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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress on Enabling an Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency Preprint M. Schott, N. Long, J. Scheib, K. Fleming, K. Benne, and L. Brackney National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55197 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

2

Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Many studies have reported energy savings after installing a dashboard, but dashboards provide neither individual feedback to the occupant nor the ability to report individual comfort. The Building Agent (BA) provides an interface to engage the occupant in a conversation with the building control system and the building engineer. Preliminary outcomes of the BA-enabled feedback loop are presented, and the effectiveness of the three display modes will be compared to other dashboard studies to baseline energy savings in future research.

Schott, M.; Scheib, J.; Long, N.; Fleming, K.; Benne, K.; Brackney, L.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to do the same. Reducing the demand for energy produced from depletable resources and generating energy from renewable sources leaves more resources available for future use. Therefore, energy savings and sustainability go hand in hand. Occupant comfort can be maintained in conjunction with energy savings, and some sustainable practices enhance comfort. Properly planned and implemented construction programs can help ensure efficiently operating systems, reducing the consumption of valuable resources, while providing an acceptable indoor environment. The authors have more than 30 years combined experience working with Texas schools in mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering and design as well as energy management.

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Learning user preferences to maximise occupant comfort in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable to ensure that the thermal comfort conditions in offices are in line with the preferences of occupants. Controlling their offices correctly therefore requires the correct prediction of their thermal sensation which is often determined ... Keywords: decision support systems, intelligent systems, thermal comfort

Anika Schumann; Nic Wilson; Mateo Burillo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Active improvement of air-conditioning system energy consumption with adaptive thermal comfort approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MSc research project aims to suggest improvements to building air-conditioning control systems, to reduce energy consumption while maintaining the comfort level of the occupants.… (more)

Muhammad Saleh, Muhammad Fadzli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection to identify energy waste in a specific building,detect system anomalies or energy waste. Notice gas used forenergy consumption, comfort improvements, retro commissioning, and anomaly detection. • Identify areas of waste and

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government July 29, 2010 - 6:15pm Addthis The new chiller system at the Dunn Building replaced an outdated rooftop-based HVAC system. | Photo courtesy of Deborah Hammond The new chiller system at the Dunn Building replaced an outdated rooftop-based HVAC system. | Photo courtesy of Deborah Hammond What are the key facts? $329,600 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant 103,000 kWh annual energy savings from HVAC system replacement 141,100 pounds of CO2 emissions avoided at the Dunn Building On any given day up to 2,000 people visit the Dunn Building in Martinsburg, W. Va. The building is the site for the Blue Ridge Community and Technical

8

Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government Energy Savings, Improved Comfort for West Virginia County Government July 29, 2010 - 6:15pm Addthis The new chiller system at the Dunn Building replaced an outdated rooftop-based HVAC system. | Photo courtesy of Deborah Hammond The new chiller system at the Dunn Building replaced an outdated rooftop-based HVAC system. | Photo courtesy of Deborah Hammond What are the key facts? $329,600 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant 103,000 kWh annual energy savings from HVAC system replacement 141,100 pounds of CO2 emissions avoided at the Dunn Building On any given day up to 2,000 people visit the Dunn Building in Martinsburg, W. Va. The building is the site for the Blue Ridge Community and Technical

9

Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees Grant Improves Comfort for Nevada City's Employees June 24, 2010 - 3:46pm Addthis Caliente, Nev., has a unique city hall: a historic railroad depot. Built in 1923 as a maintenance center halfway between Salt Lake City and Los Angeles, the depot is known far outside southeastern Nevada for its role in railway history and its Mission Revival architecture. There was just one problem: it was built before central heating or air-conditioning. "When the information on the grant came through, I was, to be perfectly honest, singing hallelujah, because I was sitting in my office with two space heaters going and a blanket over my legs," says Stana Hurlburt, grant writer for the city of Caliente. So Hurlburt and her colleagues applied for, and received, a grant of

10

Using Dashboard to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-4283E Using Dashboard to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings Kyle Marini of the Building 90 monitoring team, including, Jose (Arturo) Ayala-Navarro, Geoffrey Bell, Nicholas Goodell for the assistance of the LBNL Facilities electricians, telecommunication services, and the patience of the building

Diamond, Richard

11

The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available wind speed can be used to meet occupant comfort conditions. By calculating the change in enthalpy produced by a typical residential air conditioner during those hours when an occupant is uncomfortable, we were able to estimate the impact of natural ventilation on building cooling load. The graphic presentation of the results allows a designer to determine the potential energy savings of increasing the ventilation air flow rate as well as the orientation of building openings that will maximize ventilation cooling of the building occupants.

Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings Title Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4283E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Marini, Kyle, Girish Ghatikar, and Richard C. Diamond Call Number LBNL-4283E Keywords commercial buildings, dashboards, energy, feedback, monitoring Abstract Federal agencies are taking many steps to improve the sustainability of their operations, including improving the energy efficiency of their buildings, promoting recycling and reuse of materials, encouraging carpooling and alternative transit schemes, and installing low flow water fixture units are just a few of the common examples. However, an often overlooked means of energy savings is to provide feedback to building users about their energy use through information dashboards connected to a building's energy information system.An Energy Information System (EIS), broadly defined, is a package of performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems that is used to collect, store, analyze, and display energy information. At a minimum, the EIS provides the whole-building energy-use information (Granderson 2009a). We define a "dashboard" as a display and visualization tool that utilizes the EIS data and technology to provide critical information to users. This information can lead to actions resulting in energy savings, comfort improvements, efficient operations, and more. The tools to report analyzed information have existed in the information technology as business intelligence (Few 2006). The dashboard is distinguished from the EIS as a whole, which includes additional hardware and software components to collect and storage data, and analysis for resources and energy management (Granderson 2009b). EIS can be used for a variety of uses, including benchmarking, base-lining, anomaly detection, off-hours energy use evaluation, load shape optimization, energy rate analysis, retrofit and retro-commissioning savings (Granderson 2009a). The use of these EIS features depends on the specific users. For example, federal and other building managers may use anomaly detection to identify energy waste in a specific building, or to benchmark energy use in similar buildings to identify energy saving potential and reduce operational cost. There are several vendors of EIS technology that provide information on energy and other environmental variables in buildings.

13

comfort | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

comfort comfort Home Buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings. architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message

14

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Federal agencies are taking many steps to improve the sustainability of their operations, including improving the energy efficiency of their buildings, promoting recycling and reuse of materials, encouraging carpooling and alternative transit schemes, and installing low flow water fixture units are just a few of the common examples. However, an often overlooked means of energy savings is to provide feedback to building users about their energy use through information dashboards connected to a building?s energy information system. An Energy Information System (EIS), broadly defined, is a package of performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems that is used to collect, store, analyze, and display energy information. At a minimum, the EIS provides the whole-building energy-use information (Granderson 2009a). We define a ?dashboard? as a display and visualization tool that utilizes the EIS data and technology to provide critical information to users. This information can lead to actions resulting in energy savings, comfort improvements, efficient operations, and more. The tools to report analyzed information have existed in the information technology as business intelligence (Few 2006). The dashboard is distinguished from the EIS as a whole, which includes additional hardware and software components to collect and storage data, and analysis for resources and energy management (Granderson 2009b). EIS can be used for a variety of uses, including benchmarking, base-lining, anomaly detection, off-hours energy use evaluation, load shape optimization, energy rate analysis, retrofit and retro-commissioning savings (Granderson 2009a). The use of these EIS features depends on the specific users. For example, federal and other building managers may use anomaly detection to identify energy waste in a specific building, or to benchmark energy use in similar buildings to identify energy saving potential and reduce operational cost. There are several vendors of EIS technology that provide information on energy and other environmental variables in buildings.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Marini, Kyle; Ghatikar, Girish; Diamond, Richard

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, air velocity, and inlet size. This technique uses the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and velocity. The study shows that high sidewall supply air jets achieve uniform mixing in a room, which is essential for providing acceptable comfort levels. The study also provides information required to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

WESBES: A Wireless Embedded Sensor for Improving Human Comfort Metrics using Temporospatially Correlated Data  

SciTech Connect

When utilized properly, energy management systems (EMS) can offer significant energy savings by optimizing the efficiency of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, difficulty often arises due to the constraints imposed by the need to maintain an acceptable level of comfort for a building’s occupants. This challenge is compounded by the fact that human comfort is difficult to define in a measurable way. One way to address this problem is to provide a building manager with direct feedback from the building’s users. Still, this data is relative in nature, making it difficult to determine the actions that need to be taken, and while some useful comfort correlations have been devised, such as ASHRAE’s Predicted Mean Vote index, they are rules of thumb that do not connect individual feedback with direct, diverse feedback sensing. As they are a correlation, quantifying effects of climate, age of buildings and associated defects such as draftiness, are outside the realm of this correlation. Therefore, the contribution of this paper is the Wireless Embedded Smart Block for Environment Sensing (WESBES); an affordable wireless sensor platform that allows subjective human comfort data to be directly paired with temporospatially correlated objective sensor measurements for use in EMS. The described device offers a flexible research platform for analyzing the relationship between objective and subjective occupant feedback in order to formulate more meaningful measures of human comfort. It could also offer an affordable and expandable option for real world deployment in existing EMS.

Joel Hewlett; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure), Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil- fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year-not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air condi- tioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three instal- lations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are develop-

19

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfort, and alternative cooling strategies”. Occupants veryNon-Compressor Cooling Alternatives for Reducing Residential

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The impact of thermostat performance on energy consumption and occupant comfort in residential electric heating systems  

SciTech Connect

A digital computer simulation was used to compare the energy consumption and comfort of an electric baseboard heating system using high performance thermostats (low droop, fast cycling) to that of the same system using poorer performing thermostats (high droop, slow cycling, such as many line voltage types). Since a thermostat which allows the controlled temperature to fall below the setpoint will obviously cause less energy consumption than a thermostat which maintains the controlled temperature closer to the setpoint, the key hypothesis of this study was that the user will reset the thermostat setpoint in some fashion during the heating season to obtain acceptable conditions for all heating loads. The major assumption of this study, therefore, was the mode of this ''user-thermostat interaction''. For every case in which the simulated ''user'' could intervene, the energy consumption using high performance thermostats was found to be less, while a greater degree of comfort was maintained, than systems using poorer performing thermostats. Energy savings ranged from 2% to 18% depending upon the mode of user interaction simulated. Where energy savings were small, the ''user'' was resetting the poorly performing thermostat as often as twice a day; i.e., the ''user'' was performing the function of a better performing thermostat.

Benton, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure on Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility, featuring the Vehicle Modification Facility, Vehicle Test Pad and ReCharge Integrated Demonstration System. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year - not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air conditioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three installations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle-grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Part of NREL's Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS), the VTIF is dedicated to renewable and energy efficient solutions. This facility showcases technology and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for electric vehicle (EV) components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies and industry partners. Research conducted at the VTIF examines the interaction of building energy systems, utility grids, renewable energy sources and PEVs, integrating energy management solutions, and maximizing potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, while smoothing the transition and reducing costs for EV owners. NREL's collaboration with automakers, charging station manufacturers, utilities and fleet operators to assess technologies using VTIF resources is designed to enable PEV communication with the smart grid and create opportunities for vehicles to play an active role in building and grid management. Ultimately, this creates value for the vehicle owner and will help renewables be deployed faster and more economically, making the U.S. transportation sector more flexible and sustainable.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Toward adaptive comfort management in office buildings using participatory sensing for end user driven control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current building management systems (BMS) operate based on conservatively defined operational hours, maximum occupancy rates, and standardized occupant comfort set points. Despite the increasing building energy consumption rates, occupants are not usually ... Keywords: occupant comfort, office buildings, participatory sensing

Farrokh Jazizadeh; Burcin Becerik-Gerber

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improving the Fanger model's thermal comfort predictions for naturally ventilated spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fanger model is the official thermal comfort model in U.S. and international standards and is based on the heat balance of the human body with the environment. This investigation focuses on re-specifying the parameters ...

Truong, Phan Hue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Commercial Building Energy Management Systems Handbook: Opportunities for Reducing Costs and Improving Comfort  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is written for the commercial building owner, manager, or developer without a technical background but wanting to understand and evaluate recommendations for energy savings or comfort made by energy consultants and/or building engineers. It provides an overview of commercial building heating, ventilating, air-conditioning (HVAC), and lighting systems, and of the energy management systems (EMSs) that control comfort and provide energy savings. Opportunities for energy savings and/or increase...

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining comfort in a home can be challenging in hot-humid climates. At the common summer temperature set point of 75 degrees F, the perceived air temperature can vary by 11 degrees F because higher indoor humidity reduces comfort. Often the air conditioner (AC) thermostat set point is lower than the desirable cooling level to try to increase moisture removal so that the interior air is not humid or "muggy." However, this method is not always effective in maintaining indoor relative humidity (RH) or comfort. In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74 degrees -80 degrees F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improving Building Comfort and Energy Savings of the McKenzie Airport Terminal by Maintaining and Improving Pneumatic Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McKenzie Airport Terminal is located at Easterwood Airport, which is owned and operated by Texas A&M University. It was built in 1988. Most all HVAC equipment, which includes boiler, chiller, pumps, AHUs and exhaust fans, due to lack of maintenance, had some form of deteriorated controls, components, and operational function. For example, most of pneumatic controls were failed due to bad components, wrong settings, and disconnection before the Continuous CommissioningR (CCSM). This caused humid and hot problems of the building, and wasted energy. After maintaining and improving the pneumatic controls, the boiler and hot water pump is now turned off when outside air temperature is higher than 80°F. The chiller is now shut off when the outside air temperature is below 55 °F, and the economizers activate to maintain discharge air temperature when the outside air temperature is below 60 °F. The building comfort in temperature and relative humidity (RH) is improved after CCSM. For example, average space temperature of the building was above 75 °F most of the time before CCSM and is now 73 °F after CCSM. The relative humidity in the baggage claim area was 70% before CCSM and is now 55% after CCSM. The annual savings of electricity for chiller and natural gas for boiler are $5,040 and $12,090 respectively. The total annual energy savings are $17,130.

Liu, C.; Bruner, H. L.; Deng, S.; Brundidge, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Thermal Comfort in High-Performance Homes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop recommendations on HVAC system design and operating conditions to achieve optimal thermal comfort in high-performance homes. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed recommendations to help residential heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) designers select optimal supply inlet size and system operating conditions to maintain good thermal comfort in low heating and cooling load homes. This can be achieved by using high sidewall supply air jets to create proper combinations of air temperature and air motion in the occupied zone of the conditioned space. The design of air distribution systems for low-load homes is an integral part of residential system research and development in systems integration. As American homes become more energy efficient, space conditioning systems will be downsized. The downsizing will reach the point where the air flow volumes required to meet the remaining heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing, which can affect thermal comfort. NREL researchers performed a detailed study evaluating the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, supply air velocity, and supply inlet size. They found that in heating mode, low and intermediate supply temperatures of 95 F (308 K) and 105 F (314 K) maintained acceptable comfort levels at lower fan powers than can be achieved at 120 F (322 K) supply temperatures. For the high supply temperature of 120 F (322 K), higher fan powers (supply velocities) were required to overcome buoyancy effects and reach a good mixing in the room. In cooling mode, a supply temperature of 55 F (286 K) provided acceptable comfort levels. A small supply inlet of 8-in. (0.2 m) x 1-in. (0.025 m) is recommended in both heating and cooling modes. Computational fluid dynamics was used to model heat transfer and airflow in the room. The technique consists of using the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by determining the Air Diffusion Performance Index (ADPI). The level of comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and air velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and air velocity. Figure 1 illustrates the plots of acceptable draft temperature, which is between -3 (-1.7) and 2 F (1.1 K) for two supply velocities of 394 fpm (2 m/s) (a) and 788 fpm (4 m/s) (b) when the room was supplied by 55 F (286 K) air. The plots show the distribution at selected cross-sections along the room. Colored regions on each cross-section are considered comfortable (blue regions are on the cold side and red regions are on the warm side). Regions of acceptable draft temperature are larger at low velocity and decrease as the velocity increases. As a result, the supply velocity of 394 fpm (2 m/s) provided higher comfort level than the supply velocity of 788 fpm (4 m/s). Work is in progress at NREL to extend this research to evaluate additional configurations and to integrate this system into a whole-house context.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research determines optimal HVAC system design for research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evalu- ated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air tempera-

30

Building Design and Operation for Improving Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in a Hot-Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to develop new techniques for designing and operating unconditioned buildings in a hot-humid climate that could contribute to an improvement of thermal performance and comfort condition. The recommendations proposed in this research will also be useful for facility managers on how to maintain unconditioned buildings in this climate. This study investigated two unconditioned Thai Buddhist temples located in the urban area of Bangkok, Thailand. One is a 100-year-old, high-mass temple. The other is a 5-year-old, lower-mass temple. The indoor measurements revealed that the thermal condition inside both temples exceed the ASHRAE-recommended comfort zone. Surprisingly, the older temple maintained a more comfortable indoor condition due to its thermal inertia, shading, and earth contacts. A baseline thermal and airflow model of the old temple was established using a calibrated computer simulation method. To accomplish this, HEATX, a 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, was coupled with the DOE-2 thermal simulation program. HEATX was used to calculate the airflow rate and the surface convection coefficients for DOE-2, and DOE-2 was used to provide physical input variables to form the boundary conditions for HEATX. In this way calibrated DOE-2/CFD simulation model was accomplished, and the baseline model was obtained. To investigate an improved design, four design options were studied: 1) a reflective or low-solar absorption roof, 2) R-30 ceiling insulation, 3) shading devices, and 4) attic ventilation. Each was operated using three modes of ventilation. The low-absorption roof and the R-30 ceiling insulation options were found to be the most effective options, whereas the shading devices and attic ventilation were less effective options, regardless of which ventilation mode was applied. All design options performed much better when nighttime-only ventilation was used. Based on this analysis, two prototype temples was proposed (i.e., low-mass and high-mass temples). From the simulation results of the two prototypes, design and operation guidelines are proposed, which consist of: 1) increased wall and ceiling insulation, 2) white-colored, low-absorption roof, 3) slab-on-ground floor, 4) shading devices, 5) nighttime-only ventilation, 6) attic ventilation, and 7) wider openings to increase the natural ventilation air flow windows, wing walls, and vertical fins.

