Sample records for improve occupant comfort

  1. Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schott, M.; Scheib, J.; Long, N.; Fleming, K.; Benne, K.; Brackney, L.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many studies have reported energy savings after installing a dashboard, but dashboards provide neither individual feedback to the occupant nor the ability to report individual comfort. The Building Agent (BA) provides an interface to engage the occupant in a conversation with the building control system and the building engineer. Preliminary outcomes of the BA-enabled feedback loop are presented, and the effectiveness of the three display modes will be compared to other dashboard studies to baseline energy savings in future research.

  2. Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

    Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising...

  3. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    architects involved in energy-efficient design. It might beenergy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.energy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.

  4. Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal design, and thermoelectric devices Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal...

  5. Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback and workplace culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback years to their design, performance and evaluation. The successful delivery of green buildings requires within economic means. Occupant comfort and behaviour can have a significant impact on green building

  6. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. and E. Arens E. 1993. Air movement and thermal comfort.1994. Locally controlled air movement preferred in warmR, Bittencourt L. 2010. Air movement acceptability limits

  7. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ, Vol. I-2-5 The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter Jiaolin Wang Lu Chen Postgrauate Master... surface temperature decline to reduce the body?s heat loss. Meanwhile shudder will promote the body?s heat production. So the temperature of organism doesn?t drop with decline of the environmental temperature. But if organism stays at cool environment...

  8. Energy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: Results from human subject tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Roadmap. Energy-efficient Buildings: Heating andtechnology for both improving occupants’ thermal comfort and simultaneously reducing buildings’ heating and

  9. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Marini, Kyle; Ghatikar, Girish; Diamond, Richard

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal agencies are taking many steps to improve the sustainability of their operations, including improving the energy efficiency of their buildings, promoting recycling and reuse of materials, encouraging carpooling and alternative transit schemes, and installing low flow water fixture units are just a few of the common examples. However, an often overlooked means of energy savings is to provide feedback to building users about their energy use through information dashboards connected to a building?s energy information system. An Energy Information System (EIS), broadly defined, is a package of performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems that is used to collect, store, analyze, and display energy information. At a minimum, the EIS provides the whole-building energy-use information (Granderson 2009a). We define a ?dashboard? as a display and visualization tool that utilizes the EIS data and technology to provide critical information to users. This information can lead to actions resulting in energy savings, comfort improvements, efficient operations, and more. The tools to report analyzed information have existed in the information technology as business intelligence (Few 2006). The dashboard is distinguished from the EIS as a whole, which includes additional hardware and software components to collect and storage data, and analysis for resources and energy management (Granderson 2009b). EIS can be used for a variety of uses, including benchmarking, base-lining, anomaly detection, off-hours energy use evaluation, load shape optimization, energy rate analysis, retrofit and retro-commissioning savings (Granderson 2009a). The use of these EIS features depends on the specific users. For example, federal and other building managers may use anomaly detection to identify energy waste in a specific building, or to benchmark energy use in similar buildings to identify energy saving potential and reduce operational cost. There are several vendors of EIS technology that provide information on energy and other environmental variables in buildings.

  10. NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, air velocity, and inlet size. This technique uses the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and velocity. The study shows that high sidewall supply air jets achieve uniform mixing in a room, which is essential for providing acceptable comfort levels. The study also provides information required to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes.

  11. Agent Technology to Improve Building Energy Efficiency and Occupant Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; van Houten, R.; Kamphuis, R.; Hommelberg, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming, caused largely by energy consumption, has become a major problem. During the last decades the introduction of energy saving technologies has strongly reduced energy consumption of buildings. Users' preferences and behavior have...

  12. WESBES: A Wireless Embedded Sensor for Improving Human Comfort Metrics using Temporospatially Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Hewlett; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When utilized properly, energy management systems (EMS) can offer significant energy savings by optimizing the efficiency of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, difficulty often arises due to the constraints imposed by the need to maintain an acceptable level of comfort for a building’s occupants. This challenge is compounded by the fact that human comfort is difficult to define in a measurable way. One way to address this problem is to provide a building manager with direct feedback from the building’s users. Still, this data is relative in nature, making it difficult to determine the actions that need to be taken, and while some useful comfort correlations have been devised, such as ASHRAE’s Predicted Mean Vote index, they are rules of thumb that do not connect individual feedback with direct, diverse feedback sensing. As they are a correlation, quantifying effects of climate, age of buildings and associated defects such as draftiness, are outside the realm of this correlation. Therefore, the contribution of this paper is the Wireless Embedded Smart Block for Environment Sensing (WESBES); an affordable wireless sensor platform that allows subjective human comfort data to be directly paired with temporospatially correlated objective sensor measurements for use in EMS. The described device offers a flexible research platform for analyzing the relationship between objective and subjective occupant feedback in order to formulate more meaningful measures of human comfort. It could also offer an affordable and expandable option for real world deployment in existing EMS.

  13. Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure on Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility, featuring the Vehicle Modification Facility, Vehicle Test Pad and ReCharge Integrated Demonstration System. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year - not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air conditioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three installations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle-grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Part of NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS), the VTIF is dedicated to renewable and energy efficient solutions. This facility showcases technology and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for electric vehicle (EV) components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies and industry partners. Research conducted at the VTIF examines the interaction of building energy systems, utility grids, renewable energy sources and PEVs, integrating energy management solutions, and maximizing potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, while smoothing the transition and reducing costs for EV owners. NREL's collaboration with automakers, charging station manufacturers, utilities and fleet operators to assess technologies using VTIF resources is designed to enable PEV communication with the smart grid and create opportunities for vehicles to play an active role in building and grid management. Ultimately, this creates value for the vehicle owner and will help renewables be deployed faster and more economically, making the U.S. transportation sector more flexible and sustainable.

  14. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  15. Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining comfort in a home can be challenging in hot-humid climates. At the common summer temperature set point of 75 degrees F, the perceived air temperature can vary by 11 degrees F because higher indoor humidity reduces comfort. Often the air conditioner (AC) thermostat set point is lower than the desirable cooling level to try to increase moisture removal so that the interior air is not humid or "muggy." However, this method is not always effective in maintaining indoor relative humidity (RH) or comfort. In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74 degrees -80 degrees F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

  16. Improving the Fanger model's thermal comfort predictions for naturally ventilated spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Phan Hue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fanger model is the official thermal comfort model in U.S. and international standards and is based on the heat balance of the human body with the environment. This investigation focuses on re-specifying the parameters ...

  17. Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A real example was investigated on the relationship between indoor environment, comfort and productivity in a chipboard workplace location in southern China. In this field study, a subjective evaluation and objective measurement were carried out...

  18. Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A real example was investigated on the relationship between indoor environment, comfort and productivity in a chipboard workplace location in southern China. In this field study, a subjective evaluation and objective measurement were carried out...

  19. Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saving energy and improving comfort through plant optimization using practical examples Dipl.-Ing. Christian Mueller Honeywell Building Solutions GmbH ESL-IC-08-10-67a Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building...-22, 2008 Thank you for your attention! Dipl.-Ing. Christian Mueller christian.mueller@honeywell.com ESL-IC-08-10-67a Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 ...

  20. NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Thermal Comfort in High-Performance Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop recommendations on HVAC system design and operating conditions to achieve optimal thermal comfort in high-performance homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed recommendations to help residential heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) designers select optimal supply inlet size and system operating conditions to maintain good thermal comfort in low heating and cooling load homes. This can be achieved by using high sidewall supply air jets to create proper combinations of air temperature and air motion in the occupied zone of the conditioned space. The design of air distribution systems for low-load homes is an integral part of residential system research and development in systems integration. As American homes become more energy efficient, space conditioning systems will be downsized. The downsizing will reach the point where the air flow volumes required to meet the remaining heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing, which can affect thermal comfort. NREL researchers performed a detailed study evaluating the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, supply air velocity, and supply inlet size. They found that in heating mode, low and intermediate supply temperatures of 95 F (308 K) and 105 F (314 K) maintained acceptable comfort levels at lower fan powers than can be achieved at 120 F (322 K) supply temperatures. For the high supply temperature of 120 F (322 K), higher fan powers (supply velocities) were required to overcome buoyancy effects and reach a good mixing in the room. In cooling mode, a supply temperature of 55 F (286 K) provided acceptable comfort levels. A small supply inlet of 8-in. (0.2 m) x 1-in. (0.025 m) is recommended in both heating and cooling modes. Computational fluid dynamics was used to model heat transfer and airflow in the room. The technique consists of using the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by determining the Air Diffusion Performance Index (ADPI). The level of comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and air velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and air velocity. Figure 1 illustrates the plots of acceptable draft temperature, which is between -3 (-1.7) and 2 F (1.1 K) for two supply velocities of 394 fpm (2 m/s) (a) and 788 fpm (4 m/s) (b) when the room was supplied by 55 F (286 K) air. The plots show the distribution at selected cross-sections along the room. Colored regions on each cross-section are considered comfortable (blue regions are on the cold side and red regions are on the warm side). Regions of acceptable draft temperature are larger at low velocity and decrease as the velocity increases. As a result, the supply velocity of 394 fpm (2 m/s) provided higher comfort level than the supply velocity of 788 fpm (4 m/s). Work is in progress at NREL to extend this research to evaluate additional configurations and to integrate this system into a whole-house context.

  1. Opportunities to Save Energy and Improve Comfort by Using Wireless Sensor Networks in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Federspiel, C.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sensor types informing more comprehensive control systems, 3) occupants' involvement in control loops, 4) demand responsive electricity management, 5) integration among now-separate building systems, and 6) the adoption of mixed-mode and other new types...

  2. Energy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: Results from human subject tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for heating and cooling systems (setpoint deadband) ischair system’s maximum power is 4.8 watts for cooling (3.6Wsystems (PCS) are a promising technology for both improving occupants’ thermal comfort and simultaneously reducing buildings’ heating and cooling

  3. Does Targeted Education of Emergency Physicians Improve Their Comfort Level in Treating Psychiatric Patients?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level of EPs, when asked to treat PBPs, may be improved withto a willingness to treat. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(6):our results would be to treat the pre-intervention and post-

  4. Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the Lost FoamCoolingdesign, and

  5. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  6. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  7. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect IAQ negatively (health + productivity) InappropriateIAQ standards that support occupant comfort, health, productivity, and

  8. Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, C.

    More than 40 percent of Europe's primary energy is required for conditioning of buildings. By improving energy efficiency, approximately 30 percent of this energy could be saved. Energy counts for 35 percent of the operating cost and put...

  9. IEQ and the impact on building occupants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and its effects on health, comfort and performance of occupants is becoming increasingly essential. Facility managers are interested in IEQ's close relationship to energy use. Employers hope to enhance employee comfort and productivity, reduce absenteeism and health-care costs, and reduce risk of litigation. The rising interest in this field has placed additional pressure on the research community for practical guidelines on creating a safe, healthy and comfortable indoor environment.

  10. Using Post-Occupancy Evaluation to Inform Design and Improve Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langer, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -18 Center for the Built Environment (CBE) user survey 10 core building categories: • Acoustics • Air quality • Cleanliness and Maintenance • Office furnishings • Office layout • Classroom furnishings • Classroom layout • Thermal comfort • General... satisfaction building • General satisfaction workspace + selective additional modules (views and daylight added for this set of POEs) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Acoustic Quality Air Quality Cleanliness and maintenance Lighting Office furnishings Office layout Thermal...

  11. A methodology for identifying and improving occupant behavior in residential Zhun (Jerry) Yu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fung, Benjamin C. M.

    : Occupant behavior Building energy consumption Data mining Evaluation Identification a b s t r a c significantly reducing building energy consumption. Moreover, given that the proposed method is partly based Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Currently, residential sector building energy

  12. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, Cindy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including cost, energy and thermal comfort analysis, whichfor greatest energy benefits, prioritize thermal comfortSetting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

  13. agent causing occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency and Occupant Comfort Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Global warming, caused largely by energy consumption, has become a major problem. During the last...

  14. New Jersey Comfort Partners Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Jersey Comfort Partners program is a free of charge, direct installation energy efficiency assistance program available to most New Jersey households with significant energy usage and an...

  15. Data Collection Methods for Assessing Adaptive Comfort in Mixed-Mode Buildings and Personal Comfort Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail; Arens, Ed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    item/64p9111k   DATA  COLLECTION  FOR  ADAPTIVE  COMFORT  item/64p9111k   DATA  COLLECTION  FOR  ADAPTIVE  COMFORT  item/64p9111k   DATA  COLLECTION  FOR  ADAPTIVE  COMFORT  

  16. The Human leading the Thermal Comfort Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Van Houten, R.; Vissers, D.; Maaijen, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007 Zhang H., 2003, Human Thermal Sensation and Comfort in Transient and Non Uniform Thermal Environments; Phd Thesis Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments...

  17. Multi Agent System to Optimize Comfort and Energy Flows in the Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennings, L. W.; Houten, M. A.; Boxem, G.; Zeiler, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of multi-agent systems for autonomous flexible operation of building services systems to obtain overall improvement energy efficiency and comfort. Multi-agent systems have proven to be successful in many applications to detach the timely interdependencies...

  18. A Study on the Effects of Unwanted Air Infiltration on Thermal Comfort at an Airport Terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, B.; Wei, G.; Claridge, D.; Caeiro, J.

    The Energy Systems Laboratory at Texas A&M University is currently studying ways to make improvements in thermal comfort at the Terminal E building at DFW airport. Airport terminal building HVAC systems are generally known to consume large amounts...

  19. Potential Nationwide Improvements in Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, W.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased thermal insulation in building envelope Thermallyand building envelope. Improvements in thermal comfort from

  20. Homeowner's Guide to Window Air Conditioner Installation for Efficiency and Comfort (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet offers a step-by-step guide to proper installation of window air conditioning units, in order to improve efficiency and comfort for homeowners.

  1. Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Thermoelectric HVAC and Thermal Comfort Enablers for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  2. National Comfort Products: Order (2010-SE-0307)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered National Comfort Products to pay an $8,000 civil penalty after finding NCP had failed to conduct the required testing to certify that certain models of central air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  3. Buildings, Commissioning, Efficiency, Comfort, and CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comfort, optimize energy use and identify retrofits for existing commercial and institutional buildings and central plant facilities. It includes the entire commissioning process from assessment through implementation and subsequent follow-up as necessary...Buildings, Commissioning, Efficiency, Comfort, and CO2 Asian Pacific Building Commissioning Conference ICEBONovember 8, 2006Shenzhen, ChinaPresented ByDavid E. ClaridgeEnergy Systems LaboratoryTexas A&M University Commissioning New Buildings...

