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1

Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small Business Innovative Research Grants Achieve Commercialization Goals for Novel Gas Turbine Manufacturing Technology

3

Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide is meant to present the steam turbine performance engineer with the expected and important functions and responsibilities necessary to succeed in this position that are not necessarily taught in college. The instructions and recommendations in this guide, when properly executed, will improve the effectiveness of steam turbine performance engineers, positively affecting both the performance and reliability of the steam turbines under their care.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NETL: Turbine Projects - Efficiency Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvemenet Turbine Projects Efficiency Improvemenet Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig DataFact Sheets System Study for Improved Gas Turbine...

9

DOE-Supported Technology Passes Scale-Up Test Converting CO DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into Valuable Materials into Valuable Materials Publications News Release Release Date: June 17, 2013 DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Photo courtesy of Mikro Systems, Inc. Washington, D.C. - An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The technology - which is expected to contribute to cleaner, more reliable and affordable domestic energy production as well as creating new

10

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Assessment of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Data Mining for Wind Turbine Condition Monitoring and Performance Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind industry grows and matures, many of the larger wind turbines (2 MW and above) are being outfitted with sophisticated condition-monitoring systems (CMSs), supplied either by the original equipment manufacturer or through a third party to reduce failures, decrease maintenance downtime, and improve reliability. Such systems use vibration sensors in key positions and lubrication oil analysis, with costs of the hardware relatively high, and suffer from spurious alarms. The lifetime cost-benefit ra...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gas Turbine World performance specs 1984  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed: working insights into the performance specifications; performance and design characteristics of electric power plants, mechanical drive gas turbines, and marine propulsion gas turbines; and performance calculations.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Compressor & Steam Turbine Efficiency Improvements & Revamping Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fossil fuels remain the dominant source for primary energy production worldwide. In relation to this trend, energy consumption in turbomachinery has been increasing due to the scale up of both the machinery itself as well as the processing plants in which they operate. This energy growth requires high efficiency improvements for machine design and operation to minimize life cycle cost. This paper will focus on the mechanical drive steam turbines which power the main process equipment in the heart of the plant and introduce the history of efficiency improvements for compressors and steam turbines in the Petrochemical Industry. Since heat balance configurations affect the plant's steam consumption, the authors will explain several cases of heat balance configurations and applications / selections of steam turbines. According to the change in output demand, in some cases the original plants are modified by increasing capacity and consequently the turbines and compressors are revamped internally or replaced totally. The authors will introduce several case studies on revamping to increase efficiency and reliability as per the following cases: a) Replacement of High Pressure Section Internals b) Replacement of Low Pressure Section Internals c) Replacement of All Internals d) Internals and Casing Replacement e) Efficiency Recovery Technique Modification Finally, life cycle cost (LCC) evaluation and sensitivity due to turbomachinery performance are explained as a case study of a mega ethylene plant.

Hata, S.; Horiba, J.; Sicker, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Improving Wind Turbine Gearbox Reliability: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a new research and development initiative to improve gearbox reliability in wind turbines begun at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, USA.

Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; McNiff, B.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy. The collaborative technology license agreement, penned by Mikro Systems Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc., reflects growth in U.S.-based manufacturing know-how and leadership in cutting-edge technology development and rapid implementation. Gas turbines, which are used to produce electricity for industrial or central power generation applications, consist sequentially of compressor,

16

Charts estimate gas-turbine site performance  

SciTech Connect

Nomographs have been developed to simplify site performance estimates for various types of gas turbine engines used for industrial applications. The nomographs can provide valuable data for engineers to use for an initial appraisal of projects where gas turbines are to be considered. General guidelines for the selection of gas turbines are also discussed. In particular, site conditions that influence the performance of gas turbines are described.

Dharmadhikari, S.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington,...

18

Performance optimization of gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of a gas turbine engine can be expressed in terms of minimizing fuel consumption while maintaining nominal thrust output, maximizing thrust for the same fuel consumption and minimizing turbine blade temperature. Additional control ... Keywords: Fuel control, Gas turbines, Genetic algorithms, Optimization, Temperature control

Valceres V. R. Silva; Wael Khatib; Peter J. Fleming

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Performance and supply of fluids in a modern gas turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis considers the role fluids play in improving the efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of modern gas turbines. This includes gas turbines used… (more)

Askins, John Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Feasibility Studies on Disturbance Feedforward Techniques to Improve Wind Turbine Load Mitigation Performance: January 2009 -- January 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates disturbance feedforward and preview control to better understand the best possible improvement in load mitigation using advanced wind measurement techniques.

Laks, J.H.; Dunne, F.; Pao, L. Y.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Enhancing gas-turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

According to one report, around 80% of the large frame-size industrial and utility gas turbines (GTs) in service throughout the world were installed between 1965 and 1975. Because of substantial technology advancements since their commissioning, these older units make ideal candidates for capacity enhancements through such options as steam or water injection, inlet-air cooling, steam-cycle addition, hot-gas-path component uprates, and in the case of combined-cycles, supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). This article reports that many gas-turbine owners are searching for upgrades that will enhance capacity or thermal efficiency--or both. Uprating hot-gas-path components is perhaps the most popular option, but economic evaluations must account for shortened hot-section life and higher O and M costs.

Swanekamp, R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Adaptive simulation of gas turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented allowing the simulation of gas turbine performance with the possibility of adapting to engine particularities. Measurements along the gas path are used, in order to adapt a given performance model by appropriate modification of the component maps. The proposed method can provide accurate simulation for engines of the same type, differing due to manufacturing or assembly tolerances. It doesn't require accurate component maps, as they are derived during the adaptation process. It also can be used for health monitoring purposes, introducing thus a novel approach for component condition assessment. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by application to an industrial gas turbine.

Stamatis, A.; Mathioudakis, K.; Papailiou, K.D. (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechneion, Athens (Greece))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a Tesla turbine microchannel . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 History of the Tesla Turbine 1.3 BackgroundCFD) Solution of Flow Through a Tesla Turbine 4.1 Summary of

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

camera. Bottom: tested turbine rotor housing diameter isfound in Figure 1.1. The turbine rotor consists of severalpower was reached. The turbine rotor and nozzle can be seen

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Wind turbine generator with improved operating subassemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine includes a yaw spring return assembly to return the nacelle from a position to which it has been rotated by yawing forces, thus preventing excessive twisting of the power cables and control cables. It also includes negative coning restrainers to limit the bending of the flexible arms of the rotor towards the tower, and stop means on the rotor shaft to orient the blades in a vertical position during periods when the unit is upwind when the wind commences. A pendulum pitch control mechanism is improved by orienting the pivot axis for the pendulum arm at an angle to the longitudinal axis of its support arm, and excessive creep is of the synthetic resin flexible beam support for the blades is prevented by a restraining cable which limits the extent of pivoting of the pendulum during normal operation but which will permit further pivoting under abnormal conditions to cause the rotor to stall.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (24 Stonepost Rd., Glastonbury, CT 06033)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Wind Turbine Productivity Improvement and Procurement Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper selection of equipment specifications during wind turbine procurement and careful operation and maintenance procedures are keys to maximizing wind project availability and annual energy generation and revenues.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

Clifton, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Improving Repair Quality of Turbine Nozzles Using SA650 Braze Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

improved repairs for key gas turbine components. Airfoil components of High Pressure and Low. Pressure turbines (HPT and LPT) are subject to wear and ...

33

Improved Gas Turbines for LBTU Syngas Fuel Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines running on syngas can take advantage of that fuel's high mass flow per BTU. Optimizing performance while keeping all operating parameters within acceptable limits was the result of a G.E. project.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

NREL: News Feature - New Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines December 26, 2013 Two men stand in front of the test equipment in the dynamometer facility discussing work being done. Behind them are two large blue machines that make up the dynamometer test apparatus. A white wind turbine nacelle system is attached to these devices to their left. Enlarge image NREL engineer Scott Lambert (left) and Project Manager Mark McDade discuss calibrations being done on the new dynamometer at the 5-MW Dynamometer Test Facility at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Credit: Dennis Schroeder Premature failures of mechanical systems have a significant impact on the cost of wind turbine operations and thus the total cost of wind energy. Recently, the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory

35

Gas Turbine Technology, Part A: Overview, Cycles, and Thermodynamic Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of cogeneration technology has accelerated in recent years, and it is estimated that fifty percent of the cogeneration market will involve gas turbines. To several energy engineers, gas turbine engines present a new and somewhat perplexing prime mover. This paper (Parts A & B) intends to treat the area of gas turbine technology to provide a broad overview and understanding of this subject. This paper (Part A) covers the basics of gas turbine cycles, thermodynamics and performance considerations that are important in cogeneration. Simple, regenerative and combined cycles will be discussed, along with important performance losses (inlet and exit losses and part load operation). Waste heat recovery, as it relates to gas turbine performance, will also be discussed. This paper will provide the basic equations enabling quick computations to be made. Topics such as typical efficiencies, evaporative cooling costs, emissions, etc. will be discussed. A brief discussion of advanced cycles such as the dual fluid cycle and close cycles is also made.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Turbine Technologies for High Performance Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Available turbine technologies for a High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) have been analysed. For the envisaged steam pressures and temperatures of 25 MPa and 500 deg. C, no further challenges in turbine technologies have to be expected. The results from a steam cycle analysis indicate a net plant efficiency of 43.9% for the current HPLWR design. (authors)

Bitterman, D. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam- and water-cooled gas turbine: steam turbine combined cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study was made of the performance of air-, steam-, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam-turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal-barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205/sup 0/C to 1370/sup 0/C, resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4% when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425/sup 0/C to 1675/sup 0/C and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683/sup 0/C and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6% by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425/sup 0/C to 1730/sup 0/C and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air-cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205/sup 0/C. The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

Nainiger, J.J.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on the results of the power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on Entegrity Wind System Inc.'s EW50 small wind turbine.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Performance and market evaluation of the bladeless turbine  

SciTech Connect

The three-inch diameter prototype bladeless turbine was tested with air over a range of inlet pressures from 20 to 100 psia and speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 thousand rpm. The peak efficiency of 22.5 percent was recorded at a pressure of 98 psia and a speed of 40,000 rpm. Efficiency increased slightly with speed and inlet pressure over the range of test conditions. The test program was somewhat hindered by mechanical failures. The turbine bearings in particular were unreliable, with two instances of outright failure and numerous cases of erratic performance. A model of the bladeless turbine was developed to aid in interpreting the experimental results. A macroscopic approach, incorporating several favorable assumptions, was taken to place a reasonable upper bound on turbine efficiency. The model analytically examines the flow through the air inlet nozzles and the interaction between the fluid jet and the turbine blades. The analysis indicates that the maximum possible efficiency of a tangential flow turbine with straight axial blades is 50 percent. This is a direct consequence of turning the fluid only 90 degrees relative to the turbine blade. The adoption of the bladeless turbine as the expander in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) will depend to a great extent on the efficiency of the turbine. The market potential for ORC technology will also impact the adoption of the bladeless turbine. Other expanders have demonstrated efficiencies of 60 to 80% in ORC systems. The Gamell turbine had a peak test efficiency of 22.5% and a maximum theoretical efficiency of 50%. Costs of the turbine are highly uncertain, relying to a great extent on cost reductions achieved through quantity production and through learning.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Barnhart, J.S.; Eschbach, E.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Design of wind turbines with Ultra-High Performance Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) has proven an asset for bridge design as it significantly reduces costs. However, UHPC has not been applied yet to wind turbine technology. Design codes do not propose any recommendations ...

Jammes, François-Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Using Machine Learning to Create Turbine Performance Models (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to explore atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that of the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data is required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site.

Clifton, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM) presented in this report is the second of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a signifi...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeffrey Bons Jeffrey Bons Co-PIs: Iowa State University - Drs. Tom Shih and ZJ Wang University of Cincinnati - Drs. Tafi Hamed and Widen Tabakoff Air Force Research Lab - Dr. Richard Rivir SCIES Project 02- 01- SR104 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (06/01/02, 36 Month Duration) $563,712 Total Contract Value Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance Brigham Young University JPB/BYU/29Oct2003 BYU-UTSR-Oct03, 29 Oct 2003, JPB The Gas Turbine Community NEEDS adequate tools to estimate the associated loss in engine performance with service time. ROUGH! ARE TURBINES Surface Degradation - Increases Heat Transfer - Reduces Efficiency GAS TURBINE NEED

46

NREL Collaborates to Improve Wind Turbine Technology (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative leads to wind turbine gearbox reliability, lowering the cost of energy. Unintended gearbox failures have a significant impact on the cost of wind farm operations. In 2007, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC), which follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers, and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. NREL and other GRC partners have been able to identify shortcomings in the design, testing, and operation of wind turbines that contribute to reduced gearbox reliability. In contrast to private investigations of these problems, GRC findings are quickly shared among GRC participants, including many wind turbine manufacturers and equipment suppliers. Ultimately, the findings are made public for use throughout the wind industry. This knowledge will result in increased gearbox reliability and an overall reduction in the cost of wind energy. Project essentials include the development of two redesigned and heavily instrumented representative gearbox designs. Field and dynamometer tests are conducted on the gearboxes to build an understanding of how selected loads and events translate into bearing and gear response. The GRC evaluates and validates current wind turbine, gearbox, gear and bearing analytical tools/models, develops new tools/models, and recommends improvements to design and certification standards, as required. In addition, the GRC is investigating condition monitoring methods to improve turbine reliability. Gearbox deficiencies are the result of many factors, and the GRC team recommends efficient and cost-effective improvements in order to expand the industry knowledge base and facilitate immediate improvements in the gearbox life cycle.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Performance test of a bladeless turbine for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Possell bladeless turbine was tested at the LLL Geothermal Test Facility to evaluate its potential for application in the total flow process. Test description and performance data are given for 3000, 3500, 4000, and 4500 rpm. The maximum engine efficiency observed was less than 7 percent. It is concluded that the Possell turbine is not a viable candidate machine for the conversion of geothermal fluids by the total flow process. (LBS)

Steidel, R.; Weiss, H.

1976-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superalloy Surface Treatment Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Method to Improve Superalloy Resistance by Surface Treatment." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview To produce power more efficiently and cleanly, the next generation of power and aero turbines along with other essential components will have to operate at extreme temperatures and pressures. Currently advanced single crystal nickel-based superalloys are used in such extreme environments. Even though these components are coated with a bond

49

Field investigations examining the impact of supersaturated vapor expansions on turbine performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigators in the Heat Cycle Research project are developing a technology base which will permit the increased utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resource for the production of electrical power. The project investigations have focused upon power cycles which have the potential for the increased utilization (power produced per unit quantity of fluid) of the hydrothermal resource. The investigations to date have confirmed the viability of technology required to incorporate concepts which will allow the binary power cycle to have a performance approaching practical thermodynamic maximums. Investigations in progress are examining the potential improvements that result from allowing super-saturated turbine expansions. During these metastable expansions, the working fluid is maintained as a supersaturated vapor during the turbine expansion process; if at equilibrium conditions, liquid condensate would be present. If it can be shown that these expansions proceed without a degradation in turbine performance or damage to the turbine internals by any condensate which forms, a projected 8% improvement in the performance of the advanced cycle could be realized. Investigators are presently examining the condensation behavior of these expansions, as well as determining the impact of these expansions on turbine performance.

Mines, G.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Standards of performance for new stationary sources gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

In order to implement the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency establishes standards of performance which limit emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from new, modified, and reconstructed stationary gas turbines. The intended effect of this regulation is to require new, modified, and reconstructed stationary gas turbines to use the best demonstrated system of continuous emission reduction. There are no emission limits for gas turbines below 10.7 gigaj/hr. For all gas turbines 10.7 gigaj/hr and larger, the sulfur dioxide emission limit is 150 ppm; alternatively, a fuel with less than 0.8Vertical Bar3< sulfur can be fired. For gas turbines between 10.7 and 107.2 giga8/hr used for gas and oil transportation or production not located in a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the nitrogen oxides emission limit is 150 ppm. For gas turbines larger than 107.2 gigaj/hr used for gas and oil transportation or production located in an MSA, and for all other uses, the nitrogen oxides emission limit is 75 ppm. These regulations are effective as of 9/10/79.

1979-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Inter-stage and Performance Tests of a Two-stage High-pressure Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage research turbine at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) facility, Texas A & M University (TAMU) was replaced with a newly designed and manufactured 2-stage turbine in accordance with the design requirements as per DooSan, DHI. This new design of turbine consisted of bowed stator and rotor blades to study the effect on reduction of secondary ow losses and thus improvement in turbine efficiency if any. The new design also incorporated labyrinth seals on both inner and outer shrouds. Extensive Inter-stage and Performance experiments were carried out on this new turbine. Inter-stage measurements were accomplished by traversing three 5-hole probes radially and circumferentially, using the existing probe traverse system in TPFL. Performance tests were conducted for varying pressure ratio, at fixed rotational speed and for varying rotational speed with fixed pressure ratio and the efficiency was plotted against u/c_0. Each condition was tested and measured two to three times to check for reproducibility of the data. The results from inter-stage experiments show that the rotor row loss coefficient is about four times higher than the stator row loss coefficient. This high rotor loss coefficient reduces the total to static efficiency. From the performance tests, the maximum total-to-static efficiency observed was 85.2 percent located at around u/c_0 = 0.75. This relatively low efficiency is in consonance with the inter-stage results (high rotor loss coefficient).

Sharma, Kapil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Gas turbine performance versus time in service. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbine performance deterioration is accompanied by changes to the parameter relationships of the gas turbine components and mostly to those parameters that are significantly affected by changes to the gas turbine's components efficiencies, namely power output and heat rate. Deterioration, therefore, is characterized by a decrease in power and an increase in heat rate at constant turbine temperature, and an increase in fuel flow and heat rate at constant engine or compressor pressure ratio or at constant power output. The loss in component efficiency is normally caused by changes in the gas path configuration of the compressor(s) and/or turbine(s). These changes are normally characterized by erosion and/or corrosion of air foils, air or gas seals, or deposits on air foils which significantly affect the flow characteristics of these parts. In any case, we are talking about the introduction of fouling, corrosion, and erosion agents into the gas path through the air inlet system and the fuel system. Since the environment and fuels are the major sources of gas path contamination, such things as air filters, fuel quality, duty cycle, gas path configuration, geographic consideration, cleaning techniques and frequency should influence the rate at which deterioration takes place. Data from single shaft gas turbines operated at continuous base load power, and baseload peaking duty cycle, was used to quantify typical deterioration curves for these machines. Power deviation differences at 10,000 hours chargeable to natural gas vs distillate fuel is six percentage points in favor of natural gas. The effect of evaporative coolers, airwashers and high efficiency filters in terms of power deviation at 10,000 hours is approximately five percentage points in favor of the filtered or airwashed inlet.

Brazel, W.N.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Summary of currently used wind turbine performance prediction computer codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Informaion on currently used wind turbine aerodynamic/economic performance prediction codes is compiled and presented. Areas of interest to wind energy researchers that are not included in the reported codes are identified. Areas which are weak in experimental support are also identified.

Perkins, F.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aerodynamic performance measurements of a film-cooled turbine stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to measure the aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine stage and to quantify the loss caused by film-cooling. A secondary goal of the research is to provide a detailed breakdown of the ...