Sreshthaputra, Atch

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

What School Buildings Can Teach Us: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45   Figure 4.3.c Thermal Comfort Satisfaction: Cooling4.3.c Thermal Comfort Satisfaction: Cooling ThermostatThermal  Comfort  Satisfaction   Occupants  with  cooling  

Baker, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfort in warm conditions. ASHRAE Trans 84 (2): 263 – 277.Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal: 18-29. [9] Zhang,control, and occupant comfort. ASHRAE Trans 110:17–35. [11

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Predicting the distribution of thermal comfort votes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing occupant comfort and minimizing energy costs are two challenging tasks in the efficient operation of any office building. Often these objectives cannot be achieved simultaneously which asks for methods that resolve this trade-off in the best ... Keywords: decision support systems, intelligent systems, thermal comfort

Anika Schumann; Nic Wilson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

University of Colorado Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Warmboard sub-floor with tubing and wood Image Courtsey of Warmboard Image Thermal Comfort "That Condition of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment" (ASHRAE Standard 55) Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria 1. Thermally comfortable conditions achieved by integrating technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies: a. Temperatures between 72 o F and 76 o F b. Humidity between 40.0% and 55.0% 2. Minimal distractions to the occupant 3. Easy control of thermal comfort system 4. Uniform thermal conditions exist throughout the house Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features

35

Energy Savings and Comfort Improvements through Plant- and Operating mode Optimisation Demonstrated by Means of Project Examples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 40 percent of Europe's primary energy is required for conditioning of buildings. By improving energy efficiency, approximately 30 percent of this energy could be saved. Energy counts for 35 percent of the operating cost and put an increasing burden on the budget of real estate or facility managers. Building Automation is able to drill down operating cost and by the same time increase energy efficiency as documented in the EN 15232 (Energy performance of buildings - Impact of Building Automation, Controls and Building Management) norm. This standard notes that advanced high performing building automation can save up to 30 percent of thermal and 13 percent of electrical energy (for example in office buildings) compared to buildings with minimum building automation standard. An investigation of the energy consumption of various buildings identified significant savings in electricity and heating. 74 percent of the reviewed buildings are office or administrative type buildings, the majority of them air-conditioned. On average, the savings in primary energy demand were found to be as high as 23 percent per building. Surprising is the large percentage of the electricity needed for cooling and transport of the supply and exhaust air of 48 percent. Approximately 75 percent of this electricity is exclusively used to transport air. The survey results coincide with recent experience of energy experts from Honeywell. Based on their 30 years of experience with energy saving projects they are able to identify and activate savings that often exceed 40 percent at their customer sites. Control based means such as adjusting the operating time of ventilation systems to actual requirements, the installation of fan motors and pumps with high efficiency of up to 90 percent, the use of high-quality air filters and intelligent sensors are worthwhile investments, which rapidly pay off. Using thermography imaging, load measurements or plant operation analysis, Honeywell Building Solutions specialist are able to propose dedicated measures for buildings, that minimize the operational cost (and thus the extras tenants have to pay), the air pollutant emissions and increase the user comfort. During the course of the presentation three successful saving projects will underline the possibilities to improve plant operation with the help of know-how, measurement, control and precise sensor technology. The three German projects are: • The Municipal Hospital at Dessau • The Goethe-University at Frankfurt am Main • The pharmaceutical company CSL Behring at Marburg

Muller, C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings Speaker(s): Danni Wang Date: July 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 One of the fundamental objectives of an HVAC (heating, ventilation, air-conditioning) system is to create comfortable environments for occupants. The rule of thumb in building operation is the more energy a building consumes, the more comfortable it becomes. Saving energy and achieving comfort seem to conflict with each other. This might be true. However, are there opportunities to achieve both desires? In this talk, I will present a few case studies which demonstrate how we might both achieve comfort and save energy by using sensor networks in buildings. I will first report the latest thermal comfort survey results from around 150 commercial

37

Operable windows, personal control and occupant comfort.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE’s permission. Operable Windows, Personal Control, andcontrol of operable windows in naturally-ventilated officeences on the operation of windows in a naturally venti-

Brager, Gail; Paliaga, Gwelen; de Dear, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Comfort control for short-term occupancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

service and conserving energy in the hotel H V A C system. Osuch as hotel guests while reducing energy consumption.satisfaction and lower energy use in the hotel. The concepts

Fountain, M.; Brager, G. S.; Arens, Edward A; Bauman, Fred; Benton, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ThermoComfort_0809  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Cindy Regnier Environmental Energy Technologies Division August 2012 LBNL-6131E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

42

DOE Solar Decathlon: Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Comfort Zone Contest, teams design their houses to keep temperature and humidity steady, uniform, and comfortable. Full points are awarded for maintaining narrow...

43

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

44

Individual User Behavior Leading Factor in Comfort Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With global warming effects and exploding energy prices it is necessary to further optimize the energy performance of buildings. Intelligent Agents technology for individual climate control for each user of a building in combination with feedback on the energy consumption (costs) leads to better acceptance of the individual comfort and a reduction of the energy consumption. Agents at room level with knowledge of the actual preferences of the occupants are used to improve the distribution of the available HVAC resources of the building and lead to better performance with less energy consumption and at lower costs. At building level an agent is used to optimize the settings of HVAC-controls and lead to peak reduction. The technology was tested in field tests in different office buildings in the Netherlands.

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Van Houten, M. A.; Wortel, W.; Van Der Velden, J. A. J.; Kamphuis, R.; Hommelberg, M.; Broekhuizen, H.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

improve | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

improve improve Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

46

Effective and Comfortable Power Control Model Using Kalman Filter for Building Energy Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In building environment energy management is a big problem in recent years. Several methods and proposals exist in the literature for energy management, but the trade-off between occupants comfort level and energy usage is still a major challenge and ... Keywords: Comfort index, Energy management in buildings, Energy savings Kalman filter, Fuzzy logic

Safdar Ali, Do-Hyeun Kim

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although heating and cooling for thermal comfort inconcerning health, thermal comfort, and alternative coolingand cooling costs while maintaining acceptable thermal

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluating the performance robustness of fixed and movable shading devices against diverse occupant behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the diverse operating conditions, weather conditions, space users, and occupant preferences of buildings, it is commonplace to provide occupants with multiple means to adapt their immediate indoor environment. However, numerous studies have shown ... Keywords: building performance simulation, occupant behaviour, occupant comfort, robust building design, stochastic occupant modelling

William O'Brien

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective John L. StoopsComfort, Evolutionary Biology, Thermo Regulation, ThermalFrom an evolutionary biology perspective, the physiological

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Earth Comfort | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comfort Comfort Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Comfort Place Okemos, Michigan Zip 48864 Sector Geothermal energy Product Earth Comfort is a website that gives information on how geothermal heating and cooling works and links to how much it would cost, dealers, etc. Coordinates 42.71511°, -84.430264° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.71511,"lon":-84.430264,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

Cornell University Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort Thermal comfort in the CUSD home is a top priority for our team. Accordingly, we designed a redundant HVAC system that would carefully manage the comfort of our decathletes and guests throughout the competition and the life of the house. The CUSD home's HVAC system was optimized for Washington, DC, with the cold Ithaca climate in mind. Our design tools included a schematic energy-modeling interface called TREAT, which was built off of the SuNREL platform. TREAT was used to passively condition the space. Our schematic energy modeling helped us properly size window areas, overhangs, and building mass distribution. We used a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) package called AirPak, to refine our design. The home was modeled in both

53

Field Analysis of Thermal Comfort in Two Energy Efficient Office Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been a growing interest to include passive concepts in buildings as a design strategy for achieving energy efficiency and optimum indoor thermal comfort in workspace as well. The paper attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of tropical passive solar control components in integrating thermal comfort with energy efficiency in office building. Field measurements are carried out in selected workspace of two office buildings that have been practiced the passive solar control. Solar radiation, air temperature, globe temperature, relative humidity and air velocity were measured for seven days including the non-working days, both indoors and outdoors for each building along with direct occupant's survey to compare the measurement and the votes of occupants under the same environment. The result shows that the thermal comfort parameters lie within the recommended comfort zone of Malaysian Standards with exception of an air movement in the workspace of both buildings. The result suggested workers' preferable condition.

Qahtan, A. T.; Keumala, N.; Rao, S. P.; Samad, Z. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable March 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Q&A Have a story about improving your home's energy efficiency? Share your story with us & it could be the next one we profile on energy.gov! Share your story Addthis Learn how a home energy audit is helping Seth Budick and his family save money on their energy bills, reduce their carbon footprint and make their home more comfortable. | Photo courtesy of Seth Budick. Learn how a home energy audit is helping Seth Budick and his family save money on their energy bills, reduce their carbon footprint and make their home more comfortable. | Photo courtesy of Seth Budick. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka

55

Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable Home Energy Audits: Making Homes More Energy Efficient and Comfortable March 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Q&A Have a story about improving your home's energy efficiency? Share your story with us & it could be the next one we profile on energy.gov! Share your story Addthis Learn how a home energy audit is helping Seth Budick and his family save money on their energy bills, reduce their carbon footprint and make their home more comfortable. | Photo courtesy of Seth Budick. Learn how a home energy audit is helping Seth Budick and his family save money on their energy bills, reduce their carbon footprint and make their home more comfortable. | Photo courtesy of Seth Budick. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka

56

Affordable Comfort | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comfort Comfort Jump to: navigation, search Name Affordable Comfort Address 1187 Thorn Run Extension Place Moon Township, PA Zip 15108 Website http://www.affordablecomfort.o Coordinates 40.5134011°, -80.210059° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5134011,"lon":-80.210059,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Field Studies of Subjective Effects on Thermal Comfort in a University Classroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two field studies were conducted in a university classroom in the autumn of 2004 in Harbin. The objective of these studies was to assess the thermal conditions and the subjective effects on occupant thermal comfort. A field study was carried out when the undergraduate students were not taught the theory of thermal comfort. A second study was conducted after the undergraduate students knew something about thermal comfort. The thermal comfort variables were measured when the students were filling in the subjective questionnaires on thermal sensation and thermal comfort. A total of 167 sets of questionnaire responses were obtained. The indoor thermal environmental data for the two days are almost the same; however the thermal acceptability is different. The acceptability of the first study is 96.0%, which is higher than the acceptability of 91.5% according to the PPD. In contrast, the acceptability of the second study is 57.4%, which is very low compared with the acceptability of 95.0% according to the PPD. The students' thermal acceptability of the thermal environment before learning the theory of thermal comfort is higher than after learning about thermal comfort. These results confirm the existence of subjective effects on thermal comfort.

Wang, J.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Climate, comfort, & natural ventilation: a new adaptive comfort standard for ASHRAE standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidelines for Comfort”. ASHRAE Journal, vol 42, no. 8,Comfort in Office Buildings”, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 94,System in Office Buildings. ” ASHRAE Transactions, Vol 104 (

Brager, G. S.; de Dear, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

How to Get Comfortable with Dehumidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential consumers are educated to think about their comfort conditioning system as air conditioners and furnaces. Over the past several years the technology of products and controls has been changing. Homes have progressively gotten tighter, new construction and up grading. Equipment capabilities and performance have changed. The ability to control to more precise conditions and for more components of air treatment highlights the need to educate the consumer on the potential available today with adjunct components of the comfort conditioning system. Air conditioners are typically selected for one set of design conditions. In many situations the latent and sensible loads are not the consideration. only total load and first cost. The design conditions are exceeded only 2 1/2% of the time. Therefore, the equipment is typically oversized a majority of the time and not matched properly to the latent load. Air conditioners are, constrained by their physical performance of the components, such as the coils and compressor. As a result. the equipment can not track the wide variety of sensible and latent conditions. The increased use of "set-up" thermostat controls diminish the control of humidity. Air conditioner thermostats sense and respond only to the temperature condition, not to the humidity level. The use of a separate whole house dehumidification system can allow for separate control of the humidity and temperature. The humidity control level is independent of the cooling set point. As a result, the cooling set point can be raised (less air conditioner run time) and comfort enhanced or improved. Moisture removed is automatically expelled to the outdoors with a desiccant based system. The whole house can be treated rather than a spot area. Indoor air quality concerns. such as odors, mold and mildew, can be improved by the use of a desiccant based dehumidification unit.

Beever, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cold hands, warm hearth?: Climate, net takeback, household comfort  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Insulation reduces marginal heating costs and may lead to a takeback effect of higher wintertime thermostat settings, with a consequent dilution of energy savings. Alternatively, additional insulation could permit a lower thermostat setting by reducing drafts and radiation while increasing moisture retention, thereby enhancing comfort. This paper evaluates thermostat net takeback, the difference between takeback and enhanced comfort. Evidence supports the existence of both effects, with net takeback at the low end of literature estimates. Net thermostat takeback is on the order of 0.05{degrees}F, leading to an energy takeback that ranges from 1-3% of potential energy savings, depending on climate and house size. Other significant determinants of thermostat are heating energy price and the presence of elderly or young occupants. 19 refs., 4 tabs.

Schwarz, P.M. [North Carolina Univ., Charlotte, NC (United States); Taylor, T.N. [Duke Power Co., Charlotte, NC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Title Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in...

62

Thermal Comfort Study in a Naturally Ventilated Residential Building in a Tropical Hot-Humid Climate Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermal comfort study in a naturally ventilated residential building located in a tropical hot-humid climate region. The specific objective of this study is to investigate whether thermal comfort in this house can be achieved through a passive system only. The methods used in this study included conducting hourly monitoring of the temperature and relative humidity; measuring the air velocities; and assessing occupants' thermal sensations through questionnaires and interview. The data from the questionnaires were matched to the monitored data to assess the acceptable range of comfortable condition. Then using an hourly simulation program, some components of the building were also "modified" to investigate whether the building can be made "more comfortable". This study shows that it is possible to provide a thermally comfortable space in this region without using mechanical air-conditioning systems. The occupants' acceptable range of comfortable condition is different than that of people in the northern latitudes. The occupants sensed "neutrality" when the operative temperature in the house was about 27 degree Celsius (80°F). The occupants could also tolerate slightly warm conditions, that is up to 29 degree Celsius (84OF), and still never wanted to install any air-conditioning systems. The simulation showed that using light wall materials would result in cooler indoor temperature at night but warmer during the day. If all windows were opened (25% the total floor area) the house could be more comfortable at night but less comfortable during the day. Findings of this study are important for architects and engineers in designing comfortable living spaces in these regions.

Soebarto, V. I.; Handjarinto, S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Window performance for human thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gender, acclimation state, the opportunity to adjust clothing and physical disability on requirements for thermal comfort”. Energy

Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Performance assessment and improvement of an existing air conditioning system of a supermarket: a case study on bi-lo supermarket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bi-Lo Supermarket in this study is located in sub-tropical coastal area in Queensland, Australia. The main objective of air conditioning in any building or supermarket is to provide comfort to the occupants and patrons of the conditioned space, an objective ... Keywords: air conditioning systems, design principles, performance improvement, supermarket

M. Hansen; M. G. Rasul

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Occupancy-driven energy management for smart building automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings are among the largest consumers of electricity in the US. A significant portion of this energy use in buildings can be attributed to HVAC systems used to maintain comfort for occupants. In most cases these building HVAC systems run on fixed ... Keywords: HVAC control system, occupancy detection system, wireless sensor network

Yuvraj Agarwal; Bharathan Balaji; Rajesh Gupta; Jacob Lyles; Michael Wei; Thomas Weng

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Climate, comfort, & natural ventilation: a new adaptive comfort standard for ASHRAE standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE began funding a series of field studies of thermal comfort in office buildings in four different climate zones.

Brager, G. S.; de Dear, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Wireless sensor networks and human comfort index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional wireless home automation networks (WHANs) incorporate embedded wireless sensors and actuators that monitors and control home living environment. WHAN's primary goal is to maintain user comfort and efficient home management. Conventional ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Fuzzy logic, Human comfort, Wireless sensor network

Mohd Izani Rawi, Adnan Al-Anbuky

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Adaptive Comfort Model: Simulations & Future Directions Speaker(s): Richard de Dear Date: February 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The last 20 years of thermal comfort have witnessed a shift away from the "static" approach (exemplified by the PMV/PPD model) towards the adaptive approach (exemplified by the adaptive models in ASHRAE's Standard 55 (2004, 2010) and the European Union's counterpart standard, EN15251 (2007). - the basis and derivation of the adaptive comfort model - adaptive comfort standards (ASHRAE 55 and EN15251) - new developments and directions (reporting back from the January 2011 ASHRAE Meeting of SSPC-55 in Las Vegas) - environmental variables other than dry bulb, in the adaptive model

69

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor air temperature is in summer or the higher the indoor temperature is in winter, the more energy the air conditioning system will consume. For the sake of energy conservation, the indoor air should be set as high as possible in summer and as low as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV equation and extensive field investigation.

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Occupational Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injuries Injuries Jacqueline Agnew, PhD Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in U.S. * Study by Leigh et al., 1997 * Estimated incidence, mortality, direct & indirect costs- occupational injury & illness * 1992 data- primary and secondary sources o Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries o National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Study o Annual Survey of Occ. Injuries & Illnesses o Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Care Financing Administration, etc. Direct & Indirect Costs * Indirect * Lost earnings * Fringe benefits * Home production * Training, restaffing, disruption * Time delays Direct & Indirect Costs * Direct * Physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medication * Medical and indemnity insurance administration expenses

71

Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed facades. Many studies suggest that the energy needed to keep the interior conditions at required comfort levels in buildings depends on several factors such as physical and optical properties of building elements, indoor and outdoor climate and behaviour of the occupants, etc. Moreover depending on the different orientation of building facade, the impact of these parameters might vary. The buildings are usually designed without paying much attention to this fact. The needs of each building zone might differ greatly and in order to achieve better indoor environment, different actions might be needed to taken considering the individual characteristics of each zone. In the proposed research the possibilities of evaluating building energy and comfort performance simultaneously taking into account the impact of facade orientation with use of whole building energy simulation tools are investigated through a case study.

Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Homeowner's Guide to Window Air Conditioner Installation for Efficiency and Comfort (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet offers a step-by-step guide to proper installation of window air conditioning units, in order to improve efficiency and comfort for homeowners.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

DRAFT October 4, 2007 Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellphones). This considerably complicates the economic decisions on the cost of thermal comfort controls

74

Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Title Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-938e Year of Publication 2008 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Alan K. Meier Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, home networks & controls Abstract This report summarizes results of a literature review, a workshop, and many meetings with demand response and thermostat researchers and implementers. The information obtained from these resources was used to identify key issues of thermostat performance from both energy savings and peak demand perspectives. A research plan was developed to address these issues and activities have already begun to pursue the research agenda.

75

HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses HVAC Improvements for Existing Houses Speaker(s): Chryséis Bovagnet Date: September 5, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Many older houses in the US are either not well designed from a thermal point of view or have HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) systems in need of repairs or improvements. The building envelopes tend to have poor insulation and lots of leakage, and the HVAC systems are inefficient. The cooling/heating equipment is often located outside of the conditioned space (e.g. in attics or crawlspaces) with ducts that leak and have poor insulation, which cause energy loss and bad occupant comfort on peak days or in extreme climates. We developed a series of retrofits that will allow us to reduce the energy consumption of residential HVAC

76

A numerical approach to evaluating what percentage of a living space is well-ventilated, for the assessment of thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bioclimatic approach to designing comfortable buildings in hot and humid tropical regions requires, firstly, some preliminary, important work on the building envelope to limit the energy contributions, and secondly, an airflow optimization of the building. For the first step, tools such as nodal or zonal models have been largely implemented. For the second step, the assessment of air velocities, in three dimensions and in a large space, can only be performed through the use of detailed models such as with CFD. This paper deals with the improvement of thermal comfort by ventilating around the occupants. For this purpose, the average velocity coefficient definition is modified to be adapted to CFD and the areas involving movement or the living spaces. We propose a new approach based on the derivation of a new quantity: the well-ventilated percentage of a living space. The well-ventilated percentage of a space allows a time analysis of the aeraulic behaviour of the building in its environment. These percentages can be over a period such as one day, a season or a year. These kinds of results are helpful for an architect to configure the rooms of a house according to their uses, the environment, the architectural choices and the constraints related to the design of bioclimatic buildings.

Alain Bastide; Alfred Jean Philippe Lauret; François Garde; Harry Boyer

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

Window performance for human thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Heat Transfer through Windows”. ASHRAE Transactions 93,Performance of Vinyl-framed Windows”. Proc. 5 th Conf. Onet al. 2003b, "Operable Windows, Personal Control & Occupant

Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Air humidity requirements for human comfort  

SciTech Connect

Upper humidity limits for the comfort zone determined from two recently presented models for predicting discomfort due to skin humidity and insufficient respiratory cooling are proposed. The proposed limits are compared with the maximum permissible humidity level prescribed in existing standards for the thermal indoor environment. The skin humidity model predicts discomfort as a function of the relative humidity of the skin, which is determined by existing models for human heat and moisture transfer based on environmental parameters, clothing characteristics, and activity level. The respiratory model predicts discomfort as a function of the driving forces for heat loss from the respiratory tract, namely, the temperature and humidity of the surrounding air. An upper humidity limit based on a relative skin humidity of 0.54, corresponding to 20% dissatisfied, results in a maximum permissible humidity level near 100% RH. The requirements for respiratory comfort are much more stringent and result in lower permissible indoor air humidities. Compared with the upper humidity limit specified in existing thermal comfort standards, e.g., ASHRAE Addendum 55a, the humidity limit based on skin humidity was less restrictive and the humidity limit based on respiratory comfort was far more restrictive.