  4. Data Collection Methods for Assessing Adaptive Comfort in Mixed-Mode Buildings and Personal Comfort Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail; Arens, Ed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal  comfort  for  free  running  buildings”,   Energy  and   Buildings,   23(3):  175-­?182   Baker,  N.V. ,  naturally  ventilated  buildings. ”  In   Proceedings  of  

  5. Invitation to a Workshop on Comfort Controls in California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , where careful design of thermal mass and solar design ensure acceptable comfort with mostly passive

  6. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort-AC02-05CH11231. #12;Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering thermal comfort through a different low energy space conditioning mechanism than would otherwise

  7. Energy-Efficient and Comfortable Buildings through Multivariate Integrated Control (ECoMIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birru, Dagnachew [Philips Research North America; Wen, Yao-Jung [Philips Research North America; Rubinstein, Francis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Clear, Robert D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to develop an integrated control solution for enhanced energy efficiency and user comfort in commercial buildings. The developed technology is a zone-based control framework that minimizes energy usage while maintaining occupants’ visual and thermal comfort through control of electric lights, motorized venetian blinds and thermostats. The control framework is designed following a modular, scalable and flexible architecture to facilitate easy integration with exiting building management systems. The control framework contains two key algorithms: 1) the lighting load balancing algorithm and 2) the thermostat control algorithm. The lighting load balancing algorithm adopts a model-based closed-loop control approach to determine the optimal electric light and venetian blind settings. It is formulated into an optimization problem with minimizing lighting-related energy consumptions as the objective and delivering adequate task light and preventing daylight glare as the constraints. The thermostat control algorithm is based on a well-established thermal comfort model and formulated as a root-finding problem to dynamically determine the optimal thermostat setpoint for both energy savings and improved thermal comfort. To address building-wide scalability, a system architecture was developed for the zone-based control technology. Three levels of services are defined in the architecture: external services, facility level services and zone level services. The zone-level service includes the control algorithms described above as well as the corresponding interfaces, profiles, sensors and actuators to realize the zone controller. The facility level services connect to the zones through a backbone network, handle supervisory level information and controls, and thus facilitate building-wide scalability. The external services provide communication capability to entities outside of the building for grid interaction and remote access. Various aspects of the developed control technology were evaluated and verified through both simulations and testbed implementations. Simulations coupling a DOE medium office reference building in EnergyPlus building simulation software and a prototype controller in Matlab were performed. During summer time in a mixed-humid climate zone, the simulations revealed reductions of 27% and 42% in electric lighting load and cooling load, respectively, when compared to an advanced base case with daylight dimming and blinds automatically tilted to block direct sun. Two single-room testbeds were established. The testbed at Philips Lighting business building (Rosemont, IL) was designed for quantifying energy performance of integrated controls. This particular implementation achieved 40% and 79% savings on lighting and HVAC energy, respectively, compared to a relatively simple base case operated on predefined schedules. While the resulting energy savings was very encouraging, it should be noted that there may be several caveats associated with it. 1) The test was run during late spring and early summer, and the savings numbers might not be directly used to extrapolate the annual energy savings. 2) Due to the needs for separate control and metering of the small-scale demonstrator within a large building, the HVAC system, hence the corresponding savings, did not represent a typical energy code-compliant design. 3) The light level in the control case was regulated at a particular setpoint, which was lower than then the full-on light level in the base case, and the savings resulted from tuning down the light level to the setpoint was not attributable to the contribution of the developed technology. The testbed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA) specifically focused on glare control integration, and has demonstrated the feasibility and capability of the glare detection and prevention technique. While the short one-month test in this testbed provided a functional indication of the developed technology, and it would require at least a full solstice-to-solstice cycle to ruinously quan

  8. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  9. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Software, Anyhere; Fernandes, Luis; Lee, Eleanor; Ward, Greg

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate lighting energy savings of split-pane electrochromic (EC) windows controlled to satisfy key visual comfort parameters. Using the Radiance lighting simulation software, interior illuminance and luminance levels were computed for a south-facing private office illuminated by a window split into two independently-controlled EC panes. The transmittance of these was optimized hourly for a workplane illuminance target while meeting visual comfort constraints, using a least-squares algorithm with linear inequality constraints. Blinds were successively deployed until visual comfort criteria were satisfied. The energy performance of electrochromics proved to be highly dependent on how blinds were controlled. With hourly blind position adjustments, electrochromics showed significantly higher (62percent and 53percent, respectively without and with overhang) lighting energy consumption than clear glass. With a control algorithm designed to better approximate realistic manual control by an occupant, electrochromics achieved significant savings (48percent and 37percent, respectively without and with overhang). In all cases, energy consumption decreased when the workplace illuminance target was increased. In addition, the fraction of time during which the occupant had an unobstructed view of the outside was significantly greater with electrochromics: 10 months out of the year versus a handful of days for the reference case.

  10. Atmospheric Apparatus : the production of another comfort paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hung Fai

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays, being thermal comfort is no longer a challenging problem for modern living. With the aids of the modern environmental control technologies, a fast, convenient and effective thermal comfort experience can be easily ...

  11. Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the Lost Foam Casting Process

  12. Comfort and HVAC Performance for a New Construction Occupied Test House in Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Hovnanian(R) Homes(R) constructed a 2,253-ft2 single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

  13. Avoiding Sick Buildings while Assuring Occupant Productivity and Building Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Int-Hout, D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 Fig 5 Thermal Comfort Envelopes It can be seen that a single setpoint, such as 75F 50% RH, will satisfy neither individual above. Another problem results from occupant?s misdiagnosis of what is troubling them. The individual on the left, (1....1 Met, 1.0 Clo) above, at 75F, will probably not complain of being too warm, as indicated, but will more likely complain of being ?Stuffy?. Building operators may be inclined to ignore these complaints, especially when the building...

  14. A technical framework to describe occupant behavior for building energy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner , William; Hong , Tianzhen

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Green buildings that fail to meet expected design performance criteria indicate that technology alone does not guarantee high performance. Human influences are quite often simplified and ignored in the design, construction, and operation of buildings. Energy-conscious human behavior has been demonstrated to be a significant positive factor for improving the indoor environment while reducing the energy use of buildings. In our study we developed a new technical framework to describe energy-related human behavior in buildings. The energy-related behavior includes accounting for individuals and groups of occupants and their interactions with building energy services systems, appliances and facilities. The technical framework consists of four key components: i. the drivers behind energy-related occupant behavior, which are biological, societal, environmental, physical, and economical in nature ii. the needs of the occupants are based on satisfying criteria that are either physical (e.g. thermal, visual and acoustic comfort) or non-physical (e.g. entertainment, privacy, and social reward) iii. the actions that building occupants perform when their needs are not fulfilled iv. the systems with which an occupant can interact to satisfy their needs The technical framework aims to provide a standardized description of a complete set of human energy-related behaviors in the form of an XML schema. For each type of behavior (e.g., occupants opening/closing windows, switching on/off lights etc.) we identify a set of common behaviors based on a literature review, survey data, and our own field study and analysis. Stochastic models are adopted or developed for each type of behavior to enable the evaluation of the impact of human behavior on energy use in buildings, during either the design or operation phase. We will also demonstrate the use of the technical framework in assessing the impact of occupancy behavior on energy saving technologies. The technical framework presented is part of our human behavior research, a 5-year program under the U.S. - China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency.

  15. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal comfort", Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning,environment", Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning,Symposium on Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (

  16. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 – 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

  17. Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer§ and Anil K@cse.msu.edu Abstract The introduction of airbags into automobiles has significantly improved the safety of the occupants. Unfortunately, airbags can also cause fatal injuries if the occupant is a child smaller (in

  18. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy management, smart home, energy efficiency, thermostat strategy, heating setback Corresponding, a heating control system may require some time to heat a home to a comfortable temperature after itsPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  19. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    city hall: a historic railroad depot. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Metal halide...

  20. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Web based enterprise energy and building automation systems.from an Analysis of Building Energy Information SystemG. , & Price, P. 2009b. Building Energy Information Systems:

  1. EECBG Success Story: Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HVAC system. | Photo courtesy of Deborah Hammond The Dunn Building in Martinsburg, West Virginia replaced its HVAC system with a new chiller system fan coil units and...

  2. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can use the energy consumption data to better understand thein its software to view energy consumption data. These threeaccess to the energy consumption data of their individual

  3. Optimizing HVAC Control to Improve Building Comfort and Energy Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Joo, I.; Dong, D.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Quiroz, L.; Swiatek, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . M. Liu [9] reduced the utility cost of a 123,000 ft2 laboratory-office building up to $369,000/yr by simply detecting and fixing a leaking pneumatic line on the cooling coil control valves and implementing a supply air temperature reset schedule...

  4. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gases (GHG) or carbon footprint, and public education onand lowering the carbon footprint or GHG emissions forby reducing carbon footprint. • Compare buildings’ energy

  5. Optimizing HVAC Control to Improve Building Comfort and Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Joo, I.; Dong, D.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Quiroz, L.; Swiatek, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hp/each) and three return air fans (40hp/each). Each AHU serves both interior and exterior zones. Each MAHU serves half of the building (south and north). The main supply air ducts of two MAHUs are interlinked in a so-called ?donut? shape.... Two centrifugal chillers have been installed (450 ton/each). Each chiller has one dedicated constant- speed primary chilled water pump (15hp/each) and one dedicated constant-speed condensing water pump (25hp/each), respectively. A variable speed...

  6. EECBG Success Story: Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River Site forCommunity'

  7. EECBG Success Story: Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River Site forCommunity'Department

  8. Using Dashboard to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................................... 4 Upgrading and Commissioning the EIS Hardware Network.......................................................... 5 Schematic EIS Architecture in LBNL Building 90

  9. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    individual plug loads into the EIS for further analysis. Ourhow the performance of several EIS and dashboard case study4 Upgrading and Commissioning the EIS Hardware

  10. Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of aLogging Systems (December2009 Funding

  11. Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC | Department of Energy HVACEnergyDepartment of

  12. Improving energy efficiency in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment : analysis of EUI and cooling load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haoyu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing energy consumption without compromising the quality of products and the comfort of occupants is important in maintaining the competence of a pharmaceutical company. An energy management tool is developed to monitor ...

  13. Looking for comfort: heroines, readers, and Jane Austen's novels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himes, Amanda E.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Comfort�with its various connotations of physical ease, wealth, independence, and service�is an important concept to Jane Austen, who uses comfort in her novels to both affirm and challenge accepted women�s roles and status in her...

  14. Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort....

  15. Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort....

  16. MULTIMODAL APPROACH TO AUTOMOBILE DRIVING COMFORT: THE INFLUENCE OF VISUAL SETTING ON ASSESSMENTS OF VIBRO-ACOUSTIC COMFORT IN SIMULATORS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MULTIMODAL APPROACH TO AUTOMOBILE DRIVING COMFORT: THE INFLUENCE OF VISUAL SETTING ON ASSESSMENTS of an automobile cabin. Incorporating a visual scene with vibration and sound stimuli is one possible way to make the situation appear more realistic? Most of the studies available on automobile driving comfort

  17. Energy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: Results from human subject tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in offices for thermal comfort and energy savings. . 2013. [requirements for thermal comfort. Energy and Buildings 2002;of the experiment. HVAC energy and thermal environment are

  18. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE)...

  19. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed Cooling and Heating Based on Thermal Comfort Modeling Thermoelectric (TE) HVAC...

  20. Singing River Electric Power Association- Comfort Advantage Home Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Singing River Electric Power Association provides rebates on energy efficiency measures in new homes and heat pumps that meet [http://www.comfortadvantage.com/Comfort%20Advantage%20brochure.pdf...

  1. Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, X.; Zhou, Z.; Lian, Z.; Wen, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Jiang, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the ASHRAE 55-1992 and ISO 7730 Standards are used all over the world, many researchers have pointed out that it is impossible to maintain a uniform thermal comfort standard worldwide because of differing climate conditions. Two field...

  2. The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  3. Potential of Thermoelectrics forOccupant Comfort and Fuel Efficiency Gains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60 DATE:AnnualDepartment ofPotentialYieldin Vehicle

  4. Power to the people: personal control in offices for thermal comfort and energy savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taub, Mallory L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market of personalized comfort devices for buildings and to integrate them with the overall building HVAC

  5. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

  6. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  7. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  8. Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noye,S.; North,R.; Fisk, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -site Commissioning • Balancing • Setting to work • Compliance • Health and safety ESL-IC-14-09-22a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 8Systems deliver comfort at low energy cost... 1 Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning Sarah Noye1 PhD candidate Dr. Robin North Lecturer Prof. David Fisk Professor Laing O’Rourke Centre for System Engineering and Innovation...

  9. Window performance for human thermal comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? = 0.08 face 4, 6/16/6/16/6mm G8 Table 14: Range of glazinglow- ? coating (G5 and G8) greatly improves the solarm²] G1 G2 G3 G4 G5 G6 G7 G8 Figure 35: Scenario 1 – Maximum

  10. J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391 Journal of Occupational Health Relationships of Job and Some National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm), U 420, IFR25-RFRH, Réseau Fédératif de disorders. (J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391) Key words: Occupational injury, Job, Sex, Age, Overweight

  11. Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly adults. The per-person sensible heat generation and occupancy profiles were mapped from previous studies lamp to simulate human occupancy; occupancy and lighting loads in other areas of the home were

  12. Dew Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling: Report and Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Herrmann, L.; Kozubal, E.; Geiger, J.; Eastment, M.; Slayzak, S.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective was to demonstrate the capabilities of the high-performance multi-staged IEC technology and its ability to enhance energy efficiency and interior comfort in dry climates, while substantially reducing electric-peak demand. The project was designed to test 24 cooling units in five commercial building types at Fort Carson Army Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

  13. Affordable comfort 95 - investing in our energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the topics from the conference on Affordable Comfort, held March 26-31, 1995. Topics are concerned with energy efficiency in homes, retrofitting, weatherization, and monitoring of appliances, heating, and air conditioning systems for performance, as well as topics on electric utilities.

  14. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Comfort Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, K.; Sehgal, N.; Akers, C.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field tests were conducted in two homes in Austin, TX to evaluate the comfort performance of ductless mini-split heat pumps (DMSHPs), measuring temperature and relative humidity measurements in four rooms in each home before and after retrofitting a central HVAC system with DMSHPs.

  15. Process Control on Workplace Level - User Comfort Energy Optimalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhaart, J.; Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . But to really reduce energy load of the building, the challenge of providing the best comfort for all people present in an office is a combined effort between ICS and building climate installation. The system should cooperate in a multi-agent system within a...

  16. Optimization of thermal comfort in building through envelope design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Optimization of thermal comfort in building through envelope design Milorad Bojia , Alexandre. The building is modeled in EnergyPlus software and HookeJeves optimization methodology. The investigated house optimizations are performed such as the optimization of the thickness of the concrete block layer, of the wood

  17. Literature Review of Airflow Fluid Characteristics and their Impact on Human Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, R.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, N.; Di, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airflow dynamics significantly impact indoor thermal environment and human thermal comfort. Studies on the effects of airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort mainly focus on the effects of turbulence intensity and fluctuation frequency...