Keogh, Rory (Rory Colm), 1968-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of vortex generators for augmentation of wind turbine power performance  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the use of vortex generators (VGs) for performance augmentation of the stall-regulated AWT-26 wind turbine. The goal was to design a VG array which would increase annual energy production (AEP) by increasing power output at moderate wind speeds, without adversely affecting the loads or stall-regulation performance of the turbine. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at the University of Washington to evaluate the effect of VGs on the AWT-26 blade, which is lofted from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) S-series airfoils. Based on wind-tunnel results and analysis, a VG array was designed and then tested on the AWT-26 prototype, designated P1. Performance and loads data were measured for P1, both with and without VGs installed. the turbine performance with VGs met most of the design requirements; power output was increased at moderate wind speeds with a negligible effect on peak power. However, VG drag penalties caused a loss in power output for low wind speeds, such that performance with VGs resulted in a net decrease in AEP for sites having annual average wind speeds up to 8.5 m/s. While the present work did not lead to improved AEP for the AWT-2 turbine, it does provide insight into performance augmentation of wind turbines with VGs. The safe design of a VG array for a stall-regulated turbine has been demonstrated, and several issues involving optimal performance with VGs have been identified and addressed. 15 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

Griffin, D.A. [Lynette (R.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A neural network control strategy for improved energy capture on a variable-speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pitch control has so far been the dominating method for power control in modern variable speed wind turbines. This paper proposes an improved control technique for pitching the blades of a variable speed wind turbine, using Artificial Neural Networks ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, control trajectories, pitch control, variable-speed wind turbines

António F. Silva; Fernando A. Castro; José N. Fidalgo

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E; Holz, R [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.; Gevorgian, V [State Engineering Univ. of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

ENDWALL SHAPE MODIFICATION USING VORTEX GENERATORS AND FENCES TO IMPROVE GAS TURBINE COOLING AND EFFECTIVENESS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gas turbine is one of the most important parts of the air-breathing jet engine. Hence, improving its efficiency and rendering it operable under high… (more)

Gokce, Zeki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improve energy performance | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial...

62

Turbine-Turbine Interaction and Performance Detailed (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aero-elastic simulations.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine , S. Tullis2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine R. Bravo1 , S. Tullis2 , S. Ziada3 of electric production [1]. Although most performance testing for small-scale wind turbines is conducted vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) in urban settings, full-scale wind tunnel testing of a prototype 3.5 k

Tullis, Stephen

64

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems in more specialist applications, such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines, different silencer experiments are carried out with the aim of investigating performance of silencers used on gas turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

Parametric performance analysis of steam-injected gas turbine with a thermionic-energy-converter-lined combustor  

SciTech Connect

The performance of steam-injected gas turbines having combustors lined with thermionic energy converters (STIG/TEC systems) was analyzed and compared with that of two baseline systems a steam-injected gas turbine (without a TEC-lined combustor) and a conventional combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycle. Common gas turbine parameters were assumed for all of the systems. Two configurations of the STIG/TEC system were investigated. In both cases, steam produced in an exhaust-heat-recovery boiler cools the TEC collectors. It is then injected into the gas combustion stream and expanded through the gas turbine. The STIG/TEC system combines the advantage of gas turbine steam injection with the conversion of high-temperature combustion heat by TEC's. The addition of TEC's to the baseline steam-injected gas turbine improves both its efficiency and specific power. Depending on system configuration and design parameters, the STIG/TEC system can also achieve higher efficiency and specific power than the baseline combined cycle.

Choo, Y.K.; Burns, R.K.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF WIND TURBINE POWER REGULATION BY SWITCHED LINEAR CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF WIND TURBINE POWER REGULATION BY SWITCHED LINEAR CONTROL D.J.Leith W Power regulation of horizontal-axis grid-connected up-wind constant-speed pitch-regulated wind turbines, switched linear control is more suited for application to wind turbines than the nonlinear control strategy

Duffy, Ken

67

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE ENGINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE and topped engines. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are typical power sources used in a wide size range, development, and application of small gas turbines yielding high power density and enabling low-cost air

Müller, Norbert

68

Automated DecisionAnalytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Decision­Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno­ sis of e#ciency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day­to­day maintenance of gas­ turbine power plants. A Overview

Horvitz, Eric

69

Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno- sis of efficiency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day-to-day maintenance of gas- turbine power plants. A Overview

Horvitz, Eric

70

Nanolubricants to Improve Chiller Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanolubricants to Improve Chiller Nanolubricants to Improve Chiller Performance Mark Kedzierski NIST MAK@NIST.GOV 301 975 5282 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Enabling technology for improving the efficiency of chillers that cool large buildings with nanolubricants. (Nanolubricants are not currently used in chillers.) Develop fundamental understanding of how nanolubricants enhance refrigerant/nanolubricant. What nanoparticle size,

71

Materials review for improved automotive gas-turbine engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced materials are the key to achieving the performance and fuel economy goals of improved automotive gas turbine engines. The potential role of superalloys, refractory alloys, and ceramics in the hottest sections of future engines that may be required to operate with turbine inlet temperatures as high as 1370/sup 0/C (2500/sup 0/F) is examined. These high temperature materials are reviewed. The characteristics of the best modern conventional superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, and tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys are reviewed; and the most promising alloys in each system are compared on the basis of maximum turbine blade temperature capability. The requirements for improved high temperature protective coatings and special fabrication techniques for these advanced alloys are discussed. Chromium, columbium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed. On the basis of properties, cost, availability, and strategic importance, molybdenum alloys are found to be the most suitable refractory material for turbine wheels for mass produced engines. Ceramic material candidates are reviewed and ranked according to their probability of success in particular applications. Various forms of, and fabrication processes for both silicon nitride and silicon carbide, along with SiAlON's are investigated for use in high-stress and medium-stress high temperature environments. Low-stress glass-ceramic regenerator materials are also investigated. Treatment is given to processing requirements, such as coatings for oxidation/corrosion protection, joining methods, and machining technology. Economics of ceramic raw materials, and of various processing methods are discussed. Conclusions are drawn, and recommendations for areas of further research are proposed for consideration and/or adoption.

Belleau, C.; Ehlers, W.L.; Hagen, F.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Simulation of doubly-fed machine with improved wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of wind turbines use induction generators that are very reliable with low costs [2], but when it is straightly connected to the grid, maximum power is not accessible [1] and only a few change of speed between maximum speed and synchronous speed ... Keywords: doubly-fed machine, gearbox ratio, high speed shaft, low speed shaft, wind turbine

Hengameh Kojooyan Jafari

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peer Review Workshop III Peer Review Workshop III 18-20 October 2005 Jeffrey Bons BYU Z.J. Wang (3-D) Tom Shih (2-D) Iowa State University IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance - 2-D/3-D CFD Simulations of Rough Surfaces- * Perform detailed CFD simulations to generate understanding of flow and heat transfer phenomena over rough surfaces. * Use understanding generated to develop engineering models to predict heat transfer and friction on rough surfaces. Objectives IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Accomplishments * Performed 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations. * Generated a preliminary engineering model. 3-D CFD: Z.J. Wang * 1/6 -1/3 of the span (from Jeffrey Bons' experiment) selected for the computational domain; * 2 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm resolutions for coarse, medium and

74

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D.

76

Processing of High Performance Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Polymeric Materials for Wind Turbine Blades Using the Spiral Notch Torsion Test · High Performance Alloys for Advanced ...

77

Monitoring system improves maintenance for North Sea industrial gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

A change in maintenance emphasis and installation of a computerized condition-monitoring system for Type-H industrial gas turbines on Ekofisk platforms have led to more efficient use of manpower and more-productive machinery.

Cullen, J.P. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Tanager (NO))

1988-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) with 10-km horizontal grid spacing was used to explore improvements in wind speed forecasts at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m). An ensemble consisting of WRF model simulations with ...

Adam J. Deppe; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

METC/C-97/7278 METC/C-97/7278 Title: Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance STudies Authors: George T. Lee (METC) Frederick A. Sudhoff (METC) Conference: Fuel Cells '96 Review Meeting Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: August 20-21, 1996 Conference Sponsor: U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Turbine Research Program Cold Weather Turbine Project: Period of Performance May 27, 1999 -- March 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Northern Power Systems completed the Cold Weather Turbine (CWT) project, which was funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under subcontract XAT-9-29200-01. The project's primary goal is to develop a 100-kW wind turbine suited for deployment in remote villages in cold regions. The contract required testing and certification of the turbine to the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-1 international standard through Underwriters Laboratories (UL). The contract also required Northern Power Systems to study design considerations for operation in extreme cold (-80F at the South Pole, for example). The design was based on the successful proof of concept (POC) turbine (developed under NREL and NASA contracts), considered the prototype turbine that would be refined and manufactured to serve villages in cold regions around the world.

Lynch, J.; Bywaters, G.; Costin, D.; Hoskins, S.; Mattila, P.; Stowell, J.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for a… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Applicability of Nacelle Anemometer Measurements for Use in Turbine Power Performance Tests: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collection of accurate wind speed data is one of the more problematic elements in conducting wind turbine power performance tests. IEC 61400-12 specifies meteorological tower placement between two and four rotor diameters upwind of the test turbine. However, use of an upwind meteorological tower can be difficult at some sites. In some cases, complex terrain near the turbine may make placement of an upwind tower impossible. In addition, purchase and erection of a meteorological tower can be expensive, particularly as the hub height of large turbines increases. Because of these concerns, wind farm owners and turbine manufacturers have expressed interest in the use of turbine nacelle-mounted anemometers for collection of wind speed data. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has performed data collection and power performance tests at wind energy facilities located in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the data gathered from the Big Spring, Texas; Algona, Iowa; and Springview, Nebraska, facilities to determine whether a meaningful relationship can be derived between meteorological-tower and nacelle-anemometer wind speed measurements for Vestas V47 and V66 turbines (Big Spring) and Enron Z-50 turbines (Algona and Springview).

Smith, B.; Link, H.; Randall, G.; McCoy, T.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Title Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009...

89

Free-air performance tests of a 5-metre-diameter Darrieus turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-meter-diameter vertical-axis wind turbine has been tested at the Sandia Laboratories Wind Turbine Site. The results of these tests and some of the problems associated with free-air testing of wind turbines are presented. The performance data obtained follow the general trend of data obtained in extensive wind tunnel tests of a 2-meter-diameter turbine. However, the power coefficient data are slightly lower than anticipated. The reasons for this discrepancy are explored along with comparisons between experimental data and a computerized aerodynamic prediction model.

Sheldahl, R.E.; Blackwell, B.F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessment of Low Pressure Turbine Exhaust System Improvements at Mayo Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes extensive analyses and tests conducted on Carolina Power and Light's (CP&L's) Mayo Generating Station low pressure turbines to investigate the possibility of achieving heat rate reductions through modification to the turbine exhaust hood. Field results showed slightly less exhaust loss than anticipated from the manufacturer's thermal kit data, suggesting less potential for gains derived from hood improvements. Analytical work with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models supported t...

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance computer code darter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer code DARTER (DARrieus, Turbine, Elemental Reynolds number) is an aerodynamic performance/loads prediction scheme based upon the conservation of momentum principle. It is the latest evolution in a sequence which began with a model developed by Templin of NRC, Canada and progressed through the Sandia National Laboratories-developed SIMOSS (SSImple MOmentum, Single Streamtube) and DART (SARrieus Turbine) to DARTER.

Klimas, P. C.; French, R. E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Wind Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Turbine Generators at the Newport Indiana Chemical Depot Site Joseph Owen Roberts and Gail Mosey Produced under direction of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the...

94

Modeling the performance of a two-phase turbine using numerical methods and the results of nozzle, static cascade, and windage experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance models for a two-phase turbine were developed to verify the understanding of the loss mechanisms and to extrapolate from the single-nozzle test condition to a full-admission turbine. The numerical models for predicting the performance of the nozzle and the combined nozzle and rotor are described. Results from two-phase, static cascade tests and disk-friction and windage experiments are used to calibrate the performance model(s). Model predictions are compared with single-nozzle prototype-turbine test results, and extrapolations are made to a full-admission design. The modeling also provides predictions of performance for turbines with various blade geometries, inlet conditions, and droplet sizes. Thus the modeling provides insight into design improvements.

Comfort, W.J. III

1978-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents complete data from a test program to determine the behavior of several coal-derived and shale-derived liquid fuels when burned in state-of-the-art combustion turbine engines. The methods used in analyzing the test results are described. The heat transfer effects on gas turbine combustors are discussed, as well as NOx and other emissions effects and predictions.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fuel cell/gas turbine system performance studies  

SciTech Connect

Because of the synergistic effects (higher efficiencies, lower emissions) of combining a fuel cell and a gas turbine into a power generation system, many potential system configurations were studied. This work is focused on novel power plant systems by combining gas turbines, solid oxide fuel cells, and a high-temperature heat exchanger; these systems are ideal for the distributed power and on- site markets in the 1-5 MW size range.

Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wind Turbine Productivity Improvement Guidelines Development Status and Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of 1999, the installed nameplate wind generation totaled about 2.5 GW in the U.S. and 14.5 GW worldwide. Even with the new modern turbine technology, many wind plants do not achieve the original projected annual wind energy generation target on which the project feasibility analysis was based. The reasons for lower than projected energy generation vary, but there are many common themes, including inaccurate wind resource assessments, higher than expected energy losses, and higher than expected...

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Performance of a Wind-Profiling Lidar in the Region of Wind Turbine Rotor Disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind energy sector continues to grow, so does the need for reliable vertical wind profiles in the assessment of wind resources and turbine performance. In situ instrumentation mounted on meteorological towers can rarely probe the atmosphere ...

Matthew L. Aitken; Michael E. Rhodes; Julie K. Lundquist

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents a summary of a project to determine the effects of burning currently available coal-derived and shale-derived synthetic liquid fuels in state-of-the-art gas turbine combustors. It describes the fuels tested, the effects of NO emission and of smoke formation and reduction, and a comparison of surrogate and synthetic fuels. The project concluded that a number of selected coal and shale oil fuels can be used in current turbines as soon as these fuels become available.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Verification of creep performance of a ceramic gas turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Tensile creep tests were carried out on a Norton NT164 silicon nitride ceramic turbine blade containing 4 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sintering additive at 1,370 C in air under selected stress levels. The objective of this study was to measure the creep properties of test specimens extracted from a complex shaped ceramic gas turbine blade to verify the response of actual components. The creep results indicated that specimens from both the airfoil and dovetail sections exhibited creep rates that were about 4 to 100 times higher than those obtained from both the buttonhead and dogbone creep specimens machined from the developmental billets fabricated with the same composition and processing procedures. Electron microscopy analyses suggested that high creep rates and short lifetimes observed in specimens extracted from the turbine blade resulted from a higher glassy phase(s) content and smaller number density of elongated grain microstructure. Silicon nitride ceramics with an in-situ reinforced elongated microstructure have been the primary candidates for both advanced automotive and land-based gas turbine engine applications.

Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Parthasarathy, V. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wind Turbinie Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Mariah Windspire 1-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the Mariah Windspire 1-kW wind turbine. During this test, two configurations were tested on the same turbine. In the first configuration, the turbine inverter was optimized for power production. In the second configuration, the turbine inverter was set for normal power production. In both configurations, the inverter experienced failures and the tests were not finished.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-year program plan was generated from the study activities with the objectives of demonstrating a fuel economy of 213 mg/W . h (0.35 lb/hp-hr) brake specific fuel consumption by 1981 through use of ceramic materials, with conformance to current and projected Federal noise and emission standards, and to demonstrate a commercially viable engine. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and regenerator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Further, improved component efficiencies (for the compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, and regenerator disks show significant additional gains in fuel economy. Fuel saved in a 500,000-mile engine life, risk levels involved in development, and engine-related life cycle costs for fleets (100 units) of trucks and buses were used as criteria to select work goals for the planned program.

Helms, H.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Power Performance Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of the power performance test that was performed on a Viryd CS8 wind turbine as part of the DOE Independent Testing project. The test is an accredited test to the IEC 61400-12-1 power performance standard.

Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Power Performance Testing Progress in the DOE/EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), tests are conducted to characterize the power performance of individual wind turbines at each wind project. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions, from arid to arctic. Initial results and experiences of the testing were reported the WindPower 2000 conference. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing and new results from the past year.

Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Randall, G.; McCoy, T; Vandenbosche, J. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC)

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

BGNN Neural Network Based on Improved E.Coli Foraging Optimization Algorithm Used in the Nonlinear Modeling of Hydraulic Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel Bayesian-Gaussian neural network (BGNN) is proposed in this paper for the nonlinear modeling of hydraulic turbine which is difficult to obtain its mathematical model because of its complex and nonlinear characteristics. The topology and connection ... Keywords: BGNN, Hydraulic turbine, Improved E.Coli foraging optimization algorithm, Nonlinear modeling

Yijian Liu; Yanjun Fang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind Turbines Under Atmospheric Icing Conditions - Ice Accretion Modeling, Aerodynamics, and Control Strategies for Mitigating Performance Degradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a combined engineering methodology of ice accretion, airfoil data, and rotor performance analysis of wind turbines subject to moderate atmospheric icing conditions.… (more)

Brillembourg, Dwight

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a building was explored [2]. Referred to such applications, a VAWT can be so small in physical size that its by the present authors to study the aerodynamic performance of small VAWTs using the experimental and numerical1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

111

Investigation of transient models and performances for a doubly fed wind turbine under a grid fault  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the impacts of the integration of wind farms into utilities network, it is necessary to analyze the transient performances of wind turbine generation systems (WTGS) with the appropriate transient models. According to the grid ... Keywords: crowbar, doubly fed induction generator, drive train, transient performance, wind power

Mingyu Wang; Bin Zhao; Hui Li; Chao Yang; Renjie Ye; Z. Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improve building and plant performance | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

performance Through ENERGY STAR, EPA provides tools and resources to help you save money and reduce your carbon emissions by improving the energy efficiency of building and...

113

Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tundish Process Performance Improvement: Some Indian Case Studies ... Engineering and Human Resource Development: Design as a Common Language ... The Fundamentals of Gas Bubbling into Liquid Metals.

114

Early Identification of Steam Turbine Performance Issues via Real-Time Diagnostics:Concepts to Advance the State-of-the-Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes initial work performed to demonstrate how advanced analytics, coupled with existing monitoring tools, could be used to better identify the cause and location of steam turbine performance problems. Developing a full-fledged diagnostic system that incorporates this approach is potentially a multi-year project, but the payoff could be significant.BackgroundThe importance of power plant performance is well recognized since improving ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Effects of external boost compression on gas turbine performance in an advanced CPFBC application  

SciTech Connect

When a commercial gas turbine, designed and optimized for natural gas fuel, is used in an Advanced Circulating Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustor (CPFBC) application, changes occur that affect both the thermodynamic cycle and the performance of the individual components. These come principally from the increased pressure drop encountered between the compressor discharge and expander inlet, with changes in gas properties and flow rates for the hot combustion products having secondary effects. Net effect is that power output can be reduced and significant design and/or operational compromises may be required for the gas turbine. Application of an external boost compressor can mitigate these effects.

Freier, M.D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goldstein, H.N.; White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Improving Outage Performance: Outage Optimization Process  

SciTech Connect

Planned outage performance is a key measure of how well an Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is operated. Performance during planned outages strongly affects virtually all of a plant's performance metrics. In recognition of this fact, NPP operators worldwide have and continue to focus on improving their outage performance. The process of improving outage performance is commonly referred to as 'Outage Optimization' in the industry. This paper starts with a summary of the principles of Outage Optimization. It then provides an overview of a process in common use in the USA and elsewhere to manage the improvement of planned outages. The program described is comprehensive in that it involves managing improvement in both the Preparation and Execution phases of outage management. (author)

LaPlatney, Jere J. [AREVA NP (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermal Performance of the ABB GT24 Combustion Turbine: Peaking Service Experience at GPU Gilbert Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Durability Surveillance (DS) program -- in place since 1991 -- is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the ABB GT24 installed at GPU Genco's Gilbert Station in Milford, New Jersey, is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems. Study results will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas...

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooperative field test program for wind energy systems: Effects of precipitation on wind turbine performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. This study will be conducted at the Whisky Run windfarm on the southern Oregon coast. Precipitation has been shown to cause significant degradation in the performance of the MOD-O wind turbine by Corrigan and DeMiglio (1985), who found performance reductions of up to 20% for light rainfall, 30% for moderate rainfall and 36% for snow and drizzle. There are several penalties due to rainfall, but it appears that most of the performance degradation is due to rain induced roughness. The Whisky Run windfarm receives around 60 inches of rain per year most of which occurs from October through April. During the summer months drizzle is an occasional weather phenomena. Pacific Wind Energy (PWE) and Pacific Power and Light (PP L) propose to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. The Whisky Run windfarm is unique among windfarms because the power sales contract is set up such that the wind farm is considered a research project and the participants have agreed to engage in research that will benefit the industry. PP L will be providing all of the instrumentation except for the recording rate of rain gage. PWE will be performing the analysis of the data and project management.