Toftum, J.; Fanger, P.O.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optimal Personal Comfort Management Using SPOT+  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present SPOT+, a system that allows office workers to optimally balance between heating energy consumption and personal thermal comfort. In prior work, we described SPOT: a smart personal thermal control system based on reactive control [8]. In contrast, ... Keywords: Energy management

Peter Xiang Gao, S. Keshav

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Effect of a heated and cooled office chair on thermal comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooled Office Chair on Thermal Comfort References Akimoto,task conditioning system on thermal comfort. Proceedings ofand H. Higuchi. 2011. Thermal comfort and perceived air

Pasut, Wilmer; Zhang, Hui; Kaam, Soazig; Arens, Edward; Zhai, Yongchao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enabling Energy-Efficient Approaches to Thermal Comfort Using Room Air Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air MotionEnergy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air Motion No-fan 2Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air Motion

Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Kaam, Soazig; Zhai, Yongchao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermal comfort and perceived air quality of a PEC system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. , Gong, N. 2007. Thermal performance of a personalizedRESULTS 1. Whole-body thermal sensation and comfort withthe PEC system Whole-body thermal sensation and comfort are

Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Thermal comfort and perceived air quality of a PEC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Akimoto, T. , Genma T. 2007. Thermal sensation and comfortW. , Gong, N. 2007. Thermal performance of a personalizedRESULTS 1. Whole-body thermal sensation and comfort with the

Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Warneke, Ashley; Bauman, Fred; Higuchi, Hiroshi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Atmospheric Apparatus : the production of another comfort paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, being thermal comfort is no longer a challenging problem for modern living. With the aids of the modern environmental control technologies, a fast, convenient and effective thermal comfort experience can be easily ...

Tang, Hung Fai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Occupant Evaluation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified Health Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, concern for natural resource depletion is growing. The healthcare industry is looking to improve healthcare environments by improving design and using better resources. The U.S. Green Building Council has created the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standard that gives suggestions on how to best use energy, water, land, materials and provide a comfortable indoor environment. Many health centers have used this standard to build new health facilities. It is important that the LEED standards benefit the environment as well as healthcare staff. This study presents four case studies of LEED health centers whose medical staff and administrators evaluate the perceivable green building features applied to their facility. All facilities were given the Occupant Evaluation of LEED Certified Health Centers Survey. The Patrick Dollard Discovery Health Center, the Richard J. Lacks Cancer Center, the Angel Harvey Infant Welfare of Chicago, and the Pearland Pediatric centers received overall satisfactory scores from the occupants. Within the case studies variations in satisfaction occurred where LEED points were not received. There is no evidence that perceivable features used in the design and construction of LEED certified health centers decrease occupant satisfaction.

Hill, Anorea M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radiant barriers in houses: Energy, comfort, and moisture considerations in a northern climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the conditions under which radiant barrier utilization in attics is appropriate technology in building construction for a northern climate in Utah. A sample of 12 appropriate houses with radiant barriers were selected using predetermined criteria. Another 12 houses without radiant barriers were selected as a control sample and paired with the first 12 houses using predetermined criteria. The research involved three different types of data and analyses. First, a questionnaire survey was completed by the occupants of the 12 sample houses, with radiant barriers. The survey included such factors as: (1) comfort, (2) energy, and (3) potential increased moisture content as perceived by the occupants. Second, a t-test was used to calculate the statistical comparison of utility usage between the 12 sample houses with radiant barriers and the 12 control houses without radiant barriers. Third, the moisture content of the wood framing above and below the radiant barriers was measured over a three month period during the winter months. Data analysis indicated: (1) occupants did perceive that more comfort resulted from the installation of radiant barriers, (2) occupants did not observe additional moisture artifacts after the installation of radiant barriers, (3) occupants did perceive cost savings from utility benefits resulting from the use of radiant barriers, especially in cooling the houses in summer, (4) there was no significant difference between utility usage of houses with radiant barriers and houses without radiant barriers, (5) the moisture content in the ceiling joists of all 24 houses, except one, had a moisture content measurement less than eight percent, and (6) houses with radiant barriers have higher humidity levels within the living space than houses without radiant barrier installation.

Mendenhall, R.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part III: whole-body sensation and comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnitude estimates of thermal discomfort during transientsJ, Rohles FH, Nevins RG. Thermal comfort (thermally neutral)1.3.1 - [10] Fanger PO. Thermal comfort. NY: McGraw-Hill;

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Contact Singing River Electric Power Association Provider Singing River Electric Power Association Singing River Electric Power Association provides rebates on energy efficiency measures in new homes and heat pumps that meet [http://www.comfortadvantage.com/Comfort%20Advantage%20brochure.pdf Comfort Advantage] weatherization standards. To qualify for this rebate the home

89

Homeowner's Guide to Window Air Conditioner Installation for Efficiency and Comfort (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet offers a step-by-step guide to proper installation of window air conditioning units, in order to improve efficiency and comfort for homeowners.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Thermal Comfort Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort Model Comfort Model Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Working with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, our team at NREL developed an empirical model of people's temperature sensation (hot/cold) as well as perceptions (comfortable/uncomfortable) in a transient non-homogeneous environment. The model predicts sensation and comfort locally (at specific points on the body) as well as globally (overall). The university performed more than 100 tests on human test subjects in a controlled environmental chamber under a range of steady state and transient thermal conditions. Participants subjectively recorded their thermal comfort on a simple form. Core and local skin temperature data was

91

Evaluation of Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort From High Sidewall Supply Air Jets  

SciTech Connect

Uniform mixing of conditioned air with room air is an essential factor for providing comfort in homes. The higher the supply flow rates the easier to reach good mixing in the space. In high performance homes, however, the flow rates required to meet the small remaining thermal loads are not large enough to maintain uniform mixing in the space. The objective of this study is to resolve this issue and maintain uniform temperatures within future homes. We used computational fluid dynamics modeling to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply for residential applications in heating and cooling modes. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions, and room dimensions. Laboratory experiments supported the study of thermal mixing in heating mode; we used the results to develop a correlation to predict high sidewall diffuser performance. For cooling mode, numerical analysis is presented. The results provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to maintain proper room mixing for heating and cooling of high performance homes. It is proven that these systems can achieve good mixing and provide acceptable comfort levels. Recommendations are given on the operating conditions to guarantee occupant comfort.

Ridouane, E. H.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comfort and HVAC Performance for a New Construction Occupied Test House in Roseville, California  

SciTech Connect

K. Hovnanian(R) Homes(R) constructed a 2,253-ft2 single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

Burdick, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: LESO-COMFORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LESO-COMFORT LESO-COMFORT Evaluation of thermal comfort during a selected period (e.g. during the hottest part of summer), using a classical dynamic simulation computer code connected to the LESO-COMFORT code itself. The program uses the data already defined for LESOSAI, and only a very few additional data have to be introduced by the user. Keywords thermal comfort, load calculation, energy Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Average level of PC computer practice; understanding of basic solar radiation concepts. Users Introduced in September 1999. Audience Architects, engineers, researchers. Input The LESO-COMFORT software is basically an intelligent and user-friendly interface to a conventional dynamic building simulation program. The user does not have to describe the building to be studied from scratch. Instead,

94

New Jersey Comfort Partners Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Jersey Comfort Partners Program New Jersey Comfort Partners Program New Jersey Comfort Partners Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source New Jersey Societal Benefits Charge (public benefits fund) State New Jersey Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Direct installation, no cost to recipient The New Jersey Comfort Partners program is a free of charge, direct installation energy efficiency assistance program available to most New Jersey households with significant energy usage and an income at or below

95

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal, May, Arens, E. ,17-22, Copenhagen. . ASHRAE Standard 55- 2010. ThermalSensations of Sedentary Man, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 80 (

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Contests and Scoring - Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

open. Tuskegee University incorporated a time-proven cooling strategy - a southern "dog trot" - to maximize natural ventilation. Solar Decathlon 2005 Comfort Zone (100 Points)...

98

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web based enterprise energy and building automation systems.from an Analysis of Building Energy Information SystemG. , & Price, P. 2009b. Building Energy Information Systems:

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy saving and improved comfort by increased air movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change. Full report, Working Group III of the IPCC, ASHRAE,ASHRAE Standard 55, Thermal environmental conditions forMovement. Evaluation of ASHRAE’s Draft (RP-843), in: HVAC&R

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lacked the degree of sub metering necessary to disaggregatelevel and type of sub-metering, and expertise of userspractices. Figure A.5 – Sub metering allows data to be

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature to boiler gas usage plotted in weekly averagesFigure A.7 above, the gas usage to heat the building goes up

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Optimizing HVAC Control to Improve Building Comfort and Energy Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the benefits of optimal control in well-designed and operated buildings using a case study. The case study building was built in 2001. The HVAC and control systems have been installed with state-of-the-art equipment which include a terminal box temperature integrated minimum airflow reset. The building has been used and operated based on the design intents. This paper presents both the existing and the optimal control schedules, which include the VAV box operation schedule, AHUs optimal control, chiller and chilled water pump control, and boiler and hot water pump control. The measured hourly HVAC electricity consumption shows that annual savings of up to 40% can be achieved with an optimal control schedule.

Song, L.; Joo, I.; Dong, D.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Quiroz, L.; Swiatek, A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building Energy Use Speaker(s): Hung-Wen (Richard) Lin Date: January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Tianzhen Hong Measured energy use of buildings demonstrates large discrepancies even between buildings with the same function and located in similar climates. Among various factors contributing to the discrepancies, occupant behavior is found to be a key factor. How occupants set the comfort criteria, interact with building components and systems, and respond to environmental discomfort directly affects the operation of buildings and thus their energy use. On the other hand, it is also important to find out what sort of design methods can reduce building consumption in new and existing

104

Occupancy sensors for HVAC gaining in hotel industry  

SciTech Connect

The hotel industry is overcoming its skepticism as occupancy sensors with built-in thermistors to control heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units demonstrate their ability to cut energy costs as much as 30%. Despite the successful demonstrations and acceptance by Holiday Inn, some hotel managers of other chains continue to resist. Occupancy sensors have either ultrasonic or infrared signals, but differ from lighting control devices by also having internal thermistors and remote door switches. This allows the rooms to reach comfort levels only when the guest is present since occupants are only minimally affected if temperatures are modified during unoccupied periods. The system works best for roadside-type motels rather than convention hotels, where occupants are in and out of their rooms.

Ladd, C.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part II: local comfort of individual body parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3943. [20] Hensel H, Thermal sensation and thermoreceptors1982. [21] Attia M. Thermal pleasantness and temperatureCabanac M. The perception of thermal comfort. International

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Direct Hire Occupations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Critical Shortage Occupational Coverage: ... General Engineer; 0803 – Safety Engineer; 0804 ... Mechanical Engineer; 0840 – Nuclear Engineer; 0850 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of a PMV-based thermal comfort modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concentrates on the modelling development for a PMV-based thermal comfort system. Operators can define their own expression towards the surroundings by inserting the respective value of PMV and the system will generate the compressor and fan ... Keywords: climatic modelling, predicted mean vote (PMV), thermal comfort

Shazmin Aniza Abdul Shukor; Karl Kohlhof; Zul Azhar Zahid Jamal

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Occupational Medicine - Occupational Medicine Guiding Principles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the President's Fiscal Year 2011 Budget and Performance Plans" (June 11, 2009) DOE Human Capital Strategic Plan For additional information regarding the Occupational...

109

High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize cooling loads and occupant thermal and visualcan reduce cooling loads and improve thermal comfort but arecan reduce cooling loads and improve thermal comfort but are

Lee, Eleanor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enabling Energy-Efficient Approaches to Thermal Comfort Using Room Air Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Airuc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Airuc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air

Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Kaam, Soazig; Zhai, Yongchao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Field Study Of A Radiant Heating System For Sleep Thermal Comfort And Potential Energy Saving.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As sleep is unconscious, the traditional definition of thermal comfort with conscious judgment does not apply. In this thesis sleep thermal comfort is defined as… (more)

Wang, Christopher L. K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Field experiments on occupant comfort and office thermal environments in a hot-humid climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis, and Cris Bentonof CEDR for advice in relation toMPRL and Nora Watanabe at CEDR thanked for their assistance

de Dear, Richard; Fountain, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Improving energy efficiency in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment : analysis of EUI and cooling load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing energy consumption without compromising the quality of products and the comfort of occupants is important in maintaining the competence of a pharmaceutical company. An energy management tool is developed to monitor ...

Liu, Haoyu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort Zone Comfort Zone Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the Comfort Zone archive, sorted by date. New Contest Data Displays Provide Insight into Competition Scoring Saturday, October 5, 2013 By Solar Decathlon New contest data displays are now available on the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon website. If you are interested in the real-time performance of each house and want to keep a close eye on the competition, check out the Contests section pages. In the Contests section, the pages for the measured contests (Comfort Zone, Hot Water, Appliances, Home Entertainment, and Energy Balance) explain the contest requirements and provide real-time graphical displays of the accumulated measurements/scores for each team. Roll your cursor over the graphics to see more detailed information about each contest. For example,

115

NREL: News Feature - Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort October 30, 2009 Walking into a building constructed before the days of heating systems and air conditioning, such as a southwestern adobe, still elicits a sense of comfort and coziness. The concept of using thermal mass in walls to help maintain the temperature of a building is not new. And now, this tried and true method is being used to regulate comfort systems of NREL's Research Support Facilities (RSF), one of the most energy efficient buildings in the world. "In this case, the exterior skin of the building is doing more than just keeping the weather out," Philip Macey, project manager for RNL, the design firm for the RSF, said. "Precast panels installed as the walls are actually part of the heating and cooling system for the building.

116

Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the ASHRAE 55-1992 and ISO 7730 Standards are used all over the world, many researchers have pointed out that it is impossible to maintain a uniform thermal comfort standard worldwide because of differing climate conditions. Two field thermal comfort investigations were carried out in Shanghai and Changsha. In the hot season the neutral temperature in Changsha and Shanghai is 27.5? ET* and 26.5? ET*, respectively. Compared with other cities' studies, in Beijing and Tianjin, this paper discusses thermal comfort conditions in China. The results show that thermal neutral temperature in these Chinese cities is higher than that in the ASHRAE standard. Therefore, thermal comfort temperature in China cannot directly correlate with the ASHRAE standard. This difference should be considered when designing air conditioning designing to save energy.

Ye, X.; Zhou, Z.; Lian, Z.; Wen, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Jiang, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

LBNL-4417E Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-4417E Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images K. Konis, E.S. Lee, R.D....

118

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings Speaker(s): Danni Wang Date: July 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 One of the fundamental objectives of an...

119

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris The results from a large field study of thermal comfort in European office buildings are reported. Measurements of physical environmental conditions and occupant perceptions were collected over sixteen months from twenty-six different office buildings located in France, Greece, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. The work attempts to show relationships and produce useful information from the data set using graphical methods, especially lowess, a locally weighted regression based scatter plot smoothing technique. The

120

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images Title Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-4417E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Konis, Kyle, Eleanor S. Lee, and Robert D. Clear Call Number LBNL-4417E Abstract The objective of this study was to explore how calibrated high dynamic range (HDR) images (luminance maps) acquired in real world daylit environments can be used to characterize, evaluate, and compare visual comfort conditions of innovative facade shading and light-redirecting systems. Detailed (1536 x 1536 pixel) luminance maps were time-lapse acquired from two view positions in an unoccupied full scale testbed facility. These maps were analyzed using existing visual comfort metrics to quantify how innovative interior and exterior shading systems compare to conventional systems under real sun and sky conditions over a solstice-to-solstice test interval. The results provide a case study in the challenges and potential of methods of visualizing, evaluating and summarizing daily and seasonal variation of visual comfort conditions computed from large sets of image data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part II: local comfort of individual body parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to local heating and cooling [18,19], thermal sensation andbody heating and cooling. Journal of Thermal Biology 2004;b. pelvis cooling or heating c. thermal comfort scale Figure

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

123

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

124

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is becoming increasingly clear, the human species evolvedin the East African savannah. Details of the precise evolutionary chainremain unresolved however it appears that the process lasted severalmillion years, culminating with the emergence of modern Homo sapiensroughly 200,000 years ago. Following that final evolutionary developmentmodern Homo sapiens relatively quickly populated the entire world.Clearly modern Homo sapiens is a successful, resourceful and adaptablespecies. In the developed societies, modern humans live an existence farremoved from our evolutionary ancestors. As we have learned over the lastcentury, this "new" lifestyle can often result in unintendedconsequences. Clearly, our modern access to food, shelter, transportationand healthcare has resulted in greatly expanded expected lifespan butthis new lifestyle can also result in the emergence of different kinds ofdiseases and health problems. The environment in modern buildings haslittle resemblance to the environment of the savannah. We strive tocreate environments with little temperature, air movement and lightvariation. Building occupants often express great dissatisfaction withthese modern created environments and a significant fraction even developsomething akin to allergies to specific buildings (sick buildingsyndrome). Are the indoor environments we are creating fundamentallyunhealthy -- when examined from an evolutionary perspective?

Stoops, John L.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Multi Agent System to Optimize Comfort and Energy Flows in the Built Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the control of building energy comfort management systems led by the economic movement within the energy market resulting in different prices. This new generation of building management systems focuses on the application of multi-agent systems for autonomous flexible operation of building services systems to obtain overall improvement energy efficiency and comfort. Multi-agent systems have proven to be successful in many applications to detach the timely interdependencies between systems and applications and come to a decentralize approach. In this study a multi-agent system (MAS) is developed to control and manage building services systems. A case study on an existing building system pointed out that energy consumption is reduced of a central air conditioning unit and local heating and cooling units with help of the proposed market driven multi-agent system, while maintaining comfort within the bands of user preferences. Furthermore it can be concluded that the system adapts to the dynamic changing situation and amount of momentary available resources.

Pennings, L. W.; Houten, M. A.; Boxem, G.; Zeiler, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

127

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor environment: How to validate comfort and energy reduction Speaker(s): Wouter Borsboom Date: December 8, 2009...

128

Innovative Office Buildings for Improved Energy Efficiency and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Office Buildings for Improved Energy Efficiency and User Comfort: Lessons from Germany Speaker(s): Oliver Baumann Robert Himmler Stefan Plesser Date: October 20, 2005 -...

129

Coast Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coast Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program Coast Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program Coast Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 300 - 500, varies by home efficiency 150 per additional qual$300 - $500, varies by home efficiency Geothermal Heat Pumps: $400 - $500 Additional Heat Pump Units (When Required): $150ified heat pump system Provider Coast Electric Power Association Coast Electric Power Association (CEPA) provides rebates on heat pumps to new homes which meet certain weatherization standards. To qualify for this rebate the home must have: * Attic insulation of at least R-38 or encapsulated foam attic insulation

130

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Comfort Zone' 'Comfort Zone' New Contest Data Displays Provide Insight into Competition Scoring Saturday, October 5, 2013 By Solar Decathlon New contest data displays are now available on the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon website. If you are interested in the real-time performance of each house and want to keep a close eye on the competition, check out the Contests section pages. In the Contests section, the pages for the measured contests (Comfort Zone, Hot Water, Appliances, Home Entertainment, and Energy Balance) explain the contest requirements and provide real-time graphical displays of the accumulated measurements/scores for each team. Roll your cursor over the graphics to see more detailed information about each contest. For example, in the Appliances Contest graphic, the scores for running the refrigerator,

131

Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades Living Comfortably: A Consumer's Guide to Home Energy Upgrades March 7, 2013 - 3:15pm Addthis A weatherization worker drills holes to blow cellulose insulation in the interior walls of this home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL A weatherization worker drills holes to blow cellulose insulation in the interior walls of this home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL Dr. Richard Knaub Project Leader in Weatherization & Workforce Development at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Energy audit tools An infrared camera can display temperature differences between surfaces and help determine if a wall is insulated. It can show drafts and moisture, which can lead to mold problems.