  18. Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric Devices and Comfort Modeling Improving the Efficiency of Light-Duty Vehicle HVAC Systems using Zonal Thermoelectric...

  19. Energy and visual comfort performance of electrochromic windowswith overhangs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.S.; Tavil, A.

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-2 building energy simulations were conducted to determine if there were practical architectural and control strategy solutions that would enable electrochromic (EC) windows to significantly improve visual comfort without eroding energy-efficiency benefits. EC windows were combined with overhangs since opaque overhangs provide protection from direct sun which EC windows are unable to do alone. The window wall was divided into an upper and lower aperture so that various combinations of overhang position and control strategies could be considered. The overhang was positioned either at the top of the upper window aperture or between the upper and lower apertures. Overhang depth was varied. EC control strategies were fully bleached at all times, modulated based on incident vertical solar radiation limits, or modulated to meet the design work plane illuminance with daylight. The EC performance was compared to a state-of-the-art spectrally selective low-e window with the same divided window wall, window size, and overhang as the EC configuration. The reference window was also combined with an interior shade which was manually deployed to control glare and direct sun. Both systems had the same daylighting control system to dim the electric lighting. Results were given for south-facing private offices in a typical commercial building. In hot and cold climates such as Houston and Chicago, EC windows with overhangs can significantly reduce the average annual daylight glare index (DGI) and deliver significant annual energy use savings if the window area is large. Total primary annual energy use was increased by 2-5% for moderate-area windows in either climate but decreased by 10% in Chicago and 5% in Houston for large-area windows. Peak electric demand can be reduced by 7-8% for moderate-area windows and by 14-16% for large-area windows in either climate. Energy and peak demand reductions can be significantly greater if the reference case does not have exterior shading or state-of-the-art glass.

  20. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) | DepartmentINL E-IDROCCUPATIONAL *Occupational

  1. Monitored Energy Performance of Electrochromic Windows Controlled for Daylight and Visual Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Klems, Joseph; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Windows Controlled for Daylight and Visual Comfort Eleanorof means to bring in daylight while minimizing window glare.was controlled to admit daylight while the lower zone was

  2. Modeling the comfort effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Huang, Li; Hoyt, Tyler; Zhou, Xin; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE);comfort and on the air conditioning energy needed to correctby energy-intensive air-conditioning. Second, solar gain in

  3. Sun, Wind, and Comfort A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks in Four Downtown Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as o f Bibliography Sun, Wind, and Comfort Arens, Edward, "for an Acceptable Wind Environment," TransportationI) 1970. Gandemer, J. "Wind Environment Around Buildings:

  4. Comfort standards and variation in exceedance for mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comfort exceedance: lighting power density (W/m 2 ): low ¼example, both lighting and equipment power density defaultand low lighting and equipment power density values were

  5. Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Wen-Kuei; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy profile is one of the driving factors behind discrepancies between the measured and simulated energy consumption of buildings. The frequencies of occupants leaving their offices and the corresponding durations of absences have significant impact on energy use and the operational controls of buildings. This study used statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five-minute intervals, for a total of 200 open-plan (cubicle) offices. Five typical occupancy patterns were identified based on the average daily 24-hour profiles of the presence of occupants in their cubicles. These statistical patterns were represented by a one-square curve, a one-valley curve, a two-valley curve, a variable curve, and a flat curve. The key parameters that define the occupancy model are the average occupancy profile together with probability distributions of absence duration, and the number of times an occupant is absent from the cubicle. The statistical results also reveal that the number of absence occurrences decreases as total daily presence hours decrease, and the duration of absence from the cubicle decreases as the frequency of absence increases. The developed occupancy model captures the stochastic nature of occupants moving in and out of cubicles, and can be used to generate a more realistic occupancy schedule. This is crucial for improving the evaluation of the energy saving potential of occupancy based technologies and controls using building simulations. Finally, to demonstrate the use of the occupancy model, weekday occupant schedules were generated and discussed.

  6. Section 5 -Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Section 5 - Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy 1. Housing and Dining privileges may be terminated by the University for cause. Cause includes, but is not limited to violating. 2. The University may terminate this agreement without cause with ten days written notice. 3

  7. Research priorities for occupational radiation protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

  8. Jmtland County Energy Agency Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jämtland County Energy Agency Sweden 1 Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses-operation with the Swedish Energy Agency, carried through the project "Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses of one-family houses to start using wood pellets and an increase of the use of wood pellets in one

  9. TPE-CMS: A Comfort Measuring System for Public Bus Service in Taipei City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ling-Jyh

    TPE-CMS: A Comfort Measuring System for Public Bus Service in Taipei City Cheng-Yu Lin and Ling Measuring System (CMS) for public transportation systems in Taipei city, called TPE-CMS. TPE-CMS exploits the GPS and G-sensor of modern smart phones to measure the comfort level of vehicle rides. Then, it mashes

  10. Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low-energy cooling systems in a mild climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low- energy cooling systems in a mild. "Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low-energy cooling systems in a mild climate the architectural and mechanical design of a building. Several researchers have demonstrated the analysis of low-energy

  11. Occupational Complexity and Lifetime Cognitive Abilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, Emily

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Associations were examined between complexity of main lifetime occupation and cognitive performance in later life. Occupational complexity ratings for data, people and things were collected from the Dictionary of Occupational ...

  12. Assessment of organic compound exposures, thermal comfort parameters, and HVAC system-driven air exchange rates in public school portable classrooms in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shendell, Derek Garth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the ASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope provided inASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope values provided inthe ASHRAE 55 (1992) thermal comfort envelope of 30-60% RH.

  13. Thermal Comfort Study in a Naturally Ventilated Residential Building in a Tropical Hot-Humid Climate Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Handjarinto, S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a thermal comfort study in a naturally ventilated residential building located in a tropical hot-humid climate region. The specific objective of this study is to investigate whether thermal comfort in this house can be achieved...

  14. Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living Space in Summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living and total heat exchanger in terms of both energy conservation and thermal comfort in summer. 1. COP

  15. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  16. OccupationalSafety andHealthResearchCenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Disorders, Safety, Slips/Trips/Falls, Work Organization w w w.oshrc.ic tas.vt.edu Separating humans from the safety and health of workers. OSHRC, formally known as the Center for Innova- tion in Construction Safety for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to innova- tively improve health and safety in the construction sector

  17. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  18. Environmental Studies & Ecology Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Relations Specialist Recreation Leader Renewable Energy Consultant Safety Inspector Sales Representative. Programs Farms/Ranches FEDERAL AGENCIES Department of Defense (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Environmental Conservationist Consultant Earth Scientist Ecologist Economic Analyst Energy Occupations Entomologist

  19. 2014OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Endowment Occupational Hearing Loss: Practical Approaches to Evaluation and Management Rodney C. Diaz, MD UC Health System Prevention of Infectious Disease in Health Care Workers Craig F. Conlon, MD, PhD Kaiser

  20. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  1. Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

  2. Energy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: Results from human subject tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Roadmap. Energy-efficient Buildings: Heating andH, Zhai Y. Enabling energy-efficient approaches to thermalEnergy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: results

  3. Field Analysis of Thermal Comfort in Two Energy Efficient Office Buildings in Malaysia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qahtan, A. T.; Keumala, N.; Rao, S. P.; Samad, Z. A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of tropical passive solar control components in integrating thermal comfort with energy efficiency in office building. Field measurements are carried out in selected workspace of two office buildings that have been practiced the passive solar...

  4. Modeling the comfort effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Huang, Li; Hoyt, Tyler; Zhou, Xin; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors. Building andEFFECTS OF SHORT-WAVE SOLAR RADIATION INDOORS Edward ARENSK. The effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort.

  5. Multi Agent System to Optimize Comfort and Energy Flows in the Built Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennings, L. W.; Houten, M. A.; Boxem, G.; Zeiler, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the control of building energy comfort management systems led by the economic movement within the energy market resulting in different prices. This new generation of building management systems focuses ...

  6. Energy-efficient comfort with a heated/cooled chair: Results from human subject tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for thermal comfort. Energy and Buildings 2002;34:593-9.IEA. Technology Roadmap. Energy-efficient Buildings: HeatingH, Arens E, Webster T. Energy Savings from Extended Air

  7. STEP-UP Coaches a University Park Family to Comfort and Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    her son told her, "I don't need these extra blankets anymore I'm so warm" Through their smart choices and with help from the Energy Coach, the Kiskers are more comfortable at...

  8. Monitored Energy Performance of Electrochromic Windows Controlled for Daylight and Visual Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Klems, Joseph; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject responses to electrochromic windows. Submitted toin a full-scale electrochromic window testbed. Technicaloptimization of electrochromic operations for occupant

  9. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  10. Opportunities to Save Energy and Improve Comfort by Using Wireless Sensor Networks in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Federspiel, C.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how intensive information technology can affect future building operation. Recent breakthroughs in wireless sensor network technology will permit 1) highly flexible location of sensors, 2) increased sensing density and variety...

  11. Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effect of heating and cooling system inefficiencies onwith inefficient heating and cooling systems in CaliforniaOperation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proceedings of the

  12. Terminal Box Airflow Reset: An Effective Operation and Control Strategy for Comfort Improvement and Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Abbas, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for constant air volume terminal boxes during unoccupied hours. Authors have implemented the airflow reset in dual duct variable air volume terminal boxes [Abbas and Liu, 1996], in dual duct constant air volume terminal boxes [Liu and Zhu, 1998...], and in single duct terminal boxes [Zhu et. al, 2000]. This paper presents schedules of airflow reset for typical terminal boxes, models of potential energy savings, and issues of implementation AIRFLOW RESET The value of airflow reset depends on terminal...

  13. Improving Home Efficiency and Comfort Right After a Move | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on Armed ServicesDepartment of linkofImportant

  14. Improving Home Efficiency and Comfort Right After a Move | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRSJuly 2012|

  15. Conditions of Occupancy College Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Green and at Trinity Hall, Dartry, Dublin 6. There may be local differences in the Conditions of Occupancy between the main campus and Trinity Hall. Such differences will be described within to either the Warden of Trinity Hall in relation to rooms or residents at Trinity Hall or the Registrar

  16. Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Union Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 Jobs Jobs Transition Just Department #12;Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;#12;InternatIonal labour offIce · Geneva european commIssIon Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;photocomposed

  17. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure: 2004 Annual Report Exhibit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Classification (SOC) Manual (1980). Labor Category Occupation Code Occupation Name Agriculture 0562 0570 0580 Groundskeepers Forest Workers Misc. Agriculture Construction...

  18. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  19. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System...

  20. Improving Building Comfort and Energy Savings of the McKenzie Airport Terminal by Maintaining and Improving Pneumatic Control Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.; Bruner, H. L.; Deng, S.; Brundidge, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , had some form of deteriorated controls, components, and operational function. For example, most of pneumatic controls were failed due to bad components, wrong settings, and disconnection before the Continuous CommissioningR (CCSM). This caused humid...

  1. Improving Building Comfort and Energy Savings of the McKenzie Airport Terminal by Maintaining and Improving Pneumatic Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, C.; Bruner, H. L.; Deng, S.; Brundidge, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -cooled. Compressors are turned on and off to maintain the adjustable chilled water supply temperature at the setpoint of 43 ?F. The existing chilled water supply temperature was 41 ?F, because the thermostat, which is controlling the chilled water supply... have individual economizers, the chilled water pump is switched on and off by the outside air thermostat. It shall be on if the sensed temperature is above 55 ?F and shall remain on until the sensed temperature falls below 53 ?F. Prior to CCSM...

  2. Classified Comfort Noise Generation for Efficient Voice Transmission Yasheng Qian, Wei-Shou Hsu, Peter Kabal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabal, Peter

    speech gaps. This is known as discontinuous transmission (DTX). For Voice-over-Internet (VoIP) networks, during speech pauses transmission occurs at a lower bit rate (and lower power). This reduced powerClassified Comfort Noise Generation for Efficient Voice Transmission Yasheng Qian, Wei-Shou Hsu

  3. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  4. A Very Comfortable, Energy-Efficient Home: How You Can Make It Happen!

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Jeff Christian

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Jeff Christian, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, January 14, 2010. The first in a series of Sustainability at Home seminars that tap ORNL expertise to help you move toward sustainability-while increasing your comfort and, over time, decreasing your costs at home.

  5. The Spacing of Ceiling Fans for Human Comfort in Warm Temperature Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spain, S.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SPACING OF CEILING FANS FOR HUMAN COMFORT IN WARM TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS Syd Spain, Ph.D. Research Specialist CRS Sirrine, Inc. Houston, Tx ABSTRACT Airspeed tests of a commerci a1 1 y popular 52 in. ceiling fan operating at a low speed...

  6. Comfort Conditions in a Habitat for Humanity House in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kootin-Sanwu, V.; Haberl, J. S.; Kim, B.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  7. NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes. Potential Impact

  8. Space Heaters The University recognizes that individuals have different levels of comfort associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    for space heating. 14. Do not use space heaters or any other electric appliance around water. 15Space Heaters The University recognizes that individuals have different levels of comfort associated with temperature and heat. The use of electric space heaters as a temporary measure is permitted

  9. Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Kaiyu; Yan , Da; Hong , Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

  10. Field Study of Performance, Comfort, and Sizing of Two Variable-Speed Heat Pumps Installed in a Single 2-Story Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Odukomaiya, Adewale O [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent advancements in the application of variable-speed (VS) compressors to residential HVAC systems, opportunities are now available to size heat pumps (HPs) to more effectively meet heating and cooling loads in many of the climate zones in the US with limited use of inefficient resistance heat. This is in contrast to sizing guidance for traditional single-speed HPs that limits the ability to oversize with regard to cooling loads, because of risks of poor dehumidification during the cooling season and increased cycling losses. VS-drive HPs can often run at 30-40% of their rated cooling capacity to reduce cycling losses, and can adjust fan speed to provide better indoor humidity control. Detailed air-side performance data was collected on two VS-drive heat pumps installed in a single unoccupied research house in Knoxville, TN, a mixed-humid climate. One system provided space conditioning for the upstairs, while the other unit provided space conditioning for the downstairs. Occupancy was simulated by operating the lights, shower, appliances, other plug loads, etc. to simulate the sensible and latent loads imposed on the building space by internal electric loads and human occupants according to the Building America Research Benchmark (2008). The seasonal efficiency and energy use of the units are calculated. Annual energy use is compared to that of the single speed minimum efficiency HPs tested in the same house previously. Sizing of the units relative to the measured building load and manual J design load calculations is examined. The impact of the unit sizing with regards to indoor comfort is also evaluated.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  12. Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and DOE facility records and data are provided to DOL, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...

  13. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System-Fernald Historical Records System, Office of Legacy...