Not Available

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor- gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher elecuical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety

123

Condensate Filter Demineralizer Performance Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upgrading condensate filter demineralizer (CFD) performance poses a complex, challenging utility task. This report summarizes the major factors that impact CFD performance and defines a comprehensive improvement program. In specific, the report discusses hardware, filter media, and operating practices, describing each area in terms of the underlying technology, approach to optimization, and utility experience.

1997-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

under this contract is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration applications and to lessen environmental emissions through the replacement of...

125

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rugged ATS turbines for alternate fuels  

SciTech Connect

A major national effort is directed to developing advanced turbine systems designed for major improvements in efficiency and emissions performance using natural gas fuels. These turbine designs are also to be adaptable for future operation with alternate coal and biomass derived fuels. For several potential alternate fuel applications, available hot gas cleanup technologies will not likely be adequate to protect the turbine flowpath from deposition and corrosion. Past tests have indicated that cooling turbine airfoil surfaces could ruggedized a high temperature turbine flowpath to alleviate deposition and corrosion. Using this specification. ATS turbine that was evaluated. The initial analyses also showed that two-phase cooling offers the most attractive method of those explored to protect a coal-fueled ATS turbine from deposition and corrosion. This paper describes ruggedization approaches, particularly to counter the extreme deposition and corrosion effects of the high inlet temperatures of ATS turbines using alternate fuels.

Wenglarz, R.A.; Nirmalan, N.V.; Daehler, T.G.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM) presented in this report is the third of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a significant ...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

130

Reference wind speed distributions and height profiles for wind turbine design and performance evaluation applications. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a set of reference or standard values of wind profiles, wind speed distributions and their effects on wind turbine performance for engineering design applications. Based on measured Weibull distribution parameters, representative average, low, and high variance data are given for height profiles of mean, 25 percentile, and 75 percentile wind speeds; and for wind speed probability density (velocity frequency) functions and cumulative probability (velocity duration) functions at selected heights. Results of a sensitivity analysis of the dependence of wind turbine performance parameters on cut-in speed, and rated speed for various mean wind and wind variance regimes are also presented. Wind turbine performance is expressed in terms of capacity factor (ratio of mean power output to rated power) and recovery factor (ratio of mean energy output to energy theoretically available in the wind). The representative high, mean, and low variance cases were determined from calculated Weibull distributions at 140 sites across the Continental U.S., and all of the representative functions are evaluated at mean wind speeds of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 m/s at standard 10 m level.

Justus, C.G.; Hargraves, W.R.; Mikhail, A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Multi-Stage Axial Turbine Performance at Design and Off-Design Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics or CFD isan importanttool thatis used at various stages in the design of highly complex turbomachinery such as compressorand turbine stages that are used in land and air based power generation units. The ability of CFD to predict the performance characteristics of a specific blade design is challenged by the need to use various turbulence models to simulate turbulent flows as well as transition models to simulate laminar to turbulent transition that can be observed in various turbomachinery designs. Moreover, CFD is based on numerically solving highly complex differential equations, which through the use of a grid to discretize the geometry introduces numerical errors. Allthese factors combine to challenge CFD’s role as a predictor of blade performance. It has been generallyfound that CFD in its current state of the art is best used to compare between various design points and not as a pure predictor of performances. In this study the capability of CFD, and turbulence modeling, in turbomachinery based geometry is assessed.Three different blade designs are tested, that include an advanced two-stage turbine blade design, a three stage 2D or cylindrical design and finally a three stage bowed stator and rotor design. Allcases were experimentally tested at the Texas A&Muniversity Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL).In all cases CFD provided good insights into fundamental turbomachinery flow physics, showing the expected improvement from using 2D cylindrical blades to 3D bowed blade designs in abating the secondary flow effects which are dominant loss generators.However, comparing experimentally measured performance results to numerically predicted shows a clear deficiency, where the CFD overpredicts performance when compared to experimentallyobtained data, largely underestimating the various loss mechanisms. In a relative sense, CFD as a tool allows the user to calculate the impact a new feature or change can have on a baseline design. CFD will also provide insight into what are the dominant physics that explain why a change can provide an increase or decrease in performance. Additionally,as part of this study, one of the main factors that affect the performance of modern turbomachinery is transition from laminar to turbulent flow.Transition is an influential phenomena especially in high pressure turbines, and is sensitive to factors such asupstream incidentwake frequency and turbulence intensity.A model experimentally developed, is implemented into a CFD solver and compared to various test results showing greater capability in modeling the effects of reduced frequency on the transition point and transitional flow physics. This model is compared to industry standard models showing favorable prediction performance due to its abilityto account for upstream wake effects which most current model are unable to account for.

Abdelfattah, Sherif Alykadry

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Thermal Performance of the ABB GT24 Gas Turbine in Peaking Servicer at the Gilbert Station of GPU Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program, in place since 1991, is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the ABB GT24 installed at GPU Genco's Gilbert Station in Milford, New Jersey, is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems, and will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas turbines.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Improving Model-Based Gas Turbine Fault Diagnosis Using Multi-Operating Point Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive gas turbine fault diagnosis system has been designed using a full nonlinear simulator developed in Turbotec company for the V94.2 industrial gas turbine manufactured by Siemens AG. The methods used for detection and isolation of faulty ... Keywords: monitoring, fault diagnosis, extended Kalman filter, gas turbine, simulator

Amin Salar; Seyed Mehrdad Hosseini; Behnam Rezaei Zangmolk; Ali Khaki Sedigh

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Influence of hole shape on the performance of a turbine vane endwall film-cooling scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising combustor exit temperatures in gas turbine engines necessitate active cooling for the downstream industrial gas turbine engines. One means of achieving this goal is to increase the combustion temper- ature are so high in today's gas turbine engines that in the absence of complex cooling schemes the turbine

Thole, Karen A.

135

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improving performance via mini-applications.  

SciTech Connect

Application performance is determined by a combination of many choices: hardware platform, runtime environment, languages and compilers used, algorithm choice and implementation, and more. In this complicated environment, we find that the use of mini-applications - small self-contained proxies for real applications - is an excellent approach for rapidly exploring the parameter space of all these choices. Furthermore, use of mini-applications enriches the interaction between application, library and computer system developers by providing explicit functioning software and concrete performance results that lead to detailed, focused discussions of design trade-offs, algorithm choices and runtime performance issues. In this paper we discuss a collection of mini-applications and demonstrate how we use them to analyze and improve application performance on new and future computer platforms.

Crozier, Paul Stewart; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Numrich, Robert W. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Williams, Alan B.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Keiter, Eric Richard; Rajan, Mahesh; Willenbring, James M.; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Heroux, Michael Allen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Improving query performance in virtual data warehouses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to improve the quality of Business Intelligence Systems in an organization we can choose to build the system using BI techniques such as OLAP and data warehousing or by using traditional reports based on SQL queries. The cost and developing ... Keywords: SQL query plans, analytical functions, business intelligence projects, data extraction, indexes, partitioning techniques, query optimization and performance, tuning and optimization, virtual data warehouse

Adela Bâra; Ion Lungu; Manole Velicanu; Vlad Diaconita; Iuliana Botha

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7FA Unit in Baseload Operation: Durability Surveillance at Florida Pow er & Lights Company's Martin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures for reducing power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis in a multiyear project, launched in 1991, to assure the staying power of industrial gas turbines produced by major turbine manufacturers.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boils water to drive a steam turbine generator and then usesremaining in the steam exiting the turbine for process Dry-

Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Labora-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructu...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects Electricity...

142

DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of...

143

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of daylight to replace or supplement electric lighting in commercial buildings can result in significant energy and demand savings. High performance fenestration systems area necessary, but not sufficient, element of any successful daylighting design that reduces lighting energy use. However, these savings may be reduced if the fenestration systems impose adverse thermal loads. In this paper, we review the state of the art of several advanced fenestration systems which are designed to maximize the energy-saving potential of daylighting, while improving comfort and visual performance at an "affordable" cost. We first review the key performance issues that successful fenestration systems must address, and then review several classes of fenestration systems intended to meet those performance needs. The systems are reviewed in two categories: static and dynamic. Static systems include not only glazings, such as spectrally-selective and holographic glazings, but specialized designs of light-shelves and light-pipes, while dynamic systems cover automatically-operated Venetian blinds and electrochromic glazings. We include a discussion of the research directions in this area, and how these efforts might lead to static and dynamic hardware and system solutions that fulfill the multiple roles that these systems must play in terms of energy efficiency, comfort, visual performance, health, and amenity in future buildings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Use of Advanced Hydroelectric Turbines to Improve Water Quality and Fish Populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

technology which would help to maximize global hydropower resources while minimizing adverse environmental effects. Major technical goals for the Program are (1) the reduction of mortality among turbine-passed fish to 2 percent or less, compared to current levels ranging up to 30 percent or greater; and (2) development of aerating turbines that would ensure that water discharged from reservoirs has a dissolved oxygen concentration of at least 6 mg/L. These advanced, ?environmentally friendly? turbines would be suitable both for new hydropower installations and for retrofitting at existing dams. Several new turbine designs that have been developed in the initial phases of the AHTS program are described.

Brookshier, P.A.; Cada, G.F.; Flynn, J.V.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sale, M.J.; Sommers, G.L.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

NETL: Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines Coal and Power Systems Turbines Turbine Animation Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations... - Read More The NETL Turbine Program manages a...

146

Improving Repository Performance by Using a Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Fill a Fill Improving Repository Performance by Using a Fill The use of fills, semi-independent of the specific fill material, can improve package performance. The first barrier to prevent releases from the spent nuclear fuel is the waste package itself. The longer the waste package remains intact, the lower the ultimate releases from the spent nuclear fuel. In a typical waste package over half of the interior space is empty space. There are coolant channels in the spent fuel and square fuel assemblies can not fully fill a round waste package. After the package is buried, it will begin to corrode and the walls will thin. Rock falls may cause early failure of the waste package. However, if the package is full, it is more difficult to crush a full package and fail the exterior wall. The behavior of a waste package over time is similar to a soda can. Empty cans are easy to crush. Full, sealed cans are difficult to crush because the fluid inside supports the can.

147

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a steam driven power system by steam mixing  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a steam driven power plant wherein addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant results in a surprising increase in plant performance. For Example, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler may be installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA); Prichard, Andrew W. (Richland, WA); Reid, Bruce D. (Pasco, WA); Burritt, James (Virginia Beach, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a steam driven power system by steam mixing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a steam driven power plant wherein addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant results in a surprising increase in plant performance. For Example, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler may be installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA); Prichard, Andrew W. (Richland, WA); Reid, Bruce D. (Pasco, WA); Burritt, James (Virginia Beach, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method and apparatus for improving the performance of a nuclear power electrical generation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance a of nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs.

Tsiklauri, Georgi V. (Richland, WA); Durst, Bruce M. (Kennewick, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Stream-injected free-turbine-type gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a free turbine type gas turbine. The turbine comprises: compressor means; a core turbine mechanically coupled with the compressor means to power it; a power turbine which is independent from the core turbine; and a combustion chamber for providing a heated working fluid; means for adding steam to the working fluid; means for providing a single flow path for the working fluid, first through the core turbine and then through the power turbine. The improvement comprises: means for preventing mismatch between the core turbine and the compressor due to the addition of steam comprising coupling a variable output load to the compressor.

Cheng, D.Y.

1990-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

New technology trends for improved IGCC system performance  

SciTech Connect

The application of gas turbine technology to IGCC systems requires careful consideration of the degree and type of integration used during the system design phase. Although gas turbines provide the primary output and efficiency gains for IGCC systems, as compared with conventional coal-fired power generation systems, they are commercially available only in specific size ranges. Therefore, it is up to the IGCC system designer to optimize the IGCC power plant within the required output, efficiency, and site conditions by selecting the system configuration carefully, particularly for air separation unit (ASU) integration incorporated with oxygen blown gasification systems. An IGCC system, based on a generic, entrained flow, oxygen blown gasification system and a GE STAG 109FA combined cycle has been evaluated with varying degrees of ASU integration, two fuel equivalent heating values and two gas turbine firing temperatures to provide net plant output and efficiency results. The data presented illustrate the system flexibility afforded by variation of ASU integration and the potential performance gains available through the continued use of gas turbine advances. Emphasis is placed on system design choices that favor either low initial investment cost or low operating cost for a given IGCC system output.

Anand, A.K.; Cook, C.S.; Corman, J.C. [GE Power Generation, Schenectady, NY (United States); Smith, A.R. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ten years with turbine metering  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance experience in using 110 turbine meters to monitor the gas flow in turbines used on natural gas pipelines are discussed. Information is included on turbine meter selection, installation, calibration, performance testing, failures, and maintenance. (LCL)

Judd, H.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Extreme overbalance perforating improves well performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of extreme overbalance perforating, by Oryx Energy Co., is consistently outperforming the unpredictable, tubing-conveyed, underbalance perforating method which is generally accepted as the industry standard. Successful results reported from more than 60 Oryx Energy wells, applying this technology, support this claim. Oryx began this project in 1990 to address the less-than-predictable performance of underbalanced perforating. The goal was to improve the initial completion efficiency, translating it into higher profits resulting from earlier product sales. This article presents the concept, mechanics, procedures, potential applications and results of perforating using overpressured well bores. The procedure can also be used in wells with existing perforations if an overpressured surge is used. This article highlights some of the case histories that have used these techniques.

Dees, J.M.; Handren, P.J. [Oryx Energy Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). 1944 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed in development and demonstration of structural ceramics technology for automotive gas turbine engines. At the end of this period, the project name was changed to ``Ceramic Turbine Engine Demonstration Project``, effective Jan. 1995. Objectives are to provide early field experience demonstrating the reliability and durability of ceramic components in a modified, available gas turbine engine application, and to scale up and improve the manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate the application of these processes in the production environment. The 1994 ATTAP activities emphasized demonstration and refinement of the ceramic turbine nozzles in the AlliedSignal/Garrett Model 331-200[CT] engine test bed in preparation for field testing; improvements in understanding the vibration characteristics of the ceramic turbine blades; improvements in critical ceramics technologies; and scaleup of the process used to manufacture ceramic turbine components.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Poster: performance improvements of front tracking package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational resources on modern high-performance computers are underutilized mainly due to hardware and software performance bottlenecks. Identification of bottlenecks is primary goal of performance analysis, and performance tools are essential for ... Keywords: CFD simulations, performance analysis

James Glimm; Xiaolin Li; Vitali Morozov; Sameer Shende; Tulin Kaman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Applications: Operational wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Operational wind turbines Benefits: Optimize wind turbine performance Summary: Researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Intelligent Wind Turbine Program are developing a multi-physics modeling approach for the analysis of wind turbines in the presence of realistic

158

Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib  

SciTech Connect

A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

Wang, John Zhiqiang (Greenville, SC); Norton, Paul Francis (Greenville, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

IMPROVEMENTS IN AND RELATING TO STEAM CONDENSER INSTALLATIONS FOR STEAM TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A steam condenser arrangement for turbine power plants which have excess steam at times is described. A dump condenser with cooling water connections in parallel with steam turbine condensers receives surplus steam. Cooling water from the turbine condensers is mixed with coolant from the dump condenser so that a predetermined maximum temperature is not exceeded. The quantity of cooling water passing through the dump condenser is a proportion of the total circulating water requirements of the condenser installation, and the pressure drop across it is less than that across the main condensers. (T.R.H.)

1960-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Improvement of risk estimate on wind turbine tower buckled by hurricane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind is one of the important reasonable resources. However, wind turbine towers are sure to be threatened by hurricanes. In this paper, method to estimate the number of wind turbine towers that would be buckled by hurricanes is discussed. Monte Carlo simulations show that our method is much better than the previous one. Since in our method, the probability density function of the buckling probability of a single turbine tower in a single hurricane is obtained accurately but not from one approximated expression. The result in this paper may be useful to the design and maintenance of wind farms.

Li, Jingwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simulations of Multi-Phase Particle Deposition on Film-Cooled Turbine Sections.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for clean, efficient energy has driven the motivation for improving the performance standards for gas turbines. Increasing the combustion temperature is one way… (more)

Lawson, Seth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant cycles and performance estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC pressurization enhances SOFC efficiency and power performance. It enables the direct integration of the SOFC and gas turbine technologies which can form the basis for very efficient combined- cycle power plants. PSOFC/GT cogeneration systems, producing steam and/or hot water in addition to electric power, can be designed to achieve high fuel effectiveness values. A wide range of steam pressures and temperatures are possible owing to system component arrangement flexibility. It is anticipated that Westinghouse will offer small PSOFC/GT power plants for sale early in the next decade. These plants will have capacities less than 10 MW net ac, and they will operate with efficiencies in the 60-65% (net ac/LHV) range.

Lundberg, W.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Learning to improve path planning performance  

SciTech Connect

In robotics, path planning refers to finding a short. collision-free path from an initial robot configuration to a desired configuratioin. It has to be fast to support real-time task-level robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To remedy this situation, we present and analyze a learning algorithm that uses past experience to increase future performance. The algorithm relies on an existing path planner to provide solutions to difficult tasks. From these solutions, an evolving sparse network of useful robot configurations is learned to support faster planning. More generally, the algorithm provides a speedup-learning framework in which a slow but capable planner may be improved both cost-wise and capability-wise by a faster but less capable planner coupled with experience. The basic algorithm is suitable for stationary environments, and can be extended to accommodate changing environments with on-demand experience repair and object-attached experience abstraction. To analyze the algorithm, we characterize the situations in which the adaptive planner is useful, provide quantitative bounds to predict its behavior, and confirm our theoretical results with experiments in path planning of manipulators. Our algorithm and analysis are sufficiently, general that they may also be applied to other planning domains in which experience is useful.

Chen, Pang C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ceramic stationary gas turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

Roode, M. van

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Influence of Unsteady Wind on the Performance and Aerodynamics of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interest in small–scale wind turbines as energy sources in the built environment has increased due to the desire of consumers in urban areas to reduce… (more)

Danao, Louis Angelo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Title Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data...

168

Building Technologies Office: System Performance Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvements, were presented in the following sessions: Air Sealing Ventilation (Day 1) Space Conditioning Distribution Foundation Insulation High-R Enclosures Ventilation (Day...

169

Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Innovations for a Secure Nation Improving...

170

Nanofluids improve performance of vehicle components | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are working with two industrial partners to create nanofluids that improve the cooling of power electronics in hybrid electric vehicles. These new coolants can lessen the need for...

171

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson The Blade Reliability Collaborative has been formed to perform comprehensive studies to improve wind turbine uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized

173

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/buildings_certification.pdf Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Screenshot References: nergy Performance Certification of Buildings[1] Logo: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency

174

Can linear approximation improve performance prediction ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software performance evaluation relies on the ability of simple models to predict the performance of complex systems. Often, however, the models are not capturing potentially relevant effects in system behavior, such as sharing of memory caches or sharing ... Keywords: linear models, performance modeling, resource sharing

Vlastimil Babka; Petr T?ma

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance  

SciTech Connect

A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sootblowing optimization for improved boiler performance  

SciTech Connect

A sootblowing control system that uses predictive models to bridge the gap between sootblower operation and boiler performance goals. The system uses predictive modeling and heuristics (rules) associated with different zones in a boiler to determine an optimal sequence of sootblower operations and achieve boiler performance targets. The system performs the sootblower optimization while observing any operational constraints placed on the sootblowers.

James, John Robert; McDermott, John; Piche, Stephen; Pickard, Fred; Parikh, Neel J.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Improving Safety Performance in an Aluminium Casthouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001 ... TMS Member price: 10.00. Non-member price: 25.00. TMS Student Member price : 10.00. Product In Stock. Description Improving safety ...

178

Improvements in industrial energy performance | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

my money go? Set and Save with ENERGY STAR Product Finder Rebate Finder Store Locator Energy Savings At Home Energy Savings At Home Improving your home's energy efficiency with...