132

Design Tools for Evaluating Alternative Strategies' Impact on Human Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many designers recognize that energy savings can be achieved with alternative or innovative strategies; however, few design tools have been available to assist designers with evaluating alternatives. This paper demonstrates the use of a standard psychrometric chart enhanced with an expanded comfort zone plot based on multiple energy conservation strategies. Average local weather conditions can be plotted by month on the psychrometric chart to indicate which design alternatives have the greatest potential benefits. By utilizing a familiar engineering design tool to communicate integrated design techniques, better coordination can be achieved between architects and engineers. Victor Olgyay pioneered similar work at Notre Dame in the 1950's; however, his unusual graphical presentation has hindered widespread understanding and use of the fundamentals of expanded comfort zones. This paper outlines the basic concept of the expanded comfort zone with applications for use of mean radiant temperatures, direct radiation. air movement and evaporative cooling with examples shown for Dallas and Houston climates.

Holder, L. M. III; Hart, M. N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Comfort, cleanliness and convenience: The creeping transformation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort, cleanliness and convenience: The creeping transformation of Comfort, cleanliness and convenience: The creeping transformation of normality and what it means for energy consumption and the environment Speaker(s): Elizabeth Shove Date: April 24, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare In Western societies the sense of changing practice is both pervasive and elusive. Over just one or two generations, expectations have shifted radically: though some people in Britain still wake to patterns of frost on the inside of the window, many more have come to take the comforts of central heating and even air-conditioning for granted. To give a second quite specific example, again from Britain, the once-a-week bath is giving way to patterns of daily showering, a form predominantly valued for its

134

Dew Point Evaporative Comfort Cooling: Report and Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to demonstrate the capabilities of the high-performance multi-staged IEC technology and its ability to enhance energy efficiency and interior comfort in dry climates, while substantially reducing electric-peak demand. The project was designed to test 24 cooling units in five commercial building types at Fort Carson Army Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Dean, J.; Herrmann, L.; Kozubal, E.; Geiger, J.; Eastment, M.; Slayzak, S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Visualization framework of thermal comfort for architects (WIP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a successful integration of building energy simulation tools into the architectural workflow there is a need for better communication of the information obtained through simulation. One appropriate way of communicating that information to the technically ... Keywords: architecture, building energy simulation, information visualization, thermal comfort, visualization

Pascal Goffin; Arno Schlueter

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Comfort Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Field tests were conducted in two homes in Austin, TX to evaluate the comfort performance of ductless mini-split heat pumps (DMSHPs), measuring temperature and relative humidity measurements in four rooms in each home before and after retrofitting a central HVAC system with DMSHPs.

Roth, K.; Sehgal, N.; Akers, C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Understanding Adaptive Thermal Comfort: New Directions for Ubicomp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this domain. Author Keywords Sustainability; Thermal comfort; Heating; Cooling ACM Classification Keywords H.5, such as air conditioning or central heating [21, 23]. There has been a global trend of convergence and tighter on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting

Hazas, Mike

138

Affordable comfort 95 - investing in our energy future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the topics from the conference on Affordable Comfort, held March 26-31, 1995. Topics are concerned with energy efficiency in homes, retrofitting, weatherization, and monitoring of appliances, heating, and air conditioning systems for performance, as well as topics on electric utilities.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Understanding adaptive thermal comfort: new directions for UbiComp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many parts of the world, mechanical heating and cooling is used to regulate indoor climates, with the aim of maintaining a uniform temperature. Achieving this is energy-intensive, since large indoor spaces must be constantly heated or cooled, and ... Keywords: cooling, heating, sustainability, thermal comfort

Adrian K. Clear, Janine Morley, Mike Hazas, Adrian Friday, Oliver Bates

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Optimum utilization of site energy sources for all-season thermal comfort in new residential construction for single-family attached (rowhouse/townhouse) designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proposed design analysis is presented of a passive solar energy efficient system for a typical three-level, three bedroom, two story, garage-under townhouse. The design incorporates the best, most performance-proven and cost effective products, materials, processes, technologies, and sub-systems which are available today. Seven distinct categories recognized for analysis are identified as: the exterior environment; the interior environment; conservation of energy; natural energy utilization; auxiliary energy utilization; control and distribution systems; and occupant adaptation. Preliminary design features, fenestration sysems, the plenum-supply system, the thermal-storage party-fire walls, direct gain storage, the radiant comfort system, and direct passive cooling systems are briefly described. Features of the design under analysis and on which conclusions have not yet been formulated are: the energy reclamation system, auxiliary energy back-up systems, the distribution system and operating modes, the control systems, and non-comfort energy systems and inputs. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Web application for thermal comfort visualization and calculation according to ASHRAE Standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uc/item/4db4q37h Web app. for thermal comfort visualizationWeb application for thermal comfort visualization andtool based on an open web-based weather data visualization

Schiavon, Stefano; Hoyt, Tyler; Piccioli, Alberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Web application for thermal comfort visualization and calculation according to ASHRAE Standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

item/4db4q37h Web app. for thermal comfort visualization andWeb application for thermal comfort visualization andenvironment including thermal, indoor air quality, light and

Schiavon, Stefano; Hoyt, Tyler; Piccioli, Alberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comfort standards and variation in exceedance for mixed-mode buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE 55 adaptive comfort model and the PPD model across all 16 climate zonesASHRAE 55 adaptive comfort model versus PPD for the mixed- mode case with baseline gains in every climate zone

Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sun, wind, and pedestrian comfort: a study of Toronto's Central Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ST10,1978, pp. 1585-1593. Sun, Wind and Comfort Appendixshadow for both spaces. Sun, Wind and Comfort Discretionaryfor the obvious reason that the sun does not shine from the

Bosselmann, P.; Arens, Edward A; Dunker, K.; Wright, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Sun, Wind, and Comfort A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks in Four Downtown Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plan as o f Bibliography Sun, Wind, and Comfort Arens,Flores, and Terence O'Hare, Sun and Light for Downtown SanSUN, WIND, AND COMFORT A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

147

Image Processing Occupancy Sensor  

Lighting controls offer significant potential for reducing that energy use, and new technologies that have emerged in recent years have enabled a wide range of innovative strategies, from room-level awareness of occupancy and daylight sensing to ...

148

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

149

Energy and visual comfort performance of electrochromic windowswith overhangs  

SciTech Connect

DOE-2 building energy simulations were conducted to determine if there were practical architectural and control strategy solutions that would enable electrochromic (EC) windows to significantly improve visual comfort without eroding energy-efficiency benefits. EC windows were combined with overhangs since opaque overhangs provide protection from direct sun which EC windows are unable to do alone. The window wall was divided into an upper and lower aperture so that various combinations of overhang position and control strategies could be considered. The overhang was positioned either at the top of the upper window aperture or between the upper and lower apertures. Overhang depth was varied. EC control strategies were fully bleached at all times, modulated based on incident vertical solar radiation limits, or modulated to meet the design work plane illuminance with daylight. The EC performance was compared to a state-of-the-art spectrally selective low-e window with the same divided window wall, window size, and overhang as the EC configuration. The reference window was also combined with an interior shade which was manually deployed to control glare and direct sun. Both systems had the same daylighting control system to dim the electric lighting. Results were given for south-facing private offices in a typical commercial building. In hot and cold climates such as Houston and Chicago, EC windows with overhangs can significantly reduce the average annual daylight glare index (DGI) and deliver significant annual energy use savings if the window area is large. Total primary annual energy use was increased by 2-5% for moderate-area windows in either climate but decreased by 10% in Chicago and 5% in Houston for large-area windows. Peak electric demand can be reduced by 7-8% for moderate-area windows and by 14-16% for large-area windows in either climate. Energy and peak demand reductions can be significantly greater if the reference case does not have exterior shading or state-of-the-art glass.

Lee, E.S.; Tavil, A.

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gender, acclimation state, the opportunity to adjust clothing and physical disability on requirements for thermal comfort. Energy

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings: revisions to ASHRAE Standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE began funding a series of field studies of thermal comfort in office buildings spread across four different climate zones.

de Dear, Richard; Brager, Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simple procedure for assessing thermal comfort in passive solar heated buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fanger thermal comfort equation is linearized and used to develop a procedure for assessing thermal comfort levels in passive solar heated buildings. In order to relate comfort levels in nonuniform environments to uniform conditions, a new thermal index called the equivalent uniform temperature is introduced.

Wray, W.O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

154

Tackling the Improved Control of Mixed-Mode Buildings: A Research Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tackling the Improved Control of Mixed-Mode Buildings: A Research Update Tackling the Improved Control of Mixed-Mode Buildings: A Research Update Speaker(s): Peter May-Ostendorp Date: March 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk (This presentation by Peter May-Ostendorp will begin with an introduction to building energy research at UC Boulder, by Prof. Gregor Henze.) Mixed-mode (MM) cooling is a promising building design strategy for low-energy cooling that incorporates natural ventilation alongside other forms of space conditioning. A properly designed system will intelligently switch between modes of cooling to maximize energy savings, while preserving occupant comfort. The near-optimal operation of MM buildings is explored through a model-predictive control (MPC) study using a purpose-built optimization environment coupled to EnergyPlus. Preliminary

155

Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways Personal Comfort Systems: Cooling/Heating Local Body Parts Efficient Ways to Provide Comfort Indoors Speaker(s): Hui Zhang Date: October 9, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Rongxin Yin This presentation describes energy efficient approaches to provide comfort in offices by creating non-uniform and transient thermal environments. The presentation will describe 1) distributions and characteristics of thermoreceptors of human body, 2) comfort responses of people exposed to complex thermal environments, 3) concept of "alliesthesia", 4) personal comfort systems developed by CBE, 5) their energy efficiency and demand response potential, and 6) the CBE advanced thermal comfort model. A recording of this seminar is available at: https://vimeo.com/51536661

156

Vehicle/guideway interaction and ride comfort in maglev systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The importance of vehicle/guideway dynamics in maglev systems is discussed. The particular interest associated with modeling vehicle guide-way interactions and explaining response characteristics of maglev systems for a multicar, multiload vehicle traversing on a single- or double-span flexible guideway are considered, with an emphasis on vehicle/guideway coupling effects, comparison of concentrated and distributed loads, and ride comfort. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions over a wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters are investigated, and appropriate critical vehicle speeds or crossing frequencies are identified.

Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

158

Human comfort and auxiliary control considerations in passive solar structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy consumption and human comfort implications of various passive solar and energy conservation strategies are investigated for single-family, one-story, slab-on-grade residences in Albuquerque, NM and Washington, DC. The building energy analysis computer program BLAST is used to perform annual dynamic heating and cooling load calculations for a building in which the glazing area, glazing location, and thermal mass are varied systematically. The impacts on building performance of forced-flow ventilative cooling and nighttime and weekday thermostat setpoint adjustments are investigated. The results indicate that the annual heating and cooling loads are highly sensitive to glazing area, glazing location, and thermostatic controls. Annual cooling loads are substantially reduced by increased thermal mass in the walls. In contrast, annual heating loads are fairly insensitive to increased thermal mass in the walls, unless very large areas of south glazing are involved. BLAST calculates the air temperatures (T/sub a/) and mean radiant temperatures (T/sub mr/) in each zone for every hour of the year; a weighted average of T/sub a/ and T/sub mr/ is used to evaluate comfort conditions under various circumstances.

Place, W.; Kammerud, R.; Andersson, B.; Curtis, B.; Carroll, W.; Christensen, C.; Hannifan, M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microsoft PowerPoint - FTCP Presentation-Occupational Competency Models_September 18, 2012.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Models Models A R h GAO R NNSA M d i i A Response to the GAO Report to NNSA - Modernizing the Nuclear Security Enterprise Eric Coleman Acting Director, g , Learning & Workforce Development L&D Innovation, Technology & Performance Improvement GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings  NNSA workforce ◦ 34,000 M&O contractor employees ◦ 2,400 federal employees , p y GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings * * NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce o Workers possess skills not readily available in the job

160

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windsor Conference - Air Conditioning and the Low CarbonA. , Thomas, PC (2010). Air conditioning, comfort and energyAmerica's Romance with Air- Conditioning. Washington, D.C.

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Observations of upper-extremity skin temperature and corresponding overall-body thermal sensations and comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

body heating and cooling, Journal of Thermal Biology 2004;after local cooling was supplied, overall thermal comfortstate, thermal sensation, and comfort in the cooling region.

Wang, Danni; Zhang, H. Ph.D; Arens, Edward A; Huizenga, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PureComfort 240 Combined Cooling,Heating,and Power Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second interim case study of a PureComfort 240 combined cooling, heating and power project at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A thermal comfort levels investigation of a naturally ventilated and air-conditioned office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate thermal comfort levels of a naturally ventilated and air-conditioner office. Field experiments conducted in an office room in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) used survey questionnaires and physical measurements. ... Keywords: PMV, mechanically ventilation, naturally ventilated, neutral temperature, objective study, subjective approach, thermal comfort

R. Daghigh; N. M. Adam; K. Sopian; A. Zaharim; B. B. Sahari

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the electrical panel for run times commensurate with identified use profiles. The profiles enabled sought Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly insulating windows demonstration. The bases for occupancy simulation were data and analysis developed

166

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

168

Evaluating post-occupancy performance : Daylighting The New York Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating post-occupancy performance Evaluating post-occupancy performance Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Evaluating post-occupancy performance "We aggressively pursued innovative designs to improve the quality of the workplace for our employees and to reduce energy use and other operating costs of our facility. The outcomes of this study confirm that we were successful. More importantly, our hope is that the energy efficient measures and designs documented in this independent study may inspire other companies' workplace designs." - Angelo Salvatore, Executive Director of Building Operations, The Times Company.

169

A possible connection between thermal comfort and health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a well-established fact that cardiovascular health requires periodic exercise during which the human body often experiences significant physical discomfort. It is not obvious to the exerciser that the short-term pain and discomfort has a long-term positive health impact. Many cultures have well-established practices that involve exposing the body to periodic thermal discomfort. Scandinavian saunas and American Indian sweat lodges are two examples. Both are believed to promote health and well-being. Vacations often intentionally include significant thermal discomfort as part of the experience (e.g., sunbathing, and downhill skiing). So people often intentionally make themselves thermally uncomfortable yet the entire foundation of providing the thermal environment in our buildings is done to minimize the percentage of people thermally dissatisfied. We must provide an environment that does not negatively impact short-term health and we need to consider productivity but are our current thermal comfort standards too narrowly defined and do these standards actually contribute to longer-term negative health impacts? This paper examines the possibility that the human body thermoregulatory system has a corollary relationship to the cardiovascular system. It explores the possibility that we have an inherent need to exercise our thermoregulatory system. Potential, physiological, sociological and energy ramifications of these possibilities are discussed.

Stoops, John L.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

171

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

172

Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupant Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the...

173

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

174

TEE-0065 - In the Matter of National Comfort Products | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEE-0065 - In the Matter of National Comfort Products TEE-0065 - In the Matter of National Comfort Products TEE-0065 - In the Matter of National Comfort Products This Decision and Order considers an Application for Exception filed by National Comfort Products (NCP). In its Application, NCP seeks exception relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps. 1 In its Application, NCP asserts that the firm would suffer serious hardship, inequity, or unfair distribution of burdens if required to comply with the mandatory energy efficiency standard that applies to space constrained heat pumps manufactured after January 23, 2010. 2 10 C.F.R. § 430.32(c)(2). If NCP's Application for Exception was granted, the firm would receive exception relief from the energy efficiency standard for one

175

How Do You Stay Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather? Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather? How Do You Stay Cool and Comfortable in Hot Weather? May 28, 2009 - 5:25pm Addthis As you may have read on the blog over the past few weeks, the Stay Cool, Save Money site offers no-cost and low-cost tips for saving energy during the warm summer months, as well as ideas for long-term investments to help you save year round. Whether you rely on an air conditioner, strategically opened windows (and closed shades), fans, regular dips in the pool, or some other strategy entirely, tell us: How do you stay cool and comfortable in hot weather? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a topic related to energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments.

176

A Historical Look at the Invention of Air-conditioned Comfort...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney Comfort air conditioning is largely an American development which grew out of the need for the...

177

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worloccupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

179

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating system given by ACCA R-J for different climate zonesClimate Zone Capacity, kW (kBtu/h ) Climate Zone Capacity, kW ( kBtu/h )

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Does Targeted Education of Emergency Physicians Improve Their Comfort Level in Treating Psychiatric Patients?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no . 6 : December 2012 Western Journal of Emergency Medicinethe Veterans Affairs Emergency Physicians website. AvailablePsychiatric Association. Emergency departments healthcare

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improving vehicle aeroacoustics using machine learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach to improving the overall aeroacoustic comfort of a vehicle, an important feature of vehicle design. The traditional improvement process is extended to benefit extensively from machine learning, information retrieval ... Keywords: Aeroacoustics, Automobile industry, Machine learning, Noise frequency spectrum analysis, Process automation

Damjan Kunar; Martin Moina; Marina Giordanino; Ivan Bratko

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

184

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weather, Clothing and Thermal Adaptation to Indoor Climate,of Determining Acceptable Thermal Conditions, Building andan Adaptive Model of Thermal Comfort and Preference, Final

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Literature Review of Airflow Fluid Characteristics and their Impact on Human Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airflow dynamics significantly impact indoor thermal environment and human thermal comfort. Studies on the effects of airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort mainly focus on the effects of turbulence intensity and fluctuation frequency. The fluctuant characteristics of natural wind and mechanical wind are obviously different. However, the fluctuant characteristics of mechanical wind can shift to those of natural wind in some conditions. With the development of turbulence statistical theory, chaos and fractal theory, researchers began to use these theories to describe the structural characteristics of the fluctuating airflow in different environments or by different generating sources. The results of studies on airflow fluctuation and thermal environment are reviewed in this paper from two aspects: 1) the effect of the airflow fluctuations on thermal comfort, and 2) the physical structure of airflow fluctuations. This paper first reviews these achievements, and then summarizes studies conducted at Tsinghua University.

Zhao, R.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, N.; Di, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms  

SciTech Connect

Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly used by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. We designed and constructed four energy-efficient RCs for this study to demonstrate technologies with the potential to simultaneously improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two RCs (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each had two HVAC systems, operated on alternate weeks, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The IDEC system provides continuous outside air ventilation at {sup 3}15 CFM (7.5 L s-1) person-1, efficient particle filtration while using significantly less energy for cooling. School year long measurements included: carbon dioxide (CO2), particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. IEQ monitoring results indicate that important ventilation-relevant indoor CO2 and health-relevant VOC concentration reductions were achieved while average cooling and heating energy costs were simultaneously reduced by 50 percent and 30 percent, respectively.

Apte, Michael G.; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Hotchi, Toshi; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Lee, Seung-Min; Liff, Shawna M.; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Title Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-52690 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Apte, Michael G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, Seung-Min Lee, Shawna M. Liff, Leo I. Rainer, Derek G. Shendell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and William J. Fisk Pagination 13 Date Published 06/2003 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly used by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. We designed and constructed four energy-efficient RCs for this study to demonstrate technologies with the potential to simultaneously improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two RCs (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each had two HVAC systems, operated on alternate weeks, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The IDEC system provides continuous outside air ventilation at "15 CFM (7.5 L s-1) person-1, efficient particle filtration while using significantly less energy for cooling. School year long measurements included: carbon dioxide (CO2), particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. IEQ monitoring results indicate that important ventilation-relevant indoor CO2 and health-relevant VOC concentration reductions were achieved while average cooling and heating energy costs were simultaneously reduced by 50% and 30%, respectively.