  14. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  15. Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging Abhijit Sarkar dynamic range CMOS video camera to integrate daylight harvesting and occupancy sensing functionalities by these sensors. The prototype involves three algorithms, daylight estimation, occupancy detection and lighting

  16. Comfort demand leading the optimization to energy supply from the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aduba,K.; Zeiler,W.; Boxem,G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The control of loads in the building, may also be a resource to the grid using the flexibilities in service of the grid in Demand Side Management (DSM) scenarios as so called Demand Response (DR) or Load Control (LC). (Callaway and Hiskens 2011) However... of energy management, building management, and comfort management have to be developed to anticipate on the coming possible changes on Demand Side Management by Demand Response (DR) and Load Control (LC). This study is a first step towards...

  17. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  18. A Study on Zoning Regulations' Impact on Thermal Comfort Conditions in Non-conditioned Apartment Buildings in Dhaka City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Saiful

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    zoning schemes seemed essential for this study. To analyze the four zoning regulation schemes' impact on thermal comfort in apartment buildings, four sets of built environment were created in EnergyPlus (Energy Simulation software) as well as in Fluent...

  19. Thermal Comfort under Transient Metabolic and Dynamic Localized Airflow Conditions Combined with Neutral and Warm Ambient Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugursal, Ahmet

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Human thermal environments constitute complex combinations of various interacting thermal factors. The transient and non-uniform nature of those thermal factors further increases the complexity of the thermal comfort problem. The conventional...

  20. Which comforting messages really work best? A different perspective on Lemieux and Tighe’s “receiver perspective”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleson, Brant R.; Samter, Wendy; Jones, Susanne M.; Kunkel, Adrianne; Holmstrom, Amanda J.; Mortenson, Steven T.; MacGeorge, Erina L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article responds critically to a recent article by Lemieux and Tighe (Communication Research Reports, 21, 144–153, 2004) in which the authors conclude that recipients of comforting efforts prefer messages that exhibit ...

  1. Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON BUILDING ENERGY USE, HVAC SIZING AND THERMAL COMFORT aThe results showed that when the HVAC is controlled based onequipment sizing. When the HVAC is controlled based on the

  2. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

  3. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The...

  4. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

  5. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory VisitDosimBadgeTrckg-PIA.pdf...

  6. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New England Journal of Medicine 1993, 329, 7. S. v. Klot; A.34 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered35 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered

  7. accidents occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What is Occupational Therapy? The occupational therapist is a highly specialized health care Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , cleaning, and dressing....

  8. CBEI: Improving Code Compliance with Change of Occupancy Retrofits - 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRS Registration Formofof2015 Peer

  9. QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY CENTRE FOR MEDICAL, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL SCIENCES MODIFICATION OF ATRIUM DESIGN TO IMPROVE THERMAL AND DAYLIGHTING PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley Mabb; Centre For Medical; Environmental Physics

    The inclusion of a central court or atrium within a building is a popular design due to its aesthetic, open appearance. The greater penetration of natural light aids in the reduction in use of artificial lighting during the day. Care must be taken to balance the solar heat gain against the daylight penetration. This balance is critical for the reduction of the electrical energy load of the building, whilst maintaining a high level of comfort for the occupants. In the tropics modifications to atrium building designs are necessary to diminish high elevation direct solar heat gain. Traditionally, shading the window apertures or lowering the transmission through the glazing was used. These solutions limit the view and reduce the light level. The use of angular selective glazing upon atria allows the rejection of high elevation direct sunlight whilst redirecting and therefore improving low elevation skylight penetration. Tilted angular selective glazing used upon adjoining spaces to atria help vertical light in the atrium well to be redirected horizontally deep into the space. These effects reduce overheating which would normally restrict the use of atria in warmer environments as well as improve illumination penetration into adjoining spaces.

  10. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  14. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Smart Occupancy Sensor Debuts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building energy performance. A photo of the Image Processing Occupancy Sensor, a white plastic device similar in size and shape to a smartphone. On the top left of the device is a...

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  16. Identity work and control in occupational communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Maanen, John

    This chapter is about three highly intertwined concepts. The first concerns occupational communities and the work cultures they nourish. The second concerns the work identities that are valued (and devalued) in such ...

  17. Occupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    , hearing conservation, machine guarding, system safety, and environmental health. The workshop settingOccupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management Certificate Program Corporate) This course covers concepts used in the Environmental Management courses. The course emphasizes the practi

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  20. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  7. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  8. From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, J.F. Jr.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Appendix A, B, and C. In Appendix A, we are working as part of a research project with King Monkut's Institute of Technology, Thonburi, and the University of California, Berkeley (USA) to determine how people respond to the thermal environment inside buildings. We have prepared a short questionnaire which will survey thermal comfort. Our plan is to survey each building during each of three seasons over this year (e.g. hot, rainy, and cool seasons). Appendix B contains supporting technical documentation on conservation potential and Appendix C contains documentation on utility impacts.

  9. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the concept of the Occupant Energy Index. The Occupant Energy Index, a scale of 0 to 100, defines the full spectrum of influence that occupant behavior can have on the energy consumption of a home. A home designed to consume zero energy using... in the country, but also produces power onsite. How much might energy consumption increase when occupants return to this home? Past research has demonstrated that occupant behavior can have dramatic impacts on energy consumption. Maintained interior...

  10. Monitored Energy Performance of Electrochromic Windows Controlledfor Daylight and Visual Comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Klems, Joseph; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A 20-month field study was conducted to measure the energy performance of south-facing large-area tungsten-oxide absorptive electrochromic (EC) windows with a broad switching range in a private office setting. The EC windows were controlled by a variety of means to bring in daylight while minimizing window glare. For some cases, a Venetian blind was coupled with the EC window to block direct sun. Some tests also involved dividing the EC window wall into zones where the upper EC zone was controlled to admit daylight while the lower zone was controlled to prevent glare yet permit view. If visual comfort requirements are addressed by EC control and Venetian blinds, a 2-zone EC window configuration provided average daily lighting energy savings of 10 {+-} 15% compared to the reference case with fully lowered Venetian blinds. Cooling load reductions were 0 {+-} 3%. If the reference case assumes no daylighting controls, lighting energy savings would be 44 {+-} 11%. Peak demand reductions due to window cooling load, given a critical demand-response mode, were 19-26% maximum on clear sunny days. Peak demand reductions in lighting energy use were 0% or 72-100% compared to a reference case with and without daylighting controls, respectively. Lighting energy use was found to be very sensitive to how glare and sun is controlled. Additional research should be conducted to fine-tune EC control for visual comfort based on solar conditions so as to increase lighting energy savings.

  11. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  12. Lai, D., Guo, D., Hou, Y., Lin, C., and Chen, Q. 2014. "Studies of Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Northern China," Building and Environment, 77, 110-118

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Lai, D., Guo, D., Hou, Y., Lin, C., and Chen, Q. 2014. "Studies of Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Northern China," Building and Environment, 77, 110-118 Studies of Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Northern China Engineering, Purdue University, Indiana, USA 2 School of Environment Science and Engineering, Tianjin

  13. Impact of Ducting on Heat Pump Water Heater Space Conditioning Energy Use and Comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing penetration of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) in the residential sector will offer an important opportunity for energy savings, with a theoretical energy savings of up to 63% per water heater and up to 11% of residential energy use (EIA 2009). However, significant barriers must be overcome before this technology will reach widespread adoption in the Pacific Northwest region and nationwide. One significant barrier noted by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is the possible interaction with the homes’ space conditioning system for units installed in conditioned spaces. Such complex interactions may decrease the magnitude of whole-house savings available from HPWH installed in the conditioned space in cold climates and could lead to comfort concerns (Larson et al. 2011; Kresta 2012). Modeling studies indicate that the installation location of HPWHs can significantly impact their performance and the resultant whole-house energy savings (Larson et al. 2012; Maguire et al. 2013). However, field data are not currently available to validate these results. This field evaluation of two GE GeoSpring HPWHs in the PNNL Lab Homes is designed to measure the performance and impact on the Lab Home HVAC system of a GE GeoSpring HPWH configured with exhaust ducting compared to an unducted GeoSpring HPWH during heating and cooling season periods; and measure the performance and impact on the Lab Home HVAC system of the GeoSpring HPWH with both supply and exhaust air ducting as compared to an unducted GeoSpring HPWH during heating and cooling season periods. Important metrics evaluated in these experiments include water heater energy use, HVAC energy use, whole house energy use, interior temperatures (as a proxy for thermal comfort), and cost impacts. This technical report presents results from the PNNL Lab Homes experiment.

  14. Building Design and Operation for Improving Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in a Hot-Humid Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreshthaputra, Atch

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , and 4) attic ventilation. Each was operated using three modes of ventilation. The low-absorption roof and the R-30 ceiling insulation options were found to be the most effective options, whereas the shading devices and attic ventilation were less...

  15. Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cavity between first and second stories of the home through ineffective (or missing) air barriers separating attic space from the floor cavity. A second type of wind washing studied in this project involved insulation batts on knee walls where space...

  16. Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

    , and interior wall surfaces (see Figures 1 and 2). Condensation may occur on cold supply duct surfaces within the floor cavity resulting in ceiling moisture damage. In cold climates, cold air from wind washing can chill surfaces within the interior floor space...

  17. Development and Validation of an Occupational Skills Assessment Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and validation of an occupational skills assessment instrument is described. The instrument was designed to describe accurately a participant's actual level of occupational skills in a variety of job-related ...

  18. Non-intrusive Occupancy Inferencing using Opportunistically Available Sensor Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting, Kevin H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Chen, Dong, et al. "Non-Intrusive Occupancy MonitoringACM, 15. Zoha, Ahmed, et al. "Non-intrusive load monitoringCalifornia Los Angeles Non-intrusive Occupancy Inferencing

  19. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Experience Program, requires collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. DOE System of...

  20. Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Bharathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and is designed with Smart Home applications in mind.Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes.

  1. Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Burke Parabola Architects Galen Staengl Staengl Engineering h HEATING, VENTILATION, AND cooling (HVAC required for heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) by 20%­30% by tailoring the conditioning of buildingsTowards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling Kamin Whitehouse, Juhi Ranjan, Jiakang Lu, Tamim

  2. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the extended Koopmans' Theorem. On the basis of Weyl's theorem we give a connection between the differentiability properties of the ground state wave function and the rate at which the natural occupations approach zero when ordered as a descending series. We show, in particular, that the presence of a Coulomb cusp in the wave function leads, in general, to a power law decay of the natural occupations, whereas infinitely differentiable wave-functions typically have natural occupations that decay exponentially. We analyze for a number of explicit examples of two-particle systems that in case the wave function is non-analytic at its spatial diagonal (for instance, due to the presence of a Coulomb cusp) the natural orbital occu...

  3. Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    , and ventilation actuation signals in order to identify a dynamic model. The building occupancy estimation problem Abstract We address the problem of estimating the occupancy lev- els in rooms using the information is formulated as a regularized deconvolution problem, where the estimated occupancy is the input that, when

  4. Textured Occupancy Grids for Monocular Localization Without Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parr, Ronald

    , and Ronald Parr Abstract-- A textured occupancy grid map is an extremely versatile data structure. It can map representation, the textured occupancy grid, can now be used for humans, robots with laser- dimensional textured occupancy grid map. In such a map, three-dimensional space is discretized into a set

  5. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  6. Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore »measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  8. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); O`Dell, C. [USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his ``Ten Point Initiative`` charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent ``Tiger Teams`` are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  9. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); O'Dell, C. (USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his Ten Point Initiative'' charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent Tiger Teams'' are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  10. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  11. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

  12. Characterizing the marginal basis source energy and emissions associated with comfort cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, D.T.; Knebel, D.E.; Gansler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ten-story commercial office building located in Fort Worth, Texas, was used as a prototype to investigate the environmental impact associated with applying various electric and gas technologies for providing ventilation and comfort conditioning. The instantaneous (hourly) electrical and gas requirements demanded by the building were ``traced`` back to their source, the point where fuel is extracted from the ground The total energy consumed and emissions produced are quantified for both electric and gas technologies. On an annual basis, electric technologies had carbon dioxide emissions that were 20% to 26% lower when compared with the gas cooling technology. The gas cooling technology had lower total carbon monoxide emissions; however, after accounting for environmental oxidation of the carbon monoxide emissions, the gas cooling technology had an overall 24% to 35% greater oxide of carbon emission impact. The gas technology had a 19% to 25% lower oxide of nitrogen emission rate when compared with the electric technologies. The gas technology had a 3% to 15% lower annual total emission of sulfur dioxide compared to electric technologies. The primary reason for this is the absence of sulfur in the ``clean`` fuel assumed to be used by the gas technology (natural gas). The gas cooling technologies required 20% to 30% more energy to be extracted from the earth to provide the equivalent space conditioning for the prototypical office building when compared with the worst-and best-case electric technologies, respectively.

  13. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  14. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  15. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  16. Interdisciplinary Innovation and Vision in the HVAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecker, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy costs in buildings are forcing the building owners, developers, fund and facility managers to find alternate energy efficiency methods while improving the indoor air quality and thus the comfort level of the room occupants. High...

  17. Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification – a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinius, W.; Hirsch, H.

    Target topic: achieving sustainability, saving energy, and improving occupant comfort? Lead Author Wolfram Trinius, PhD, Ingenieurb?ro Trinius, Hamburg, Germany and University of Gavle, Sweden Co Authors Harry Hirsch, HH Consulting, Baden...

  18. Vibro-acoustical comfort in cars at idle : human perception of simulated sounds and vibrations from three and four cylinder diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    three and four cylinder diesel engines Etienne Parizet, Maël Amari Laboratoire Vibrations Acoustique This paper deals with comfort in diesel cars running at idle. A bench was used to reproduce the vertical

  19. Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

  20. Impact of the Position of a Radiator to Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-IC-10/05-35 1 Impact of the Position of the Radiator on Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System Xiangyang Gong David E... the energy consumption and thermal comfort distribution in a typical office with a mixed radiant and convective heating system for two different locations of radiant heat sources. Accurately estimating the energy consumption in a mixed heating space...

  1. Impact of the Position of a Radiator to Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-IC-10/05-35 1 Impact of the Position of the Radiator on Energy Consumption and Thermal Comfort in a Mixed Radiant and Convective Heating System Xiangyang Gong David E... the energy consumption and thermal comfort distribution in a typical office with a mixed radiant and convective heating system for two different locations of radiant heat sources. Accurately estimating the energy consumption in a mixed heating space...

  2. Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm for High Occupancy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Elagin; Pavel Murat; Alexandre Pranko; Alexei Safonov

    2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithms based on the particle flow approach are becoming increasingly utilized in collider experiments due to their superior jet energy and missing energy resolution compared to the traditional calorimeter-based measurements. Such methods have been shown to work well in environments with low occupancy of particles per unit of calorimeter granularity. However, at higher instantaneous luminosity or in detectors with coarse calorimeter segmentation, the overlaps of calorimeter energy deposits from charged and neutral particles significantly complicate particle energy reconstruction, reducing the overall energy resolution of the method. We present a technique designed to resolve overlapping energy depositions of spatially close particles using a statistically consistent probabilistic procedure. The technique is nearly free of ad-hoc corrections, improves energy resolution, and provides new important handles that can improve the sensitivity of physics analyses: the uncertainty of the jet energy on an event-by-event basis and the estimate of the probability of a given particle hypothesis for a given detector response. When applied to the reconstruction of hadronic jets produced in the decays of tau leptons using the CDF-II detector at Fermilab, the method has demonstrated reliable and robust performance.