179

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high-performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Performance improvement of permanent magnet ac motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-phase motors have several advantages over the traditional three-phase motors. In this study, the additional degrees of freedom available in five-phase permanent magnet motors have been used for three purposes: 1) enhancing the torque producing capability of the motor, 2) improving the reliability of the system, and 3) better adjusting of the torque and flux linkages of the five-phase direct torque controlled system. 1) Due to the fact that space and time harmonics of the same orders will contribute positively to output torque, a five-phase permanent magnet motor with quasi-rectangular back-EMF waveform is supplied with combined fundamental and third harmonic of currents. For modeling and analysis of the motor a 0 3 3 1 1 q d q d frame of reference is defined where 1 1q d rotates at the synchronous speed and 3 3q d rotates at the three times synchronous speed. Based on the mathematical model in the 0 3 3 1 1 q d q d frame of reference, it is shown that this system while having a higher torque density with respect to a conventional permanent magnet synchronous machine, is also compatible with vector control algorithm. 2) A resilient current control of the five-phase permanent motor with both sinusoidal and trapezoidal back-EMF waveforms under asymmetrical fault condition is proposed. In this scheme, the stator MMF is kept unchanged during healthy and faulty condition. Therefore, the five-phase permanent magnet motor operates continuously and steadily without additional hardware and just by modifying the control algorithm in case of loss of up to two phases. The feature is of major importance in some specific applications where high reliability is required. 3) High torque and flux ripple are the major drawbacks of a three-phase direct torque controlled system. The number of space voltage vectors directly influences the performance of DTC system. A five-phase drive, while benefiting from other advantages of high order phase drives, has inherently 32 space voltage vectors which permits better flexibility in selecting the switching states and finer adjustment of flux and torque. A sensorless direct torque control of five-phase permanent magnet motor is implemented. Speed information is obtained based on the position of stator flux linkages and load angle. Experiments have been conducted on a 5kW five-phase surface mount permanent magnet motor and a 3kW five-phase interior permanent magnet motor by using TMS320C32 DSP. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical studies and simulation analysis, which further demonstrate the feasibility and practical significance of the five-phase permanent magnet motor drives.

Parsa, Leila

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7F Unit in Peaking Operation: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Elect ric Power Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year durability surveillance program. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis of a General Electric 7F unit in peaking operation.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Balancing Performance, Noise, Cost, and Aesthetics in the Southwest Windpower "Storm" Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of an 1800-watt innovative small wind turbine and discusses the importance of idiosyncratic aerodynamic and aeroacoustic airfoil characteristics for clean airfoils at low Reynolds numbers.

Migliore, P.; Green, J.; Calley, D.; Lonjaret, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Blade tip clearance effect on the performance and flow field of a three stage axial turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of a 1.5 % blade tip clearance on a rotating three stage turbine under different operating points was investigated using radially and circumferentially traversed five hole pressure probes. The probes were used to obtain flow field total and static pressures, absolute and relative velocities and angles, as well as calculate the blade span distribution of total pressure loss coefficient. Total temperature thermocouple probes were traversed radially and circumferentially to obtain temperature profiles under running conditions. Results showed high discrepancies especially in the blade tip region which is due to high circulation flows occurring at the tip that produce an out of probe calibration range type flow. Engine efficiency and massflow rate was also measured using a venturi flow meter in order to discern the effect the blade tip clearance has on the engine efficiency and performance. Results have shown that the blade tip clearance losses appear to play a smaller role when compared to other losses such as exit losses. This was because the engine efficiency was slightly affected when run using a blade tip clearance.

Abdel-Fattah, Sharef Aly

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Identifying cost reduction and performance improvement opportunities through simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During difficult economic times, companies have few positive cost reducing options that simultaneously improve operational performance. This paper addresses how Deloitte Consulting partnered with Simio LLC to model multiple process improvement opportunities ...

J. Ethan Brown; David Sturrock

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Algorithms for improved performance in cryptographic protocols.  

SciTech Connect

Public key cryptographic algorithms provide data authentication and non-repudiation for electronic transmissions. The mathematical nature of the algorithms, however, means they require a significant amount of computation, and encrypted messages and digital signatures possess high bandwidth. Accordingly, there are many environments (e.g. wireless, ad-hoc, remote sensing networks) where public-key requirements are prohibitive and cannot be used. The use of elliptic curves in public-key computations has provided a means by which computations and bandwidth can be somewhat reduced. We report here on the research conducted in an LDRD aimed to find even more efficient algorithms and to make public-key cryptography available to a wider range of computing environments. We improved upon several algorithms, including one for which a patent has been applied. Further we discovered some new problems and relations on which future cryptographic algorithms may be based.

Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

How ENERGY STAR Helps Manufacturers Improve the Energy Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Helps Manufacturers Improve the Energy Performance of their Operations Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and...

190

Learning from Buildings: Technologies for Measuring, Benchmarking, and Improving Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Price, 2009. “Building Energy Information Systems:2011. Learning from buildings: technologies for measuring,Information to Improve Building Performance: A Study of

Arens, Edward; Brager, Gail; Goins, John; Lehrer, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Intermetallic Electrodes Improve Safety and Performance in Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intermetallic Electrodes Improve Safety and Performance in Lithium-Ion Batteries Technology available for licensing: A new class of intermetallic material that can be used as a...

192

Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross Pollination between Industry and Engineering Programs/Students in Manitoba · Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate to

193

Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 168 - August 29, 2013 Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and...

194

Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting Diode with Hole Blocking Materials as Dopants for Transport Layers.

195

Improving boiler performance through operator training  

SciTech Connect

The majority of the technical training in many plant facilities is the self-study type. These courses consist of packaged text materials as well as plant specific lessons. Video-based training is more effective than textbooks alone, and computer interactive training is becoming increasingly popular. Demonstration of technical competence can be conducted in a variety of ways: supervised system check off and verification system walk-throughs; simulator evaluation; written examinations required for promotion; and oral examinations. Boiler operators can be required to demonstrate in a practical way that they can apply the boiler plant theory to actual job performance in the plant. Some classifications may be required to perform a supervised system check off and verification before promotion to the next higher classification. Personnel who operate boilers from a control room or gauge board may be required to successfully complete simulator training and evaluation. All classifications may require successful completion of written and oral examinations before being promoted to the next higher classification.

DeHart, R.M. [Cogentrix Energy, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

198

A New BP Network Based on Improved PSO Algorithm and Its Application on Fault Diagnosis of Gas Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at improving the convergence performance of conventional BP neural network, this paper presents an improved PSO algorithm instead of gradient descent method to optimize the weights and thresholds of BP network. The strategy of the algorithm is ...

Wei Hu; Jingtao Hu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Interface between a gas turbine and PFBC  

SciTech Connect

First-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology has potential advantages that include lower capital cost, improved environmental performance, shorter lead times, higher efficiency, and enhanced fuel flexibility. The objective of this program is to ensure that combustion turbine designs stay current with PFBC technology, specifically to ensure that the Westinghouse 251B12 combustion turbine is suitable for demonstration phases of this technology as it progresses toward commercial deployment. This paper presents the preliminary design of system interfaces that permit combining a PFBC and a Westinghouse 251B12 combustion turbine.

Bannister, R.L.; McGuigan, A.W.; Christenson, J.A.; Howell, I.L.; Marson, E.; Post, M.V.; Risley, R.P.; Vota, T.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Performance Characteristics of an Electrochemically Powered Turboprop: A Comparison with State of the Art Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As we search for alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles it is important to consider the role of electrochemical fuel cells in aircraft propulsion systems. This paper focuses on this issue with regards to small turboprop aircraft. An electrochemical propulsion system would employ liquid hydrogen in an air breathing fuel cell that would generate electricity to run electric motors which in tum power the props. The major question this paper addresses is: under what conditions will a hydrogen/fuel cell power system be superior to a state of the art hydrogen/gas turbine power system? The systems are compared on a fuel consumption basis, a cost basis, and a reliability/ maintainability basis. The analysis show that both specific power and efficiency play an important role in determining which configuration uses less fuel. In general, the fuel cell system is heavier but more efficient than the gas turbine. It appears that the fuel cell system will begin to compete with the gas turbine as the power densities surpass 1 kw/kg and the efficiencies approaches .45. From a cost perspective gas turbines presently cost $500/ Kw and fuel cells are far more expensive. However, the raw materials in a fuel cell are inexpensive and could conceivably be cheaper, thus making the fuel cells increasingly attractive. From a reliability perspective, the fuel cell system appears to have a significant advantage due to the lack of moving parts and the high reliability of electric motors.

Johnson, M. C.; Swan, D. H.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Superior Energy Performance: A Roadmap for Achieving Continual Improvements in Energy Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superior Energy Performance: Superior Energy Performance: A Roadmap for Achieving Continual Improvements in Energy Performance March 4, 2010 Joe Almaguer Dow Chemical Paul Scheihing U.S. Department of Energy Agenda: * Superior Energy Performance Overview * Program Design * Program Status and Moving Forward Superior Energy Performance What is Superior Energy Performance? A market-based, ANSI-accredited plant certification program that provides industrial facilities with a roadmap for achieving continual improvement in energy efficiency while boosting competitiveness. Goals: * Drive continual improvement in energy intensity * Develop a transparent system to validate energy intensity improvements and management practices * Encourage broad participation

205

Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six  

SciTech Connect

Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections 2010--Volume 4: Turbine Generat or Component Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections-2006; Volume 4: Turbine-Generat or Component Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. This analysis quantifies the relative merit of various technological advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors and presents them graphically as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. Substantial annual energy gains (exceeding 50% at 350/sup 0/C) are shown to be attainable with improved parabolic troughs.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies DOE RFP Seeks Projects for Improving Environmental Performance of Unconventional Natural Gas Technologies December 21, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research projects to study ways for improving the environmental performance of unconventional gas development are being sought by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy. The research opportunity was released in a request for proposals (RFP) issued by NETL's contractor, the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA), with a deadline of March 6, 2012. A second RFP, focusing on the needs of small oil and natural gas producers, was released

212

Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world LANL statistical tools have helped create Reliability Technology (RT), which increases the overall fraction of productive manufacturing time, or "uptime," for its internal manufacturing lines. April 3, 2012 Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Reliability Technology (RT) is a comprehensive reliability engineering system developed by P&G to increase the overall fraction of productive manufacturing time, or "uptime" for its internal manufacturing lines. The genesis for the system came from the large amount of runtime data collected on P&G's manufacturing lines, coupled with the Laboratory's

213

Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 186 - September 25, 2013 Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 186 - September 25, 2013 On August 29, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a Request for Information seeking information on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for significant onshore electric transmission projects requiring Federal authorizations. This notice announces an extension of the public comment period for submitting comments regarding the IIP Process to October 31, 2013. Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting

214

Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 186 - September 25, 2013 Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 186 - September 25, 2013 On August 29, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a Request for Information seeking information on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for significant onshore electric transmission projects requiring Federal authorizations. This notice announces an extension of the public comment period for submitting comments regarding the IIP Process to October 31, 2013. Extension of Comment Period on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting

215

Improving Real World Efficiency of High Performance Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Real World Efficiency of High Performance Buildings Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/buildings February 2012 The Issue Highperformance buildings efficiency in highperformance buildings, however, are not always realized in practice. Addressing

216

Training Framework to Improve the DOE Performance-Based Culture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Department. Training Framework Improve Performance Responsible Contacts N. Tony Nguyen PROGRAM ANALYST E-mail tony.nguyen@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-4533 More Documents &...

217

Study on the performance improvements of electrical domestic appliance factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis has two objectives. First, it aims to help TECHSOL electronics domestic appliance measure and analyze its current performance. Secondly, it is aimed to ascertain where a small improvement can result in significant ...

Kasan Hidayat, Andy Darwin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Optical interference coatings for improved luminaire performance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An interior broadbeam HID uplight and an upstream roadway luminaire were developed to demonstrate that optical coated luminaire components can improve the visual effectiveness and energy efficiency of a lighting system. Optical coated reflectors and flat lens covers were very effective in the development of new improved lighting techniques. The coatings reduce reflection and transmission losses, opening the door to new design options for improving lighting performance and saving energy.

Rubins, H.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the Member Agencies of the Steering Committee (Member Agencies) created under Executive Order 13604 of March 22, 2012, and pursuant to the June 7, 2013 Transmission Presidential Memorandum, is seeking public input on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process. The proposed IIP Process is intended to improve interagency and intergovernmental coordination focused on ensuring that project proponents develop and submit accurate and complete information early in the project planning process to facilitate efficient

220

Current performance and potential improvements in solar thermal industrial heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A representive current state-of-the-art system using parabolic trough technology was developed using data from a system recently installed in Tehachapi, California. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system at three different insolation locations. Based on discussions with industry personnel and within NREL, we identified a number of technology improvements that offer the potential for increasing the energy performance and reducing the energy-cost of the baseline system. The technology improvements modeled included an evacuated-tube receiver, an antireflective coating on the receiver tube, an improved absorber material, a cleaner reflecting surface, a reflecting surface that can withstand contact cleaning, and two silver reflectors. The properties associated with the improvements were incorporated into the model simulation at the three insolation locations to determine if there were any performance gains. The results showed that there was a potential for a more am 50% improvement in the annual energy delivered by a 2677 m[sup 2] system incorporating a combination of the enumerated technology improvements. We discuss the commercial and technological status of each design improvement and present performance predictions for the trough-design improvements.

Hale, M.J.; Williams, T.; Barker, G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Current performance and potential improvements in solar thermal industrial heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A representive current state-of-the-art system using parabolic trough technology was developed using data from a system recently installed in Tehachapi, California. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system at three different insolation locations. Based on discussions with industry personnel and within NREL, we identified a number of technology improvements that offer the potential for increasing the energy performance and reducing the energy-cost of the baseline system. The technology improvements modeled included an evacuated-tube receiver, an antireflective coating on the receiver tube, an improved absorber material, a cleaner reflecting surface, a reflecting surface that can withstand contact cleaning, and two silver reflectors. The properties associated with the improvements were incorporated into the model simulation at the three insolation locations to determine if there were any performance gains. The results showed that there was a potential for a more am 50% improvement in the annual energy delivered by a 2677 m{sup 2} system incorporating a combination of the enumerated technology improvements. We discuss the commercial and technological status of each design improvement and present performance predictions for the trough-design improvements.

Hale, M.J.; Williams, T.; Barker, G.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Technologies Inc. and its subcontractors, during the period April 1, 1993 through October 31, 1994 under Phase II of the DOE Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development program. The objective of the program is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Benchmarking and Performance Improvement at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has initiated a major work process improvement campaign using the tools of formalized benchmarking and streamlining. This paper provides insights into some of the process improvement activities performed at Rocky Flats from November 1995 through December 1996. It reviews the background, motivation, methodology, results, and lessons learned from this ongoing effort. The paper also presents important gains realized through process analysis and improvement including significant cost savings, productivity improvements, and an enhanced understanding of site work processes.

Elliott, C. [Kaiser-Hill Co., LLC, Golden, CO (United States)], Doyle, D. [USDOE Rocky Flats Office, Golden, CO (United States)], Featherman, W.D. [Project Performance Corp., Sterline, VA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

SMART POWER TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

Nirm V. Nirmalan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ECC-D4 Electostatic Oil Cleaner Design for Heavy-Duty Gas Turbine Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The turbine technology improvements from 1980 onwards have considerably increased mechanical and thermal stresses on turbine oils which, cause oil oxidation and thereby turbine… (more)

Gorur, Murat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Applications of an Improved Wavelet Network in the Low Pressure Cylinder of Turbine Steam Exhaust Enthalpies Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

this paper applies the principle of the immune system adjustment to optimize the structure parameters of wavelet network, so as to establish a new type of wavelet neural network model which will be applied to turbine exhaust steam enthalpies. The calculation ... Keywords: steam turbine, wavelet network Vector distance Eexhaust, steam enthalpy

Zhang Liping; Sun Quanhong; Xu Qi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information on Improving Performance of Federal Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 168 - August 29, 2013 Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 168 - August 29, 2013 The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, in collaboration with the Member Agencies of the Steering Committee (Member Agencies) created under Executive Order 13604 of March 22, 2012, and pursuant to the June 7, 2013 Transmission Presidential Memorandum, is seeking information on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for significant onshore electric transmission projects requiring Federal Authorization(s).

228

Guide to Optimized Nuclear Low-Pressure Turbine Rotor Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past few years, the nuclear utility industry has reduced down-time for refueling outages to trim costs and improve overall unit performance. Consequently, this has also reduced the time available for other routine outage work and has often placed turbine maintenance and inspection tasks on the critical path. This report provides a review of the strategies several nuclear utilities have employed at their plants to reduce the time required to perform low-pressure turbine inspections. Included is a r...

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information presented at the Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar held July 15-16, 2002, in Saratoga Springs, New York. The biannual seminar -- sponsored by EPRI Plant Support Engineering (PSE), EPRI Plant Performance Enhancement Program (P2EP), and Rochester Gas and Electric -- provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experience regarding the achievement of the highest possible megawatt electric (MWe) output from nuclear po...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

NETL: Turbines - Research&Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R & D R & D Turbines Research and Development NETL In-house R&D for Turbines The Combustion and Engine Dynamics Division within NETL's Office of Science and Technology provides skills, expertise, equipment, and facilities to conduct research and provides technical support for NETL product lines and programs in combustion science and technology and in the dynamics of prime movers or engines, such as gas turbines; fuel cells; internal combustion engines; or hybrid cycles that utilize fossil fuels, biomass, wastes, or other related fuel sources. Research is conducted with the primary goals of improving cycle efficiency, reducing capital cost, and improving environmental performance. Studies on supporting technologies, such as combustion instability, fuels versatility, and fluid and particle dynamics, are performed as well.

233

Biomedical ontology improves biomedical literature clustering performance: a comparison study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document clustering has been used for better document retrieval and text mining. In this paper, we investigate if a biomedical ontology improves biomedical literature clustering performance in terms of the effectiveness and the scalability. For this ... Keywords: MEDLINE, MeSH, bioinformatics, biomedical literature, biomedical ontology, comparison study, document clustering, document retrieval, information retrieval, text mining

Illhoi Yoo; Xiaohua Hu; Il-Yeol Song

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance Stephanie L for supercapacitor applications. Surface modification increases the amount of nitrogen by four times when compared elements in highly porous carbon used for electric double-layer supercapacitors.1 These elements modify

Cao, Guozhong

235

Improving the Performance of Creep-Strength-Enhanced Ferritic Steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outages, concerns about reliability & safety, more aggressive inspection procedures #12;5 27-April-2011 continue with ASME, boiler manufacturers, and EPRI #12;21 27-April-2011 Improving the Performance of Creep-Strength-Enhanced Ferritic Steels FY2011 Milestones & Status: · Complete tensile testing of selected weldments from temper

236

IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE CREEP STRENGTH-ENHANCED FERRITIC STEELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCE CREEP STRENGTH-ENHANCED FERRITIC STEELS PI: Michael Santella (ORNL) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan) BACKGROUND Creep strength-enhanced ferritic steels such as the 9 Cr steel, ASTM A387 Grade 91, have become the key to the realization of increasingly

237

Aerothermodynamics of low pressure steam turbines and condensers  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on steam turbines and steam condensers. Topics considered include the design of modern low pressure steam turbines, throughflow design methods, three-dimensional flow calculations, the calculation of wet steam stages, aerodynamic development of turbine blades, turbine performance measurement, turbine exhaust system design, and condensers for large turbines.

Moore, M.J.; Sieverding, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL Collaborative Improves the Reliability of Wind Turbine Gearboxes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Gearbox failures have a significant impact on the cost of wind farm operations. To help minimize gearbox failures, in 2007 the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC), which consists of manufacturers, owners, researchers, and consultants. Based on all the lessons learned from the past five years, the GRC has now produced a new and improved design, which is projected to yield an operating lifetime of 12 years, more than triple that of the previous redesigned gearbox. The GRC findings will result in increased gearbox reliability and an overall reduction in the cost of wind energy.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Title Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li Journal Electrochemical Solid-State Letters Volume 14 Start Page A61 Issue 5 Pagination A61-A63 Date Published 02/2001 Keywords Electrochemistry, elemental semiconductors, etching, lithium, nanoparticles, secondary cells, silicon, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra Abstract This study characterizes the native oxide layer of Si nanoparticles and evaluates its effect on their performance for Li-ion batteries. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to identify the chemical state and morphology of the native oxide layer. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis were used to estimate the oxide content for the Si samples. Hydrofluoric acid was used to reduce the oxide layer. A correlation between etching time and oxide content was established. The initial electrochemical performances indicate that the reversible capacity of etched Si nanoparticles was enhanced significantly compared with that of the as-received Si sample.

240

Computational Predictions and Experimental Measurements of the Performance of a Louver Particle Separator for Use in Gas Turbine Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbine engines that power aircraft operate in harsh environments where solid particles, such as sand, are ingested into the engine. Solid particles damage aircraft… (more)

Musgrove, Grant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Project Title: New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost The University of North Florida (UNF)--with project partners the University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Johnson Matthey--has recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell MEA technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a passive water recovery MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Developers at the University of North Florida identified water management components as an insurmountable barrier to achieving the required system size and weight necessary to achieve the energy density requirements of small portable power applications. UNF developed an innovative “passive water recovery” MEA for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) which provides a path to system simplification and optimization. The passive water recovery MEA incorporates a hydrophobic, porous, barrier layer within the cathode electrode, so that capillary pressure forces the water produced at the cathode through holes in the membrane and back to the anode. By directly transferring the water from the cathode to the anode, the balance of plant is very much simplified and the need for heavy, bulky water recovery components is eliminated. At the heart of the passive water recovery MEA is the UNF DM-1 membrane that utilizes a hydrocarbon structure to optimize performance in a DMFC system. The membrane has inherent performance advantages, such as a low methanol crossover (high overall efficiency), while maintaining a high proton conductivity (good electrochemical efficiency) when compared to perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes such as Nafion. Critically, the membrane provides an extremely low electro-osmotic drag coefficient of approximately one water molecule per proton (versus the 2-3 for Nafion) that minimizes flooding issues at the cathode, which often fatally limit open cathode MEA performance. During this successfully completed DOE program the project team met all of the project goals. The team built and tested over 1,500 MEAs with a wide range of different manufacturing chemistries and process conditions. This project demonstrated that the UNF MEA design could be fabricated with a high degree of reproducibility and repeatability. Some specific achievements include: • Durability - The UNF MEA has demonstrated over 11,000 hours continuous operation in a short stack configuration. The root cause of an off-state degradation issue was successfully mitigated by modifying the manufacturing process by changing the wetting agents used in the catalyst printing. The stability of the anode electrode was increased by replacing the anode electrodes with a stabilized PtRu/C catalyst. The overall degradation rate was significantly reduced through optimization of the MEA operating conditions. • Performance - The project team optimized the performance of the critical MEA sub-components. By increasing the membrane thickness, the methanol crossover was reduced, thereby increasing the fuel utilization efficiency without sacrificing any electrochemical performance. The reduction in methanol crossover increased the fuel utilization efficiency from 78% to over 90%. The liquid barrier layer was optimized to provide improved reproducibility, thereby improving stack voltage uniformity and reliability. Additionally the barrier layer water permeability was lowered without sacrificing any power density, thereby enabling increased operating temperature. Improvements in the cathode catalyst selection and coating provided an additional 10% to 20% improvement in the MEA performance at the target operating range. • Cost - Commercially scalable processes were developed for all of the critical MEA components which led to improved yields and lower overall manufacturing costs. Furthermore, significant steps have been made in improving the process control, which increases MEA

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J. [University of North Florida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Project Title: New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost The University of North Florida (UNF)--with project partners the University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Johnson Matthey--has recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell MEA technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a passive water recovery MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Developers at the University of North Florida identified water management components as an insurmountable barrier to achieving the required system size and weight necessary to achieve the energy density requirements of small portable power applications. UNF developed an innovative “passive water recovery” MEA for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) which provides a path to system simplification and optimization. The passive water recovery MEA incorporates a hydrophobic, porous, barrier layer within the cathode electrode, so that capillary pressure forces the water produced at the cathode through holes in the membrane and back to the anode. By directly transferring the water from the cathode to the anode, the balance of plant is very much simplified and the need for heavy, bulky water recovery components is eliminated. At the heart of the passive water recovery MEA is the UNF DM-1 membrane that utilizes a hydrocarbon structure to optimize performance in a DMFC system. The membrane has inherent performance advantages, such as a low methanol crossover (high overall efficiency), while maintaining a high proton conductivity (good electrochemical efficiency) when compared to perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes such as Nafion. Critically, the membrane provides an extremely low electro-osmotic drag coefficient of approximately one water molecule per proton (versus the 2-3 for Nafion) that minimizes flooding issues at the cathode, which often fatally limit open cathode MEA performance. During this successfully completed DOE program the project team met all of the project goals. The team built and tested over 1,500 MEAs with a wide range of different manufacturing chemistries and process conditions. This project demonstrated that the UNF MEA design could be fabricated with a high degree of reproducibility and repeatability. Some specific achievements include: • Durability - The UNF MEA has demonstrated over 11,000 hours continuous operation in a short stack configuration. The root cause of an off-state degradation issue was successfully mitigated by modifying the manufacturing process by changing the wetting agents used in the catalyst printing. The stability of the anode electrode was increased by replacing the anode electrodes with a stabilized PtRu/C catalyst. The overall degradation rate was significantly reduced through optimization of the MEA operating conditions. • Performance - The project team optimized the performance of the critical MEA sub-components. By increasing the membrane thickness, the methanol crossover was reduced, thereby increasing the fuel utilization efficiency without sacrificing any electrochemical performance. The reduction in methanol crossover increased the fuel utilization efficiency from 78% to over 90%. The liquid barrier layer was optimized to provide improved reproducibility, thereby improving stack voltage uniformity and reliability. Additionally the barrier layer water permeability was lowered without sacrificing any power density, thereby enabling increased operating temperature. Improvements in the cathode catalyst selection and coating provided an additional 10% to 20% improvement in the MEA performance at the target operating range. • Cost - Commercially scalable processes were developed for all of the critical MEA components which led to improved yields and lower overall manufacturing costs. Furthermore, significant steps have been made in improving the process control, which increases MEA

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J. [University of North Florida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Title Improving Building Performance at Urban Scale with a Framework for Real-time Data Sharing Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-6303E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Pang, Xiufeng, Tianzhen Hong, and Mary Ann Piette Date Published 05/2013 Keywords building performance, energy efficiency, energy modeling, optimal operation, urban scale. Abstract This paper describes work in progress toward an urban-scale system aiming to reduce energy use in neighboring buildings by providing three components: a database for accessing past and present weather data from high quality weather stations; a network for communicating energy-saving strategies between building owners; and a set of modeling tools for real-time building energy simulation.

244

NETL: Turbines - About the Turbine Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines About the Turbine Program Siemens Turbine Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations, harkening back to primitive devices such as waterwheels (2,000...

245

Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Dioxide Fill DU Dioxide Fill Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill Fills may improve repository performance by acting as sacrificial materials, which delay the degradation of SNF uranium dioxide. Because fill and SNF have the same chemical form of uranium (uranium dioxide), the DU dioxide in a repository is the only fill which has the same behavior as that of the SNF. In the natural environment, some uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long periods of time. The outer parts of the ore deposit degrade while the inner parts of the deposit are protected. The same approach is proposed herein for protecting SNF. The application could use half or more of the DU inventory in the United States. Behavior of Uranium and Potential Behavior of a Waste Package with SNF and Fill

246

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Model April 3, 2013 The important relationships between climate change and agriculture are uncertain, particularly the feedbacks related to the carbon cycle. Nevertheless, vegetation models have not yet considered the full impacts of management practices and nitrogen feedbacks on the carbon cycle. We are working to meet this need. We have integrated three crop types (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) into the Community Land Model (CLM). In developing the agriculture version of CLM, we added plant processes related to management practices and nitrogen cycling. A manuscript documenting our changes to CLM has been accepted for publication in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions ("Modeling

247

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

248

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Layne, A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

66 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, JULY 2010 Optimization of Wind Turbine Performance With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

66 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, JULY 2010 Optimization of Wind Turbine, torque, tower acceleration, wind turbine vibrations. I. INTRODUCTION I NTEREST in renewable energy has to carbon taxation has become a catalyst in the quest for clean energy. Wind energy has been most

Kusiak, Andrew

252

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High-Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pittsburgh Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh PIs: F. S. Pettit, G. H. Meier Subcontractor: J. L. Beuth SCIES Project 02- 01- SR101 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (05/01/02, 36 Month Duration + 6 mo No-Cost Extension) $ 458,420 Total Contract Value ($ 412,695 DOE) Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology For Improving the Oxidation, Hot Corrosion and Impact Resistance of High- Temperature Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbines University of Pittsburgh - Carnegie Mellon University University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh In the next generation gas turbine, resistance to thermal cycling damage may be as important as resistance to long isothermal exposures. Moreover, metallic coatings and Thermal Barrier

253

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

254

Improving Building Energy System Performance by Continuous Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The term Continuous Commissioning (CC) was first used by engineers at the Energy Systems Lab (ESL) at Texas A&M University to describe an ongoing process which improves the operation of buildings using measured hourly energy use and environmental data. The first buildings to undergo a continuous commissioning process were in the Texas LoanSTAR program [Liu, et al, 1994, Claridge, et al, 1994]. These buildings had been retrofitted with various energy efficiency improvements, and measured hourly data were available to verify that the retrofits were performing as desired, and to analyze the overall building performance. The ESL engineers, using hourly data, site visits, and ESL-developed software [Liu and Claridge 1995], then worked with the facility engineers to fine-tune the building operation. These efforts were so successful that another 15 to 30% of the annual building energy cost was saved ~ and these were in buildings that supposedly had all cost effective retrofits and operating improvements already implemented [Liu 1996].

Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BigHorn Development Project, located in Silverthorne, Colorado, is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The BigHorn Home Improvement Center, completed in the spring of 2000, is a 42,366-ft2 (3,936 m2) hardware store, warehouse, and lumberyard. The authors were brought in at the design stage of the project to provide research-level guidance to apply an integrated design process and perform a postoccupancy evaluation. An aggressive energy design goal of 60% energy cost saving was set early in the process, which focused the efforts of the design team and provided a goal for measuring the success of the project. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity. After construction, the authors installed monitoring equipment to collect energy performance data and analyzed the building's energy performance for two and one-half years. The authors also helped program the building controls and provided recommendations for improving operating efficiency. The building shows an estimated 53% energy cost saving and a 54% source energy saving. These savings were determined with whole-building energy simulations that were calibrated with measured data. This paper discusses lessons learned related to the design process, the daylighting performance, the PV system, and the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system.

Deru, M.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cooperative field test program for wind energy systems: Effects of precipitation on wind turbine performance. Detailed test plan and quality assurance plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. This study will be conducted at the Whisky Run windfarm on the southern Oregon coast. Precipitation has been shown to cause significant degradation in the performance of the MOD-O wind turbine by Corrigan and DeMiglio (1985), who found performance reductions of up to 20% for light rainfall, 30% for moderate rainfall and 36% for snow and drizzle. There are several penalties due to rainfall, but it appears that most of the performance degradation is due to rain induced roughness. The Whisky Run windfarm receives around 60 inches of rain per year most of which occurs from October through April. During the summer months drizzle is an occasional weather phenomena. Pacific Wind Energy (PWE) and Pacific Power and Light (PP&L) propose to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. The Whisky Run windfarm is unique among windfarms because the power sales contract is set up such that the wind farm is considered a research project and the participants have agreed to engage in research that will benefit the industry. PP&L will be providing all of the instrumentation except for the recording rate of rain gage. PWE will be performing the analysis of the data and project management.

Not Available

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Improve Performance and Reduce Cost of Any Lithium-Ion Battery  

TM Microstructured components for high-performance lithium batteries www.porouspower.com Symmetrix™ - Improve Performance & Reduce Cost of Any ...

259

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I:  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance Feed-Pump Hydraulic Performance and Design Improvement, Phase I: J2esearch Program Design Volume 2 EPRI EPRI CS-2323 Volume 2 Project 1884-6 Final Report March 1982 Keywords: Feed Pumps Feed Pump Reliability Feed Pump Hydraulics Feed Pump Design Feed Pump Research Feed Pump Specifications Prepared by Borg-Warner Corporation (Byron Jackson Pump Division and Borg-Warner Research Center) Carson, California and Massa^ f Technology Cambri__ . s ,-T. a a *a_^"nt.- ji^, w « ' jm.m ^j.^M\MMMim^mjii'mmmjmiiiimm\i- " I E CT R I C P 0 W E R R E S E A R C H I N ST ITO T E DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

260

The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Robust Gas Turbine Project M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory Prof. David Darmofal, Prof. Daniel and in-service conditions is a key factor in gas turbine product quality. While a given design may these improved engines. The M.I.T. Gas Turbine Laboratory (GTL) has a long history of developing advanced

Waitz, Ian A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

SPACE HANDBOOK TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Turbine specific weight vs. power plant output was investigated for rubidium, potassium, and sodium at several inlet temperatures to obtain order of magnitude performance and weight of possible nuclear power plant systems. (W.L.H.)

Grimaldi, J.

1960-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance  

SciTech Connect

Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance

267

NREL: Wind Research - Midsize Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midsize Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research To facilitate the development and commercialization of midsize wind turbines (turbines with a capacity rating of more than 100 kW up to 1 MW), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL launched the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project. In its latest study, NREL determined that there is a substantial market for midsize wind turbines. One of the most significant barriers to the midsize turbine market is the lack of turbines available for deployment; there are few midsize turbines on the market today. The objectives of the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project are to reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by filling an existing domestic technology gap; facilitate partnerships; accelerate maturation of existing U.S. wind energy businesses; and incorporate process improvement

268

IMPROVING CONSISTENCY OF PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS IN THE DOE COMPLEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-level waste (LLW) performance assessment (PA) process has been traditionally focused on disposal facilities at a few United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites and commercial disposal facilities. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the scope of the use of PA-like modeling approaches, involving multiple activities, facilities, contractors and regulators. The scope now includes, for example: (1) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessments, (2) CERCLA disposal cells, (3) Waste Determinations and High-Level Waste (HLW) Closure activities, (4) Potential on-site disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste, and (5) In-situ decommissioning (including potential use of existing facilities for disposal). The dramatic increase in the variety of activities requiring more detailed modeling has resulted in a similar increase in the potential for inconsistency in approaches both at a site and complexwide scale. This paper includes a summary of USDOE Environmental Management (EM) sponsored initiatives and activities for improved consistency. New initiatives entitled the Performance Assessment Community of Practice and Performance Assessment Assistance Team are also introduced.

Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

Turbine arrangement  

SciTech Connect

A turbine arrangement is disclosed for a gas turbine engine having a sloped gas flowpath through the turbine. The radial axes of the rotor blades and stator vanes in the sloped flowpath are tilted such that the axes are substantially normal to the mean flow streamline of the gases. This arrangement reduces tip losses and thereby increases engine efficiency.

Johnston, R.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

A low order model for vertical axis wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new computational model for initial sizing and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines

Drela, Mark

271

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR IMPROVING PERFORMANCE OF A FAST REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specific arrangement of the fertile material and fissionable material in the active portion of a fast reactor to achieve improvement in performance and to effectively lower the operating temperatures in the center of the reactor is described. According to this invention a group of fuel elements containing fissionable material are assembled to form a hollow fuel core. Elements containing a fertile material, such as depleted uranium, are inserted into the interior of the fuel core to form a central blanket. Additional elemenis of fertile material are arranged about the fuel core to form outer blankets which in tunn are surrounded by a reflector. This arrangement of fuel core and blankets results in substantial flattening of the flux pattern.

Koch, L.J.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIMUM DESIGN CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE FOR VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Commission). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Commission, its employees, or the state of California. The Commission, the state of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warranty, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the Commission nor has the Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information in this report. PREFACE The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program supports public interest energy research and development that will help improve the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The PIER Program, managed by the California Energy Commission (Commission), annually awards up to $62 million of which $2 million/year is allocated to the Energy Innovation Small Grant (EISG) Program for grants. The EISG Program is administered by the San Diego State

Hamid R. Rahai; Eisg Awardee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of improved performance refractory liner materials for slagging gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refractory liners for slagging gasifiers used in power generation, chemical production, or as a possible future source of hydrogen for a hydrogen based economy, suffer from a short service life. These liner materials are made of high Cr2O3 and lower levels of Al2O3 and/or ZrO2. As a working face lining in the gasifier, refractories are exposed to molten slags at elevated temperature that originate from ash in the carbon feedstock, including coal and/or petroleum coke. The molten slag causes refractory failure by corrosion dissolution and by spalling. The Albany Research Center is working to improve the performance of Cr2O3 refractories and to develop refractories without Cr2O3 or with Cr2O3 content under 30 wt pct. Research on high Cr2O3 materials has resulted in an improved refractory with phosphate additions that is undergoing field testing. Results to date of field trials, along with research direction on refractories with no or low Cr2O3, will be discussed.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Powell, Cynthia; Thomas, Hugh; Krabbe, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

High Performance Healthcare Buildings: A Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency iii 11-Sept-2009 ListA Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency 11-Sept-2009 Topic /A Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency 11-Sept-2009 Topic /

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Improved Performance of Red Mud Settlers at Worsley Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of Product Quality in Circulating Fluidized Bed Calcination · New Polymers for Improved Flocculation of High DSP-Containing Muds · Reduction ...

