Water Lee-Ping Wang,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-consistent polarizable model such as AMOEBA. The model is parameterized using ForceBalance, a systematic optimization calculations. We show that iAMOEBA is a highly accurate model for water in the solid, liquid, and gas phases properties beyond the training data set including the phase diagram. The increased accuracy of iAMOEBA over

Ponder, Jay