  3. PROMOTING ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilms, W.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim Criteria for Energy Conservation in New Buildings",Robert and others, "Energy Conservation Program Guide forDivision Promoting Energy Conservation Through Occupational

  4. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS)...

  5. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High...

  6. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk (most common ­ personal hygiene very important); d) storage ­ leaks; and e) waste ­ storage and disposal

  7. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ed. ) American Industrial Hygiene Association: 2008.occupational medicine and industrial hygiene is hampered byThe vast majority of industrial hygiene exposure limits for

  8. Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management...

  9. achieving effective occupational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deferred annuity, occupational pension scheme, derisking, two-pension fund separation, crisis. Charles Sutcliffe; Ecy Tz; Charles Sutcliffe; John Board; Peter Casson; Simone...

  10. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

  11. A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy, Guidance & Reports Worker Health & Safety A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees...

  12. assessment occupational health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Health Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to tuberculosis including health care workers, public safety workers, and employees with animal contact IIIMichigan...

  13. Systems and methods for sensing occupancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

  14. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  15. Occupational Safety Performance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM Policy AcquisitionWeatherization FundingFundingOccupational

  16. Detecting and tracing building occupants to optimize process control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler,W.; Labeodan,T.; Boxem,G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Philadelphia, USA Hoes P., Hensen J., Loomans M., Vries B. de, Bourgeois D. (2009) User behavior in whole building simulation, Energy and Buildings 41: 295-302. Huizinga, C., Abbaszadeh, S., Zagreus, L., Arens, E., (2006) Air quality and thermal comfort...

  17. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  18. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  19. An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appiah, Justice

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for high occupancy vehicle...

  20. CROSS-CULTURAL EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN ASIAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Quoc (Thai) My

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    values and no significant relationship with level of acculturation. Results from the study yielded two newly developed measures of occupational engagement, the Occupational Engagement Scale-Asian American (OES-AA) and Occupational Engagement...

  1. MINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    , e.g. the Health Care Corporation, Basic Medical Sciences, Pharmacy, etc. and that no definite safetyMINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING Wednesday, February 7 as the Committee's newest member. Dr. LeFort has completed the Occupational Health & Safety Certification Training

  2. Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building Manuel Yguel, Olivier Aycard for multi-resolution map building based on wavelets, which we call the wavelet occupancy grid (WavOG). Pai representation and data storage for large maps, under the constraints of multi-sensor real-time updates

  3. Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    cadwallader, lee

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

  4. Power to the people: personal control in offices for thermal comfort and energy savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taub, Mallory L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    they did not like the ergonomics. While both of those peoplethe study because the ergonomics were bothersome. This tablebe even higher if the ergonomics of the device were improved

  5. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  6. Capability Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement As stated in Section 3.5 of the Technical Requirements, The performance of the ASC and NERSC...

  7. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

  8. In-situ measurement of electrodermal activity during occupational therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Elliott B. (Elliot Bruce)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physiological arousal is an important part of occupational therapy for children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) but therapists do not have a way to objectively measure how therapy affects arousal. We hypothesized ...

  9. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  10. Behavioral Assessment of Occupational Skills of Learning Disabled Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, using direct observation and measurement techniques, analyzed the differences in occupational skills among learning disabled youths and their non-learning disabled peers . The results showed low levels of ...

  11. Occupational neurotoxicology of organic solvents and solvent mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triebig, G. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of two field studies in painters and spray painters, the outcomes of examinations of workers with suspected work-related disease due to solvents, as well as data from an evaluation of an epidemiologic study in painters with confirmed occupational disease, are presented and discussed. The results of these studies and the experiences in occupational medicine in the Federal Republic of Germany do not support the assumption of high neurotoxic risks in solvent-exposed workers, which can be postulated from various epidemiologic studies from Scandinavian countries. Several factors may explain the different conclusions: (1) lower solvent exposures of German painters in the past decades; (2) false positive diagnosis of a toxic encephalopathy; (3) aetiological misclassification; (4) differences in legislation relevant for the acknowledgement of occupational diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for further well-designed epidemiologic studies in occupationally solvent-exposed workers. Suggestions regarding assessment of exposure and neurobehavioral tests are given.

  12. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  13. Occupational orientations of Mexican American youth in selected Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Edgar

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOU1'H IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Sociology OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A. Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR. Approved as to style and oontent by: Chairman of' Committee . -e . ~ - c...

  14. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , London W1T 3JH, UK Building Research & Information Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rbri20 Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation Mardelle Mc... published: 08 Aug 2012. To cite this article: Mardelle McCuskey Shepley , Zofia Rybkowski , Jennifer Aliber & Cathleen Lange (2012): Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 40:6, 700-712 To link...

  15. Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friebele, John Duncan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

  16. HEALTHCARESCIENCES Physical & Occupational Therapy, Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    competition for admittance to physical therapy programs. Obtain knowledge of several basic sciences including, accident, or congenital handicap. Physical therapy seeks to improve mobility, relieve pain, or minimize Research Consultation SpecialtiesInclude: Pediatrics Geriatrics Sports Medicine Orthopedics Neurology

  17. Natural ventilation and acoustic comfort A. Chilton, P. Novo, N. McBride, A. Lewis-Nunes, I. Johnston and J. Rene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . This means that it is harder to closely regulate natural ventilation, which can result in additional heat-losses during the heating season. There is also less potential for heat-recovery in natural ventilation systemsNatural ventilation and acoustic comfort A. Chilton, P. Novo, N. McBride, A. Lewis-Nunes, I

  18. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  19. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

  20. Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and satisfaction aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Wargocki, Pawel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and thermal comfort in office buildings: Results of a largeIn: Proceedings of Healthy Buildings, Vol III, pp. 393-397.M. (2007) 'Green' buildings: What Australian building users

  1. Wireless Sensor Technology to Optimize the Occupant's Dynamic Demand Pattern Within the Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Environmental Ergonomics, Boston Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments, Building and Environment 45(2): 380-410 ...

  2. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE. CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL...

  3. An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appiah, Justice

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand ...

  4. Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, Ryan Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

  5. Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

  6. Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

  7. Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

  8. Occupancy Based Fault Detection on Building Level - a Feasibility Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuip, B.; Houten, M.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy based fault detection on building level ? a feasibility study B.G.C.C. Tuip BSc. dr.ir. M.A. v. Houten dr. Dipl.-Ing. M. Trcka prof.dr.ir. J.L.M. Hensen Unit Building Performance and Systems Eindhoven University of Technology...

  9. APPLIED ISSUES Salamander occupancy in headwater stream networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Winsor H.

    E. GREEN AND WINSOR H. LOWE§ *US Geological Survey ­ Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD into larger streams and rivers. For three of the four species, occupancy was lower in the urbanised region at Correspondence: Evan H. Campbell Grant, USGS-Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, 12100 Beech Forest Road, Laurel

  10. UTEP Master of Occupational Therapy Program Application Process and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    /Occupational Therapy Academic Services Building, Rm 223 University of Texas at El Paso 601 West Schuster El Paso, Texas 79968 (915) 747-5491 gradschool@utep.edu #12;Rev. 5/11 The University of Texas at El Paso College

  11. Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

  12. POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based to reach target temperatures and minimize ventilation requirements. Based on live tests of the system, we, Measurement, Performance Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation, Energy savings 1. INTRODUCTION Permission

  13. ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    to reduce energy consumption. In particular, heating, cooling, and ventilation systems, which account for 42 States has increased 53% [8]. In 2010, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning Both are primary co ventilation based on near real-time estimates of occupancy and temperature using conditioning schedules

  14. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  15. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  16. Occupational exposure to DDT among mosquito control sprayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Kasilo, O.J. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DDT, a broad action insecticide whose use is restricted or banned in most industrialized countries is still often used for vector control in many tropical and developing countries. Despite the fact that DDT is accumulative and persistant in the ecosystem use of such substitutes as malathion or propoxur is not popular because these increases costs by 3.4 to 8.5 fold. As such DDT is economically attractive to poorer countries. As far as can be ascertained no systemic poisoning has resulted from occupational exposure to DDT. Due to the large particle size, the amount of DDT inhaled by workers is far less than the amount reaching exposed portions of skin. As such occupational exposure is mainly dermal or tropical. Occupational exposure to DDT studies have been done before. The present study is an analysis of some characteristics, (i.e. age, body size, relationship between plasma vitamin A and DDE levels, and smoking habits), of occupational exposure to DDT among spraymen in a Zimbabwe population.

  17. Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures Sungkyoon) models to investigate nonlinear relationships between levels of benzene metabolites (E,E- muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid, phenol, hydroqui- none, and catechol) and benzene exposure among 386 exposed and control workers

  18. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  20. Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network James Howard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    of the forecasting algorithm for the different conditions. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the U.S. Department of Energy could take advantage of times when electricity cost is lower, to chill a cold water storage tankForecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network Data James Howard Colorado School of Mines

  1. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University and mixtures, and the risk of ecological damage due to their use or release. 3. It facilitates informed ingredient, actions to prevent health and environmental harm depend on accurate knowledge of product

  2. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in Cold and Very Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  3. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 5; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Marine Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Steward, H.; Love, P. M.; Palmer, J. A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the Marine climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team--from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  4. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 4; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Mixed-Humid Climate Climate Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Love, P. M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  5. Ph. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    to three Divisions of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Morgantown officePh. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION A. Program Objectives: The principal objective of the Occupational Safety and Health Ph.D. major is to educate and train

  6. A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local that are challenging for a single vehicle system. In this paper, a new method for occupancy grid maps merging the proposed occupancy grid maps merging method is also introduced. Real-data tests are given to demonstrate

  7. Willard O. Eddy Hall Revitalization Phase 2 Table of contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    windows to improve the energy efficiency and overall occupant comfort of the building · an entrance to improve energy efficiency to the building while dramatically improving the aesthetics. Similar exterior 1. Structural Narrative 2. LEED Goal i. Fort Collins (or Excel Energy) Utility Rebate Program

  8. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  9. Personalized building comfort control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldmeier, Mark Christopher, 1974-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating an appropriate indoor climate is essential to worker productivity and personal happiness. It is also an area of large expenditure for building owners. And, with rising fuel costs, finding ways of reducing energy ...

  10. Thermal comfort during surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, David Harold

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintained, From the wet and dry-bulb readings the relative humidity was obtained . Lamont ( 1977) found that "scrubbed" personnel because of their extra layer of clothing, occlusive garments, i. e. rubber gloves, pro- tective footwear, masks... Association, 1975. Hospital Licensing Standards Texas Department of Health Resources, Hospital Licensure Division, 1969. Houghten, F. C. and W. L. Cook. Cooling Requirements of Operating Room and Recovery Ward. ASHVE Transactions, 1939, 45, 161. Lamont, S...

  11. Energy Savings + Employee Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takach, J.

    not provide as efficient a system as possible. The investigation of alternate heating systems led to gas fired infra red heaters. This paper addresses the results from the installation of such heaters....

  12. Moving air for comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brager, L. Zagreus. 2007, “Air movement preferences observed709-731. 9. Toftum, J. 2004. “Air movement – good or bad? ”Indoor Air 14, pp 40-45. 10. Gong, N. , K. Tham, A. Melikov,

  13. Performance Tested Comfort Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalmsthe Price

  14. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is to estimate savings relative to a “reference” home. However, in the case of zero energy homes it is absolute consumption, rather than relative savings, that is of interest. In such cases, a single set of operating assumptions will not suffice because... they impacted the heating, cooling, and water heating consumption. The customized internal gains distribution curve used for the baseline occupant profile is presented in figure 3. House Characteristic Base Case Area per Floor (ft 2 ) 2000 Number...

  15. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  16. Occupational Radiation Protection Record-Keeping and Reporting Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational radiation protection record-keeping and reporting program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  17. Occupational and traning requirements for expanded coal production (as of October 1980). [Forecasting to 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated because of the anticipated rapid growth in trained personnel requirements in bituminous coal mining, and because the industry had already experienced significant problems in recruiting skilled manpower in the course of its employment expansion during the 1970's. Employment in bituminous coal mining is projected to nearly double, from 234,000 in 1977 to 456,000 in 1995, as the net result of a projected threefold increase in coal output to nearly 2.0 billion in 1995 and of an expected significant improvement in overall productivity. A large proportion of current coal mining employees are in occupations which require significant amounts of training for effective work performance. Employment growth to 1955 will be most rapid in those occupations requiring the greatest training or educational preparation. The new training infrastructure which has emerged to meet these needs includes both internal, company-operated training programs and those offered by various external providers. Among the latter are: Vocational schools, community colleges, and university extension departments; public agencies, such as MSHA and state mining departments; coal industry trade associations; and vendors or training consultant groups. The Conference Board survey of coal industry training programs, conducted in late 1979, was designed to provide comprehensive data on the scope of the coal industry's own training activities and on related training issues, based on a mail questionnaire survey addressed to all companies producing 300,000 or more tons per year. The training programs are described with emphasis on time changes, regional effects and implications for a coordinated plan.

  18. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Upper Trinity River Basin was mainly from findings in a Corps environmental impact statement (EIS) report in the 1980s, according to Gene Rice, Corps project manager of the Dallas Floodway and Dallas Floodway Extension projects, two of the Trinity River... to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed...

  19. Corps Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H 2 O | pg. 6 O ne of the key federal players in the restoration of the Trinity River Basin is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, whose primary civil mission is developing and managing the nation?s water resources, including projects to reduce... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  20. Building America Case Study: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

  1. Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1 1/2-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

  2. Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

  3. Low-cost coarse airborne particulate matter sensing for indoor occupancy detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekly, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy-efficient smart building, occupancy detection andare being added to smart buildings to ensure the quality ofvaluable information for smart buildings. An important next

  4. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ed. The Fairmont Press, Inc. EPRI. 1994. Occupancy sensors:Institute, Palo Alto, CA. EPRI BR-100323. Ekahau. Real TimePower Research Institute (EPRI) identified approximately 30%

  5. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems for Occupant Symptoms in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-61870 Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-for Occupant Symptoms in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-

  6. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Payne FW. Energy management control system handbook.5] F. W. Payne. Energy management control system hand- book.Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:

  7. Impact of different building ventilation modes on occupant expectations of the main IEQ factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupants satisfied Bonus Factor Proportional Factor Highthat Basic, Proportional and Bonus Factors have with overallNO Prop. YES Basic YES Bonus NO Prop. NO Prop. Satisfied

  8. Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

  9. Office of Occupational Medicine. FY 1993, Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, we have assessed every DOE site at least once, many twice. With the information collected during these visits, EH-43 is developing a solid understanding of the occupational medical program activities at each site and will be better able to monitor progress. The assessment staff provided more specific technical assistance than in the past, especially in the area of compliance. In addition, the cardiovascular medical guidelines are near completion and the personnel assurance, firefighters, and protective force personnel medical guidelines are ready for the concurrence process.