190

Energy Efficient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.efficientwindows.org July 2011 E nergy-efficient windows save heating and cooling energy and improve occupant comfort while allowing for downsized HVAC equipment....

191

Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: Monitoring and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Retrofits are residential remodeling projects, which attempt to drastically reduce energy usage and environmental impact, as well as increase occupant comfort and improve...

192

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allowing the fluid to be delivered at the intended temperature. The addition of insulation can also improve the comfort of the occupants and reduce energy consumption by...

193

The New Approach of Low-Carbon Buildings in China and Developing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with cultures and lifestyles, while improving occupancy comfort and health. Therefore, technologies and strategies for low-carbon building solutions in developing countries...

194

The adaptive model of thermal comfort and energy conservation in the built environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupancy pattern and climate zone. A recent researchin many moderate climate zones of the world. Keywordsbuilding types, all climate zones, and all popu- lations (

de Dear, Richard; Brager, Gail

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

196

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

197

Contact model, fit process and, foot animation for the virtual simulator of the footwear comfort  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the new advances carried out for Simucal. Simucal was introduced in [13] and it is a footwear virtual simulator designed to perform studies of comfort and functionality in CAD footwear design. In this paper, a new finite element ... Keywords: Contact model, Foot animation, Shoe upper, Virtual simulation

M. J. Rupérez; C. Monserrat; S. Alemany; M. C. Juan; M. Alcañíz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low-energy cooling systems in a mild climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additional energy savings could be achieved by installing cooling towers in order to obtain free cooling to the chilled water loop for much of the year. However, cooling towers are generally not used in the U1 Energy consumption and comfort analysis for different low- energy cooling systems in a mild

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

199

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program More Documents & Publications LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management

202

Occupational Safety Performance Trends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety Trends More Documents & Publications Strategic Safety Goals EA-1954: Draft Environmental Assessment Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard...

203

2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster  

SciTech Connect

This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

ORAU

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

WEB RESOURCE: Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2007 ... The Occupational Outlook Handbook gives information on the training and education needed to go into engineering, earnings, job prospects, ...

205

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Home Outreach Event Calendar for DOE Nuclear Weapons Workers Covered Facilities Database Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness...

206

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subject: Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di...

207

Occupant Behavior, Egress, and Emergency Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forman Williams, Director, Center for Energy Research, University ... Total evacuation of a tower assuming a full occupant load without visitors (19,800 ...

208

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act...

209

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High

210

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

211

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON BUILDING ENERGY USE, HVAC SIZING AND THERMAL COMFORT aThe results showed that when the HVAC is controlled based onequipment sizing. When the HVAC is controlled based on the

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the seventh annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for EPRI's OHSD program.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the eighth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for the OHSD program.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

214

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Occupancy change detection system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations More Documents & Publications Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation

217

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

218

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SITE-APPS-ACCRED-BOUNDRY.pdf WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SI...

219

Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , Fatal occupational electrocutions in the United States.Narrative Review: Electrocution and Life-ThreateningFatal occupational electrocutions in the United States. Inj

Vergara, Ximena Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Title Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Publication Type Report LBNL...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors October 4, 2013 - 4:20pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations...

222

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit...

223

Bonnyrigg solar village: An analysis of annual energy use and comfort  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, 12 solar-efficient houses and 3 standard houses were designed and built for the New South Wales Housing commission near Sydney, Australia. Recently, a pilot study was done to evaluate the energy use and comfort levels in these 15 houses over a two-year period. Heavyweight, well insulated houses, as a group, used the least energy annually, averaging 19,235 MJ in 1983-1984. They are least likely to require winter space heating, which typically contributes 31% of the total energy bill. A trade-off of a well insulated house is less comfort in the summer unless active measures are taken by the residents to open windows in the evenings and close shades in the day for effective cooling. Even so, the four houses with heavyweight wall construction remained in the daytime comfort zone an average of 76% of the time in 1983. The annual energy use in the houses was compared to other studies done in Australia. The average energy consumption of the 12 passive solar homes was 22,687 MJ/year in the two-year period 1983-1984. Bartels (1985) found the average household consumption in New South Wales to be 28,000 MJ. The three control houses used 30,059 MJ/year on average, though the sample size was considerably smaller, and thus more likely to be affected by atypical user behavior. This study provides clear evidence of the effectiveness of solar efficient design in significantly reducing winter heating loads.

Ballinger, J.A.; Di Franco, T.L.; Prasad, D.K. (Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard Qualification Standard Reference Guide JULY 2011 Occupational Safety This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii TABLES ........................................................................................................................................ iv ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. v PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

225

Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any employee, contractor or visitor experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Wellness seminars. A variety of workshops designed to educate participants on a wide range of health-related topics. Physician directed services: For employees whose physician has directed medical care such as allergy injections, blood pressure

226

Window Signaling Systems: Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.M Parkins. 1984. “Window-Opening Behavior in OfficeOccupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems," CBEDaly, A. 2002. “Operable windows and HVAC systems. ” HPAC

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Monitored Energy Performance of Electrochromic Windows Controlledfor Daylight and Visual Comfort  

SciTech Connect

A 20-month field study was conducted to measure the energy performance of south-facing large-area tungsten-oxide absorptive electrochromic (EC) windows with a broad switching range in a private office setting. The EC windows were controlled by a variety of means to bring in daylight while minimizing window glare. For some cases, a Venetian blind was coupled with the EC window to block direct sun. Some tests also involved dividing the EC window wall into zones where the upper EC zone was controlled to admit daylight while the lower zone was controlled to prevent glare yet permit view. If visual comfort requirements are addressed by EC control and Venetian blinds, a 2-zone EC window configuration provided average daily lighting energy savings of 10 {+-} 15% compared to the reference case with fully lowered Venetian blinds. Cooling load reductions were 0 {+-} 3%. If the reference case assumes no daylighting controls, lighting energy savings would be 44 {+-} 11%. Peak demand reductions due to window cooling load, given a critical demand-response mode, were 19-26% maximum on clear sunny days. Peak demand reductions in lighting energy use were 0% or 72-100% compared to a reference case with and without daylighting controls, respectively. Lighting energy use was found to be very sensitive to how glare and sun is controlled. Additional research should be conducted to fine-tune EC control for visual comfort based on solar conditions so as to increase lighting energy savings.

Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Klems, Joseph; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the ninth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 13 years (1995 2007) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. These injury data a...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 15 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This twelfth annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry is based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 16 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system. The...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the tenth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 14 years (1995 2008) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. The current OHSD da...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office More Documents & Publications Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Authorization for High Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on

237

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to explore how calibrated high dynamic range (HDR) images (luminance maps) acquired in real world daylit environments can be used to characterize, evaluate, and compare visual comfort conditions of innovative facade shading and light-redirecting systems. Detailed (1536 x 1536 pixel) luminance maps were time-lapse acquired from two view positions in an unoccupied full scale testbed facility. These maps were analyzed using existing visual comfort metrics to quantify how innovative interior and exterior shading systems compare to conventional systems under real sun and sky conditions over a solstice-to-solstice test interval. The results provide a case study in the challenges and potential of methods of visualizing, evaluating and summarizing daily and seasonal variation of visual comfort conditions computed from large sets of image data.

Konis, Kyle; Lee, Eleanor; Clear, Robert

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Electronic ballast improves efficiency  

SciTech Connect

As part of a DOE program, the performance of various electronic ballasts for fluorescent lamps have been evaluated relative to high quality core-coil ballasts under similar ambient conditions. The results of this investigation are reported. Real energy savings can exceed 40% while comfort and quality of illumination are improved. A detailed comparison of two types of ballast is presented. Voltage effects and temperature effects as well as dimming features are discussed. Light levels, power energy consumption, and daylighting are also treated. It is concluded that, with the electronic ballast, an annual payback of $8.20/yr is possible as compared to the core-coil ballasted fluorescent lamp. Further, much greater flexibility in use is possible with the electronic ballast equipped lamp. (MJJ)

Verderber, R.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind washing is a general term referring to diminished thermal control caused by air movement over or through a thermal barrier. The primary focus of this paper is towards a specific type of wind washing where wind can push attic air into the floor cavity between first and second stories of the home through ineffective (or missing) air barriers separating attic space from the floor cavity. A second type of wind washing studied in this project involved insulation batts on knee walls where space between the batts and the wall board allowed air movement against the gypsum wall board. During hot weather, the first type of wind washing pushes hot air into the floor cavity (between the first and second stories) thereby heating ceiling, floor, and interior wall surfaces (see Figures 1 and 2). Condensation may occur on cold supply duct surfaces within the floor cavity resulting in ceiling moisture damage. In cold climates, cold air from wind washing can chill surfaces within the interior floor space and result in frozen water pipes. Through the summer of 2009, a field study tested thirty-two two-story homes and found significant wind washing potential in 40% of the homes. Part I of this paper will highlight the evaluation methods used and the extent of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper.

Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Short-Term Monitoring to Diagnose Comfort Problems in a Residence in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results from a project to resolve comfort problems created by high indoor humidity in a 3,400 sq.ft. house in Bryan, Texas. The case study house had been certified by the local utility to meet their energy efficiency standards. However, the resident of the house complained that the house felt too humid although the desired temperature conditions were being maintained. Several HVAC contractors had been previously hired to resolve the problem without success. The field measurements undertaken to diagnose the problem are typical of those that could be undertaken by a house inspector and include an inspection of the construction of the house, short-term monitoring of temperature and humidity, blower door tests and whole-house pressurization tests. To perform the analysis both floors of the house were instrumented with portable data loggers and monitored for a period of two weeks to measure the temperature and relative humidity of the supply, return and ambient conditions. Analysis procedures applied to the house include comparing the measured data against the ASHRAE comfort zone (ASHRAE, 1997) which confirmed adequate zone temperatures with high humidity conditions, and inadequate supply air delivery temperatures for humidity removal. Combined results of the blower door tests and whole-house pressurization tests indicated a potential for leakage through the return air duct. After the recommendations were presented to the homeowner, a new contractor was hired and retrofits applied on the house (i.e., cleaning the cooling coils, enlarging the compressor and relining of the return duct). Measurements were then repeated to determine that the problem had been f ~ e d . This paper describes the case study residence, the measurements used to diagnose the problem, analysis methods, and presents results of the application of the analysis.

Kootin-Sanwu, V.; Sresthaputra, A.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effects of battery technologies, driving patterns, and climate comfort control on the performance of electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A computer software package, EAGLES, has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze electric vehicle (EV) performance. In this paper, we present EAGLES predictions of EV driving range, acceleration rate, and energy consumption under various driving patterns, with different battery technologies, and with assumptions concerning use of air conditioners and/or heaters for climate comfort control. The specifications of a baseline, four-passenger EV for given design performance requirements are established, assuming urban driving conditions represented by the Los Angeles 92 (LA-92) driving cycle and using battery characteristics similar to those of the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) midterm battery performance goals. To examine the impacts of driving patterns, energy consumption is simulated under three different driving cycles: the New York City Cycle, the Los Angeles 92 Cycle, and the ECE-15 Cycle. To test the impacts of battery technologies, performance attributes of an advanced lead-acid battery, the USABC midterm battery goals, and the USABC long-term battery goals are used. Finally, EV energy consumption from use of air conditioners and/or heaters under different climates is estimated and the associated driving range penalty for one European city (Paris) and two United States cities (Chicago and Los Angeles) is predicted. The results of this paper show the importance of considering various effects, such as battery technology, driving pattern, and climate comfort control, in the determination of EV performances. Electric vehicle energy consumption decreases more than 20% when a battery with characteristics similar to the USABC long-term goals is used instead of an advanced lead-acid battery.

Marr, W.W.; Wang, M.Q.; Santini, D.J.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

245

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

248

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

250

CFD simulation for pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety in urban areas: General decision framework and case study for the Eindhoven University campus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind comfort and wind safety for pedestrians are important requirements in urban areas. Many city authorities request studies of pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety for new buildings and new urban areas. These studies involve combining statistical ... Keywords: Building aerodynamics, Built environment, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Discomfort and danger, Experimental validation, Guidelines, Wind flow

B. Blocken; W. D. Janssen; T. van Hooff

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

252

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate occupational radiation protection programs against DOE policy, standards, and regulatory requirements. The approach includes evaluation of essential programmatic elements of radiation protection programs with additional emphasis on implementation of the core functions of integrated safety management. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012

253

Occupational hazards associated with geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure to noise, H{sub 2}S, NH/sub 3/, hazardous chemicals and wastes, and heat are the major occupational health hazards associated with geothermal energy development - from drilling to power production. Exposures to these agents, although not unique to geothermal energy development, occur in situations peculiar to the industry. Reports show that occupational illnesses associated with geothermal energy development are increasing, while the corresponding rates from all power production are decreasing. Most of those related to geothermal energy result from the H{sub 2}S-abatement systems used in response to environmental pollution regulations.

Hahn, J.L.

1979-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:Occupancy-Based Energy Management System. The objective ofOccupancy-Based Energy Management System. The experiments to

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRIs Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2004 from sixteen participating companies.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluation of Occupational Magnetic Field Exposure Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a first step in assessing potential effects of EMF exposure guidelines on utility operations, EPRI sponsored a technical evaluation of the major occupational EMF exposure guidelines and an analysis of existing magnetic-field exposure databases. The research reported herein is a comprehensive extension of that work, that includes studies by several research groups on diverse topics related to guidelines.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Market survey: Lighting loggers and occupancy loggers  

SciTech Connect

Six companies in the United States market lighting loggers, a class of devices that includes runtime and time-of-use lighting loggers and occupancy loggers. Runtime loggers are the simplest and least expensive loggers, measuring how long lights remain off or on -- data useful for assessing energy savings of lighting efficiency upgrades. Time-of-use loggers, manufactured by only one company, are more sophisticated and versatile, as well as more expensive. They record when and for how long lights are turned off and on--data useful for energy savings assessments and billing impact studies for buildings with time-of-use rates. Occupancy loggers are marketed by three companies in the United States. These loggers measure how long lights remain on when no one is in the room. Such data is useful for determining potential savings from occupancy sensors. Lighting loggers are most cost-effective when information is needed on lighting usage in individual spaces. Other methods can be more economical when overall lighting usage for a building or an entire floor is all that is needed. The simplicity of the loggers makes them accessible to anyone interested in assessing lighting savings, including end users, utilities, ESCOs, and consultants. But lighting and occupancy loggers are not always the least expensive or best way to assess lighting retrofit savings, and can be misapplied if used without a clear objective and understanding of the loggers` limitations.

Gregerson, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

259

Non-Intrusive Occupancy Monitoring using Smart Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information about a home's occupancy is necessary to implement many advanced energy-efficiency optimizations. However, monitoring occupancy directly is intrusive, typically requiring the deployment of multiple environmental sensors, e.g., motion, ... Keywords: Electricity, Energy, Grid

Dong Chen, Sean Barker, Adarsh Subbaswamy, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Use of Private Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of occupant behavior on building energy use is significant, and even so at the energy end use levels such as lighting, space cooling and heating. For atypical single-occupancy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

263

Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SECURITY PLAN FOR THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM S January 23, 2009 ...

264

Occupational Health Programs - Jacqueline Agnew, PhD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Knowledge Base -Hospital - Construction -Brewery -Garment -Printing - Research Facilities Essential Components of Occupational & Environmental Health Programs 1 . Health...

265

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation Athanasius Zakhary Faculty University, Giza, Egypt (n.elgayar@fci-cu.edu.eg) #12;Abstract Forecasting hotel arrivals and occupancy simulation approach for the arrivals and occupancy forecasting problem. In this approach we simulate

Atiya, Amir

266

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

267

Thermal Comfort under Transient Metabolic and Dynamic Localized Airflow Conditions Combined with Neutral and Warm Ambient Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human thermal environments constitute complex combinations of various interacting thermal factors. The transient and non-uniform nature of those thermal factors further increases the complexity of the thermal comfort problem. The conventional approach to the thermal comfort problem has been simplifying the problem and providing steady thermal environments which would satisfy the majority of the people in a given space. However, several problems emerged with this approach. People became finely tuned to the narrow range of conditions and developed expectations for the same conditions which made them uncomfortable when there were slight deviations from those conditions. Also, the steady approach didn't solve the comfort problem because, in practice, people move between spaces, and thermal conditions such as metabolic rate, surface temperatures, airflow speed and direction vary in a typical day. A human subject test was designed to determine the transient relationship between the people and their environments. In the first part, thermal perceptions of people were taken during various metabolic rate conditions. In the second and the third parts, transient conditions of different thermal factors were created. Various combinations of airflow frequencies, airflow location around the body, metabolic rate, and room temperatures were tested for their individual and interaction effects of providing thermal comfort. The concept of Localized Dynamic Airflow was proposed in which room airflow was simply redirected to different parts of the body with a varying airflow speed. Results showed that males and females respond differently to the thermal conditions. The room temperatures they found neutral were significantly different. People?s thermal comfort during transient metabolic conditions was similar to high metabolic conditions. This heightened response extended into the next ten minutes after the high metabolic conditions ended. Test results suggested that people tolerate higher temperatures during transient environmental conditions. The average response was for comfortable even during the high temperature (83°F) and high metabolic rate (4 met) conditions. Low energy use of the localized dynamic airflow and the increased room temperatures has significant potential for monetary savings.

Ugursal, Ahmet

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The impact of glazing selection on residential duct design and comfort  

SciTech Connect

The vast majority of residential HVAC contractors design and install duct systems using rules of thumb and design guidelines based on obsolete assumptions about house thermal characteristics. Perhaps the most widely accepted rule of thumb is that conditioned air should be delivered at the building perimeter to control the load and achieve acceptable comfort at the windows. The basis for this rule dates back to testing performed in uninsulated houses and laboratory facilities with single-glazed windows. Through computer modeling, field testing, and laboratory testing, initial guidelines have been developed to allow the builder or HVAC contractor to forsake perimeter duct distribution when certain levels of energy efficiency are met, which typically involves better performing windows than are typically selected. The concept of minimized duct design (MDD) affords the opportunity to mitigate many of the problems associated with ductwork, including energy waste, poor indoor air quality, and compromised combustion appliance safety, while encouraging the use of higher performance glazing. Analysis shows that in many cases the cost savings in the ductwork will offset the added cost of the window upgrade.

Hawthorne, W.A.; Reilly, S.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

{sup 125}I Measurements for Occupational Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Whenever there is a risk of occupational exposure to dispersible radioactive material, it is necessary to have a monitoring program to assess the effective dose arising from the intake of radionuclides by workers. In this paper we present our experience in bioassay measurements of {sup 125}I in urine samples of workers using high resolution gamma spectrometry. For a 24-hour excretion period, we found activity values of the order of one Bq and estimated the committed effective doses to be less than one {mu}Sv. Although very small, these values led to a re-evaluation and improvement of the laboratory safety conditions. We discuss the calibration procedure followed for the activity measurements, the estimation of the uncertainty in the excreted activity, the calculation of detection and quantification limits and estimation of performance indicators. Aspects regarding the spectral analysis, true coincidence summing and matrix effects are also considered.