276

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections 2010--Volume 3: Balancing and A lignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections -- 2011: Volume 2, Repair Proce dures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections—2007: Volumes 2 and 4 Sup plemental Additions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70 of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections-2006; Volume 1: General Practic es  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

COOLING FAN AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upcoming emissions regulations (Tiers 3, 4a and 4b) are imposing significantly higher heat loads on the cooling system than lesser regulated machines. This work was a suite of tasks aimed at reducing the parasitic losses of the cooling system, or improving the design process through six distinct tasks: 1. Develop an axial fan that will provide more airflow, with less input power and less noise. The initial plan was to use Genetic Algorithms to do an automated fan design, incorporating forward sweep for low noise. First and second generation concepts could not meet either performance or sound goals. An experienced turbomachinery designer, using a specialized CFD analysis program has taken over the design and has been able to demonstrate a 5% flow improvement (vs 10% goal) and 10% efficiency improvement (vs 10% goal) using blade twist only. 2. Fan shroud developments, using an 'aeroshroud' concept developed at Michigan State University. Performance testing at Michigan State University showed the design is capable of meeting the goal of a 10% increase in flow, but over a very narrow operating range of fan performance. The goal of 10% increase in fan efficiency was not met. Fan noise was reduced from 0 to 2dB, vs. a goal of 5dB at constant airflow. The narrow range of fan operating conditions affected by the aeroshroud makes this concept unattractive for further development at this time 3. Improved axial fan system modeling is needed to accommodate the numbers of cooling systems to be redesigned to meet lower emissions requirements. A CFD fan system modeling guide has been completed and transferred to design engineers. Current, uncontrolled modeling practices produce flow estimates in some cases within 5% of measured values, and in some cases within 25% of measured values. The techniques in the modeling guide reduced variability to the goal of + 5% for the case under study. 4. Demonstrate the performance and design versatility of a high performance fan. A 'swept blade mixed flow' fan was rapid prototyped from cast aluminum for a performance demonstration on a small construction machine. The fan was mounted directly in place of the conventional fan (relatively close to the engine). The goal was to provide equal airflow at constant fan speed, with 75% of the input power and 5 dB quieter than the conventional fan. The result was a significant loss in flow with the prototype due to its sensitivity to downstream blockage. This sensitivity to downstream blockage affects flow, efficiency, and noise all negatively, and further development was terminated. 5. Develop a high efficiency variable speed fan drive to replace existing slipping clutch style fan drives. The goal for this task was to provide a continuously variable speed fan drive with an efficiency of 95%+ at max speed, and losses no greater than at max speed as the fan speed would vary throughout its entire speed range. The process developed to quantify the fuel savings potential of a variable speed fan drive has produced a simple tool to predict the fuel savings of a variable speed drive, and has sparked significant interest in the use of variable speed fan drive for Tier 3 emissions compliant machines. The proposed dual ratio slipping clutch variable speed fan drive can provide a more efficient system than a conventional single ratio slipping clutch fan drive, but could not meet the established performance goals of this task, so this task was halted in a gate review prior to the start of detailed design. 6. Develop a cooling system air filtration device to allow the use of automotive style high performance heat exchangers currently in off road machines. The goal of this task was to provide a radiator air filtration system that could allow high fin density, louvered radiators to operate in a find dust application with the same resistance to fouling as a current production off-road radiator design. Initial sensitivity testing demonstrated that fan speed has a significant impact on the fouling of radiator cores due to fine dusts, so machines equipped with continuously variabl

Ronald Dupree

2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recovery Act: Electrochromic Glazing Technology: Improved Performance, Lower Price  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependency of the US on energy imports and anticipated further increases in energy prices reinforce the concerns about meeting the energy demand in the future and one element of a secure energy future is conservation. It is estimated that the buildings sector represents 40% of the US's total energy consumption. And buildings produce as much as one third of the greenhouse gas emissions primarily through fossil fuel usage during their operational phase. A significant fraction of this energy usage is simply due to inefficient window technology. Electrochromic (EC) windows allow electronic control of their optical properties so that the transparency to light can be adjusted from clear to dark. This ability to control the amount of solar energy allowed into the building can be advantageously used to minimize lighting, heating and air conditioning costs. Currently, the penetration of EC windows into the marketplace is extremely small, and consequently there is a huge opportunity for energy savings if this market can be expanded. In order to increase the potential energy savings it is necessary to increase the quantity of EC windows in operation. Additionally, any incremental improvement in the energy performance of each window will add to the potential energy savings. The overall goals of this project were therefore to improve the energy performance and lower the cost of dynamic (EC) smart windows for residential and commercial building applications. This project is obviously of benefit to the public by addressing two major areas: lowering the cost and improving the energy performance of EC glazings. The high level goals for these activities were: (i) to improve the range between the clear and the tinted state, (ii) reduce the price of EC windows by utilizing lower cost materials, (iii) lowering the U-Value1 SAGE Electrochromics Inc. is the only company in the US which has a track record of producing EC windows, and presently has a small operational factory in Faribault MN which is shipping products throughout the world. There is a much larger factory currently under construction close by. This project was targeted specifically to address the issues outlined above, with a view to implementation on the new high volume manufacturing facility. Each of the Tasks which were addressed in this project is relatively straightforward to implement in this new facility and so the benefits of the work will be realized quickly. , and (iv) ensure the proposed changes have no detrimental effect to the proven durability of the window. The research described here has helped to understand and provide solutions to several interesting and previously unresolved issues of the technology as well as make progress in areas which will have a significant impact on energy saving. In particular several materials improvements have been made, and tasks related to throughput and yield improvements have been completed. All of this has been accomplished without any detrimental effect on the proven durability of the SageGlass EC device. The project was divided into four main areas: 1. Improvement of the Properties of the EC device by material enhancements (Task 2); 2. Reduce the cost of production by improving the efficiency and yields of some key manufacturing processes (Task 3); 3. Further reduce the cost by significant modifications to the structure of the device (Task 4); 4. Ensure the durability of the EC device is not affected by any of the changes resulting from these activities (Task 5). A detailed description of the activities carried out in these areas is given in the following report, along with the aims and goals of the work. We will see that we have completed Tasks 2 and 3 fully, and the durability of the resulting device structure has been unaffected. Some of Task 4 was not carried out because of difficulties with integrating the installation of the required targets into the production coater due to external constraints not related to this project. We will also see that the durability of the devices produced as a result of this work was

Burdis, Mark; Sbar, Neil

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Dynamic Wind Turbine Simulator of the Wind Turbine Generator System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study dynamic performances of wind turbine generator system (WTGS), and to determine the control structures in laboratory. The dynamic torque generated by wind turbine (WT) must be simulated. In there paper, a dynamic wind turbine emulator (WTE) is ... Keywords: dynamic wind turbine emulation, wind shear, tower shadow, torque compensation

Lei Lu; Zhen Xie; Xing Zhang; Shuying Yang; Renxian Cao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Title Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Michael Spears, Chi-Ming Lai, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of Sustainable Buildings 2005 Conference Pagination 1432-1437 Conference Location Tokyo, Japan, September 27-29, 2005 Abstract The factory-built relocatable classroom (RC) is a dominant force in the school facility construction industry in the United States (U.S.) and elsewhere. It is estimated that there are approximately 650,000 RCs currently occupied in the U.S., housing about 16 million students. RCs receive public attention due to complaints about poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Both measured data and anecdotal evidence in California have suggested excessive acoustical noise from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment as a central factor leading to degraded IEQ. In the U.S., RCs are typically equipped with unitary exterior wall-mount HVAC systems, and interior acoustical noise due to structural and airborne transmission can reach levels of about 58dB(A) with compressor cycling, under unoccupied conditions. Due to these noise levels teachers often simply choose to turn off the HVAC, leading to inadequate ventilation, as well as poor thermal conditioning, and thus to poor indoor air quality. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde are common. We discuss the acoustic component of our efforts to develop and test energy efficient HVAC systems that address the ventilation, controls, and acoustic requirements necessary to ensure high quality indoor environments in RCs

284

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Nath. 2000. Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. Hydrocarbonas well as selection of steam turbines or electric motors toand minimizing losses in the steam turbines) can result in

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

Frank Macri

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [2.86 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K] and 0.30 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [1.70 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K]). Turning such windows into ``superwindows,`` windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (1.14 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (0.57 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [2.86 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K] and 0.30 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [1.70 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K]). Turning such windows into superwindows,'' windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (1.14 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (0.57 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Turbines in the sky  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are being investigated as power sources for the proposed Star Wars weapons flatforms. The gas turbine engine offers the best opportunity for exploiting the high-temperature potential of both nuclear and chemical combustion. The use of mature gas turbine technology and existing materials would result in highly reliable PCUs capable of meeting SDI's requirements. However, operation under the temperature limits imposed by existing materials would result in a prohibitively heavy system. Cooled blades would somewhat increase temperature capability; however the turbine's mass, though reduced, would still be unacceptably large. The greatest improvements would result from the ability to operate at temperatures of up to 2000 K, pressures up to 14 MPa, and stress up to 690 MPa.

Boyle, R.V.; Riple, J.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Improvement Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006 J. Cohen and T. Schweizer Princeton Energy Resources International (PERI) Rockville, Maryland A. Laxson, S. Butterfield, S. Schreck, and L. Fingersh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Veers and T. Ashwill Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Technical Report NREL/TP-500-41036 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

290

Intermetallic Electrodes Improve Safety and Performance in Lithium ...  

volumetric and gravimetric capacity and improves battery stability and safety. ... Transportation applications, such as electric and hybrid-electric vehicles

291

A Methodology for Improving Business Process Performance through Positive Deviance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of process improvement and the role that best practice reference models play in the achievement of process improvement are both well recognized. Best practice reference models are generally created by experts who are external to the organisation. ... Keywords: Best Practice, Business Process Improvement, Business Process Variants, Entropy Weighting, Flexible Processes, Multi Criteria Decision Making

Mukhammad Andri Setiawan, Shazia Sadiq

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

UNSTEADY SIMULATION OF FLOW IN MICRO VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though wind turbines and windmills have been used for centuries, the application of aerodynamics technology to improve reliability and reduce costs of wind-generated energy has only been pursued in earnest for the past 40 years. Today, wind energy is mainly used to generate electricity. Wind is a renewable energy source. Power production from wind turbines is affected by certain conditions: wind speed, turbine speed, turbulence and the changes of wind direction. These conditions are not always optimal and have negative effects on most turbines. The present turbine is supposed to be less affected by these conditions because the blades combine a rotating movement around each own axis and around the nacelle’s one. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine can be more highly unsteady, because of great blade stagger angles. The turbine has a rotor with three straight blades of symmetrical airfoil. Paper presents unsteady simulations that have been performed for one wind velocity, and different initial blades stagger angles. The influence of interaction of blades is studied for one specific constant rotational speed among the four rotational speeds that have been studied.

A. C. Bayeul-lainé; G. Bois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.BackgroundAs a focus of innovative approaches and techniques, maintenance of aging steam ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges expected for conventional radial flow machines. Based on these measurements, the expected efficiency peak for prototype application is 93.64%. These data were used in the final sizing of the supporting mechanical and balance of plant equipment. The preliminary equipment cost for the design specification is $1450/kW with a total supply schedule of 28 months. This equipment supply includes turbine, generator, unit controls, limited balance of plant equipment, field installation, and commissioning. Based on the selected head and flow design conditions, fish passage survival through the final turbine is estimated to be approximately 98% for 7.9-inch (200-mm) fish, and the predicted survival reaches 100% for fish 3.9 inches (100 mm) and less in length. Note that fish up to 7.9- inches (200 mm) in length make up more than 90% of fish entrained at hydro projects in the United States. Completion of these efforts provides a mechanical and electrical design that can be readily adapted to site-specific conditions with additional engineering development comparable to costs associated with conventional turbine designs.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Testing and Performance of the Siemens V84.3A Gas Turbine in Peaking Service at Hawthorn Station of Kansas City Power & Light Compan y  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program, in place since 1991, is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the Siemens V84.3A installed at the Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) Hawthorn Station is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems, and will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas turb...

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Control can improve wind turbine performance by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are implementing and testing state-space controls on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART), a turbine specifically configured to test advanced controls. We show the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in Region 3 using rotor collective pitch and reduce dynamic loads in Regions 2 and 3 using generator torque. These controls enhance damping in the first drive train torsion mode. We base these designs on sensors typically used in commercial turbines. We evaluate the performance of these controls by showing field test results. We also compare results from these modern controllers to results from a baseline proportional integral controller for the CART. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Balas, M. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Performance comparison between transpiration air cooled turbine 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) stator vanes and solid uncooled vanes  

SciTech Connect

Testing was conducted to compare the aerodynamic performance of a turbine vane using transpiration air-cooling capable of operation at 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) gas temperature with a vane of identical profile with no cooling provisions to determine the effect of cooling on vane kinetic energy efficiency and loss coefficient. The test configuration was a 10-vane section of full scale first stage turbine stator annulus designed for 1.6 pressure ratio, cooling air flow equal to 6.1 percent of primary flow, 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) turbine inlet temperature and primary-to-coolant temperature ratio of 2.7. To enable comparison with other investigations, tests were conducted at three pressure ratios from 1.4 to 1.6, three coolant flows from 75 to 120 percent of design, and three primary-tocoolant temperature ratios from 2.70 to 1.15. Efficiency, loss coefficient and flow capacity test results were in good agreement with predicted values for both the transpiration air cooled and uncooled vanes. The testing demonstrated that it is necessary to conduct test evaluations of transpiration air-cooled components at or near design coolant-to-gas stream temperature ratio in order to achieve correct results.

Manning, G.B.; Moskowitz, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas 7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas David Bogard Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: A major goal of this project is to determine a reliable methodology for simulating contaminant deposition in a low-speed wind tunnel facility where testing is considerably less costly. The project is aimed at developing new cooling designs for turbine components that will minimize the effect of the depositions of contaminant particles on turbine components and maintain good film cooling performance even when surface conditions deteriorate. Moreover, a methodology will be established that

299

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri 3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Robin Ames Project Objective: This project is advanced research designed to provide the gas turbine industry with a set of quantitative aerodynamic and film cooling effectiveness data essential to understanding the basic physics of complex secondary flows. This includes their influence on the efficiency and performance of gas turbines, and the impact that differing film cooling ejection arrangements have on suppressing the detrimental effect of these

300

NERSC and HDF Group Optimize HDF5 Library to Improve I/O Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and HDF Group Optimize HDF5 Library to Improve IO Performance NERSC and HDF Group Optimize HDF5 Library to Improve IO Performance June 28, 2010 A common complaint among air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Turbine Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study was sponsored by the Turbine Survival Program in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE), Hydro Optimization Team (HOT), and the Federal Columbia River Power System...

302

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

Albrecht H. Mayer

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

Albrecht H. Mayer

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Lithium-Titanium-Oxide Anodes Improve Battery Safety and Performance  

titanium-oxide materials improves on the safety of graphite electrodes while also offering ... such as electric and hybrid-electric vehicles Portable electronic ...

305

Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating Markets For Green Biofuels Kalaitzandonakes, N. ,Creating Markets For Green Biofuels US Dept. ofCreating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving

Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the DOE Industrial Technologies Program, this sourcebook contains the practical guidelines and information manufacturers need to improve the efficiency of their pumping systems.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Anodes Improve Safety and Performance in Lithium-ion Batteries ...  

Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries have become the battery of choice for everything from cell phones to electric cars, but there is still much room for improvement.

308

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic of multi-megawatt turbines requires a new generation of modeling capability to assess individual turbine performance as well as detailed turbine- turbine and turbine-atmosphere interactions. Scientists

309

Design of a Transonic Research Turbine Facility Ruolong Ma*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and performance of modern gas-turbine engines. A detailed address of the various opportunities for flow control throughout the gas-turbine engine in terms of their impact on each engine component was given by Lord et al.1 in the new Advanced Performance Gas Turbine Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. II. Turbine Rig

Morris, Scott C.

310

Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."

Hodos, W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

How ENERGY STAR Helps Manufacturers Improve the Energy Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against the industry nationally Energy Tracking Tool - Helps establish production-based energy intensity metrics, set goals, and track performance Portfolio Manager - Scores the...

313

NREL Evaluates Thermal Performance of Uninsulated Walls to Improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

homes, which are currently over-predicted. Potential Impact Accurate estimates of the thermal characteris- tics of uninsulated assemblies will reduce pre-retrofit performance...

314

The Development of Improved Performance PM UDIMET(r) 720 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

to 350°F under vacuum the ensure removal of water vapor. After outgassing, the ... performing compression tests on baseline Udimet 720 material. The testing ...

315

Guidelines for planning and organizing a performance improvement project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management planning is the key to success in any type of project. This paper identifies and examines the areas of management responsibility in a performance evaluation project.

Dennis R. Chastain

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cost curves: An improved method for visualizing classifier performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces cost curves, a graphical technique for visualizing the performance (error rate or expected cost) of 2-class classifiers over the full range of possible class distributions and misclassification costs. Cost curves are shown to be ... Keywords: Classifiers, Machine learning, Performance evaluation, ROC curves

Chris Drummond; Robert C. Holte

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: News Release - Innovations in Gas Turbines to be Pursued in Two New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2000 4, 2000 Innovations in Gas Turbines to be Pursued In Two New Energy Department Projects GE to Develop Cleaner Combustors, "Smart" Sensors NISKAYUNA, NY - With the natural gas turbine fast becoming the workhorse for new power generating plants in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is preparing to award two new research contracts that could help improve the environmental performance and efficiencies of tomorrow's high-efficiency turbines. As part of a wide-ranging competition, the Department's National Energy Technology Laboratory has selected General Electric Co., Niskayuna, NY, for projects to develop a new gas turbine combustion system and a "Smart Power Turbine" sensor-and control system. A Cleaner Burning Combustor

319

Temperature stratified turbine compressors  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency of a compressor of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The inlet gas entering the compressor is stratified into two portions of different temperatures. The higher temperature gas is introduced adjacent the outer tipe of the compressor blades to reduce the relative Mach number of the flow at the area.

Earnest, E.R.; Passinos, B.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Improving GridFTP performance using the Phoebus session layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phoebus is an infrastructure for improving end-to-end throughput in high-bandwidth, long-distance networks by using a "session layer" protocol and "gateways" in the network. Phoebus has the ability to dynamically allocate network resources and to use ...

Ezra Kissel; Martin Swany; Aaron Brown

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chemically recuperated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a powerplant. It comprises: a gas turbine engine having a compressor, a combustor downstream of the compressor, a turbine, and a power turbine downstream and adjacent the turbine there being no reheating means between the turbine and power turbine; a reformer positioned downstream of the power turbine such that the output of the power turbine provides a first means for heating the reformer; a second means for heating the reformer, the second means positioned downstream of the power turbine.

Horner, M.W.; Hines, W.R.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Performance Engineering: Understanding and Improving the Performance of Large-Scale Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, vol.component of the high-performance computing world. This isJournal of High Performance Computing Applications, vol.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Improving server application performance via pure TCP ACK receive optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Network stack performance is critical to server scalability and user-perceived application experience. Perpacket overhead is a major bottleneck in scaling network I/O. While much effort is expended on reducing perpacket overhead for data-carrying packets, ...

Michael Chan, David R. Cheriton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Improving sensornet performance by separating system configuration from system logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sensor network protocols are self-configuring, but independent self-configuration at different layers often results in suboptimal performance. We present Chi, a full-system configuration architecture that separates system logic from system configuration. ...

Niclas Finne; Joakim Eriksson; Nicolas Tsiftes; Adam Dunkels; Thiemo Voigt

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Objective performance metrics for improved space telerobotics training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA astronauts undergo many hours of formal training and self-study to gain proficiency in space teleoperation tasks. After each lesson, instructors score an astronaut's performance in several broad skill categories, ...

Forman, Rachel Emily

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Near-term improvements in parabolic troughs: an economic and performance assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic-trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. This analysis qualifies the performance potential of various parabolic-trough component improvements from a systems viewpoint and uses these performance data to determine the worth of each improvement on an economic basis. The improvements considered are evacuated receivers, silvered-glass reflectors, improved receiver, selective coatings, higher optical accuracy concentrations, and higher transmittance receiver glazings. Upper-bound costs for each improvement are provided as well as estimates of the increased solar system rates of return that are made possible by these improvements. The performance and economic potential of some of these improvements are shown to be substantial, especially at higher collector operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Murphy, L.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Pratt & Whitney Aero-Derivative Combustion Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market forces associated with deregulation are driving the incorporation of new technologies into combustion turbine designs, with the goal of increased profitability via improved performance. The next generation aero-derivative combustion turbines currently being introduced into the market carry a degree of technical risk due to new technologies incorporated into their design. This report reviews the design evolution and experience base of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS) FT8 and FT4 aero-derivative...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

High Performance Healthcare Buildings: A Roadmap to Improved Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a road map for improving the energy efficiency of hospitals and other healthcare facilities. The report compiles input from a broad array of experts in healthcare facility design and operations. The initial section lists challenges and barriers to efficiency improvements in healthcare. Opportunities are organized around the following ten themes: understanding and benchmarking energy use; best practices and training; codes and standards; improved utilization of existing HVAC designs and technology; innovation in HVAC design and technology; electrical system design; lighting; medical equipment and process loads; economic and organizational issues; and the design of next generation sustainable hospitals. Achieving energy efficiency will require a broad set of activities including research, development, deployment, demonstration, training, etc., organized around 48 specific objectives. Specific activities are prioritized in consideration of potential impact, likelihood of near- or mid-term feasibility and anticipated cost-effectiveness. This document is intended to be broad in consideration though not exhaustive. Opportunities and needs are identified and described with the goal of focusing efforts and resources.

Singer, Brett C.; Tschudi, William F.

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

ORCENT2. Nuclear Steam Turbine Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

ORCENT2 performs heat and mass balance calculations at valves-wide-open design conditions, maximum guaranteed rating conditions, and an approximation of part-load conditions for steam turbine cycles supplied with throttle steam, characteristic of contemporary light-water reactors. The program handles both condensing and back-pressure turbine exhaust arrangements. Turbine performance calculations are based on the General Electric Company method for 1800-rpm large steam turbine-generators operating with light-water-cooled nuclear reactors. Output includes all information normally shown on a turbine-cycle heat balance diagram.

Fuller, L.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab, TN (United States)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Using current web page structure to improve prefetching performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web prefetching is a technique aimed at reducing user-perceived latencies in the World Wide Web. The spatial locality shown by user accesses makes it possible to predict future accesses from the previous ones. A prefetching engine uses these predictions ... Keywords: Web performance, Web prefetching

Josep Domenech; Jose A. Gil; Julio Sahuquillo; Ana Pont

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Improving the performance scalability of the community atmosphere model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), which serves as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), is the most computationally expensive CCSM component in typical configurations. On current and next-generation leadership class ... Keywords: CAM, atmospheric modeling, massively parallel computing, performance, scalability

Arthur A. Mirin; Patrick H. Worley

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design, Specific Rating Study; Period of Performance: June 29, 2000--March 1, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched the Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program to examine ways in which the cost of wind energy could be reduced a further 30%. One element of the WindPACT program has been a series of design studies aimed at each of the major subsystems of the wind turbine to study the effect of scale and of alternative design approaches. The WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study was carried out by Global Energy Concepts, LLC, (GEC) on behalf of NREL, and the final report was delivered in June 2002. The study examined what configuration and design changes in the rotor would reduce the overall cost of energy. The objectives of this report are to use the 1.5-MW baseline configuration from the earlier WindPACT Rotor Design Study to examine the effect of different power ratings and to identify an optimum specific rating; to examine the effect of different maximum tip speeds on overall cost of energy (COE); to examine the role of different wind regimes on the optimum specific rating; and to examine how the optimum specific rating may be affected by introducing more advanced blade designs.

Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

The value of steam turbine upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technological advances in mechanical and aerodynamic design of the turbine steam path are resulting in higher reliability and efficiency. A recent study conducted on a 390 MW pulverized coal-fired unit revealed just how much these new technological advancements can improve efficiency and output. The empirical study showed that the turbine upgrade raised high pressure (HP) turbine efficiency by 5%, intermediate pressure (IP) turbine efficiency by 4%, and low pressure (LP) turbine efficiency by 2.5%. In addition, the unit's highest achievable gross generation increased from 360 MW to 371 MW. 3 figs.

Potter, K.; Olear, D.; [General Physics Corp. (United States)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine. It comprises: a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section; a gas turbine including a turbine section, a combustor, a fuel valve supplying the combustor, and an air compressor with a discharge end leading to the combustor; a load riven by the reheat steam turbine and the gas turbine; the reheat steam turbine, the gas turbine and the load all having rotating members; a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine, including a high pressure steam generating section supplying steam to the high pressure steam turbine section through the control valve, and a steam reheater section receiving steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, and solid couplings serving to solidify couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing.

Moore, J.H.

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections–2013: Supplemental Addition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.BackgroundAs a focus of innovative approaches and techniques, maintenance of aging steam ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections, Volume 1: General Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.BackgroundAs a focus of innovative approaches and techniques, maintenance of aging steam ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Research - NASA Glenn Research Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Research-NASA Glenn Research Center Background Advancing the efficiency and performance levels of gas turbine technology requires high levels of fundamental understanding of the actual turbine component level technology systems. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center (NASA Glenn), with support from the Ohio State University, is planning research to compile

342

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

Kaita, R

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R; Wilgen, J B

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

346

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Improved performance of railcar/rail truck interface components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to improve the railcar/rail truck interface by developing a low maintenance bearing interface with a favorable friction coefficient. Friction and wear at the center bowl/center plate bearing interface cause high turning moments around curved track, wear of truck components, and increased detrimental dynamic effects. The recommended improvement of the rail truck interface is a set of two steel inserts, one concave and one convex, that can be retrofit to center bowls/center plates. The insert geometry addresses concerns about maintaining favorable pressure distribution on existing components, minimizing overall height increase to accommodate existing infrastructure, and retaining railcar stability. The stability of the railcar upon the design inserts has been ensured when the instantaneous center of rotation of the railcar body is above the railcar center of gravity. The damping ratio provided by the frictional moment within center bowl is 240 and eliminates the possibility of dynamic amplification. Using a 90 inch radius of curvature ensures stability and requires a 0.5 inch diameter reduction of the existing center plate for a gap of 1/16 inch. The increase in railcar height for the specific design is 0.71 inches which can be absorbed by either grinding of the center plate or new manufacturing dimensions. The design is feasible for small travel values corresponding to small vertical gaps at the side bearings. In addition to geometry alterations, the bearing surfaces are coated with a protective metallic layer. The literature suggests that optimum friction coefficients between bearing elements in the center bowl/center plate interface may reduce turning moments of the truck, wear of truck components, and detrimental dynamic effects such as hunting. Axial-torsional tests determined friction coefficient estimates and wear properties for a matrix of various metallic protective coatings and steel. Tungsten carbide-cobalt-chrome has a favorable coefficient of 0.3 under standard center bowl/center plate contact conditions.

Story, Brett Alan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Cement Industry This paper from Duke University focuses primarily on the development of an updated ENERGY STAR industrial...

350

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and...

351

The Emergence of Trade Associations as Agents of Environmental Performance Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores a surprising phenomenon: the emergence of trade associations as agents of environmental performance improvement. Trade associations in the United States have historically fought environmental regulation, ...

Nash, Jennifer

2002-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Permanent magnet assisted synchronous reluctance motor, design and performance improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, permanent magnet assisted (PMa)-synchronous reluctance motors (SynRM) have been considered as a possible alternative motor drive for high performance applications. In order to have an efficient motor drive, performing of three steps in design of the overall drive is not avoidable. These steps are design optimization of the motor, identification of the motor parameter and implementation of an advanced control system to ensure optimum operation. Therefore, this dissertation first deals with the design optimization of the Permanent Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor (PMa-SynRM). Various key points in the rotor design of a low cost PMa-SynRM are introduced and their effects are studied. Finite element approach has been utilized to show the effects of these parameters on the developed average electromagnetic torque and the total d-q inductances. As it can be inferred from the name of the motor, there are some permanent magnets mounted in the rotor core. One of the features considered in the design of this motor is the magnetization of the permanent magnets mounted in the rotor core using the stator windings to reduce the manufacturing cost. At the next step, identification of the motor parameters is discussed. Variation of motor parameters due to temperature and airgap flux has been reported in the literatures. Use of off-line models for estimating the motor parameters is known as a computationally intensive method, especially when the models include the effect of cross saturation. Therefore in practical applications, on-line parameter estimation is favored to achieve a high performance control system. In this dissertation, a simple practical method for parameter estimation of the PMa-SynRM is introduced. Last part of the dissertation presents one advanced control strategy which utilized the introduced parameter estimator. A practical Maximum Torque Per Ampere (MTPA) control scheme along with a simple parameter estimator for PMa-SynRM is introduced. This method is capable of maintaining the MTPA condition and stays robust against the variations of motor parameters. Effectiveness of the motor design procedure and the control strategy is validated by presenting simulation and experimental results of a 1.5 kW prototype PMa-SynRM, designed and manufactured through the introduced design method.

Niazi, Peyman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hoisting Branch Conditions -- Improving Super-Scalar Processor Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The performance and hardware complexity of super-scalar architectures is hindered by conditional branch instructions. When conditional branches are encountered in a program, the instruction fetch unit must rapidly predict the branch predicate and begin speculatively fetching instructions with no loss of instruction throughput. Speculative execution has a high hardware cost, is limited by dynamic branch prediction accuracies, and does not scale well for increasingly super-scalar architectures. The conditional branch bottleneck would be solved if we could somehow move branch condition evaluation far forward in the instruction stream and provide a new branch instruction that encoded both the source and target address of a branch. This paper summarizes the hardware extensions to support just such a Future Branch, then gives a compiler algorithm for hoisting branch evaluation across many blocks. The algorithm is applicable to other optimizations for parallelism, such as prefetching data. ...

Bill Appelbe; Reid Harmon; Scott Wills; Maurizio Vitale

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Subhourly wind forecasting techniques for wind turbine operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three models for making automated forecasts of subhourly wind and wind power fluctuations were examined to determine the models' appropriateness, accuracy, and reliability in wind forecasting for wind turbine operation. Such automated forecasts appear to have value not only in wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine operating strategies (such as determining when to attempt startup). A simple persistence model, an autoregressive model, and a generalized equivalent Markhov (GEM) model were developed and tested using spring season data from the WKY television tower located near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The three models represent a pure measurement approach, a pure statistical method and a statistical-dynamical model, respectively. Forecasting models of wind speed means and measures of deviations about the mean were developed and tested for all three forecasting techniques for the 45-meter level and for the 10-, 30- and 60-minute time intervals. The results of this exploratory study indicate that a persistence-based approach, using onsite measurements, will probably be superior in the 10-minute time frame. The GEM model appears to have the most potential in 30-minute and longer time frames, particularly when forecasting wind speed fluctuations. However, several improvements to the GEM model are suggested. In comparison to the other models, the autoregressive model performed poorly at all time frames; but, it is recommended that this model be upgraded to an autoregressive moving average (ARMA or ARIMA) model. The primary constraint in adapting the forecasting models to the production of wind turbine cluster power output forecasts is the lack of either actual data, or suitable models, for simulating wind turbine cluster performance.

Wegley, H.L.; Kosorok, M.R.; Formica, W.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

366

Combustion turbine operation and optimization model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combustion turbine performance deterioration, quantified by loss of system power, is an artifact of increased inlet air temperature and continuous degradation of the machine. Furthermore,… (more)

Sengupta, Jeet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Performance and Improvements of the ATLAS Jet Trigger System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the harsh conditions of the LHC, with proton bunches colliding every 50 ns and up to 40 pp interactions per bunch crossing, the ATLAS trigger system has to be flexible to maintaining an unbiased efficiency for a wide variety of physics studies while providing a fast rejection of non-interesting events. Jets are the most commonly produced objects at the LHC, essential for many physics measurements that range from precise QCD studies to searches for New Physics beyond the Standard Model, or even unexpected physics signals. The ATLAS jet trigger is the primary mean for selecting events with high pT jets and its good performance is fundamental to achieve the physics goals of ATLAS. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one (L1) being hardware based, with a 2 ?s latency, and the two following ones (called collectively High Level Triggers or HLT) being softwared based with larger processing times. It was designed to work in a Region of Interest (RoI) based approach, where the second lev...

Conde Muino, P; The ATLAS collaboration

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improving the Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries at Low Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability for Li-ion batteries to operate at low temperatures is extremely critical for the development of energy storage for electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Currently, Li-ion cells have limited success in operating at temperature below –10 deg C. Electrolyte conductivity at low temperature is not the main cause of the poor performance of Li-ion cells. Rather the formation of a tight interfacial film between the electrolyte and the electrodes has often been an issue that resulted in a progressive capacity fading and limited discharge rate capability. The objective of our Phase I work is to develop novel electrolytes that can form low interfacial resistance solid electrolyte interface (SEI) films on carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes. From the results of our Phase I work, we found that the interfacial impedance of Fluoro Ethylene Carbonate (FEC) electrolyte at the low temperature of –20degC is astonishingly low, compared to the baseline 1.2M LiPFEMC:EC:PC:DMC (10:20:10:60) electrolyte. We found that electrolyte formulations with fluorinated carbonate co-solvent have excellent film forming properties and better de-solvation characteristics to decrease the interfacial SEI film resistance and facilitate the Li-ion diffusion across the SEI film. The very overwhelming low interfacial impedance for FEC electrolytes will translate into Li-ion cells with much higher power for cold cranking and high Regen/charge at the low temperature. Further, since the SEI film resistance is low, Li interaction kinetics into the electrode will remain very fast and thus Li plating during Regen/charge period be will less likely to happen.

Trung H. Nguyen; Peter Marren; Kevin Gering

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chapter 14: Wind Turbine Control Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by gravity, stochastic wind disturbances, and gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional turbulent wind inflow field that drives fatigue loading. Wind turbine modeling is also complex and challenging. Accurate models must contain many degrees of freedom (DOF) to capture the most important dynamic effects. The rotation of the rotor adds complexity to the dynamics modeling. Designs of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for these complexities. Algorithms must capture the most important turbine dynamics without being too complex and unwieldy. Off-the-shelf commercial soft ware is seldom adequate for wind turbine dynamics modeling. Instead, specialized dynamic simulation codes are usually required to model all the important nonlinear effects. As illustrated in Figure 14-1, a wind turbine control system consists of sensors, actuators and a system that ties these elements together. A hardware or software system processes input signals from the sensors and generates output signals for actuators. The main goal of the controller is to modify the operating states of the turbine to maintain safe turbine operation, maximize power, mitigate damaging fatigue loads, and detect fault conditions. A supervisory control system starts and stops the machine, yaws the turbine when there is a significant yaw misalignment, detects fault conditions, and performs emergency shut-downs. Other parts of the controller are intended to maximize power and reduce loads during normal turbine operation.

Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Progress in Implementing and Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing wind turbines with maximum energy production and longevity for minimal cost is a major goal of the federal wind program and the wind industry. Control can improve the performance of wind turbines by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) we are designing state-space control algorithms for turbine speed regulation and load reduction and testing them on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART). The CART is a test-bed especially designed to test advanced control algorithms on a two-bladed teetering hub upwind turbine. In this paper we briefly describe the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in region 3 for the CART. These controls use rotor collective pitch to regulate speed and also enhance damping in the 1st drive-train torsion, 1st rotor symmetric flap mode, and the 1st tower fore-aft mode. We designed these controls using linear optimal control techniques using state estimation based on limited turbine measurements such as generator speed and tower fore-aft bending moment. In this paper, we describe the issues and steps involved with implementing and testing these controls on the CART, and we show simulated tests to quantify controller performance. We then present preliminary results after implementing and testing these controls on the CART. We compare results from these controls to field test results from a baseline Proportional Integral control system. Finally we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to support research on floating offshore wind turbine platforms. This project would support the mission, vision, and goals of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of innovative wind power technologies. Development of offshore wind energy technologies would help the nation reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and

377

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Interim Guidelines for In Situ Visual Inspection of Inlet and Outlet Turbine Stages: Part 2: Experiences, Approaches and Improvement s in Remote Visual Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ inspection of steam turbine rotors will minimize the length of planned outages by reducing the amount of equipment disassembly required. This interim report provides a state-of-the-art review of in situ visual inspection of steam turbine rotors, also known as remote visual inspection (RVI). The report also proposes an approach for the next phase of this project, which will promote not only application of RVI technology but also delivery of advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) equipment to cri...

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

Capstone Turbine Corporation

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Biphase turbine bottoming cycle for a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

Application of a two-phase turbine system to waste heat recovery was examined. Bottoming cycle efficiencies ranging from 15 to 30% were calculated for a 720/sup 0/F diesel exhaust temperature. A single stage demonstration unit, designed for non-toxic fluids (water and DowTherm A) and for atmospheric seals and bearings, had a cycle efficiency of 23%. The net output power was 276 hp at 8,100 rpm, increasing the total shaft power from 1,800 hp for the diesel alone, to 2,076 hp for the combined system. A four stage organic turbine, for the same application, had a rotational speed of 14,700 rpm while a four stage steam turbine had 26,000 rpm. Fabrication drawings were prepared for the turbine and nozzle. The major improvement leading to higher cycle efficiency and lower turbine rpm was found to be the use of a liquid component with lower sensible heat. A reduction in capital cost was found to result from the use of a contact heat exchanger instead of tube-fin construction. The cost for a contact heat exchanger was only $35-52/kWe compared to $98/kWe for a tube-fin heat exchanger. Design drawings and materials list were prepared. A program resulting in the demonstration of a two-phase bottoming system was planned and the required cost estimated. The program would result in a feasibility test of the nozzle and turbine at the end of the first year, a laboratory performance test of the bottoming system by the end of the second year and a field demonstration test and laboratory endurance test of the bottoming system during the third year. The blowdown test rig for the first year's program and test turbine were designed.

Ahmad, S.; Hays, L.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electronic fuel control system for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for monitoring gas turbine operating temperatures and rotational velocity for producing one of a group of fuel control signals for controlling the fuel input rate to the gas turbine. The method consists of: monitoring turbine inlet temperatures through respective sensors for the gas turbine, averaging the turbine inlet temperatures to produce an average turbine inlet temperature signal, monitoring a gas generator inlet temperature sensor of the gas turbine for producing a gas generator inlet temperature signal, generating a speed signal proportional to the rotational velocity of the gas turbine, combining the gas generator inlet temperature signal with the speed signal to produce a first function signal, applying the first function signal to a stored data set to produce a second function signal, the stored data set related to performance characteristics of the gas turbine, and comparing the turbine inlet temperature signal to the second function signal to produce a difference signal therefrom, the difference signal serving as a fuel control signal for the gas turbine.

Nick, C.F.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE's Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, which is necessary to achieve METC's vision for future IGCC systems. This major new program is a cooperative effort in which DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE) are joining forces with the private sector to develop ultra-high efficiency gas turbine systems. A goal of this Program is to have a utility-size gas turbine with a 60 percent efficiency (lower heating value basis (LHV)) ready for commercialization by the year 2002. (While this paper focuses on utility-size turbines which are the primary interest of this audience, an ultra-high efficiency, industrial-size gas turbine will also be developed in the ATS Program with a comparable improvement in efficiency.) Natural gas is the target fuel of the Program, a recognition by DOE that natural gas will play a significant role in supplying future power generation needs in the US. However, to insure that the US has fuel supply options, ATS designs will be adaptable to coal and biomass fuels. Therefore, the ATS Program will directly benefit IGCC and other advanced coal based power generation systems. Cost and efficiency improvements in the turbine system as well as in the gasification and gas stream cleanup plant sections will enable IGCC to reach a cost target of $1,000--$1,280/kW and an efficiency goal of 52 percent (higher heating value basis (HHV)) in the post-2000 market.

Bechtel, T.F.; Bajura, R.A.; Salvador, L.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Baseline gas turbine development program. Eighteenth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Initial running of the upgraded engine took place on July 13, 1976. The engine proved to be mechanically sound, but was also 43% deficient in power. A continuing corrective development effort has to date reduced the power deficiency to 32%. Compressor efficiency was increased 2 points by changing to a 28-channel diffuser and tandem deswirl vanes; improved processing of seals has reduced regenerator leakage from about 5 to 2.5% of engine flow; a new compressor turbine nozzle has increased compressor turbine stage efficiency by about 1 point; and adjustments to burner mixing ports has reduced pressure drop from 2.8 to 2.1% of engine pressure. Key compressor turbine component improvements are scheduled for test during the next quarterly period. During the quarter, progress was also made on development of the Upgraded Vehicle control system; and instrumentation of the fourth program engine was completed by NASA. The engine will be used for development efforts at NASA LeRC.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.] [comps.

1977-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many challenges exist for the efficient and safe operation of wind turbines due to the difficulty in creating accurate models of their dynamic characteristics and the turbulent conditions in which they operate. A promising new area of wind turbine research is the application of adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to problems where the plant model is not well known and the plant operating conditions are unpredictable. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances, which model the uniform wind disturbance across the wind turbine rotor. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. To improve controller performance, we use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to regulate turbine rotational speed and to accommodate step disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved generator speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller. The adaptive controller demonstrated robustness to modeling errors and changes in system parameters.

Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Improving the efficiency of binary cycles  

SciTech Connect

The performance of binary geothermal power plants can be improved through the proper choice of a working fluid, and optimization of component designs and operating conditions. This paper summarizes the investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which are examining binary cycle performance improvements for moderate temperature (350 to 400 F) resources. These investigations examine performance improvements resulting from the supercritical vaporization and countercurrent integral condensation of mixed hydrocarbon working fluids, as well as the modification of the turbine inlet state points to achieve supersaturated turbine vapor expansions. For resources, with the brine outlet temperature restricted, the use of turbine exhaust recuperators is examined. The reference plant used to determine improvements in plant performance in these studies operates at conditions similar to the 45 MW Heber binary plant. The brine effectiveness (watt-hours per pound of brine) is used as an indicator for improvements in performance. The performance of the binary cycle can be improved by 25 to 30% relative to the reference plant through the selection of the optimum working fluids and operating conditions, achieving countercurrent integral condensation, and allowing supersaturated vapor expansions in the turbine. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Mines, G.L.; Bliem, C.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Projects selected in todays announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants. The projects selected for negotiation of awards include: Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will further develop and validate the Aquantis Current Plane ocean current turbine technology. The project will validate analytical design tools and develop the technology's direct drive component. DOE share: up to $750,000; Duration: up to 2 years Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will first develop a bottom habitat survey methodology and siting study approach in accordance with all relevant regulatory agencies in the southeast Florida region; then they will determine the most suitable areas for mooring marine and hydrokinetic facilities based on the

390

Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

An experimental study on improvement of a Savonius rotor performance with curtaining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study introduces a new curtaining arrangement to improve the performance of Savonius wind rotors. The curtain arrangement was placed in front of the rotor preventing the negative torque opposite the rotor rotation. The geometrical parameters of the curtain arrangement were optimized to generate an optimum performance. The rotor with different curtain arrangements was tested out of a wind tunnel, and its performance was compared with that of the conventional rotor. The maximum power coefficient of the Savonius wind rotor is increased to about 38.5% with the optimum curtain arrangement. The experimental results showed that the performance of Savonius wind rotors could be improved with a suitable curtain arrangement. (author)

Altan, Burcin Deda; Atilgan, Mehmet [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Pamukkale University, Kinikli 20070 Denizli (Turkey); Oezdamar, Aydogan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ege University, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

I/O deduplication: utilizing content similarity to improve I/O performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duplication of data in storage systems is becoming increasingly common. We introduce I/O Deduplication, a storage optimization that utilizes content similarity for improving I/O performance by eliminating I/O operations and reducing the mechanical delays ...

Ricardo Koller; Raju Rangaswami

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the progress during the six year of the project on ''Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance.'' This report is funded under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Class I program which is targeted towards improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in fluvially-dominated deltaic deposits. The project involves using an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by drilling of horizontal injection wells to improve production performance. The project was divided into two budget periods. In the first budget period, many modern technologies were used to develop a detailed reservoir management plan; whereas, in the second budget period, conventional data was used to develop a reservoir management plan. The idea was to determine the cost effectiveness of various technologies in improving the performance of mature oil fields.

Kelkar, Mohan; Liner, Chris; Kerr, Dennis

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

An improved structural mechanics model for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to provide improved predictions of Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) for the FRAPCON nuclear fuel performance code, a new model, the FRAPCON Radial-Axial Soft Pellet (FRASP) model, was developed. This ...

Mieloszyk, Alexander James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Program on Technology Innovation: Erosion Resistant Coatings for Gas and Steam Turbines - Advanced Nano-Coatings and Vendor Evaluati on Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Erosion of steam turbine blades and gas turbine compressor blades costs power producers millions of dollars each year. Improved mitigation techniques to reduce erosion damage will improve turbine efficiency and reduce maintenance downtime.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

EASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY SPONSORED BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AS PART OF THE ENERGY STAR® PROGRAM GALE A. BOYD AND CHRISTIAN DELGADO DUKE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS BOX 90097, DURHAM, NC 27708 JULY 10, 2012 2 | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY CONTENTS Figures .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Tables ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

399

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Forecasting and strategic inventory placement for gas turbine aftermarket spares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of forecasting demand for Life Limited Parts (LLPs) in the gas turbine engine aftermarket industry. It is based on work performed at Pratt & Whitney, a major producer of turbine engines. ...

Simmons, Joshua T. (Joshua Thomas)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities provides nuclear and fossil personnel with a faster and more accurate method for performing turbine measurement activities during an outage.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Turbine protection system for bypass operation  

SciTech Connect

In a steam turbine installation having a high pressure turbine, a steam generator is described for providing steam to the turbine, at least a lower pressure turbine, a reheater in the steam path between the high and lower pressure turbines, and a steam bypass path for bypassing the turbines, the high pressure turbine having a one-way check valve in its output steam line to prevent bypass steam from entering its output. The improvement described here consists of: (A) a second bypass path for passing steam around the high pressure turbine; (B) the second bypass path including, (i) steam jet compressor means including two input sections and an output section, with one input section being connected to the high pressure turbine output, the other input section being connected to receive steam from the steam generator and the output section being connected to the input of the reheater, (ii) valving means for controlling the steam supply from the steam generator to the steam jet compressor means; and (C) control means responsive to an output condition at the high pressure turbine output for controlling the valving means.

Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

1986-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alstom 3-MW Wind Turbine Installed at NWTC (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3-MW Alstom wind turbine was installed at NREL's NWTC in October 2010. Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing on the company's 3-MW ECO 100 wind turbine and to validate models of Alstom's unique drivetrain concept. The turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 2010 and engineers began certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for type certification of the 60-Hz unit. The successful outcome of this test will enable Alstom to begin commercial production of ECO 100 in the United States. NREL also will obtain additional measurements of power performance, acoustic noise, and system frequency to complement the 50 Hz results previously completed in Europe. After NREL completes the certification testing on the ECO 100, it will conduct long-term testing to validate gearbox performance to gain a better understanding of the machine's unique ALSTOM PURE TORQUE{trademark} drivetrain concept. In conventional wind turbines, the rotor is supported by the shaft-bearing gearbox assembly. Rotor loads are partially transmitted to the gearbox and may reduce gearbox reliability. In the ALSTOM PURE TORQUE concept, the rotor is supported by a cast frame running through the hub, which transfers bending loads directly to the tower. Torque is transmitted to the shaft through an elastic coupling at the front of the hub. According to Alstom, this system will increase wind turbine reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs by isolating the gearbox from rotor loads. Gearbox reliability has challenged the wind energy industry for more than two decades. Gearbox failures require expensive and time-consuming replacement, significantly increasing the cost of wind plant operation while reducing the plant's power output and revenue. To solve gearbox reliability issues, NREL launched a Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) in 2006 and brought together the world's leading turbine manufacturers, consultants, and experts from more than 30 companies and organizations. GRC's goal was to validate the typical design process-from wind turbine system loads to bearing ratings-through a comprehensive dynamometer and field-test program. Design analyses will form a basis for improving reliability of future designs and retrofit packages. Through its study of Alstom's Eco 100 gearbox, NREL can compare its GRC model gearbox with Alstom's and add the results to the GRC database, which is helping to advance more reliable wind turbine technology.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Proceedings: 1991 EPRI Gas Turbine Procurement Seminar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's 1991 workshop on gas turbine procurement will help equipment specifiers to develop more-effective procurement procedures for new gas turbine generating units.Properly drafted specifications and an informed purchase posture improve the quality of a procurement and can result in lower unit life-cycle cost.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gas Turbine Recuperators: Benefits and Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed resources (DR) are projected to be an expanding part of the power generation mix in the future -- with conventional industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines as well as emerging microturbine products playing an important role. This report assesses the role of recuperators in improving the power generation efficiency of simple-cycle gas turbines and microturbines.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description The technical approaches are: -UTRC shall develop a lab-based analysis of hybrid-water/air-cooled condensers with minimal water consumption, focusing on combined mist evaporative pre-cooling and mist deluge evaporative cooling technology applied to microchannel heat exchangers. Models to predict evaporative cooling performance will be validated by sub-scale testing. The predicted performance will be compared to that of state-of-the-art commercial evaporative coolers. -UTRC shall analyze the interaction of turbine design and cooling needs and specifically address how an enhanced turbine, which features variable nozzles and diffuser boundary layer suction, would further improve the ORC system performance and enable full utilization of the hybrid-cooled system. UTRC shall design, procure and test the enhanced turbine in an existing 200 kW geothermal ORC system for a technology demonstration. -UTRC shall complete a detailed design of the hybrid-cooled geothermal ORC system with an enhanced turbine that complies with its performance, cost, and quality requirements, and use this system design to prescribe subsystem/component technology requirements and interfaces. UTRC shall optimize UTC's PureCycle® geothermal ORC system integrated with a hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser and an enhanced turbine for net power output, efficiency and water consumption. -UTRC shall analyze the feasibility of addressing pure water supply for hybrid-water/aircooled condenser by using geothermal-driven Liquid-Gap-Membrane-Distillation (LGMD) technology, as an alternative to conventional Reverse Osmosis/De-Ionized treatment.

408

Single Rotor Turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

21st century advanced hydropower turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While hydropower turbine manufacturers have incrementally improved turbine technology to increase efficiency, the basic design concepts haven`t changed for decades. These late 19th and early 20th century designs did not consider environmental effects, since little was known about environmental effects of hydropower at the time. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the hydropower industry recognize that hydropower plants have an effect on the environment and there is a great need to bring turbine designs into the 21st century. DOE has issued a request for proposals (RFP) that requested proposers to discard conventional thinking, search out innovative solutions, and to visualize innovative turbines designed from a new perspective. This perspective would look at the {open_quotes}turbine system{close_quotes} (intake to tailrace) which will balance environmental, technical, and economic considerations. This paper describes the DOE Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program.

Brookshier, P.A.; Flynn, J.V.; Loose, R.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Gas Turbine Repair Guidelines: Alstom GT26  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities and power generators in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities, generators, and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on turbine blades, vanes, and combustion hardware. The guidelines in this volume address the specific features of the Alstom GT26 gas turbine.

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

Turbine power plant with back pressure turbine  

SciTech Connect

A combined gas/steam turbine power plant is disclosed including a gas turbine having a combustion chamber and a steam turbine driven by steam generated with heat from the combustion gases of the gas turbine. The steam is utilized in a technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Relatively small fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by varying a delivery of fuel to the combustion chamber. Relatively large fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by supplying live steam directly to the technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Various devices are provided for conditioning the steam prior to being supplied to the technological process.

Kalt, J.; Kehlhofer, R.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Dual Structure Turbine Disks Via Partial Immersion Heat Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

turbine disk forging. The method is termed partial immersion treatment. It includes ... to improve gas turbine operating efficiencies generally results in increased turbine inlet .... to aid in this manual advance. (Figure lb). ... A second Astroloy disk was ..... engineer. (prime contractor) was Mr. R. M. Gasior, of Cytemp Specialty.

415

Reliable, Lightweight Transmissions For Off-Shore, Utility Scale Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to reduce the technical risk for a hydrostatic transmission based drivetrain for high-power utility-size wind turbines. A theoretical study has been performed to validate the reduction of cost of energy (CoE) for the wind turbine, identify risk mitigation strategies for the drive system and critical components, namely the pump, shaft connection and hydrostatic transmission (HST) controls and address additional benefits such as reduced deployment costs, improved torque density and improved mean time between repairs (MTBR).

Jean-Claude Ossyra

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

Plant Engineering: Performance Diagnostic Test Program for the Nuclear Turbine Cycle at Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, many power generating companies are challenged to reduce operating costs, and at the same time, the cost of unit unavailability can be significant in today's power markets. In the past decade, management of nuclear power plants, including Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP), has been focused on reducing forced outage rates and nuclear-safety-related issues, with less attention paid to thermal performance. But recently, KHNP has been strongly challenged to increase unit thermal performance, as f...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS Eric FOCK Ile de La Réunion - FRANCE ABSTRACT This paper deals with neural networks modelling of HVAC systems of HVAC system can be modelled using manufacturer design data presented as derived performance maps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Cooling-Tower Performance Prediction and Improvement: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New data and methods enable engineers to predict and improve the thermal performance of evaporative cooling towers. Current EPRI research focuses on analytic tools that will help utilities avoid costly operating penalties associated with cooling towers that do not meet thermal performance specifications.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (2000c). New steam turbine saves chemical manufacturer $demand. Back-pressure steam turbines which may be used to

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costscan be driven by a steam turbine or an electric motor. Hot

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve turbine performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

422

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

423

Microsoft Word - LL-White Paper Prac_Improve_Perform.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM/GJ1156-2006 LM/GJ1156-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-02 White Paper Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance March 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: LM Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance March 2006 Doc. No. S0224000 Page iii Signature Page Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance March 2006 Prepared By: ____________________________________________________ Jody Waugh

424

Approach for the Improvement of Energy Performance of a Stock of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work performed by CSTB, ADEME and the Ministry of equipment in France to improve the energy performance of the ministry stock of buildings: 7 millions square meters, 10 000 buildings, wide range of different buildings of different sizes and uses. The project has four major phases: analysis of existing tools for energy performance evaluation, identification of the endusers of the tools and definition of a building typology, development of tools adapted to the endusers, validation and improvement of the tools. Since the building managers' motivation is an important factor to improve the energy performance of the buildings, the study has tried to incorporate the endusers needs and constraints in the different phases of tools development.

Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Bouillon, J.; Crozier, L.; Guyot, G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An Approach for Using TFlash to Improve the Lightning Performance of Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TFlash is an advanced transmission line, lightning performance prediction software. TFlash's ability to predict whether lighting will cause a flashover can help in the design of new transmission lines and help modify existing transmission lines to improve performance. However, to make full use of the software, it is important for the user to have an understanding of the parameters that influence the lightning performance of the line. This report highlights the parameters and shows their influence by mean...

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Impingement starting and power boosting of small gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The technology of high-pressure air or hot-gas impingement from stationary shroud supplementary nozzles onto radial outflow compressors and radial inflow turbines to permit rapid gas turbine starting or power boosting is discussed. Data are presented on the equivalent turbine component performance for convergent/divergent shroud impingement nozzles, which reveal the sensitivity of nozzle velocity coefficient with Mach number and turbine efficiency with impingement nozzle admission arc. Compressor and turbine matching is addressed in the transient turbine start mode with the possibility of operating these components in braking or reverse flow regimes when impingement flow rates exceed design.

Rodgers, C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Wind Farm Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high- performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms. The knowledge gained from this research could lead to improved turbine design standards, increased productivity in large wind farms, and a lower cost of energy from wind power. This is key, because as turbines grow in size-approximately doubling in height over the past five years-they present more complex challenges to wind turbine designers and operators. To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, NREL and the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) joined together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the

429

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, [August 3, 1993--October 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3 through October 31, 1993, for Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30246. The objective of this program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an industrial gas turbine system to operate at a thermal efficiency of 50 percent and developable to 60 percent. Solar`s ATS Engine Design Team reviewed the intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine concept defined in the Program proposal, validated certain assumptions associated therewith, and began the process of actualizing this concept in terms of achievable turbomachinery components. Given the probable use of a free power turbine arrangement, both 1-spool and 2-spool compressor arrangements were examined with both fixed and variable turbine geometry. Off-design performance, both part-load and full-load over a range of inlet air temperatures, was examined. During this period certain simplifying assumptions were made regarding the amount of cycle air extracted for use in turbine cooling and the distribution of its return to the cycle. The exact influence of turbine cooling air extraction on cycle performance (thermal efficiency) will be highly dependent upon turbine airfoil material selection, its life/temperature capabilities, etc. Thus, cycle performance will be subject to some degree of change as the design progresses. Even now, improvements made to the cycle performance model will result in variation in presented results. As a general rule, later results will always supersede earlier results when there is an apparent conflict.

Karstensen, K.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these technologies and the corresponding early adopters are likely to be located.

Sy Ali

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

MHK Technologies/Denniss Auld Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denniss Auld Turbine Denniss Auld Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Denniss Auld Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oceanlinx Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/GPP Namibia *MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project *MHK Projects/Hawaii *MHK Projects/Oceanlinx Maui *MHK Projects/Port Kembla *MHK Projects/Portland Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The turbine used in an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) is a key element in the devices economic performance. The Oceanlinx turbine uses variable pitch blades, which, with the slower rotational speed and higher torque of the turbine, improves efficiency and reliability and reduces the need for maintenance. The turbine uses a sensor system with a pressure transducer that measures the pressure exerted on the ocean floor by each wave as it approaches or enters the capture chamber. The transducer sends a voltage signal proportional to the pressure that identifies the height, duration and shape of each wave. The signal from the transducer is sent to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) that adjusts various parameters, such as the blade angle and turbine speed, in real time. The generator, which is coupled to the Oceanlinx turbine, is designed so that the electrical control will vary the speed and torque characteristic of the generator load in real time to maximize the power transfer. An induction machine will be used for the generator, with coupling to the electricity grid provided by a fully regenerative electronic control system. The grid interconnection point and the control system are located in a weatherproof building external to the air duct. The voltage of the three phase connection at this point is 415 V L-L at 50 Hz. With the appropriate phase and pulse width modulation, power is transferred in either direction with harmonies and power factor variation contained within the electricity authoritys requirements. The system is normally configured to operate at a power factor of 0.95 or better.

433

Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate improved reliability and increased performance made possible by deeply embedding instrumentation and controls (I&C) in nuclear power plant (NPP) components and systems. The project is employing a highly instrumented canned rotor, magnetic bearing, fluoride salt pump as its I&C technology demonstration platform. I&C is intimately part of the basic millisecond-by-millisecond functioning of the system; treating I&C as an integral part of the system design is innovative and will allow significant improvement in capabilities and performance. As systems become more complex and greater performance is required, traditional I&C design techniques become inadequate and more advanced I&C needs to be applied. New I&C techniques enable optimal and reliable performance and tolerance of noise and uncertainties in the system rather than merely monitoring quasistable performance. Traditionally, I&C has been incorporated in NPP components after the design is nearly complete; adequate performance was obtained through over-design. By incorporating I&C at the beginning of the design phase, the control system can provide superior performance and reliability and enable designs that are otherwise impossible. This report describes the progress and status of the project and provides a conceptual design overview for the platform to demonstrate the performance and reliability improvements enabled by advanced embedded I&C.

Kisner, R.; Melin, A.; Burress, T.; Fugate, D.; Holcomb, D.; Wilgen, J.; Miller, J.; Wilson, D.; Silva, P.; Whitlow, L.; Peretz, F.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program fifth quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Baseline engines 5, 6, and 7 were built. Action to correct a 7 percent power deficiency is underway. Two baseline vehicles are operational, with the third ready for engine installation. Measurement of baseline performance and emissions is in process. NASA Lewis has their baseline engine installation operational. They are also assemblying a cold flow power turbine test rig and have made substantial progress in defining upgraded engine aerodynamics. A study was made of sizing the upgraded engine for a compact size vehicle. Chrysler's proprietary linerless insulation was installed into the endurance engine. Evaluation was delayed by a power turbine section failure. Substantial progress was made in Chrysler's proprietary low emissions burner program. Preparations are being made to evaluate the Solar burner. Evaluation of ceramic regenerator cores are in process. A seal development program was initiated. AiResearch has most of the integrated control system preprototype elements defined, and has many key elements under test. Their transient engine simulation model is nearly operational. A compressor turbine wheel disc is being designed utilizing Pratt-Whitney superplastic forging properties. Procurement of two variable inlet guide vane assemblies is about complete. Detail drawings of a Free Rotor vehicle installation are being completed.

Wagner, C.E.

1974-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Comments on the Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the Request for Information on Improving Performance of on the Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects Comments on the Request for Information on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects On August 29, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a Request for Information seeking information on a draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for significant onshore electric transmission projects requiring Federal authorizations. On September 25, the public comment period was extended to October 31, 2013. Comments received are available below. Comments from Lee Cunningham, sent September 23, 2013 Comments from Patrick Ledger of Arizona's G&T Cooperatives, sent September 25, 2013

437

Preliminary study of the potential for performance improvements in solar desiccant cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic operation of the desiccant cooling system is reviewed, and a preliminary evaluation of the potential for improving desiccant cooling system performance to COPs of 1.0 to 1.2 is performed. A second-law thermodynamic system analysis was carried out, demonstrating that present desiccant systems only achieve 10% to 15% of theoretical maximum performance and that a large potential for improvement exists. Computer simulations have been used to study the effects of improving desiccant properties and increasing the effectiveness of some components of the system. Results have shown that modification of desiccant properties can only produce a limited (10%) increase in COP. Larger increases can be achieved by increasing the effectiveness of the sensible heat exchanger. However, this study indicates that the key to obtaining higher COPs is in the design of the dehumidifier. One design that shows promise is the parallel passage dehumidifier.

Schlepp, D.R.; Barlow, R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a significantly improved combustion system for its Mercury 50 advanced industrial gas turbine by selectively incorporating advanced alloys, coatings, and composite and...