  10. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ: RelocationCriticalityFireofOccupational

  11. FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ:Department ofIndustrialOccupational Safety

  12. Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEM CommunicationsReporting Occupational

  13. Walk-In Medical Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD Contract No.List ofOccupational

  14. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MG. (2010). Balancing energy conservation and occupant needsReport   Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in

  15. Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

  16. Improved aethalometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  17. Improving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    and institutional campuses can significantly contribute to energy conservation. The rollout of smart grids of occupants, and is a micro-grid test-bed for the DoE sponsored Los Angeles Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectImproving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Saima Aman

  18. Updated: 10/03/08! Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Updated: 10/03/08! ! ! ! TLL Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED) The Occupational Education Studies (OCED) option in the TLL is intended for professionals in the general field of workforce education and development. Teachers and administrators in career and technical education; personnel

  19. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  20. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

  1. Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 Management ENVHLTH 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health

  2. APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    for (check): Medical Studies Health Care Administration Dental Studies Occupational Therapy VeterinaryAPPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health You are able to complete this application by simply typing your information into the spaces

  3. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  4. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  5. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  6. OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á & control General Terms Algorithms, Machine Learning, Measurement Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems[2]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC

  7. Job Characteristics, Occupational Status, and Ambulatory Cardiovascular Activity in Women Linda C. Gallo, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Job Characteristics, Occupational Status, and Ambulatory Cardiovascular Activity in Women Linda C. Moreover, the concurrent effects of occupational sta- tus and job characteristics have rarely been investigated. Some research is consistent with the idea that stressful job characteris- tics are especially

  8. Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1 A. K. McMahan,2 M. D a systematic analysis of the spectral properties of -plutonium with varying 5f occupancy. The LDA Hamiltonian properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, plutonium is probably the most complicated element

  9. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to ...

  10. Three essays in labor and health economics: individual decisions on occupation, labor supply, and demand for heatlh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Ja Eun

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I examine individual decisions in occupational choice, labor supply, and health care utilization. Occupational choice decisions of female college graduates on whether to teach or not are analyzed to understand the role...

  11. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure Available online 20 January 2009 Keywords: Benzene exposure Gene expression Human blood Toxicogenomics expression changes associated with well-characterized occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood

  12. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  13. Occupational and environmental human lead exposure in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paoliello, M.M.B. [Departamento de Patologia, Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas, Centro de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Avenida Robert Koch 60, 86038-440 Londrina, Parana (Brazil)]. E-mail: monibas@sercomtel.com.br; De Capitani, E.M. [Centro de Controle de Intoxicacoes, Hospital Universitario da UNICAMP, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review of data on assessment of exposure and adverse effects due to environmental and occupational lead exposure in Brazil. Epidemiological investigations on children lead exposure around industrial and mining areas have shown that lead contamination is an actual source of concern. Lead in gasoline has been phasing out since the 1980s, and it is now completely discontinued. The last lead mining and lead refining plant was closed in 1995, leaving residual environmental lead contamination which has recently been investigated using a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, there are hundreds of small battery recycling plants and secondary smelting facilities all over the country, which produce focal urban areas of lead contamination. Current regulatory limits for workplace lead exposure have shown to be inadequate as safety limits according to a few studies carried out lately.

  14. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, K., E-mail: klaus.schmid@ipp.mpg.de; Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12?H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  15. Metracker version 1.5: Life-cycle performance metrics tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Robert J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy-efficiency; environmental impact; occupant health, comfort and productivity; and building functionality, adaptability, durability, and sustainability.

  16. Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

  17. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    comfort model enhancementvalidation, climate system efficiency parameters and system trade off, and powertrain mode operation changes to further vehicle energy saving while...

  18. Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Nakul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Requirements for air-conditioning appliances and comfortLetschert. 2008. Future Air Conditioning Energy ConsumptionV. , 2007. Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in

  19. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  20. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 26--29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted October 26--29, 1992 at EG&G Measurement, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide examination results, and recommendations for improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete.

  1. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 26--29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T.S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted October 26--29, 1992 at EG G Measurement, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide examination results, and recommendations for improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete.

  2. what is a cool roof? what is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on materials, climate zone, & electricity rates.1 · Improved occupant comfort · Compliance with building energy Licensing Board for any construction project valued at over $500 in labor and materials. #12;COOL ROOFS 2008 on hot, sunny days. Solar reflectance refers to a material's ability to reflect the sun's solar energy

  3. Neurovascular coupling to D2/D3 dopamine receptor occupancy using simultaneous PET/functional MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Yen-Ming

    This study employed simultaneous neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the relationship between changes in receptor occupancy measured by PET ...

  4. Occupancy and site distribution of europium in barium magnesium aluminate Eu Mossbauer spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boolchand, Punit

    Occupancy and site distribution of europium in barium magnesium aluminate by 151 Eu Mo¨ssbauer Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. Analysis of the Mo¨ssbauer line shapes reveals a pentamodal or higher site

  5. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    item/1pz2528w If energy consumption data are not availablewith both energy consumption data (in kWh or kBtu) andaffects energy consumption, and use occupant data to

  6. Towards Building Occupants Positioning: Track and Trace for Optimal Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Labeodan, T.; Bozem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -time occupancy detection systems comprising multiple sensors within a wireless network (WSN) using technologies such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and WIFI enabled devices have been proposed for use in large commercial office buildings. However due...

  7. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

  8. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

  9. Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Abstract Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed

  10. Environmental and occupational hazards of the anesthesia workplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kole, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our present state of research and knowledge strongly suggests that the volatile agents, halothane, enflurane and isoflurane, present only a minimal threat to our environment. Nitrous oxide, however, has ozone-depleting potential as well as a greenhouse gas effect which may contribute much to the problem of global warming over the next few decades. Release of anesthetic gases into the atmosphere presents a small problem in contrast to other sources of ozone-depleting chemicals and greenhouse gases, but anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by reevaluating the use of N2O, using low flows of gases and exploring the use of activated charcoal absorption in the scavenging systems to remove volatile agents. Infectious waste, radiation, lasers, chemicals and waste gases pose possible occupational health hazards in the operating room. Each of us should play a critical role in monitoring harmful substances and should actively practice techniques which would lessen the hazards. We should be cognizant of the fact that sources not yet introduced into our environment may have adverse effects on our health and that vigilance and education are key factors in maintaining a safe work environment.24 references.

  11. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  12. Occupational employment in nuclear-related activities, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.G.; Olsen, K.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1981 employment in nuclear-related activities is described, and compared to previous years. Employment characteristics examined include detailed occupations of scientists, engineers, and technicians; worker involvement in research and development activities; employment by industrial segment (e.g., reactor operation and maintenance, weapons production, and commercial laboratory services); employment by establishment type (government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO), private, and nonprofit); regional employment; and employment by establishment size. Total 1981 nuclear-related employment is estimated to be 249,500 - a growth of 22,600 workers over the 1977 total. GOCO workers make up 36.9% of this total. Among all the nuclear-related workers, scientists comprise 5.1%, engineers, 15.3%; and technicians, 17.5%; the remaining 62.1% is composed of managers, skilled craft and clerical workers, and other support services. Research and development involvement has declined from the 1977 survey results, with 60.4% of scientists and 27.0% of engineers currently involved in R and D. The largest single industrial segment activity is weapons development (16.9% of total employment), followed closely by reactor operation and maintenance employment (16.7%). There has been considerable change in the distribution of employment by industrial segment from 1977 to 1981; the reactor and reactor component design and manufacturing segment fell by over 9700 workers while reactor operation and maintenance employment grew by over 24,000 workers.

  13. Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding energy use. These all constitute drivers for the adoption of more sustainable ways of securing our energy needs (Shuai et al., 2011). Approximately about 40% of the world?s energy is consumed by buildings (ASHRAE, 2007), of which roughly about... short-comings; Passive infrared (PIR) sensor is the most commonly used technology for occupancy sensing in non-domestic buildings especially for lighting control (Delaney et al., 2009), however it fails to detect stationary occupants, thus switching...

  14. Wireless Sensor Technology to Optimize the Occupant's Dynamic Demand Pattern Within the Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is to look how the individual building occupants? movements, their staying on different locations within their building. Distributed information can be obtained by low-cost wireless sensor networks (Arens et al. 2005, Tse and Chan 2008), low-cost infrared..., could only be achieved if users could be located within the building. Low-budget wireless sensor networks with portable nodes show high potential for real-time localization and monitoring of building occupants ( Feldmeier and Paradiso 2010). Therefore...

  15. A study of College Station visitor opinions regarding hotel occupancy tax expenditures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweifel, Eva Louise

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF COLLEGE STATION VISITOR OPINIONS REGARDING HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX EXPENDITURES A Thesis by EVA LOUISE ZWEIFEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Recreation and Resources Development A STUDY OF COLLEGE STATION VISITOR OPINIONS REGARDING HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX EXPENDITURES A Thesis by EVA LOUISE ZWEIFEL Approved as to style and content by...

  16. Utilizing graduate follow-up studies for the identification of new and emerging occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isbell, Teresa Smith

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of respondent comments. 69 Analysis of addresses of respondents who expressed interest in other courses 69 Indicators of New and Emerging Occupations 70 IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 71 Summary Conclusions 71 73 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A...) life styles, and (e) resources. 'These factors singularly and in combination influence the types of jobs available" (p. 3). Nelson recommended that the information- gathering process begin early in the process of identifying a new occupation...

  17. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lighting complaints in the two main comparison groups.the lighting control profiles in the two comparison groups.lighting and acoustic quality in green buildings do not show a significant improvement in comparison

  18. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe?(MoO?)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; et al

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe?(MoO?)? electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na? and Li?, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe?(MoO?)? and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites inmore »partially sodiated Fe?(MoO?)? are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe?(MoO?)? and Na/Fe?(MoO?)? cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.« less

  19. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe?(MoO?)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji-Li [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Zhou, Yong-Ning [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shi, Si-Qi [Shanghai Univ., Shanghai (China); Shadike, Zulipiya [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Huang, Xuan-Qi [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Luo, Jun [Shanghai Univ., Shanghai (China); Yang, Zhen-Zhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Li, Hong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fu, Zheng-Wen [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe?(MoO?)? electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na? and Li?, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe?(MoO?)? and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites in partially sodiated Fe?(MoO?)? are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe?(MoO?)? and Na/Fe?(MoO?)? cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.

  20. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackley, Catherine M.; Walker, Marion F.; Burton, Chris R.; Watkins, Caroline L.; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    or drug addiction. Care home man- agers were offered a full explanation of the study. No care homes were actively delivering occupational ther- apy as a component of standard care. Once the managers had given informed consent, care home staff searched... to the treatment allo- cation of care homes. intervention and control Residents in the control arm received usual care. This did not involve an occupational therapy component. The occupational therapy intervention at the level of the care home resident followed...

  1. Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

  2. Occupational exposures during routine activities in coal-fueled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, M.J.; MacIntosh, D.L.; Williams, P.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Science

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited information is available on occupational exposures during routine, nonoutage work activities in coal-fueled power plants. This study evaluated occupational exposures to the principal contaminants in the facilities, including respirable dust (coal dust), arsenic, noise, asbestos, and heat stress. The data were collected over a 3-month period, during the summer of 2001. Each of the 5 facilities was divided into 5 similar exposure groups based on previous exposure assessments and job tasks performed. Of the nearly 400 air samples collected, only 1 exceeded the allowable occupational exposure value. For the noise samples, 55 (about 18%) were equal to or greater than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour hearing conservation program level of 85 dBA, and 12 (about 4%) were equal to or greater than the OSHA 8-hour permissible exposure level of 90 dBA. Heat stress monitoring at the facilities indicates that 26% of the 1-hour TWAs were exceeded for one or all of the recommended heat stress limits. The data also concluded that some work sites were above the heat stress ceiling values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Four of the 20 employees personally monitored exceeded the recommended limits for heart rate or body core temperature. This suggests there is a potential for heat strain if signs and symptoms are ignored. Recommendations are made to better control the heat stress exposure.

  3. The Post-occupancy Performance of Green Office Buildings: Evidence for the Fiekd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsham, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Workplace Image ? Positive Mood ? Visual and Physical Discomfort Frequency ? Sleep Quality at Night Green vs. Conventional (Physical Measurements) ? Green buildings perform better: ? Lower air speed ? Fewer airborne particulates G b ildi f? reen... to windows ? lower predicted mean vote e a v e ( d a y s / m(better thermal comfort) ? lower number of airborne particulates S i c k L e (?/m3)Mass of Particles ? 10 micron, PM10 (?g/m3) Energy ? Re-analysis of data from 100 LEED...

  4. Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental comfort, performance indicators, and symptom0.27 - 0.81). A l l performance indicators (confusion scale,itchy, or irritated Performance indicators (7-not at all, to

  5. Occupational safety data and casualty rates for the uranium fuel cycle. [Glossaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Hoy, H.C.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational casualty (injuries, illnesses, fatalities, and lost workdays) and production data are presented and used to calculate occupational casualty incidence rates for technologies that make up the uranium fuel cycle, including: mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment of uranium; fabrication of reactor fuel; transportation of uranium and fuel elements; generation of electric power; and transmission of electric power. Each technology is treated in a separate chapter. All data sources are referenced. All steps used to calculate normalized occupational casualty incidence rates from the data are presented. Rates given include fatalities, serious cases, and lost workdays per 100 man-years worked, per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output, and per other appropriate units of output.

  6. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  7. Occupancy Based Fault Detection on Building Level - a Feasibility Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuip, B.; Houten, M.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -going commissioning and fault detection and diagnostics (FDD) has been performed to improve the current situation of building problems by comparing measured building performance with design predictions [Portland 2003]. For fault detection, different methods... conference on building commissioning, Portland Energy Conservation. Portland. 2003. Methods for automated and continuous commissioning of building systems. US department of commerce, Portland energy conservation inc. Schijndel, A.W.M. van, 2008...

  8. Affordable Comfort | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) | OpenInformationAffinity Wind Farm

  9. comfort | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,Eaga SolarZoloHome Dc'scloud Home Dc's

  10. Earth Comfort | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South,Earlsboro, Oklahoma: Energy Resources

  11. Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to...