Silva, L.; Pinhao, N. R. [Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, ITN-Nuclear and Technological Institute, Estrada Nacional N 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Card - Occupational Safety Qualification Card - Occupational Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-OccupationalSafety.docx Description Occupational Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Chemical Processing

271

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Purpose The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers' compensation, and much more. This training will advance DOE's mission as follows: By providing medical and allied health professionals (eg, Industrial Hygiene) and their management with updates regarding medical services and

272

A Study on Zoning Regulations' Impact on Thermal Comfort Conditions in Non-conditioned Apartment Buildings in Dhaka City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unfavorable thermal comfort conditions are common in the non-conditioned apartment buildings typical of Dhaka (Ali, 2007; Hafiz, 2004). Causes behind such unfavorable thermal comfort conditions include (but are not limited to) Dhaka?s climate, microclimate in Dhaka's typical residential neighborhood, its socio-economic context, housing type, and its inadequate planning regulations. Dhaka's climate is hot humid but it can be tackled with well designed buildings as well as well as designed neighborhoods, both of which demands ample open space. However, due to land scarcity and high population density, building developments lack open spaces and that results in unfavorable thermal comfort conditions in apartment buildings. Dhaka?s previous zoning regulations were unable to control this dense development, and therefore, a new set of zoning regulations were enacted (2008). However, no post-evaluation study was conducted to research the effect of this new set of regulations. The intention of this research is to first evaluate the existing regulations, and second, to suggest appropriate zoning regulation schemes for Dhaka's non-conditioned apartment buildings (for a lot size of 1/3 acre), which would provide favorable thermal comfort conditions without changing its existing density. To accomplish the first goal, this research analyzed two existing zoning schemes (one based on regulations of 1996, and the other based on the regulations of 2008). To accomplish the second goal, this research analyzed two hypothetical zoning schemes. The hypothetical ones were studied because this research finds 1996 and 2008 regulations to be two extremes (in terms of allowing open space and building height), and therefore examination of in-between alternative zoning schemes seemed essential for this study. To analyze the four zoning regulation schemes' impact on thermal comfort in apartment buildings, four sets of built environment were created in EnergyPlus (Energy Simulation software) as well as in Fluent (Computational Fluid Dynamics software). Each set of built environment is a cluster of nine buildings; and each set is different from each other in terms of their building footprints and building heights. The building on the center was modeled implicitly, and remaining buildings were modeled as solid blocks (to act as neighboring buildings) for blocking sun and wind. The ES and CFD software simulated possible solar, daylight, and wind availability inside the central building, and consequently produce data on thermal comfort conditions, namely indoor temperature and air velocity. The simulation results were compared to see which zoning schemes provided the most favorable thermal comfort conditions. This research found one of the in-between schemes (60% allowable footprint, 9-story height limit) to be more appropriate in terms of thermal comfort conditions than the other three schemes; because it provides better solar protection and better natural ventilation and consequently it reduces indoor temperature and increases indoor air velocity.

Islam, Saiful

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

274

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

275

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory based requirements. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

276

New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors October 7, 2013 - 9:09am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for vending machine occupancy sensors within the Federal sector. Benefits Vending machine occupancy sensors detect when no people are in the vicinity and powers down beverage vending machines. These systems do not completely turn off compressor, but reduce their run times. Application Vending machine occupancy sensors are applicable in most building categories where vending machines are present. Key Factors for Deployment Occupancy sensors or similar features should be an integral part of new vending machine purchases. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

277

Improving the Cyber Workforce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... assigned”; regardless of job series/ occupational specialty ... Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board ? Director of National Intelligence ...

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medical Services Contract Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned small business. This is a two-year hybrid contract with four-one-year option periods that includes firm-fixed price with award fee, cost reimbursement, and Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) components. As the Occupational Medical Services Contractor, HPM Corporation will: Provide occupational medical services to approximately 8,000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid

282

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2004: Occupational Health and Safety Trends 1995-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fifth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2003 from fourteen participating companies.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3,...

285

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

''Development of the 1996 Proposed Amendment to 10 CFR part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection,'' (regulatory development document, November 1996) which may be viewed...

286

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing...

287

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

288

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes to high occupancy toll lane operations. References Retrieved...

289

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

290

Window signalling systems: control strategies and occupant behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant response to window control signaling systems (CBEDaly, A. (2002). Operable windows and HVAC systems. HPACK. (2008). The use of windows as controls for indoor

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,quality survey in office buildings, comparing green withnon-green buildings. On average, occupants in green

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency...

293

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation...

294

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

295

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Appendix A, B, and C. In Appendix A, we are working as part of a research project with King Monkut's Institute of Technology, Thonburi, and the University of California, Berkeley (USA) to determine how people respond to the thermal environment inside buildings. We have prepared a short questionnaire which will survey thermal comfort. Our plan is to survey each building during each of three seasons over this year (e.g. hot, rainy, and cool seasons). Appendix B contains supporting technical documentation on conservation potential and Appendix C contains documentation on utility impacts.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

Mester, Rudolf

300

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOTEL / MOTEL TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX WAIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STATE AGENCIES) HOTEL MOTEL OPERATORS: RETAIN THIS WAIVER FOR YOUR FILES TO SUBSTANTIATE YOUR REPORTS of the State Agency indicated below; that the charge for the occupancy at the above establishment on the dates of California. $ OCCUPANCY DATES AMOUNT PAID California State University, Fullerton STATE AGENCY NAME 800 North

de Lijser, Peter

302

POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimally controlling HVAC systems in buildings based on actual occupancy levels. POEM is comprised for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based are then fused with an occupancy prediction model us- ing a particle filter in order to determine the most

Cerpa, Alberto E.

303

Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of estimating the occupancy levels in rooms using the information available in standard HVAC systems. Instead of employing dedicated devices, we exploit the significant statistical correlations between the occupancy levels and ... Keywords: Inference, Parametric and Nonparametric methods, System Identification

Afrooz Ebadat, Giulio Bottegal, Damiano Varagnolo, Bo Wahlberg, Karl H. Johansson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the ... Keywords: energy, environment, home heating, prediction, sensing

James Scott; A.J. Bernheim Brush; John Krumm; Brian Meyers; Michael Hazas; Stephen Hodges; Nicolas Villar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

How the Number and Placement of Sensors Controlling Room Air Distribution Systems Affect Energy Use and Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of sensor number and placement on the energy needed to condition a typical office using several likely variants of an underfloor air distribution system (UFAD). The study uses an empirical-based room stratification model developed from full-scale tests of UFAD systems. Annual energy consumption is calculated for an interior zone using outside air temperature bin data. The comfort criteria are taken from ASHRAE standard 55-92. The simulations indicate that there are benefits derived from using more than one temperature sensor to control conditions in the occupied zone of a room. Among these are: 1. By adjusting both supply air temperature and volume to maintain the maximum allowable thermal gradient in the occupied (lower) part of the room, an optimal supply air condition can reduce energy use (relative to the best arrangement of a single sensor) while maintaining comfort; 2. Discomfort caused by stratification can be detected by having one of the sensors located at foot level; 3. For the simulated UFAD interior zone of a typical office building in Sacramento, an overall energy saving of 8%/24% (VAV/CAV respectively) can be achieved when two sensors as opposed to one are used to control room conditions.

Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Webster, T.; Shi, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

307

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager DOE-STD-1178-2004, Technical Program Manager DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Management DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection

308

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers February 1, 2010 Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well-being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening

309

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) March 17-18, 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW): Registration, Directions, Lodging, and Access REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE SYSTEM The 2014 DOE Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar will be held March 17-18 in Room 4A-104 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, DC. Register for the 2014 OMWW at http://hsspublic.energy.gov/Workshops/CMO/2014/Registration.aspx. The deadline for registration will be January 17, 2014 in order to comply with conference system requirements. Upon completing the registration, you will immediately receive a confirmatory email. An additional confirmatory email will be sent to registrants shortly after January 17th (once all

310

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Predictions of thermal comfort and pollutant distributions for a thermostatically-controlled, air-conditioned, partitioned room: Numerical results and enhanced graphical presentation  

SciTech Connect

An index of local thermal comfort and pollutant distributions have been computed with the TEMPEST computer code, in a transient simulation of an air-conditioned enclosure with an incomplete partition. This complex three-dimensional air conditioning problem included forced ventilation through inlet veins, flow through a partition, remote return air vents, and infiltration source, a pollutant source, and a thermostatically controlled air conditioning system. Five forced ventilation schemes that varied in vent areas and face velocities were simulated. Thermal comfort was modeled as a three-dimensional scalar field dependent on the fluid velocity and temperature fields; where humidity activity levels, and clothing were considered constants. Pollutants transport was incorporated through an additional constituent diffusion equation. Six distinct graphic techniques for the visualization of the three-dimensional data fields of air velocity, temperature, and comfort index were tested. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

White, M.D.; Eyler, L.L.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Human Behavior Meets Building Intelligence: How Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems,"Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals Katie Ackerly andincorporate operable windows for the benefits of personal

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang; Apte, Michael; Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Property:HPBD/DateOfOccupancy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DateOfOccupancy DateOfOccupancy Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: H High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database Pages using the property "HPBD/DateOfOccupancy" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + January 4 + High Performance Buildings Database + January 6 + High Performance Buildings Database + October 2 +

315

Façade apertures optimization: integrating cross-ventilation performance analysis in fluid dynamics simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance-oriented design has as a primary aim to introduce spaces that achieve acceptable levels of human comfort. Wind-induced airflow plays a significant role in the improving occupants' comfort in a building. This paper explores the extent to which ... Keywords: building performance simulation, generative design, multiple criteria optimization, parametric design, wind-induced ventilation

Chrysanthi (Sandy) Karagkouni; Ava Fatah gen Schieck; Martha Tsigkari; Angelos Chronis

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

317

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

318

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning Speaker(s): Ryota Shirai Date: August 31, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Naoya Motegi...

319

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback Speaker(s): Geoff Levermore Date: June 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This presentation will describe some of...

320

Density Functional Theory Based Calculations of Site Occupancy in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the site occupancy behavior based on two .... First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Forming-Crush Simulation Optimization Using Internal State Variable Model.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PROCEEDINGS Open Access Occupational cancer in developed countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of occupational exposures have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. About one third of the factors identified as definite or probable human carcinogens were first investigated in the workplace and these exposures exact a considerable toll on working populations. There are many additional workplace exposures that are suspect carcinogens that require further evaluation to ensure a safe work environment. Information from occupational investigations is also relevant to the general population because many occupational exposures can be found outside the workplace. Much of our understanding about occupational cancer has been obtained from studies largely composed of white men in developed countries. The movement of industry from developed to developing countries underscores the need for future investigations to include more diverse populations. What do we know? Studies of exposures in the workplace have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of

Aaron Blair; Loraine Marrett; Laura Beane Freeman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, M; Wild, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of daylight to replace or supplement electric lighting in commercial buildings can result in significant energy and demand savings. High performance fenestration systems area necessary, but not sufficient, element of any successful daylighting design that reduces lighting energy use. However, these savings may be reduced if the fenestration systems impose adverse thermal loads. In this paper, we review the state of the art of several advanced fenestration systems which are designed to maximize the energy-saving potential of daylighting, while improving comfort and visual performance at an "affordable" cost. We first review the key performance issues that successful fenestration systems must address, and then review several classes of fenestration systems intended to meet those performance needs. The systems are reviewed in two categories: static and dynamic. Static systems include not only glazings, such as spectrally-selective and holographic glazings, but specialized designs of light-shelves and light-pipes, while dynamic systems cover automatically-operated Venetian blinds and electrochromic glazings. We include a discussion of the research directions in this area, and how these efforts might lead to static and dynamic hardware and system solutions that fulfill the multiple roles that these systems must play in terms of energy efficiency, comfort, visual performance, health, and amenity in future buildings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. We performed a field study of over 1100 Thai office workers in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. We analyzed Thai subjective responses on the ASHRAE, McIntyre and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENS. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, we performed a series of parametric simulations using the DOE-2.1D computer program on three commercial building prototypes based on actual buildings in Bangkok; an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. We investigated a wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type, from architectural measures to HVAC equipment and control solutions. The best measures applied in combination into high efficiency cases can generate energy savings in excess of 50%. Economic analyses performed for the high efficiency cases, resulted in costs of conserved energy of less than and internal rates of return in excess of 40%. Thermal cool storage, cogeneration, and gas cooling technology showed promise as cost-effective electric load management strategies.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

From comfort to kilowatts: An integrated assessment of electricity conservation in Thailand's commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

Thailand serves as a case study of the potential to conserve electricity in the fast-growing commercial sectors of the tropical developing world. A field study of over 1,100 Thai office workers was performed in which a questionnaire survey and simultaneous physical measurements were taken. Both air-conditioned and non-air-conditioned buildings were included. Thai subjective responses were analyzed on the ASHRAE, McIntyre, and other rating scales, relating them to Effective Temperature, demographics, and to rational indices of warmth such as PMV and TSENSA. These results suggest that without sacrificing comfort, significant energy conservation opportunities exist through the relaxation of upper space temperature limits. To investigate the potential for conserving energy in a cost-effective manner, a series of parametric simulations were performed using the DOE-2.1D computer program for three commercial building prototypes in Bangkok: an office, a hotel, and a shopping center. A wide range of energy conservation measures appropriate for each building type was studied. Drawing on the building energy-simulation results, impacts on the Thai electric utility were evaluated under various conservation scenarios.

Busch, J.F. Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 4; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Mixed-Humid Climate Climate Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the mixed-humid climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Baechler, M. C.; Love, P. M.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 5; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Marine Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the Marine climate region. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team--from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Steward, H.; Love, P. M.; Palmer, J. A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in Cold and Very Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect

This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Not Available

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 1; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot and Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect

This Building America Best Practices guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot and humid climate. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Baechler, M. C.; Love, P. M.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

335

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Address 830 Punchbowl Street #425 Place Honolulu, HI Zip 96813 Phone number 808586-9100 Website http://hawaii.gov/labor/hiosh Coordinates 21.3036793°, -157.8607676° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.3036793,"lon":-157.8607676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce July 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl..doe.gov 509-376-4171 The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services acquisition at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Draft RFP is one step in the process toward awarding a contract and provides an opportunity for companies, Hanford stakeholders, and the site's workforce to provide input on the Draft RFP. DOE will provide

337

Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

339

Editorial: Occupation inference through detection and classification of biographical activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dealing with biographical information (e.g., biography generation, answering biography-related questions, etc.) requires the identification of important activities in the life of the individual in question. While there are activities that can be used ... Keywords: Biography information, Occupation classification

Elena Filatova; John Prager

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

342

POEM: power-efficient occupancy-based energy management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings account for 40% of US primary energy consumption and 72% of electricity. Of this total, 50% of the energy consumed in buildings is used for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based on ... Keywords: HVAC, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Stefan Achleitner; Alberto E. Cerpa

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Using unlabeled Wi-Fi scan data to discover occupancy patterns of private households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster presents the homeset algorithm, a lightweight approach to estimate occupancy schedules of private households. The algorithm relies on the mobile phones of households' occupants to collect Wi-Fi scans. The scans are then used to determine ...

Wilhelm Kleiminger, Christian Beckel, Anind Dey, Silvia Santini

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

COPOLAN: non-invasive occupancy profiling for preliminary assessment of HVAC fixed timing strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, control of heating, cooling and ventilation equipment operation is mainly achieved via timers with fixed setback schedules, configured using experience and standard models of space occupancy. Applying generic timing strategies is however rarely ... Keywords: electricity, local area network, occupancy

Anthony Schoofs; Declan T. Delaney; Gregory M. P. O'Hare; Antonio G. Ruzzelli

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

Hammond, Ryan Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Combining daylighting, personal controls, and load shedding offers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems can enhance occupant comfort and improve organizational productivity. However, even with advances lighting system to respond to available daylight and demand response control · Allows building occupantsCombining daylighting, personal controls, and load shedding offers enormous potential for reducing

348

Personalized building comfort control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating an appropriate indoor climate is essential to worker productivity and personal happiness. It is also an area of large expenditure for building owners. And, with rising fuel costs, finding ways of reducing energy ...

Feldmeier, Mark Christopher, 1974-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Moving air for comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to facilitate the design layout of fans in accordance withCeiling fans in open office space Figure 7 Design office inapproximately 30-70 W/fan. In the design, they were assumed

Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Moving air for comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Energy Center, 14pp. ASHRAE Journal, May 2009, pp 8 –Transactions 95(1), pp 269-280. ASHRAE Journal, May 2009, ppcomfort prediction tool. ” ASHRAE Journal, September, 39-42.

Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A social demographic study of the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality resulting in death  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores occupational fatalities to American males for the years 1998 and 1999. The focus is on predicting the likelihood that the individual will sustain an occupational injury resulting in death based on an occupational status score. Demographic variables measuring Southern residence, race, ethnicity, marital status, education and age were also included in analyses. Research questions include whether or not individuals in higher status occupations are at a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational fatality, and how the demographic variables included effect occupational fatalities. Using data from death certificates allowed me to measure the individual’s occupational status based on their “usual occupation” and find out whether or not differences exist. The thesis involves two analyses, one with the sample comprised of only males between the ages of 25 and 55 and one including only married males between the ages of 25 and 55. Logistic regression is employed as the method of analysis to model the odds of the risk of sustaining an occupational fatality that results in death. The results of the first model found only marital status to be positively and significantly related to occupational fatalities. Black, Hispanic, South and education were found to be negatively related to occupational fatalities. The main hypothesis of this thesis was not supported, however because the regression shows that with each increase on the occupational status index, no significant increase or decrease occurred in sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. In the second regression that included only married males, many of the relationships no longer existed. Hispanic and the education variable both lost statistical significance. The only variables to maintain significance were black and South, which were both associated with a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. Problems with the occupational status index as a predictor for the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality and restrictions of the data may be the main issue that resulted in a lack of findings.

Traut, Rachel Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Spot Ventilation: Source Control to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Whole-House Ventilation Systems: Improved Control of Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 6, occupational hygiene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CleanFleet project was a 24-month demonstration of FedEx delivery vans operating on each of four gaseous or liquid alternative fuels: compressed natural gas (CNG), propane gas, methanol M-85, and California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG). Two electric vans were also demonstrated. Each alternative fuel fleet was operated from a different FedEx station site in the Los Angeles area. Gasoline-fueled control vans located at each site allowed for comparisons between fleets. The alternative fuels used in the CleanFleet project differ from conventional fuels both in their physical properties and in their potential health effects. These differences can result in occupational health implications for fleet users of these fuels. Therefore, as part of the CleanFleet project a limited occupational hygiene survey was performed.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of localised and real-time occupancy numbers can have compelling control applications for Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, a precise and reliable measurement of occupancy still remains difficult. Existing technologies are plagued with a number of issues ranging from unreliable data, maintaining privacy and sensor drift. More effective control of HVAC systems may be possible using a smart sensing network for occupancy detection. A low-cost and non-intrusive sensor network is deployed in an open-plan office, combining information such as sound level and motion, to estimate occupancy numbers, while an infrared camera is implemented to establish ground truth occupancy levels. Symmetrical uncertainty analysis is used for feature selection, and selected multi-sensory features are fused using a neuralnetwork model, with occupancy estimation accuracy reaching up to 84.59%. The proposed system offers promising opportunities for reliable occupancy sensing, capable of supporting demand driven HVAC operations.

Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EPRI EMF Exposure Database: EMDEX Occupational Study Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers from the EMDEX Occupational Study (WO2966-01) provided data from this study for inclusion in the EPRI EMF Exposure Database. This data set contains fourteen data products related to measurements of electric and magnetic field personal exposure: binary and ASCII time-series files of individual measurements, summaries of occupied environment by partition (continuous period in environment), by day and by entire measurement session, summaries of occupied environment for work status (work/non-work...