  12. Computer Science This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Computer Science This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career Occupations Computer Operations Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager Design & Manufacturing, Engineering Computer Applications

  13. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving IAQ and Energy Conservation Goals with ASHRAEBalancing energy conservation and occupant needs in  500-99-013 Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs

  14. ROBERT J. BUDNITZ Occupation: Physicist in Energy/Environmental Research and Nuclear Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    ROBERT J. BUDNITZ Occupation: Physicist in Energy/Environmental Research and Nuclear Safety Birth December 2004 to September 2007 (in Livermore): Leader, Nuclear & Risk Science Group, Energy & Environment Directorate Associate Program Leader for Nuclear Systems Safety and Security, E&E Directorate October 2002

  15. EH&S GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT MANAGERS: Minimizing Impacts on Local Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EH&S GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT MANAGERS: Minimizing Impacts on Local Building Occupants I. BACKGROUND; · shutting off the ventilation to the affected areas; · conducting the project after hours or on weekends: · increasing the building ventilation; · installing temporary fans; · conducting the project after hours

  16. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO A Low-Cost, Low-Power, Wireless Occupancy Sensing Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fiction writers to dream of "smart buildings", buildings that intelligently adapt to the needs of their human occupants[1]. There are many valuable applications of smart building technologies. A building of smart buildings is energy conservation. The US Department of Energy estimates that buildings account

  17. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    A Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University.Cerpa, University of California, Merced Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 35% energy usage in the United and Prediction for Building Energy Management and Auditing. ACM Trans. Sensor Netw. V, N, Article A (August 2012

  18. The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction · Biofuel: ­ National Security ­ Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production ­ Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

  19. Procedural Level Generation Using Occupancy-Regulated Extension Peter Mawhorter, Michael Mateas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Procedural Level Generation Using Occupancy-Regulated Extension Peter Mawhorter, Michael Mateas Abstract-- Existing approaches to procedural level generation in 2D platformer games are, with some notable at arbitrary scales. I. INTRODUCTION A good procedural level generator must satisfy complex constraints

  20. Occupational Health & Safety Directorate Queen Mary, University of London Fire Induction Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Occupational Health & Safety Directorate Queen Mary, University of London ­ Fire Induction Form June 2011 Note: In order to conform with Paragraph 21-(1) Regulatory Reform (F.S) Order 2005, the Head that the necessary information has been provided. This form must be retained by the department (copied to health

  1. Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, D.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

  2. Occupation fluctuation noise: A fundamental source of linewidth broadening in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahala, K.; Yariv, A.

    1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we consider the effect of fast thermal fluctuations of electronic state occupancy on the field spectrum of semiconductor lasers and derive for the first time an expression for the resulting power independent linewidth contribution. The magnitude and temperature dependence of this linewidth component agree reasonably well with measurements of a power independent linewidth made by Welford and Mooradian.

  3. Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy, And Comparison with C60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy of Chemistry, New York UniVersity, New York, New York 10003, Department of Chemistry, Brown UniVersity, ProVidence, Rhode Island 02912, and Department of Chemistry, Columbia UniVersity, New York, New York 10027 Received

  4. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety ­ Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene ­ Associate EVHS 10010 Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 GEOL 21062 Environmental Geology 3

  5. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Occupational and Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility.

  6. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety -Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene -Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety - Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene - Associate Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 2 1 Kent Core Requirement 3 KBS EVHS 21010 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 DG GEOL 21062

  7. Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene Associate of Applied Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental Health and Safety ­ Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene ­ Associate 3 EVHS 10004 Toxicology 3 EVHS 10010 Industrial Hygiene I 4 US 10097 Destination Kent State Sciences EVHS 21010 Industrial Hygiene II 4 PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 GEOL 21062

  8. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management VARICK L. ERICKSON, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    -conditioning (HVAC) systems [EIA 2010]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC energy can be saved by setting: Occupancy-based system for efficient reduction of HVAC energy," in Proceedings of the 10th International control strategy," in Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing Systems for Energy

  9. BJOG . Author manuscript Occupational predictors of pregnancy outcomes in Irish working women in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and working conditions. Data including pregnancy outcomes were also obtained from clinical hospital recordsBJOG . Author manuscript Page /1 12 Occupational predictors of pregnancy outcomes in Irish working and pregnancy outcomes in a prospective cohort of Irish pregnant women. Design This study has a prospective

  10. Sensitivity of Building Energy Simulation with Building Occupancy for a University Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhajed, Shreyans

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas A&M University. The energy model for the building was created using the DOE-2 engine and validated with actual energy consumption data. As constructed building characteristics and occupancy loading data were used in the DOE-2 model. Parametric runs...

  11. Sensitivity of Building Energy Simulation with Building Occupancy for a University Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhajed, Shreyans

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas A&M University. The energy model for the building was created using the DOE-2 engine and validated with actual energy consumption data. As constructed building characteristics and occupancy loading data were used in the DOE-2 model. Parametric runs...

  12. OCCUPATION DU SOL ET GESTION DE Modlisation prospective en paysage agricole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    OCCUPATION DU SOL ET GESTION DE L'EAU Modélisation prospective en paysage agricole fragmenté Thomas locales. De même, la gestion de l'eau constitue une compétence partagée par une multitude d'organismes, relevant d'un mille-feuille de règles. Cela ne facilite pas une gestion de l'eau efficiente qui ne se

  13. The Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Introduction Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the largest energy consumer in the home- grammable thermostats can reduce the energy needed to heat and cool a home by 10-30% without reducingThe Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns Ge

  14. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  15. Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    Sentinel: Occupancy Based HVAC Actuation using Existing WiFi Infrastructure within Commercial.agarwal@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Commercial buildings contribute to 19% of the primary energy consumption in the US, with HVAC systems accounting for 39.6% of this usage. To reduce HVAC energy use, prior studies have pro- posed using

  16. RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    RoomZoner: Occupancy-based Room-Level Zoning of a Centralized HVAC System Tamim Sookoor & Kamin. In this paper we present a CPS that enables a centralized Heating, Ventila- tion, and Air Conditioning (HVAC application due to residential HVAC systems ac- counting for over 15% of all U.S. energy usage, making it one

  17. SF 4040-DOP (5-2011) Supersedes (7-2010) issue DECLARATION of OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE PROVIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    , standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), American National Standards Institute medicine services to workers employed at DOE-controlled premises. To assist in ensuring contractors meet. Work on a DOE site for more than 30 days in a 12-month period; OR 2. Are enrolled for any length

  18. Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouch, Matthew J.

    E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

  19. SoPC based Smart Home Embedded Computer Capable of Caring for the Home Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Gul N.

    SoPC based Smart Home Embedded Computer Capable of Caring for the Home Occupants G. N. Khan and J. Toronto, Ontario Canada M5B 2K3 Abstract--We present a Smart-Home Embedded Computer (SHEC) system Ethernet network. A home simulator software incorporating virtual appliances and devices models the smart

  20. Stairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initial cost and publicize availability to lighting designers and contractors · Publicize energy savingsStairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells with high-wattage light fixtures (T12s or T8s), 24-hour use can lead to a significant and unnecessary waste of electricity

  1. Incremental performance improvements for a surface-convergency H- ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouleau, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chacon - Golcher, Edwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geros, Ernest [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Kenneth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stelzer, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Roderich [NON LANL; Tarvainen, Olli [NON LANL

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss some of the interventions on LANSCE's surface-conversion negative-hydrogen ion sources to increase reliability; lifetime and output without any major re-design of the machine. LANSCE's source presently delivers a baseline 16 mA, 60 Hz, 12% duty factor beam. We describe how better quality control and processing of tungsten filaments allow the comfortable completion of 28-day run cycles, how improved temperature control of the ion source body yields an increased H{sup -} output, how higher input power through an additional filament allows operations at plasma densities while maintaining the filament lifetime and how adequate electrode biasing inside the source provide some control over the beam Twiss parameters on exit.

  2. This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Annals of occupational hygiene following peer review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in The Annals of occupational hygiene following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Annals of Occupational Hygiene, doi:10.1093/annhyg/mel080 is available online at: http HALauthormanuscriptinserm-00141242,version1 HAL author manuscript Annals of Occupational Hygiene 2007;51(3):337-44 #12

  3. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  4. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  5. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  6. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' orientation to occupational safety in DOE'' taught at Rocky Flats, Colorado, April 23--May 2, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted twice at the Rocky Flats facility between April 23, 1991 and May 2, 1991. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendices A and B. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  7. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Upton, New York, November 17--20, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angyus, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,`` (S-101) which was conducted November 17--20, 1992 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in Upton, New York. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 presents examination results. Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  8. Evaluation of P-101 course Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE'' taught in Amarillo, Texas, May 7, 1991--May 17, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,'' which was conductd May 7, 1991 -- May 17, 1991 at Amarillo, Texas. The first part of the report summaries the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments in Appendix A. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Examination results on the final examination indicate that appropriate knowledge was gained by students attending the course.

  9. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Richland, Washington, May 20--May 23, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinther, R W

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the DOE Safety Training Institute's course, Supervisors Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' which was conducted May 20--23, 1991 at Richland, Washington. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees written comments in Appendix A. The second part summarizes results from the final examination designed to measure the knowledge gained from the course. The third part of the report summarizes course modifications and recommendations for improvement. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  10. Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Upton, New York, November 17--20, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angyus, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' (S-101) which was conducted November 17--20, 1992 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in Upton, New York. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 presents examination results. Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments and Appendix B presents a copy of the course evaluation form that students were asked to complete. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  11. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  12. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  13. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642­650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545 equivalent to those based on the Land's method. We want to draw the attention of the industrial hygiene

  14. Tapping into social resources to address occupational health : a network analysis of Vietnamese-owned nail salons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, Tam Minh-Thi, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Social networks in the Vietnamese nail salon industry were studied for their utility in addressing occupational health risks. Major findings include heavy reliance on family networks for fundamental needs, an extensive ...

  15. The influence of occupational value orientations on the vocational development of East Texas youth: A longitudinal study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Nelson Loyd

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occupational status attainment (among the more relevant: Kohout and Rothney, 1964; Kuvlesky and Bealer, 1967; Bohlen and Yoesting, 1968; Portes, et al. , 1968; and Sewell, et al. , 1969), there exists a general lack of agreement concerning the nature...

  16. Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans in Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrabanek, R. L.; Rapton, Avra

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from farm work towarcl the blue-collar jobs. A few farm laborers became operators of their own farm. Among household heads who had started their careers in nonfarm jobs, however, there was little up- ward occupational mobility. Among the San... their skills sufficiently to match those of the total popu- lation, and they occupied a position midway between their parents and the total population. For example, a. in San Antonio the proportion of laborers, both farm and nonfarm, among male younger...

  17. Statistical Analysis of Occupational Safety Data of Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and Non-VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) was originally developed by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1982 to foster greater ownership of safety and health in the workplace. The Department of Energy (DOE) adopted VPP in 1992; currently 23 sites across the DOE complex participate in the program. As its name implies, it is a voluntary program; i.e. not required by laws or regulations.

  18. Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porta, Miquel [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)], E-mail: mporta@imim.es; Bosch de Basea, Magda [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica CIBERESP (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Benavides, Fernando G. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Tomas [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Fernandez, Esteve [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institut Catala d'Oncologia, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Esther [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Alguacil, Juan [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Puigdomenech, Elisa [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. Objective: To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane. Methods: Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Results: Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Conclusions: Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers.

  19. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, Michael D.; Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.; Lin, Yiqing; Brahme, Rohini; Surana, Amit; Narayanan, Satish; Cerpa, Alberto; Ericson, Varick; Kamthe, Ankur

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the University of California Merced (UCM), and the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) conducted field studies and modeling analyses in the Classroom and Office Building (COB) and the Science and Engineering Building (S&E) at the University of California, Merced. In the first year, of a planned multiyear project, our goal was to study the feasibility and efficacy of occupancy-based energy management. The first-year research goals were twofold. The first was to explore the likely energy savings if we know the number and location of building occupants in a typical commercial building. The second was to model and estimate people movement in a building. Our findings suggest that a 10-14percent reduction in HVAC energy consumption is possible over typical HVAC operating conditions when we know occupancy throughout the building. With the conclusion of the first-year tasks, we plan to review these results further before this group pursues follow-on funding.

  20. Improving Fired Heater Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shriver, J. E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1982. 2, Fehervari, Willi, "Gas Measurement and Control for Pipeline Systems," The Foxboro Company. 3. Shriver, James, "CO/02 Boiler Control: Point Is Vi tal," POWER, October 1982. Set 1\\. Dukelow, Samuel, "Improving Boiler Efficiency...

  1. Recent Improvements in DDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, D.J.

    1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will report new developments and recent improvements to DDT. "Window DDT" now will remember undefined symbols and define them on a later command. Using sequence breaks, it can change the contents of memory while ...

  2. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    additive shows some improvement in flammability compared to the control electrolyte (EC:EMC (2:8)). Metal Phosphate-Coated Cathodes (PSI): Delivered 2 kg of LiMPO4-coated...

  3. Improved Dragline Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, K. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause of energy conservation can be served by increasing the efficiency of large draglines used in surface coal mining. The topic is the application of a training simulator, computer instrumentation and computer simulation to improve dragline...

  4. Managing Energy Efficiency Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almaguer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results has been the utilization of Six Sigma methodology to identify and seize opportunities to improve our performance and to better meet customer needs. Since its implementation in 1999, Six Sigma has proven to be a breakthrough process that can... take Dow to the next level of performance for all our key stakeholders. The Six Sigma methodology has been especially successful in improving energy efficiency and reducing energy costs and is the primary methodology used by technology center...

  5. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  6. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  7. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  8. A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM MAINTAINING THE US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Merrill; L. C. Cadwallader; M. Dagher

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This ORE analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for maintenance activities anticipated for the US DCLL TBM concept and its ancillary systems. Identification of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and estimates of the time required to perform these tasks were developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This paper details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  9. Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noye,S.; North,R.; Fisk, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -cost data for pop-up monitoring™ • Initial characterisation test on low power sensors show suitable accuracy and the ability to detect relevant building properties for commissioning • Deployment on major project this autumn Thank you for your attention... on the availability of a low-cost set of appropriate data. This paper presents the initial development phase of a pop-up monitoringTM toolkit using a wireless sensor network system to perform commissioning during the initial year of occupation of a building...

  10. The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

  11. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Programs 88 Students in a class on solar photovoltaic design and installation prepare to mount solar panels academic unit, a course may be taken more than once toward fulfilling endorsement requirements. However is course credit earned through any unit of UAF. Formal classroom instruction, correspondence study

  12. OCCUPATIONAL ENDORSEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Programs 87 Students in a class on solar photovoltaic design and installation prepare to mount solar panels academic unit, a course may be taken more than once toward fulfilling endorsement requirements. However is course credit earned through any unit of UAF. Formal classroom instruction, correspondence study

  13. Occupational Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ? The general population may be exposed to radon in indoor and outdoor air and drinking water. ? The primary source of indoor radon is from soil; radon in the soil can enter the home through cracks in the floors, walls, or foundations. The release of radon from water may also contribute to indoor levels. ? Exposures to radon gas are accompanied by exposure to radon progeny which are the decay products of radon-222 [e.g., bismuth-214 ( 214 Bi), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), 214 Pb, polonium-210 ( 210 Po), and 218 Po.

  14. Occupation Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization FundingObserving

  15. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  16. Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, J R [ORNL; Grossman, T [ORNL; Rice, C K [ORNL; Fairchild, P D [ORNL; Gross, I L [Engelhard/ICC

    2004-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    desiccant dehumidification technology is emerging as a technically viable alternative for comfort conditioning in many commercial and institutional buildings. Attempts to improve the indoor air quality of buildings has resulted in increasingly stringent guidelines for occupant outdoor air ventilation rates. Additionally, revised building heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) design criteria based on regional peak dew point data highlight the important of the latent (moisture removal) building load relative to the sensible (temperature) building load.

  17. LEED-EB: How to Achieve Certification and Reduce Operating Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iczkowski, E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as the triple bottom line benefits. Recycling of building debris diverts materials from the landfills and minimizing waste water lessens the strain on water treatment plants; thereby reducing negative environmental impacts. Operating and maintaining...-building perspective reduces negative environmental impacts, increases the buildings asset value, and improves the occupant comfort level; a triple bottom line savings. The LEED-NC rating system includes six categories with seven prerequisites and sixty...

  18. Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by extension, energy use levels. I am conducting a study to determine how...

  19. Creating Value Through Controls

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE SSL R&D Workshop 2014 Sensors and controls Qualitative: Occupant comfort & productivity Positive PR: "going green" Greater consistency in energy savings Easy...

  20. Commissioning Guidance for ESPCs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and often does not achieve the building occupant comfort needed to maintain worker productivity. Additionally, they are faced with congressionally mandated requirements to reduce...

  1. On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hung-Wen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  2. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  3. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  4. Vehicular Thermoelectrics: The New Green Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air ConditionerHeater (TE HVAC) Maintain Vehicle Occupant Comfort With Major Reduction of Fuel Use Eliminate Vehicular Use of R134a Refrigerant Gas which has 1300...

  5. Improved solar heating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  6. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  7. Improving haul truck productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

  8. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  9. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  10. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  11. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Karotsis, Georgios [ORNL; Guthrie, Malcolm [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Pradhan, Neelam [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  12. Radiation-Generating Devices Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a sealed radioactive source accountability and control program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart M of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  13. Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunce, Peter L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First US Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934 2003 by Peter L . Bunce This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly... of the First US Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1935” Institute of Haitian Studies University of Kansas. 2003. Terms of Use: http://www2.ku.edu/~scholar/docs/license.shtml Occasional Paper N° 27 Peter L. Bunce Foundations on Sand: An Analysis of the First US...

  14. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency, save money, and improve comfort for homeowners. A Homeowner's Guide to Window Air Conditioner Installation for Efficiency and Comfort More Documents & Publications...

  15. International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 10 No1 June 2011 Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Journal of Ventilation ISSN 1473-3315 Volume 10 No1 June 2011 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 49 Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences Dorthe K. Mortensen1, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure

  16. Improved ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  17. Improved cycling cryopump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

  18. Improved Dark Energy Constraints

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in graphene byI _Improved Dark

  19. Occupant Evaluation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified Health Centers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Anorea M.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, concern for natural resource depletion is growing. The healthcare industry is looking to improve healthcare environments by improving design and using better resources. The U.S. Green Building Council has created ...

  20. Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

  1. On the initial-occupancy dependence of some luminescence phenomena under the one-trap-one-recombination-center (OTOR) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Reuven

    2010 Accepted 6 February 2010 Keywords: Thermoluminescence (TL) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL and archaeological and geological dating, on the initial occupancy of the relevant traps, n0, within the OTOR (also. We also consider the behavior of CW-OSL and phosphorescence in a transformed form, as well as TL

  2. Enabling Building Energy Auditing Using Adapted Occupancy Ankur Kamthe, Varick Erickson, Miguel A. Carreira-Perpi~nan and Alberto Cerpa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Enabling Building Energy Auditing Using Adapted Occupancy Models Ankur Kamthe, Varick Erickson the overall energy usage numbers. A common way to estimate energy savings is through building energy auditing. A detailed energy audit [12] is comprehensive, time-consuming and involves inspection and analysis

  3. Fourth IEEE Workshop on Applications of Computer Vision, October 1998, Princeton, New Jersey, USA Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumm, John

    Video Occupant Detection for Airbag Deployment John Krumm and Greg Kirk Intelligent Systems & Robotics Center Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Abstract When an airbag deploys on a rear-facing infant seat, it can injure or kill the infant. When an airbag deploys on an empty seat, the airbag

  4. CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 106, NO. 5, 10 MARCH 2014668 Occupational health hazard in India: need for surveillance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    The National Health Policy of India 1983 and 2002 has outlined the urgent need to prevent and treat diseasesCOMMENTARY CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 106, NO. 5, 10 MARCH 2014668 Occupational health hazard in India fall into the ears of the more powerful, i.e. the employers and the policy makers. There is poor

  5. The occupational endorsement certification in welding and materials technology is designed for beginning students who want to learn to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    WELDING & MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY The occupational endorsement certification in welding and materials technology is designed for beginning students who want to learn to cut and weld, as well as students seeking more advanced courses who would like to take their welding skills further. Our program emphasizes

  6. Accomodation and Travel Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Accomodation and Travel GST PST Accomodation: long term (30 days or over) with continuous occupancy No GST No PST Accomodation: short term (less than 30 days) 5% 8% + 2% MRDT tax where applicable Accomodation: under $30 per day or $210 or less per week No GST No PST, no MRDT BC Ferry fares No GST No PST

  7. Design, Construction, Transportation, Operation and Post-Occupancy Analysis for the Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Ramirez, E.; Im, P.; Cho, S.; Canez, J.; Haberl, J.; Schaider, N.; Fisk, P.; Feigenbaum, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design, construction, transportation, operation and post occupancy analysis of the 2007 Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House (TAMU SD house). The TAMU SD house was developed to be a modular house that could grow into varying...

  8. doi: 10.1136/oem.60.11.e13 2003 60: e13Occup Environ Med

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doi: 10.1136/oem.60.11.e13 2003 60: e13Occup Environ Med N Lamond, J Dorrian, G D Roach, et al Lamond, J Dorrian, G D Roach, K McCulloch, A L Holmes, H J Burgess, A Fletcher, D Dawson

  9. Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Rubinstein, Nesrin Colak, Judith Jennings, and Danielle Neils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Introduction Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings [1 sensors for reducing peak demand, 2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting

  10. Why occupancy-responsive adaptive thermostats do not always save -and the limits for when they should

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Why occupancy-responsive adaptive thermostats do not always save - and the limits for when thermostats do not guarantee energy savings. As a result, EPA ended EnergyStar certification of programmable, and adaptive control schemes have shown significant annual HVAC savings on the order of 10-20%. However

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6 used by Photon Sciences to ensure that the ESH policies of the Laboratory are met in our activities and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6/6/12 Page 2 of 2

  12. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  13. Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Calderon

    1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

  14. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  15. Methods for testing interactions, with applications to occupational exposures, smoking, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.C.; Whittemore, A.S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various approaches to assessing the interaction between smoking and occupational exposures are described. The definition of interaction depends on the measure of association under consideration and can be expressed in terms of disease risk, time, or dose. Simple descriptive methods and maximum likelihood model fitting methods are presented for analyzing interactions in terms of joint effects on disease risk. Methods for assessing the influence of exposures on times to disease, using appropriate denominators, are also described. The various approaches are illustrated with published data on lung cancer in relation to asbestos, radon daughters, chloromethyl ethers, and arsenic. Some of the mechanisms that can be invoked to explain the observed patterns include initiation and promotion, lung clearance, transport across cell membranes, and mucous secretion.

  16. Evaluation of S-101 courses Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, T S

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE,'' (S-101) which was conducted August 5 to 8, 1991 at Hanford, in Richland, Washington. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  17. Sustainability in Real Estate- "Do Green Buildings make Investors Happy?" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bode, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and chartered surveyors start accounting for energy efficiency, the health and comfort issues of occupants as well as other sustainability aspects. Occupants are already showing interest in the sustainability issues of their real estate. According to an opinion...

  18. Indoor environmental quality surveys. A brief literature review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peretti, Clara; Schiavon, Stefano

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and (IAQ), occupant health, individuals productivity (selfproductivity, and quality, and structure layout organizational effectiveness quality 100 buildings in Long term Occupant perceptions of IAQproductivity) al. , 2003) Long term SBS research, benchmarking Thermal comfort, IAQ,

  19. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Brower; Michael Cheng; George T. Fleming

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  20. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  1. Identification of serum biomarkers for occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis induced by trichloroethylene using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Wen-Xu; Liu, Wei [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhang, Yanfang [Shenzhen Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Disease, Shenzhen 518001 (China); Huang, Peiwu; Yang, Xifei; Ren, Xiaohu; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Tang, Haiyan [Shenzhen Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Disease, Shenzhen 518001 (China); Zhou, Guifeng [Medical School of Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410006 (China); Huang, Xinfeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Liu, Jianjun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Medical Key Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Medical Key Laboratory of Health Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis induced by trichloroethylene (OMLDT) is an autoimmune disease and it has become a serious occupational health hazard. In the present study, we collected fasting blood samples from patients with OMLDT (n = 18) and healthy volunteers (n = 33) to explore serum peptidome patterns. Peptides in sera were purified using weak cation exchange magnetic beads (MB-WCX), and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ClinProTools bioinformatics software. The intensities of thirty protein/peptide peaks were significantly different between the healthy control and OMLDT patients. A pattern of three peaks (m/z 2106.3, 2134.5, and 3263.67) was selected for supervised neural network (SNN) model building to separate the OMLDT patients from the healthy controls with a sensitivity of 95.5% and a specificity of 73.8%. Furthermore, two peptide peaks of m/z 4091.61 and 4281.69 were identified as fragments of ATP-binding cassette transporter family A member 12 (ABCA12), and cationic trypsinogen (PRRS1), respectively. Our findings not only show that specific proteomic fingerprints in the sera of OMLDT patients can be served as a differentiated tool of OMLDT patients with high sensitivity and high specificity, but also reveal the novel correlation between OMLDT with ABC transports and PRRS1, which will be of potential value for clinical and mechanistic studies of OMLDT. - Highlights: • Identify 30 differential protein/peptide peaks between OMLDT and healthy control • The test sensitivity and test specificity were 95.5% and 73.8%, respectively. • ABCA12 and PRSS1 were identified as potential biomarkers in OMLDT patients.

  2. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

  3. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4) using combinations of high and low molecular weight (Mw) polymers, (5) using secondary crosslinking reactions, (6) injecting un-hydrated polymer particles, and (7) incorporating particulates. All of these methods showed promise in some aspects, but required performance improvements in other aspects. All materials investigated to date showed significant performance variations with fracture width. High pressure gradients and limited distance of penetration are common problems in tight fractures. Gravity segregation and low resistance to breaching are common problems in wide fractures. These will be key issues to address in future work. Although gels can exhibit disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures, the levels of permeability reduction for oil flow are too high to allow practical exploitation in most circumstances. In contrast, disproportionate permeability reduction provided by gels that form in porous rock (adjacent to the fractures) has considerable potential in fractured systems.

  4. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  5. Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to promote energy awareness, to improve communicationstype of workspace, and energy awareness at home. ( Thea bias towards higher energy awareness in this sample. This

  6. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be used to design low energy buildings, predict the energyhigh performing building should have low energy consumptionlow cost and no cost improvements in building energy

  7. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  8. Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halatek, Tadeusz [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: halatek@imp.lodz.pl; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina [Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Disease, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Rabieh, Sasan [Faculty of Biology, Chemistry, and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Wasowicz, Wojciech [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m{sup 3}). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m{sup 3}). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 {mu}g/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x{sub a} 39.0 {mu}g/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum {beta}{sub 2}M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

  9. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  10. Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  11. Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Improving Solar Cell Efficiency October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share The two-dimensional grazing...

  12. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  13. Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

  14. A recent study of meteorological conditions around the Pentagon will support development of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack. I nFEBRUARY 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | #12;of the most likely targets for a future terrorist attack

  15. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  16. vy physical work). Some white-collar jobs may share these characteris-tics, but these factors overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    overwhelmingly tilt toward blue-collar occupations. Often blue-collar jobs tend to be dirty, dangerous, and of a confiscated driver's license. Loaning money and covering for behav- ioral problems are also not uncommon. Some

  17. Energy retrofit and occupant behaviour in protected housing: A case study of the Brunswick Centre in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Ben; Steemers, Koen

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    , and window opening schedule. In addition, occupancy number and flat orientation, that influence the internal gains and solar radiations of the flats, are included. By comparing energy use and behaviour patterns, their interrelationship can be further... show that the variance resulting from the comparison of West and East orientation ranges from 0.23% to 0.97%, with east facing flats having marginally higher energy use. This might be due to different effects of solar radiation on different...

  18. Radiation Safety Training Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiation safety training program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart J of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  19. Indoor Environment Program 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Much of this energy can be saved by reducing buildings' air infiltration and ventilation, since the heat load associated with these processes is about 13 quads per year. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants that originate indoors, reducing ventilation can cause undesirable side effects such as lowering indoor air quality and adversely affecting the health, comfort and productivity of building occupants. The purpose of this research is to increase the energy efficiency of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The research explores energy use and efficiency of buildings; building ventilation and infiltration; the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and exposure and risk assessment for indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO[sub x]. The Program also conducts multidisciplinary studies on relationships between occupant health and comfort symptoms and factors within a building's environment. Air infiltration and ventilation rates are measured and modeled for residential and commercial buildings in order to understand energy transport and thermal losses from various components of building shells and ventilation systems. Methods for reducing energy losses are based on these studies. The effectiveness of various ventilation systems for pollutant removal is also investigated. Methods for characterizing ventilation and building energy use are developed for experimental and applied uses.

  20. Indoor Environment Program 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Much of this energy can be saved by reducing buildings` air infiltration and ventilation, since the heat load associated with these processes is about 13 quads per year. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants that originate indoors, reducing ventilation can cause undesirable side effects such as lowering indoor air quality and adversely affecting the health, comfort and productivity of building occupants. The purpose of this research is to increase the energy efficiency of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The research explores energy use and efficiency of buildings; building ventilation and infiltration; the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and exposure and risk assessment for indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}. The Program also conducts multidisciplinary studies on relationships between occupant health and comfort symptoms and factors within a building`s environment. Air infiltration and ventilation rates are measured and modeled for residential and commercial buildings in order to understand energy transport and thermal losses from various components of building shells and ventilation systems. Methods for reducing energy losses are based on these studies. The effectiveness of various ventilation systems for pollutant removal is also investigated. Methods for characterizing ventilation and building energy use are developed for experimental and applied uses.