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Potential single-occupancy vehicle demand for the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway high-occupancy vehicle lanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1960�s, high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes have been successfully used as a travel demand management technique. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes as an alternative to HOV lanes to help manage the increasing demand for travel. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for HOV lanes. As two of the four HOT lanes in the world, the HOT lane facilities in Houston, Texas received relatively low patronage after operating for over 6 years on the Katy Freeway and over 4 years on the Northwest Freeway. There existed an opportunity to increase the usage of these HOT lanes by allowing single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) travelers to use the lanes, for an appropriate toll. The potential SOV demand for HOV lane use during the off-peak periods from the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway general-purpose lane (GPL) travelers was estimated in this study by using the data collected from a 2003 survey of travelers on the Katy and Northwest Freeway GPLs who were not enrolled in QuickRide. Based on survey results, more travelers would choose to drive on the HOT lanes as SOV travelers during the off-peak periods when the facilities provided higher travel time savings and charged lower tolls. Two important factors influencing travelers� use of the HOV lanes were their value of travel time savings (VTTS) and penalty for changing travel schedule (VPCS). It was found that respondents had VTTS approximately 43 percent of their hourly wage rate and VPCS approximately 3 percent of their hourly wage rate. Combining this information with current travel time savings and available capacity on the HOV lanes, it was found that approximately 2000 SOV travelers per day would pay an average toll of $2.25 to use the HOV lanes during the off-peak periods.

Xu, Lei

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Refractory Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Improvement Refractory Improvement NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 2 Project Description Industry would like gasifier on-line availability of 85-95% for utility applications and 95% for applications such as chemical production. Gasification facilities' are currently unable to meet these requirements, which have created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of gasification technologies. Refractory liners and syngas coolers are among key components of the gasification process previously identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities in the gasifier's carbon feedstock is the root cause of many problems impacting gasifier RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability). At the high temperatures of gasification, ash changes to liquid, gas, and solid phases which wear down refractory materials and can cause fouling, either of which can lead to unplanned shutdowns for system repair, replacement, or cleaning.

362

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Title Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Issue 3 Pagination 357-367 Keywords dampness and mold, health, ieq improvement, offices, temperature, ventilation Abstract This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 °C, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set of non-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

363

Innovative Evaporative and Thermally Activated Technologies Improve Air Conditioning, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Evaporative and Innovative Evaporative and Thermally Activated Technologies Improve Air Conditioning Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) invented a breakthrough technology that improves air conditioning in a novel way-with heat. NREL combined desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90% less electricity and up to 80% less total energy than traditional air conditioning (AC). This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVap), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. Desiccants are an example of a thermally activated technology (TAT) that relies on heat instead

364

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor environment: How to validate comfort and energy reduction Speaker(s): Wouter Borsboom Date: December 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 TNO is a research institute which is active in the energy saving and indoor environment. We like to present our research, our goals and discuss the challenges and the opportunities for cooperation. Therefore we like to give a presentation about the following topic and we are also interested in a presentation of LBL and UC Berkeley. An important topic in the building industry is near zero energy buildings. Most countries in Europe implemented programs to advance this goal in one way or another. In near-zero energy buildings, the interaction between building and systems

365

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit 03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 102 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 105 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer needs a Use and Occupancy Permit from the Hawaii Department of

367

Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility  

SciTech Connect

Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts ofreductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shadingenergy efficiency, peak demand, visual comfort, buildings, x

Lee, Eleanor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

How much sense do room occupancy sensor controls make  

SciTech Connect

Hotel operators are faced with a confusing array of both remote and local guest room energy control devices. A wide variety of decentralized electronic room controllers, each with its own control logic and vendor claims are in competition with remote front desk microprocessor controls which are essentially ''blind'' to actual occupancy. This paper is a review of the characteristics of various controllers, their behaviour with different in-room environmental equipment, and guest reactions to the potpourri of available devices.

Becker, H.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hyperendemic malaria transmission in areas of occupation-related travel in the Peruvian Amazon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyperendemic malaria transmission in areas of occupation-mathematically model malaria transmission [25] and confirmedE: Clustered local transmission and asymptomatic Plasmodium

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Occupational well-being: the development of a theory and a measure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research on occupational well-being, commonly conceptualized as job satisfaction or the opposite of burnout, is criticized for its lack of theoretical basis. Danna and Griffin… (more)

Schultz, Monica L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Occupant Control of Windows: Accounting for Human Behavior in Building Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) User behaviour of window control in offices duringPage 13 Occupant Control of Windows: Accounting for Humanfor the modeling of window opening and closing behaviour,

Borgeson, Sam; Brager, Gail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Occupancy Rates and Emergency Department Work Index Scores Correlate with Leaving Without Being Seen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The left-without-being-seen rate: an imperfect measure ofdepartment occupancy rate: a simple measure of emergencytimes, lengths of stay, and rate of left without being seen.

Kulstad, Erik B; Hart, K. Michael; Waghchoure, Simon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Gender differences in respiratory symptoms-Does occupation matter?  

SciTech Connect

Little attention has been given to gender differences in respiratory health, particularly in occupational settings. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate gender differences in respiratory morbidity based on surveys of hospitality workers, radiographers, and respiratory therapists. Data were available from mail surveys of 850 hospitality industry workers (participation rate 73.9%; 52.6% female), 586 radiographers (participation rate 63.6%; 85% female), and 275 respiratory therapists (participation rate 64.1%; 58.6% female). Cross-tabulations by gender were evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} analysis and logistic regression with adjustment for personal and work characteristics. Women consistently had greater respiratory morbidity for symptoms associated with shortness of breath, whereas men usually had a higher prevalence of phlegm. There were few differences in work exposures apart from perception of exposure to ETS among hospitality workers. Gender differences in symptoms were often reduced after adjustment for personal and work characteristics but for respiratory therapists there were even greater gender disparities for asthma attack and breathing trouble. Population health findings of elevated symptoms among women were only partially supported by these occupational respiratory health surveys. The influence of differential exposures and personal factors should be considered when interpreting gender differences in health outcomes.

Dimich-Ward, Helen [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada)]. E-mail: hward@interchange.ubc.ca; Camp, Patricia G. [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); James Hogg iCapture Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6 (Canada); Kennedy, Susan M. [School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal comfort measurements. CEDR-WP03-93. M. Foster, T.C BENTON, Arch Cain Diaz, CEDR, KYLE STAS Konis, PhD, ArchMasters, Arch Cain Diaz, CEDR, KYLE STAS Konis, PhD, Arch

Konis, Kyle Stas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal comfort measurements. CEDR-WP03-93. M. Foster, T.C BENTON, Arch Cain Diaz, CEDR, KYLE STAS Konis, PhD, ArchMasters, Arch Cain Diaz, CEDR, KYLE STAS Konis, PhD, Arch

Konis, Kyle Stas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A multi-sensor based occupancy estimation model for supporting demand driven HVAC operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is a major energy consumer in buildings, and implementing demand driven HVAC operations is a way to reduce HVAC related energy consumption. This relies on the availability of occupancy information, which ... Keywords: HVAC, building energy consumption, demand driven, non-intrusive sensor, occupancy estimation

Zheng Yang; Nan Li; Burcin Becerik-Gerber; Michael Orosz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1 A. K. McMahan,2 M. D a systematic analysis of the spectral properties of -plutonium with varying 5f occupancy. The LDA Hamiltonian properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, plutonium is probably the most complicated element

380

Using Monte-Carlo simulation for risk assessment: application to occupational exposure during remediation works  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to apply the Monte-Carlo techniques to develop a probabilistic risk assessment. The risk resulting from the occupational exposure during the remediation activities of a uranium tailings disposal, in an abandoned uranium mining ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, occupational exposure, risk and dose assessment, uranium tailings disposal

M. L. Dinis; A. Fiúza

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services contract at the Hanford Site. The solicitation is for a small-business contractor to perform occupational medical services for the DOE Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection.

383

OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control conditioning strategies. Using strategies based on sensor network occupancy model predictions, weOBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á Descriptors I.6.5 [Simulation and Modeling]: Model Development; J.7 [Computers In Other Systems]: Command

Cerpa, Alberto E.

384

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MedGate Occupational MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Procurement Cycle System (PCS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management

385

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Focus Area: Vehicle Distance Traveled Reduction Topics: Best Practices Website: ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/fhwahop09029/index.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/review-high-occupancy-vehicle-hov-lan Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report provides an assessment of performance of existing high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane facilities in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes

386

Occupational Medicine in Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Departmental requirements provide for support of both Federal and contractor employees with respect to crisis intervention, assessment, short-term counseling, case management, management consultation, education, and training (and the promotion thereof), and prevention. These include services for all behavioral problems, ensuring that medical evaluations are obtained before or as part of psychiatric evaluations to determine whether behavioral problems are caused by medical conditions. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. 1. Employee Assistance Programs 2. Substance Abuse Programs 1. Employee Assistance Programs Federal Employees Federal Employee Health Services: Occupational Medicine, Employee Assistance, and Workers' Compensation Programs (DOE O 341.1A, 2007)

387

RICHARD WILLIAM HORNUNG. Modeling Occupational Mortality Data with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Statistical methodology for application to survival data has expanded rapidly in the last two decades. Increasing interest in the field of occupational health demands that the current state-of-the-art in modeling exposure-risk relationships be utilized in assessing potential dangers to worker health. It is the aim of this research to investigate the more sophisticated survivorship models in producing a quantitative risk assessment of lung cancer in U.S. uranium miners. The Cox proportional hazards model was chosen for this purpose. A variety of risk functions are examined, with a power function model providing the best fit. A number of risk factors influence the exposure-response relationship. Among these are a strong independent multiplicative effect of cigarette smoking t a positive effect for age at initial exposure, and a negative effect for time since last exposure. The nature of the temporal effects suggest that

Richard W; Richard W; Michael J. Symons

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Viewpoint on occupational health in the oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the potential health and safety hazards which may be expected in a large-scale oil shale industry, the types of operations that will be utilized to extract oil from oil shale are examined. These are broadly characterized as mining, raw shale processing and handling, retorting and refining, and spent shale disposal. With few exceptions, these operations in shale oil production are similar to operations in existing industries. Health and safety risks and occupational health controls are also expected to be similar. To date medical studies on workers in the oil shale industry who have been exposed to shale dusts and oil products have indicated that the chief problem areas are pneumoconiosis and skin cancers. A broad viewpoint of the prospective occupational health problems in the oil shale industry can be obtained by reviewing similar activities and exposures in other industrial operations. This viewpoint would suggest that the prospective problems can be controlled adequately by conventional methods of worker protection. Several unique situations do exist in this industry. The mining and material handling of tonnages of oil shale exceeds any experience in other mining activities. This is a problem of scale. It seems unlikely that it will produce new safety problems. The in situ mining offers the unique situation of burning and abandoned underground retorts in near proximity to work forces preparing future in situ retorts. The potential of exposures to dusts, gases and vapors will simply have to be measured as such operations come on stream. Measurements made to date have not shown unique hazards to exist, although existing data are limited to demonstration-scale retorts burning one-at-a-time under normal conditions.

Voelz, G.L.; Grier, R.S.; Hargis, K.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar radiation through an air conditioned building depends on what is called the building envelope. Building envelope consists of the surfaces that separate the inside from the building outdoors. Area, direction, and specifications of glass walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal resistance in air conditioned buildings. Effect of glass wall radiation temperature on the indoor temperature distribution of building rooms is also investigated. Heat gain through various types of glass is discussed. Optimization and testing of these types are carried out theoretically and experimentally as well. A series of experiments on different types of glass with special strips is performed.

Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Simulation-assisted building energy performance improvement using sensible control decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The building sector contributes significantly to global energy consumption and emission of greenhouse gases. Thermal insulation along with installation of energy-efficient building systems can reduce energy needs while preserving or improving occupant ... Keywords: adaptive optimization, energy efficiency in buildings, large-scale systems, non-linear systems

M. F. Pichler; A. Dröscher; H. Schranzhofer; G. D. Kontes; G. I. Giannakis; E. B. Kosmatopoulos; D. V. Rovas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, January 19--22, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted January 19--22, 1993 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 covers examination results, and Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments, and Appendix B provides the evaluation form.

Wright, T.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, January 19--22, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted January 19--22, 1993 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 covers examination results, and Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments, and Appendix B provides the evaluation form.

Wright, T.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy efficient building environment control strategies using real-time occupancy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate control systems often rely on building regulation maximum occupancy numbers for maintaining proper temperatures. However, in many situations, there are rooms that are used infrequently, and may be heated or cooled needlessly. Having knowledge ...

Varick L. Erickson; Yiqing Lin; Ankur Kamthe; Rohini Brahme; Amit Surana; Alberto E. Cerpa; Michael D. Sohn; Satish Narayanan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Energy Edge, Post-Occupancy Evaluation Project: The Eastgate Corporate Center Bellevue, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Workspace Satisfaction Survey measures occupant satisfaction with the thermal, lighting, acoustical, and air quality aspects of the work environment. In addition to ratings of these ambient environmental features, occupants also rate their satisfaction with a number of functional and aesthetic features of the office environment as well as their satisfaction with specific kinds of workspaces (e.g. computer rooms, the lobby, employee lounge, etc.) Each section on ambient conditions includes questions on the frequency with which people experience particular kinds of discomforts or problems, how much the discomfort bothers them, and how much it interferes with their work. Occupants are also asked to identify how they cope with discomfort or environmental problems, and to what extent these behaviors enable them to achieve more satisfactory conditions. This report documents the results of this survey of the occupants of the Eastgate Corporate Center, Bellevue, Washington. 21 figs., 7 tabs.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

START: an automated tool for serial analysis of chromatin occupancy data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary: The serial analysis of chromatin occupancy technique (SACO) promises to become a widely used method for the unbiased genome-wide experimental identification of loci bound by a transcription factor of interest. We describe the first web-based ...

Voichita D. Marinescu; Isaac S. Kohane; Tae-Kyung Kim; David A. Harmin; Michael E. Greenberg; Alberto Riva

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191. Source: 58 FR 65485, Dec. 14, 1993, unless otherwise noted. Subpart A-General Provisions 835.1 Scope. (a)...

399

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A field study of the actual lighting savings achievable from occupancy sensor use was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The study involved two seperate field assessments. The objective of the first test was to assess and effectively quantify the potential ``wasted-light`` hours associated with different occupant and space types associated with occupancy sensor control installations. These quantities are the primary factor in determining actual lighting energy savings associated with occupancy lighting control. The second test was conducted to explore the potential additional savings from more sensitive sensor equipment or better equipment adjustment that might reduce the need for delay timers. This information provides quantitative insight into the energy savings lost because of the limitations of current sensing equipment.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Occupational Health and Safety Database, 1995-2011: Injury Surveillance Highlights 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptive highlights are presented from the 2012 data reporting year of the Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program as a preliminary assessment of this long-term injury and illness surveillance program for the electric sector. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD currently integrates 17 years of personnel, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the U.S. national Smart Grid activity coordinated by theor occupant comfort. While smart-grid developments may

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Development of Occupational Exposure Limits for the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Production of plutonium for the United States’ nuclear weapons program from the 1940’s to the 1980’s generated 53 million gallons of radioactive chemical waste, which is storedin 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern W 18 ashington State. Recent 19 attempts to begin the retrieval and treatment of these wastes require moving the waste to 20 more modern tanks results in potential exposure of the workers to unfamiliar odors 21 emanating from headspace in the tanks. Given the unknown risks involved, workers 22 were placed on supplied air respiratory protection. CH2M HILL, the managers of the 23 Hanford Site Tank Farms, asked an Independent Toxicology Panel (ITP) to assist them in issues relating to an Industrial Hygiene and risk assessment problem. The ITP was called upon to help determine the risk of exposure to vapors from the tanks, and in general develop a strategy for solution of the problem. This paper presents the methods used to determine the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) and the resultant development of screening values and Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for these COPCs. A total of 1,826 chemicals were inventoried and evaluated. Over 1,500 chemicals were identified in the waste tanks headspaces and more than 600 of these were assigned screening values; 72 of these compounds were recommended for AOEL development. Included in this list of 72 were 57 COPCs identified by the ITP and of these 47 were subsequently assigned AOELs. An exhaustive exposure assessment strategy was developed by the CH2M HILL industrial hygiene department to evaluate these COPCs.

Still, Kenneth; Gardner, Donald; Snyder, Robert; Anderson, Thomas; Honeyman, James; Timchalk, Charles

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nyland, Jennifer F. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lighting Group: Controls: IBECS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBECS IBECS Integrated Building Environmental Communications System Objective The overall technical goal of the IBECS project is to develop an integrated building equipment communications network that will allow appropriate automation of lighting and envelope systems to increase energy efficiency, improve building performance, and enhance occupant experience in the space. This network will provide a low-cost means for occupants to control local lighting and window systems, thereby improving occupant comfort, satisfaction and performance. A related goal is to improve existing lighting control components and accelerate development of new daylighting technologies that will allow daylighting to be more extensively applied to a larger proportion of building floor space.

405

Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters Diamondoids Improve Electron Emitters Print Monday, 17 September 2012 12:02 Diamondoids are nanoparticles made of only a handful of carbon...

407

Integrated Framework toward a Closed Loop Measurement and Verification Shankar Earni, Phil Coleman, Mark Sanders, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aging buildings to achieve desired building occupant comfort needed to maintain worker productivity companies (ESCOs). An ESPC project allows an agency to reallocate its utility and building O&M expenses to pay for energy system infrastructure improvements from the resulting cost savings. In ESPCs

408

ANCCA, an estrogen-regulated AAA+ ATPase coactivator for ER alpha, is required for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification June X.at the ER target chromatin. Moreover, mutations at the ATPco-regulator complexes at chromatin is a process facilitated

Zou, June X; Revenko, Alexey S; Li, Li B; Gemo, Abigael T; Chen, Hong-Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

410

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1136-2009 1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

411

Coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations for high-field electron transport  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that in the framework of balance-equation approach, the coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations can be used as a complete set of equations to determine the high-field transport of semiconductors in both strong and weak electron-electron interaction limits. We call to attention that the occupation rate equation conserves the total particle number and maintains the energy balance of the relative electron system, and there is no need to introduce any other term in it. The addition of an energy-drift term in the particle-occupation rate equation [Phys. Rev. B 71, 195205 (2005)] is physically inadequate for the violation of the total particle-number conservation and the energy balance. It may lead to a substantial unphysical increase of the total particle number by the application of a dc electric field.

Lei, X. L. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences  

SciTech Connect

Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P.; Sullivan, Greg P.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wednesday Wednesday November 4, 1998 Part III Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 835 Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule 59662 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 213 / Wednesday, November 4, 1998 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 835 [Docket No.: EH-RM-96-835] RIN 1901-AA59 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory-

415

Improving Relocatable Classroom HVAC For Improved IEQ And Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Relocatable Classroom HVAC For Improved IEQ And Energy Efficiency Title Improving Relocatable Classroom HVAC For Improved IEQ And Energy Efficiency Publication Type...

416

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 7, 1997 May 7, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices" BACKGROUND: The Department and its contractors are responsible for ensuring that a safe and healthy work environment is provided to Department and contractor employees at its operating facilities. Contractors are responsible for establishing a comprehensive occupational safety and health program, which includes reporting of significant work- related employee injuries. The Department is responsible

417

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates  

SciTech Connect

This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder?s team?from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates  

SciTech Connect

This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Mapping multiple gas/odor sources in an uncontrolled indoor environment using a Bayesian occupancy grid mapping based method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of autonomously localizing multiple gas/odor sources in an indoor environment without a strong airflow. To do this, a robot iteratively creates an occupancy grid map. The produced map shows the probability each discrete ... Keywords: Gas source localization, Gas source mapping, Indoor monitoring, Occupancy grid mapping

Gabriele Ferri; Michael V. Jakuba; Alessio Mondini; Virgilio Mattoli; Barbara Mazzolai; Dana R. Yoerger; Paolo Dario

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences an individual GRE is highly conserved. In this study, we examined whether sequence conservation of sites re, we found that the level of conservation of these sites at genes up-regulated by glucocorticoids

Yamamoto, Keith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ZonePAC: Zonal Power Estimation and Control via HVAC Metering and Occupant Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating Ventillation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems account for nearly 40% of primary energy consumption by commercial buildings. Yet, these systems by and large operate in an open-loop with the building occupants. While the monitoring and feedback ... Keywords: Energy Estimation, HVAC, Thermostat, User Interface, Variable Air Volume

Bharathan Balaji, Hidetoshi Teraoka, Rajesh Gupta, Yuvraj Agarwal

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

Colley, D.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Domain experts' knowledge-based intelligent decision support system in occupational shoulder and neck pain therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research develops a fuzzy knowledge-based decision support system (FKBDSS) that measures and predicts the degree of severity of the work-related risk associated with shoulder and neck pain (SNP) that is a prevalent pain complaint in an occupational ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy processing, Domain expert, Fuzzy knowledge-based decision support system, Fuzzy set theory, Musculoskeletal disorder, Shoulder and neck pain

T. Padma; P. Balasubramanie

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The smart thermostat: using occupancy sensors to save energy in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) is the largest source of residential energy consumption. In this paper, we demonstrate how to use cheap and simple sensing technology to automatically sense occupancy and sleep patterns in a home, and how to use ... Keywords: building energy, home monitoring, programmable thermostats, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Tamim Sookoor; Vijay Srinivasan; Ge Gao; Brian Holben; John Stankovic; Eric Field; Kamin Whitehouse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

When Callings Are Calling: Crafting Work and Leisure in Pursuit of Unanswered Occupational Callings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scholars have identified benefits of viewing work as a calling, but little research has explored the notion that people are frequently unable to work in occupations that answer their callings. To develop propositions on how individuals experience and ... Keywords: calling, job crafting, psychological well-being, regulatory focus, self-regulation, work orientation

Justin M. Berg; Adam M. Grant; Victoria Johnson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response HVAC control strategy," in proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing SystemsA Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University into building conditioning system for usage based demand control conditioning strategies. Using strategies based

Cerpa, Alberto E.

427

BOFAR: buffer occupancy factor based adaptive router for mesh NoCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the route computation operation in an adaptive router returns more than one output channels, the selection strategy chooses one from them based on the congestion metric used. The effectiveness of a selection strategy depends on what metric is used ... Keywords: adaptive routers, buffer occupancy, network-on-chip

John Jose; J. Shiva Shankar; K. V. Mahathi; Damarla Kranthi Kumar; Madhu Mutyam

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

11 Jul 2007 (updated 3 Feb 2009) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-005-R003 1 of 1 Authorization to Release Occupational Exposure Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information concerning the internal and external occupational radiation dose I received while at SLAC. (Please Occupational Exposure Information To obtain this authorization, print this form, fill it in, sign it

Wechsler, Risa H.

429

Improved Perturbation Theory for Improved Lattice Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a systematic improvement of perturbation theory for gauge fields on the lattice; the improvement entails resumming, to all orders in the coupling constant, a dominant subclass of tadpole diagrams. This method, originally proposed for the Wilson gluon action, is extended here to encompass all possible gluon actions made of closed Wilson loops; any fermion action can be employed as well. The effect of resummation is to replace various parameters in the action (coupling constant, Symanzik coefficients, clover coefficient) by ``dressed'' values; the latter are solutions to certain coupled integral equations, which are easy to solve numerically. Some positive features of this method are: a) It is gauge invariant, b) it can be systematically applied to improve (to all orders) results obtained at any given order in perturbation theory, c) it does indeed absorb in the dressed parameters the bulk of tadpole contributions. Two different applications are presented: The additive renormalization of fermion masses, and the multiplicative renormalization Z_V (Z_A) of the vector (axial) current. In many cases where non-perturbative estimates of renormalization functions are also available for comparison, the agreement with improved perturbative results is significantly better as compared to results from bare perturbation theory.

M. Constantinou; H. Panagopoulos; A. Skouroupathis

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments Recently completed analyses suggest that improving buildings and indoor environments could reduce health-care costs and sick leave and increase worker performance, resulting in an estimated productivity gain of $30 to $150 billion annually. The research literature provides strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and their indoor environments influence the prevalence of several adverse health effects. These include communicable respiratory disease (e.g., common colds and influenza), allergy and asthma symptoms, and acute sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms such as headaches, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. For example, in six studies, the number of respiratory illnesses in building occupants varied by a factor of 1.2 to

431

Your Improvement Suggestions Requested  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Once you have joined, click on the Subgroup tab and chose Improvement Day 2010. By E-mail. If you can't create a LinkedIn ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

433

Methods to improve school design in Sierra Leone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most schools in Sierra Leone are constructed using a standard design with little variation from building to building. They are relatively high-cost and have poor ventilation, lighting and thermal comfort. In January 2010, ...

Clonts, Kelly A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Improving energy efficiency in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment -- office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reducing energy consumption without compromising the quality of products in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment and maintaining the comfort of employees is of critical important in maintaining the financial viability ...

Li, Wu, M. Eng Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Improved plug valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved plug valve wherein a novel shape for the valve plug and valve chamber provide mating surfaces for improved wear characteristics is described. The novel shape of the valve plug is a frustum of a body of revolution of a curve known as a tractrix, a solid shape otherwise known as a pseudosphere.

Wordin, J.J.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Improved wire chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

Atac, M.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 6 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process Document Number: P-006 Rev 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): P-008 Corrective-Preventive Action Process, P-004 Business System Management Review and REG-003 Records Register P-006 Measurement, Analysis, and Improvement Process 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0416 Changed verbiage in Step 6 to, "CAR/PAR/IO using P-008, Corrective-Preventive Action & Improvement Opportunity"

439

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

440

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Industrial Hygiene program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FEDERAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Attachment E: Physician Treatment Orders - FOH-24 Form (formerly 229-B)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOH-24 (formerly 229-B) rev. 7/01 FOH-24 (formerly 229-B) rev. 7/01 FEDERAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Attachment E: Physician Treatment Orders - FOH-24 Form (formerly 229-B) ALL INFORMATION WILL BE CONSIDERED CONFIDENTIAL Dear Doctor: If you are using this form for allergen immunotherapy, you must provide the information requested in blocks #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, and 12. TO: FOH Occupational Health Center Patient Name:_________________________________________ Diagnosis:______________________________________ Physician's Orders (may attach additional page): 1) Exact Name of Medication 2) Dosage 3) Interval of Administration 4) Method of Administration: ____ SQ ____ IM 5) Expiration Date of Order: (if less than 6 months) 6) First dose of each new multi-dose vial or box of single dose

442

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 December 2006 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1128-98 iii Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1128-98, Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities

443

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

444

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION "" ( "· FROM: DANIEL B. PONE~ SUBJECT: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well- being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. In the context of support to EEOICP, DOE's role is to work on behalf of the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and

445

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR 835 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION LEARNING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Change No: 1 10 CFR 835 Level: Familiar Date:11/1/08 1 10/1/08 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION FAMILIAR LEVEL ___________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. State the scope of 10 CFR 835. 2. Define the following terms. annual limit on intake bioassay contamination area derived air concentration high contamination area radiation weighting factor 3. State the requirements of the general rule. 4. State the radiation protection program requirements. 5. State the requirements of the internal audit.

446

Waste collection in developing countries - Tackling occupational safety and health hazards at their source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management procedures in developing countries are associated with occupational safety and health risks. Gastro-intestinal infections, respiratory and skin diseases as well as muscular-skeletal problems and cutting injuries are commonly found among waste workers around the globe. In order to find efficient, sustainable solutions to reduce occupational risks of waste workers, a methodological risk assessment has to be performed and counteractive measures have to be developed according to an internationally acknowledged hierarchy. From a case study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia suggestions for the transferral of collected household waste into roadside containers are given. With construction of ramps to dump collected household waste straight into roadside containers and an adaptation of pushcarts and collection procedures, the risk is tackled at the source.

Bleck, Daniela, E-mail: bleck.daniela@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany); Wettberg, Wieland, E-mail: wettberg.wieland@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Occupation number and fluctuations in the finite-temperature Bose-Hubbard model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the occupation numbers and number fluctuations of ultra-cold atoms in deep optical lattices for finite temperatures within the Bose-Hubbard model. Simple analytical expressions for the mean occupation number and number fluctuations are obtained in the weak-hopping regime using an interpolation between results from different perturbation approaches in the Mott-insulator and superfluid phases. These analytical results are compared to exact one dimensional numerical calculations using a finite temperature variant of the Density-Matrix Renormalisation Group (DMRG) method and found to have a high degree of accuracy. We also find very good agreement in the crossover ``thermal'' region. With the present approach the magnitude of number fluctuations under realistic experimental conditions can be estimated and the properties of the finite temperature phase diagram can be studied.

L. I. Plimak; M. Fleischhauer; M. K. Olsen

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

449

Occupational Health and Safety Database 2012: Annual Data Reporting Years, 1995-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and identifying research targets for health and safety research in the electric power sector.Results and FindingsThe OHSD integrates 17-years (1995-2011) of personnel, injury, and medical claims data from 18 companies into a single data system. This ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Occupational Health & Safety Annual Report 2000: Injury & Illness in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database that is designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness occurrence. Electric energy company health and safety professionals can use this information for establishing and evaluating injury prevention programs. The database provides the capability for epidemiological monitoring, annual injury/illness reporting, program evaluation, and occupational health and injury research. This report presents the firs...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mine safety: Occupational health -- general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational hazards in the metals and fossil fuel mining environment. Topics include the detection, control and effects of respirable dust, safety aspects of various mining methods, gas detection, and field surveys of specific operations. Some attention is given to legislative aspects of mine safety and benefits to the disabled.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Mine safety: Occupational health -- general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational hazards in the metals and fossil fuel mining environment. Topics include the detection, control and effects of respirable dust, safety aspects of various mining methods, gas detection, and field surveys of specific operations. Some attention is given to legislative aspects of mine safety and benefits to the disabled. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Submitted Citation: Lewis, A; Long, CM; Peterson, MK; Weatherstone, S; Quick, W; Campleman, S; Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power. Submitted to INT J ENVIRON RES PUBLIC HEALTH. Biomass power plants will increasingly contribute to reaching international energy targets for renewable production of electricity and greenhouse gas emission reductions. Biomass combustors, common in small scale, industrial boiler applications, are being developed for ap...

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

454

Occupational Hygiene Aspects of Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition By-Products: Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an inert gas that is present in many different types of electrical utility equipment. While the environmental concerns about this gas have been widely addressed, worker exposure aspects of SF6 decomposition by-products have not been fully explored. To address this knowledge gap, EPRI conducted a workshop on March 12, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. This workshop was designed to 1) address the perspectives of occupational hygiene and engineering ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in Hanford Site facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing the cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include an assessment of the total potential savings from the application of sensors across the entire site. The study involved placing sensor test equipment in multiple office spaces in eight buildings that are part of the Hanford contractor facilities. Further testing was conducted to assess the effects of timer sensitivity adjustments on potential lighting energy savings. The results of this test indicated that up to 100% additional wasted-light energy can be saved by using timer sensitivity settings as low as 2.5 min, which is less than standard factory settings of usually 10 to 20 min. The analysis indicates that savings from lighting operations are affected by the work function and number of occupants in occupied spaces. The availability of daylight in a building space does not appear to have any noticeable aggregate effect on the quantity of wasted-light hours in occupied or unoccupied spaces. An assessment of the total potential savings for the entire Hanford Site included life-cycle costing that followed the federally accepted methodology. The life-cycle cost analysis was performed for a set of possible lighting wattages across the building spaces and occupant types identified from the initial analysis. Under current conditions, the potential savings is estimated to be $525,812/yr at an initial cost of $976,824. The total Net Present Value for the site is estimated at $3,539,926 with a simple payback period of 1.85 years.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

File:03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:54, 12 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:54, 12 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (23 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 11:55, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:55, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (33 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 12:57, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:57, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (31 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

457

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. EM’s TRC and DART case cumulative rate trend lines over the past 15 quarters remain well below comparable industries’ TRC and DART Case rates. For benchmark comparison, the Construction Industry and the Waste Management & Remediation Service Industry numbers are selected to best approximate the complex-wide decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remediation, waste management and facility construction activities contracted by EM

458

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the University of California Merced (UCM), and the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) conducted field studies and modeling analyses in the Classroom and Office Building (COB) and the Science and Engineering Building (S&E) at the University of California, Merced. In the first year, of a planned multiyear project, our goal was to study the feasibility and efficacy of occupancy-based energy management. The first-year research goals were twofold. The first was to explore the likely energy savings if we know the number and location of building occupants in a typical commercial building. The second was to model and estimate people movement in a building. Our findings suggest that a 10-14percent reduction in HVAC energy consumption is possible over typical HVAC operating conditions when we know occupancy throughout the building. With the conclusion of the first-year tasks, we plan to review these results further before this group pursues follow-on funding.

Sohn, Michael D.; Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.; Lin, Yiqing; Brahme, Rohini; Surana, Amit; Narayanan, Satish; Cerpa, Alberto; Ericson, Varick; Kamthe, Ankur

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Evaluation of 2 Rem per Year Occupational Dose Limit: Potential Effects on U.S. Nuclear Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report provides an evaluation of potential impacts on the U.S. nuclear power industry of a reduction in the occupational radiation dose limit from 5 rem per year to 2 rem per year.

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

460

Tapping into social resources to address occupational health : a network analysis of Vietnamese-owned nail salons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social networks in the Vietnamese nail salon industry were studied for their utility in addressing occupational health risks. Major findings include heavy reliance on family networks for fundamental needs, an extensive ...

Doan, Tam Minh-Thi, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

An Improved Humidity Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common feature of all capacitance humidity sensors is their undesirable hysteresis effect due to the unequal adsorption and desorption of water vapor on the surfaces of their dielectric porous materials. To eliminate this error, an improved ...

Shixuan Pang; Hartmut Graßl; Horst Jäger

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2002: Injury and Illness Trends in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many industries, there are no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance systems for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Surveillance Database designed to provide more detailed, precise information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce than is available from other sources....

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2003: Injury and Illness Among the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among some sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many other industries, there is no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance system for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health Surveillance Database to provide detailed information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce. The database facilitates epidemiological monitoring, ongoing ...

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

Surveillance Guides - Continous Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively managing environment, safety, and health issues in a manner that fosters continuous improvement. The activities included in this surveillance help the Facility Representative determine whether safety issues identified through internal contractor, and external DOE or Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board evaluation programs are resolved consistent with the level of safety importance. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 414.1, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information 2.3 DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Investigations of Abnormal Events 2.4 48 CFR 1970.5204, Department of Energy Acquisition

466

Improved energy sealing capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to the need for tapping national energy resources, an improved high temperature sealing material has been developed through the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. Parker Seal was selected as one of the technology transferees from L'Garde Inc. and has optimized this transferred technology for further improved performance capabilities and acceptable plant processing. This paper summarizes Parker Seal's testing and evaluation efforts on L'Garde's Y267 transferred technology for a new geothermal and stream service material. This new product, Parker's E962-85 is described in this paper.

Barsoumian, Jerry L.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

467

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Investigation of Advanced Power Plants and Multiple Use Applications for Single Occupancy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of advanced and conventional drivetrains in a single occupancy vehicle has been undertaken utilizing numerical modeling. The vehicle modeling code Advisor, developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has shown that high efficiency, low power output hybrid vehicle drivetrains can almost double the economy relative to conventional powertrains. Experimental verification of the high efficiency potential of a free piston based electrical generator at 2 kilowatts output has been accomplished. For the purpose of introducing this class of transportation, however, the low cost and robust construction of the conventional drivetrain may be the logical first choice.

Peter Van Blarigan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)  

SciTech Connect

In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korca etj. The Department of Human and Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

Qafmolla, Luan [Centre of Applied nuclear Physics, Tirana (Albania); Hoxhaj, Enver [University 'Luigj GURAKUQI' Shkoder (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect

The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Operations Improvement Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976-1981 timeframe. The first 20% of energy savings, versus the 1972 reference, had already been captured or was in progress via conventional energy conservation methods. The site energy surveys identified attractive investments to save a second 20% of energy use. In early 1982, Exxon Corp. started to apply this same technology to its major facilities to define attractive NO INVESTMENT and LOW INVESTMENT operational improvement savings which could be implemented quickly. This presentation covers Exxon's approach to site energy optimization and the Operations Improvement Survey Program. The Program has identified at many sites, an average of 5% reduction in today's energy costs at No/Low investment plus additional savings in the feedstock and energy supply areas.

Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Improved solar heating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

474

Improved collecting apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved collecting apparatus for small aquatic or airborne organisms such as plankton, larval fish, insects, etc. The improvement constitutes an apertured removal container within which is retained a collecting bag, and which is secured at the apex of a conical collecting net. Such collectors are towed behind a vessel or vehicle with the open end of the conical net facing forward for trapping the aquatic or airborne organisms within the collecting bag, while allowing the water or air to pass through the apertures in the container. The container is readily removable from the collecting net whereby the collecting bag can be quickly removed and replaced for further sample collection. The collecting bag is provided with means for preventing the bag from being pulled into the container by the water or air following therethrough.

Duncan, C.P.

1981-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improving PPM Using Dictionaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method to improve traditional character-based PPM text compression algorithms. Consider a text file as a sequence of alternating words and non-words, the basic idea of our algorithm is to encode non-words and prefixes of words using character-based context models and encode suffixes of words using dictionary models. By using dictionary models, the algorithm can encode multiple characters as a whole, and thus enhance the compression efficiency. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are: 1) it does not require any text preprocessing; 2) it does not need any explicit codeword to identify switch between context and dictionary models; 3) it can be applied to any character-based PPM algorithms without incurring much additional computational cost. Test results show that significant improvements can be obtained over character-based PPM, especially in low order cases.

Hu, Yichuan; Zhang,; Khan, Farooq; Li, Ying

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Membranes Improve Insulation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been determined from extensive tests involving test models and home attics that loose fill and fiber batt insulation does not function as expected by the industry. The reason for this deficiency is current test methods do not accurately predict the magnitude of air infiltration into fiber insulation as used in home attics, radiant heat infiltration into the insulation during summer, or radiant heat loss through the insulation during winter conditions. The use of (1) moisture permeable membranes over the insulation, and (2) layered membranes between fiber batts to form closed cells in the insulation both dramatically improve the efficiency of the fiber insulation. The efficiency of this insulation will be improved to an even greater degree if these membranes reflect radiant heat as well as reduce convection air currents. Extensive tests have also been conducted which show that if moisture permeable membranes are used over fiber insulation, the moisture content of the insulation will be reduced.

Bullock, C. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Improving Floating Point Compression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Improving Floating Point Compression through Binary Masks Leonardo A. Bautista Gomez Argonne National Laboratory Franck Cappello Argonne National Laboratory Abstract-Modern scientific technology such as particle accel- erators, telescopes and supercomputers are producing extremely large amounts of data. That scientific data needs to be processed using systems with high computational capabilities such as supercomputers. Given that the scientific data is increasing in size at an exponential rate, storing and accessing the data is becoming expensive in both, time and space. Most of this scientific data is stored using floating point representation. Scientific applications executed in supercomputers spend a large amount of CPU cycles reading and writing floating point values, making data compression techniques an interesting way to increase computing efficiency.

478

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

479

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Major Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) The Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) was established in October 2000 to further the commercial-scale...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve occupant comfort" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study  

SciTech Connect

A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Karotsis, Georgios [ORNL; Guthrie, Malcolm [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Pradhan, Neelam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

indoor | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

indoor indoor Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

483

text | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

text text Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 50% (2 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 25% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 25% (1 vote) Total votes: 4 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

484

design | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

design design Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor