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1

Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, Supplement B, White River Falls Fish Passage, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

White River Falls are located in north central Oregon approximately 25 miles south of the City of The Dalles. The project site is characterized by a series of three natural waterfalls with a combined fall of 180 ft. In the watershed above the falls are some 120 miles of mainstem habitat and an undetermined amount of tributary stream habitat that could be opened to anadromous fish, if passage is provided around the falls. The purpose of this project is to determine feasibility of passage, select a passage scheme, and design and construct passage facilities. This report provides information on possible facilities that would pass adult anadromous fish over the White River Falls. 25 references, 29 figures, 12 tables. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Studies of fish passage through culverts in Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and biological criteria. Fish Passage Development andHeritage Program and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks,G.M. 1995. Nonanadromous fish passage in highway culverts.

Blank, Matt; Cahoon, Joel; Burford, Drake; McMahon, Tom; Stein, Otto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of...

5

Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows  

SciTech Connect

Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Research and development of fish passage technology  

SciTech Connect

Any fish passage provided at TVA's John Sevier Fossil Plant (JSF) would involve only warmwater species. Although some anadromous (marine) warmwater species (e.g., American shad, blueback herring) are currently passed upstream and downstream through structures deliberately built for that purpose, effectiveness of this technology for passage of adults and young of potential target species (e.g., paddlefish and sauger/walleye) in Cherokee Reservoir is unproven. Downstream passage is by far the larger and more poorly understood subject of fish migration and should be investigated first. Currently, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is conducting research on downstream fish passage (Project RP 2694). It will ultimately be necessary to adapt this information to the target species and site specificity at JSF.

Hackney, P.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek, 2008 Annual Report : February 1, 2008 to January 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect

During the 2008 season, projects completed under BPA project 2000-100-00 included installation of riparian fencing, maintenance of existing riparian fencing, monitoring of at-risk culverts and installation of riparian vegetation along impacted sections of Omak Creek. Redd and snorkel surveys were conducted in Omak Creek to determine steelhead production. Canopy closure surveys were conducted to monitor riparian vegetation recovery after exclusion of cattle since 2000 from a study area commonly known as the Moomaw property. Additional redd and fry surveys were conducted above Mission Falls and in the lower portion of Stapaloop Creek to try and determine whether there has been successful passage at Mission Falls. Monitoring adult steelhead trying to navigate the falls resulted in the discovery of shallow pool depth at an upper pool that is preventing many fish from successfully navigating the entire falls. The Omak Creek Habitat and Passage Project has worked with NRCS to obtain additional funds to implement projects in 2009 that will address passage at Mission Falls, culvert replacement, as well as additional riparian planting. The Omak Creek Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is currently revising the Omak Creek Watershed Assessment. In addition, the group is revising strategy to focus efforts in targeted areas to provide a greater positive impact within the watershed. In 2008 the NRCS Riparian Technical Team was supposed to assess areas within the watershed that have unique problems and require special treatments to successfully resolve the issues involved. The technical team will be scheduled for 2009 to assist the TAG in developing strategies for these special areas.

Dasher, Rhonda; Fisher, Christopher [Colville Confederated Tribes

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

199602000 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

199602000 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER 2501 SW First Avenue, Suite 230, Portland, OR 97201, 2002 Northwest Power Planning Council Attention Judi Hertz Response to ISRP 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite of environmental conditions (e.g., runoff volumes, #12;August 23, 2002 2 199602000 response.doc estuary/ocean

9

The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments 2012 Salmon River Smolt Monitoring Program Trap Submitted To The Fish Passage Center Oversight Board December 30, 2012 #12;G:\\STAFF\\DOCUMENT\\2012 Documents\\2012 Files\\156-12.doc Profile The Fish Passage Center (Center) was first established in 1984

10

Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat

DeHart, Michele [Fish Passage Center of the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - american fish passage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish passage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american fish passage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fish Passage in the United States...

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting fish passage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish passage Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: affecting fish passage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NOAA Restoration Center supports...

13

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0397 March 2008 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0397) Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation); Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), Title of Proposed Project: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project State Involved: Washington (WA) Abstract: BPA proposes to fund modification of the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in

14

Fish injury and mortality in spillage and turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

Spillage rather than turbine passage has generally been considered the more benign route for fish passing hydroelectric stations. However, recent studies utilizing the HI-Z Turb`N Tag recapture technique indicate that fish survival may be similar for these passage routes. Short-term ({<=}1 h) survival rates determined during 25 passage tests at propeller turbines on a variety of fish species were compared with those from six sluice/spill tests. Turbine passage survival data were partitioned by fish size, individual turbine unit size, and efficient or inefficient mode of turbine operation. The survival rate in all the turbine passage tests ranged from 81 to 100% (median 96%). Survival estimates were generally similar over the entire range of turbine discharges tested and regardless of operational mode for fish {<=}200 mm (93 to 100%; median 96%). However, studies on fish >200 mm where smaller turbines operated inefficiently were more variable. Estimated survival rates of 81 to 86% were obtained for these larger fish. These latter studies occurred at horizontal propeller type turbines where an inefficient wicket gate or turbine blade setting was tested. Survival rates obtained during the sluice/spill tests ranged from 93 to 100%, with a median of 98%. Although fish species or size did not appear an important factor, the physical characteristics of the sluice/spill area apparently did affect survival. Unobstructed spills yielded higher survival rates. Since similar passage survival rates were obtained for turbine passage (96%) compared to spill passage (98%), the strategy of diverting fishes over spillways or through bypasses should be reexamined. This is especially true when bypasses or spills are suggested as mitigation to protect emigrating juvenile anadromous fishes. Whichever strategy is chosen a quantitative evaluation of each route should be undertaken.

Heisey, P.G.; Mathur, D.; Euston, E.T. [RMC Environmental Services, Drumore, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Improving hydroturbine pressures to enhance salmon passage survival and recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of turbine pressure data collection and barotrauma studies relative to fish passage through large Kaplan turbines and how this information may be applied to safer fish passage through turbines. The specific objectives are to 1) discuss turbine pressures defined by Sensor Fish releases; 2) discuss what has been learned about pressure effects on fish and the factors influencing barotrauma associated with simulated turbine passage; 3) elucidate data gaps associated with fish behavior and passage that influence barotrauma during turbine passage; 4) discuss how the results of these studies have led to turbine design criteria for safer fish passage; and 5) relate this information to salmon recovery efforts and safer fish passage for Atlantic and Pacific salmonids.

Trumbo, Bradly A.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Renholods, Jon F.; Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

SciTech Connect

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish hrough Navigation Locks and Use OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 352 #12;Cover Photograph.- Brailing fish from haul seine into live car. #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effects of hydroelectric turbine passage on fish early life stages  

SciTech Connect

Turbine-passage mortality has been studied extensively for juveniles and adults of migratory fish species, but few studies have directly quantified mortality of fish eggs and larvae. An analysis of literature relating to component stresses of turbine passage (i.e., pressure changes, blade contact, and shear) indicates that mortality of early life stages of fish would be relatively low at low-head, bulb turbine installations. The shear forces and pressure regimes normally experienced are insufficient to cause high mortality rates. The probability of contact with turbine blades is related to the size of the fish; less than 5% of entrained ichthyoplankton would be killed by the blades in a bulb turbine. Other sources of mortality (e.g., cavitation and entrainment of fish acclimated to deep water) are controlled by operation of the facility and thus are mitigable. Because turbine-passage mortality among fish early life stages can be very difficult to estimate directly, it may be more fruitful to base the need for mitigation at any given site on detailed knowledge of turbine characteristics and the susceptibility of the fish community to entrainment. 7 refs., 1 fig.

Cada, G.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005  

SciTech Connect

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS  

SciTech Connect

A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

DOE/EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (November 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0397 November 2008 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BON N E V I L L E POW E R AD M I N I S T R A T I O N DOE/BP-3957 November 2008 Lyle Falls Fish Passage Facility Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife U.S.D.A. Forest Service November 2008 Lyle Falls Fish Passage Facility Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) DOE/EIS-0397

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult fish passage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adult fish passage Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ADULT SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 6 FISH AND WILDLIFE...

27

Alternatives for physically modifying John Sevier detention dam to allow fish passage  

SciTech Connect

Studies conducted in the vicinity of John Sevier Steam-Electric Plant (JSF) indicated some modification of the fish assemblage from that expected. By blocking movements of fish between Cherokee Reservoir and the upper Holston River, John Sevier detention dam has affected the fisheries in both systems. Providing passage for river-spawning fish at John Sevier detention dam might improve fish communities and fisheries in Cherokee Reservoir as well as upstream habitats. This would include enhanced reproductive success of river-spawning species found in Cherokee Reservoir (e.g., white bass and possibly striped bass and paddlefish) and repopulation of John Sevier Reservoir and the upper Holston River by several species presently found only downstream of the detention dam. TVA has identified and studied several alternatives that alone or in combination might improve the fisheries. Cost estimates were developed for three alternatives. These three alternatives with cost estimates are discussed briefly along with two other alternatives for which cost estimates have not been made. Merits of the three alternatives which have at least some possibility to improve migratory fish stocks are discussed in detail. 5 references.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations  

SciTech Connect

One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fish Passage at UDOT Culverts: Prioritization and Assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??State Departments of Transportation are becoming more involved in providing Aquatic Organism Passage (AOP) at road-stream crossings. Department of Transportation (DOT) emphasis on AOP has… (more)

Beavers, Aaron Evens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

SciTech Connect

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009  

SciTech Connect

Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 27. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised April 2006 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 27.1. Notation Table 27.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4π 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident particle energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4π 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization

37

EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

38

DOE/EIS-0397: Record of Decision for the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (2/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT RECORD OF DECISION Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. In addition to improving fish passage to the upper part of the Klickitat River watershed, the modifications will facilitate collection and monitoring of biological information for future fishery management and enhance opportunities for adult salmonids to access and utilize habitat in the upper Klickitat River. This decision implements the Proposed Action and Preferred Alternative identified in the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (Lyle Falls) EIS (DOE/EIS-0397, November 2008). BPA was

39

Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration S-1 Executive Summary S.1 Chapter 1: Purpose of and Need for Action The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (YN) have requested funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to modify the existing Lyle Falls Fishway located on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. This fishway is owned by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and operated by the YN. The US Forest Service (USFS) administers portions of the Klickitat River and its corridor under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act). Lyle Falls, at river mile (RM) 2.2 of the Klickitat River, prevents some upstream migrating fish from reaching the upper watershed, especially when flows are low. The

40

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume I..  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developed to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost ratio of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. 28 figs., 23 tabs.

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fish Assemblages in Manistee River Tributaries: Longitudinal Distribution Analysis, Seasonal Variation, and Riparian Improvement Evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sedimentation affects both stream physical and biological integrity. Improperly designed stream passage accompanied with sedimentation and altered hydrology can impede fish passage and reduce fish… (more)

Gressick, Nicholas J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower Turbines Background One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S. is the provision of adequate fish passage at projects. Mortality of downstream migrating fish, particularly as a result of passing through hydropower

45

An Analysis of Stream Culvert Fish Passage on the Navy Railroad Line between Bremerton and Shelton, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Navy railroad service line runs between Shelton, Bremerton, and Silverdale, and is used by the Navy to transfer freight to its facilities. It is also used by commercial clients to ship service items and bulk cargo for municipalities along portions of the route. Culverts of various size and construction convey streams and stormwater runoff under the railroad line. These allow transfer of water and, in some cases allow for passage of juvenile and adult salmon into waters upstream of the culverts. As part of this project, 21 culverts along a 34-mile reach (Shelton to Bremerton) of this railroad were surveyed to evaluate their function and ability to allow salmon to utilize the streams. The culverts and attached watersheds were evaluated using criteria developed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to assign a Priority Index (PI) to barriers present on each fish-bearing stream. The PI is a relative numeric rating indicator, assigned using consistent criteria related to the degree of potential habitat gained by removing barriers and improving the function of the watershed. Of the 21 culverts evaluated, five were found to be complete fish-passage barriers and six were found to be partial barriers, primarily to juvenile salmon. Three of these culverts had PI ratings above 10 and five others had ratings between 7 and 10. Corrective action can be taken based on any PI rating, but the WDFW normally assigns lower priority to projects with PI scores lower than 15. Several of the stream and culverts had previously been evaluated for structural integrity and function and have been scheduled for repair. A narrative indicating the condition of the culvert has been prepared as well as a table indicating the PI scores and a summary of recommendations for action for each culvert.

May, Christopher W.; Miller, Martin C.; Southard, John A.

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Idaho Fish Screening Improvements Final Status Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project funds two Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) fish habitat biologists to develop, secure funding for, and implement on-the-ground fish habitat improvement projects in the lower Clearwater River drainage and the upper Salmon River drainage. This report summarizes project activity during the first year of funding. The Clearwater Region fish habitat biologist began work on January 28, 2008 and the Salmon Region habitat biologist began on February 11, 2008.

Leitzinger, Eric J.

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

G:\\STAFF\\DOCUMENT\\2011 Documents\\2011 Files\\37-11.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powerhouse and juvenile bypass passage. Acoustic tag data may have the most appropriate application in basic

48

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

LOVE ET AL.: FISH ASSEMBLAGE IN THE ANACAPA PASSAGE CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 48, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and 2001­04, using a manned research submersible, we surveyed the fish assemblage on rocky outcrops below 30 m re- main very poorly described. With the exception of a semi-quantitative survey of some of the fish assemblages of oil platforms and natural reefs in 30 to 360 m of water in southern California

Love, Milton

53

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

Hamza, Iqbal

54

Effects of Water Velocity and Trash Rack Architecture on Juvenile Fish Passage and Interactions: A Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species have experienced population declines due to modification of estuarine ecosystems. Fish screens (or for many urban, agricultural, and industrial activities (FAO and DVWK 1996). Current- ly, the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to spawn, and juveniles of these species move down these rivers to the ocean, where

Anderson, Todd

55

FISH PASSAGE CENTER OVERSIGHT BOARD Meeting Notes for August 11, 2008 Spokane, Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amendments to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife (F&W) Program regarding, he said. The first involves who submits a request for a study. It would be good if the correspondence doing that. The second issue involves the questions raised about the role of ocean conditions

56

Quantifying Barotrauma Risk to Juvenile Fish during Hydro-turbine Passage  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a method for hydro turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine engineering design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed hydro turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism (stressor) and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, engineers and biologists can identify the more-promising designs and operating conditions to minimize hydraulic conditions hazardous to passing fish. In this paper, the BioPA method is applied to estimate barotrauma induced mortal injury rates for Chinook salmon exposed to rapid pressure changes in Kaplan-type hydro turbines. Following the description of the general method, application of the BioPA to estimate the probability of mortal injury from exposure to rapid decompression is illustrated using a Kaplan hydro turbine at the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest region of the USA. The estimated rates of mortal injury increased from 0.3% to 1.7% as discharge through the turbine increased from 334 to 564 m3/s for fish assumed to be acclimated to a depth of 5 m. The majority of pressure nadirs occurred immediately below the runner blades, with the lowest values in the gap at the blade tips and just below the leading edge of the blades. Such information can help engineers focus on problem areas when designing new turbine runners to be more fish-friendly than existing units.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

58

Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?  

SciTech Connect

Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

59

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design: Analysis of Barriers to Upstream Fish Migration, Volume IV of IV, Investigation of the Physical and Biological Conditions Affecting Fish Passage Success at Culverts and Waterfalls, 1982-1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

A synopsis of the project components was prepared to provide an overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists or engineers. This short report can be used also by technical persons who are interested in the scope of the project, and as a summary of the three main reports. The contents includes an historical perspective on fishway design which provides the basis for this project. The major project accomplishments and significant additions to the body of knowledge about the analysis and design of fishways are discussed. In the next section the research project organization, objectives and components are presented to familiarize the reader with the scope of this project. The summary report concludes with recommendations for assisting in the enhancement and restoration of fisheries resources from the perspective of fish passage problems and their solution. Promising research topics are included.

Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

California: Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage California: Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage March 6, 2014 - 10:01am Addthis The Electric Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

63

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) procurement of one access easement with a private landowner, (2) design, layout, and implementation of 3.36 miles of instream structure maintenance, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 15.1 miles of fence, (4) revegetation along 3.36 miles of stream, (5) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, (6) extensive interagency coordination, and (7) environmental education activities with local high school students.

Bailey, Timothy D.; Laws, Troy S. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK* Department temperature are known to influence the accuracy of fish bioenergetics models. In an effort to improve the accuracy of a juvenile esocid bioenergetics model, we used a regression-based approach to develop

67

Quantifying mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to simulated hydro-turbine passage  

SciTech Connect

A proportion of juvenile Chinook salmon and other salmonids travel through one or more turbines during seaward migration in the Columbia and Snake River every year. Despite this understanding, limited information exists on how these fish respond to hydraulic pressures found during turbine passage events. In this study we exposed juvenile Chinook salmon to varied acclimation pressures and subsequent exposure pressures (nadir) to mimic the hydraulic pressures of large Kaplan turbines (ratio of pressure change). Additionally, we varied abiotic (total dissolved gas, rate of pressure change) and biotic (condition factor, fish length, fish weight) factors that may contribute to the incidence of mortal injury associated with fish passing through hydro-turbines. We determined that the main factor associated with mortal injury of juvenile Chinook salmon during simulated turbine passage was the ratio between acclimation and nadir pressures. Condition factor, total dissolved gas, and the rate of pressure change were found to only slightly increase the predictive power of equations relating probability of mortal injury to conditions of exposure or characteristics of test fish during simulated turbine passage. This research will assist engineers and fisheries managers in operating and improving hydroelectric facility efficiency while minimizing mortality and injury of turbine-passed juvenile Chinook salmon. The results are discussed in the context of turbine development and the necessity of understanding how different species of fish will respond to the hydraulic pressures of turbine passage.

Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Welch, Abigail E.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

GRANDE RONDE RIVER BASIN FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kathy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration #12;CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . · · . . · . . . . . . i INTRODUCTION

69

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand...

71

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and reconstruction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary of Program activities for the 2004 calendar year (January 1 through December 31, 2004), within each of the four main project phases, including: (1) Implementation--Pre-Work, (2) Implementation--On Site Development, (3) Operation and Maintenance, and (4) Monitoring and Evaluation. This report also summarizes Program Administrative, Interagency Coordination, and Public Education activities.

St. Hilaire, Danny R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program, 1996-2003 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contractual obligations with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's (ODFW), Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement Program (Program). The last Annual Program Report was submitted in 1997, and described projects undertaken in 1995. This report describes Program activities carried out in 2003, along with a summary of projects undertaken during the years 1996 through 2002. The Program works cooperatively with private landowners to develop long-term restoration agreements, under which, passive and active Habitat Improvement Projects are conducted. Historically, projects have included livestock exclusion fencing (passive restoration) to protect riparian habitats, along with the installation of instream structures (active restoration) to address erosion and improve fish habitat. In recent years, the focus of active restoration has shifted to bioengineering treatments and, more recently, to channel re-design and re-construction aimed at improving fish habitat, by restoring stable channel function. This report provides a summary table of past projects (1996-2002), along with a text description of more extensive habitat improvement projects, including: (1) Implementation of a four-phased project on the Lobato property (Birch Creek) beginning in 1996 and involving a demonstration bioengineering site and riparian improvements (fencing, planting), (2) Implementation of stable channel design/instream structure placement on the Houser property, East Birch Creek, beginning in 1998, an (3) Implementation of a joint, US Army Corps of Engineers/ODFW (cost share) project beginning in 2001 on the Brogoitti property, East Birch Creek, which involved implementation of stable channel design/construction and riparian improvement treatments.

St. Hilaire, Danny R.; Montgomery, Michael; Bailey, Timothy D. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Improving fish farmers' climate change adaptation strategies through information utilisation in Akinyele local government area of Oyo State, Nigeria: implication for sustainable fish production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the information utilisation by fish farmers on climate change adaptation strategies with the view of improving their adaptation to climate change and as well increasing fish production in Nigeria. A survey was carried out to obtain data from the farmers. The data collected were analysed by using frequency count, mean and percentage. Information that could have improved adaptive capacity of farmers on devastating effects of climate change on fish production was not frequently disseminated to the farmers in the study area. Extension education should make evident the variables that hinder fish farmers' information utilisation because inadequate information prevents potential users from using appropriate information on their farms. Effort should therefore be made to promote the dissemination of information on how farmers can adapt to climate change through investment in information technology such as remote sensing. The effort should also include adequate and consistent sponsorship of extension information broadcast on radio and television stations.

Kayode Arimi; Adetola Jenyo-Oni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reading Comprehension Passages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Select one of the passages listed below. Complete the passage by selecting the words that best fit the context of the passage. Press the 'Check My Answers!' button when you are done to see how you did! Attention Teachers!! Add your own reading comprehension passages for your class to use! If you are reading this, your browser is NOT running JavaScript. JavaScript MUST be enabled for this section of our site to work. Once you have turned JavaScript on, reload this page and this warning will go away. The Scientific Method in the Lab* Charges and Electricity The Earth's Energy Budget The Water Cycle The Water Cycle #2* Minerals* 3rd Grade Resources* Where Plants and Animals Live* Internet Safety Looking for Quarks Inside the Atom

77

Fish elevator and method of elevating fish  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

Truebe, Jonathan (Mirror Lake, NH); Drooker, Michael S. (Sanbornville, NH)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Improving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Conservation Biology Vietnam is a tropical country rich in biodiversity. However, biodiversity in Vietnam has forests. Improving the conservation of biodiversity in Vietnam is a contemporary issue of concern. MyImproving Avian Conservation in Northern Vietnam PhD Dissertation, Department of Fish, Wildlife

80

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

California: Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alden hydroelectric will provide a more sustainable option for producing electricity at more than 1,000 estimated environmentally sensitive hydropower facilities and enable hydropower development at thousands of new sites.

84

Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Alden hydroelectric will provide a more sustainable option for producing electricity at more than 1,000 estimated environmentally sensitive hydropower facilities and enable hydropower development at thousands of new sites.

85

passage.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passage Passage of particles through matter 1 1. PASSAGE OF PARTICLES THROUGH MATTER Revised January 2012 by H. Bichsel (University of Washington), D.E. Groom (LBNL), and S.R. Klein (LBNL). 1.1. Notation Table 1.1: Summary of variables used in this section. The kinematic variables β and γ have their usual meanings. Symbol Definition Units or Value α Fine structure constant 1/137.035 999 11(46) (e 2 /4πǫ 0 c) M Incident particle mass MeV/c 2 E Incident part. energy γM c 2 MeV T Kinetic energy MeV m e c 2 Electron mass × c 2 0.510 998 918(44) MeV r e Classical electron radius 2.817 940 325(28) fm e 2 /4πǫ 0 m e c 2 N A Avogadro's number 6.022 1415(10) × 10 23 mol -1 ze Charge of incident particle Z Atomic number of absorber A Atomic mass of absorber g mol -1 K/A 4πN A r 2 e m e c 2 /A 0.307 075 MeV g -1 cm 2 for A = 1 g mol -1 I Mean excitation energy eV (Nota bene! ) δ(βγ) Density effect correction to ionization energy

86

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

SciTech Connect

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Pre-Screen Loss and Fish Facility Efficiency for Delta Smelt at the South Delta's State Water Project, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss.cfm. Trefethen PS. 1968. Fish passage research. Reviewof progress, 1961-66. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service BureauCalifornia Department of Fish and Game Fish Bulletin 136:

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Safer Passage  

SciTech Connect

The successful migration of juvenile salmonids downriver on the Columbia and Snake Rivers to the Pacific Ocean in the United States Pacific Northwest has been challenged due to the multiple hydropower facilities located on these rivers. Because head injury likely results from physical trauma, such as impacting a physical structure or extreme high velocities, the development of a biomarker assay to quickly assess subacute physical injury and recovery is essential to determine the impact of hydropower structures on fish health.

Miracle, Ann L.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Changes in Habitat and Populations of Steelhead Trout, Coho Salmon, and Chinook Salmon in Fish Creek, Oregon; Habitat Improvement, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, began in 1982 as a cooperative venture between the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1987) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Benefit-cost analysis of habitat improvements.

Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B.; Cain, Thomas C. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Parental effects improve escape performance of juvenile reef fish in a high-CO2 world  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...performance of juvenile reef fish in a high-CO2 world Bridie J. M. Allan 1 Gabrielle M...Torregrande, Oristano, Italy Rising CO2 levels in the oceans are predicted to have...parental effects may reduce the impact of high CO2 on the growth, survival and routine metabolic...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coupling of ecological and water quality models for improved water resource and fish management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values of primary producers and other groups to predict fish biomass. Linking the two models will provide the means of going up the food chain by trophic levels. The Chesapeake Bay was chosen as the study site since both models are in use there. Before...

Tillman, Dorothy Hamlin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement C, White River Habitat Inventory, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

More than 130 miles of stream fish habitat was inventoried and evaluated on the Mt. Hood National Forest during the first year of this multi-year project. First year tasks included field inventory and evaluation of habitat conditions on the White River and tributary streams thought to have the highest potential for supporting anadromous fish populations. All streams inventoried were located on the Mt. Hood National Forest. The surveyed area appears to contain most of the high quality anadromous fish habitat in the drainage. Habitat conditions appear suitable for steelhead, coho, and chinook salmon, and possibly sockeye. One hundred and twenty-four miles of potential anadromous fish habitat were identifed in the survey. Currently, 32 miles of this habitat would be readily accessible to anadromous fish. An additional 72 miles of habitat could be accessed with only minor passage improvement work. About 20 miles of habitat, however, will require major investment to provide fish passage. Three large lakes (Boulder, 14 acres; Badger, 45 acres; Clear, 550 acres) appear to be well-suited for rearing anadromous fish, although passage enhancement would be needed before self-sustaining runs could be established in any of the lakes.

Heller, David

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

Villefranche sur mer

99

Fish Passage Center Oversight Board 1 December 13, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minutes for December 13, 2010 ­ Portland, Oregon Participants at the Council's office and by phone: Bruce Oversight Board (FPCOB) chairman Bruce Measure called the meeting to order at 1:35 p.m. and asked, DeHart said. This is the first year we held an annual review on the CSS, she said. The FPC got lots

100

Fish Passage in the Upper Mississippi River System Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were analyzed relative to open (gates out of the water) versus closed (water retained in upstream pool above LDs 22 and 26 and 75% below. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and Western Illinois University (WIU) have also tagged 91 lake sturgeon in pools 20, 24, and the open river, most of which moved

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101

Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage  

SciTech Connect

Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival Proportions at John Day Dam, 2009  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the acoustic telemetry study at JDA during 2009 was to determine the best configuration and operation for JDA prior to conducting BiOp performance standard tests. The primary objective was to determine the best operation between 30% and 40% spill treatments. Route-specific and JDA to TDA forebay survival estimates, passage distribution, and timing/behavior metrics were used for comparison of 30% to a 40% spill treatments. A secondary objective was to evaluate the performance of TSWs installed in spill bays 15 and 16 and to estimate fish survival rates and passage efficiencies under 30% and 40% spill-discharge treatments each season.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Khan, Fenton; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, J. R.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

2011 Fact Sheet EMPLOYMENT & BAR PASSAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Resident $22,339 Non-Resident $30,829 Class of 2010 Employment Statistics Bar Passage Employed (2102011 Fact Sheet ENROLLMENT EMPLOYMENT & BAR PASSAGE ACADEMICS Centers Biodefense, Law, and Public students employed in short-term positions funded by the law school's Copeland Fellows Program. Clinical

Rock, Chris

104

First Passage Time for Stochastic Dynamic System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Passage Time for Stochastic Dynamic System and Climate Modeling Peter C Chu Naval Ocean, P.C., 2007: First passage time analysis on climate indices. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic. Poberezhny, 2002: Power law decay in model predictability skill. Geophysical Research Letters, 29 (15), 10

Chu, Peter C.

105

The Effect of an Externally Attached Neutrally Buoyant Transmitter on Mortal Injury during Simulated Hydroturbine Passage  

SciTech Connect

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing through hydroturbines experience a rapid decrease in pressure as they pass by the turbine blade and the severity of this decompression can be highly variable. This rapid decrease in pressure can result in injuries such as swim bladder rupture, exophthalmia, and emboli and hemorrhaging in the fins and tissues. However, recent research indicates that the presence of a telemetry tag (acoustic, radio, inductive) implanted inside the coelom of a juvenile salmon increases the likelihood that the fish will be injured or die during turbine passage. Thus, previous research conducted using telemetry tags implanted into the coelom of fish may have been inaccurate. Thus, a new technique is needed to provide unbiased estimates of survival through turbines. This research provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter. Both nontagged fish and fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter were exposed to a range of rapid decompressions simulating turbine passage. Juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter did not receive a higher degree of barotrauma than their nontagged counterparts. We suggest that future research include field-based comparisons of survival and behavior among fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter and those internally implanted with transmitters.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

How to Add Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Please follow these instructions for submitting a reading comprehension passage: Use a text editor or word processor to create your reading comprehension passage. Since Jefferson Lab is a basic physics research facility, passages that incorporate some aspect of science are preferred over passages that do not. Make certain that your passage is accessible to a general audience. While you are creating this passage primarily for your classes' benefit, realize that anyone on the internet will be able to view it. The passage should make sense to anyone, not just to those in your class. Check your passage for: Factual accuracy Correct spelling Correct punctuation Proper grammar Once you have your passage, place brackets ([]) around the words you

107

Bodman Statement on House Passage of Energy Bill | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Passage of Energy Bill House Passage of Energy Bill Bodman Statement on House Passage of Energy Bill April 21, 2005 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement today regarding House passage of energy legislation: "I congratulate the House of Representatives for passing comprehensive energy legislation. This bill will put us on a path to affordable and reliable supplies of energy in the future by improving energy efficiency; increasing domestic energy supplies; diversifying our energy sources to include more renewable energy sources; and modernizing our energy delivery system. For the good of American families, the American economy and America's national security, I call on the Senate to pass energy legislation and get a bill to the President's desk by this summer."

108

Eco-Design of River Fishways for Upstream Passage: Application for Hanfeng Dam, Pengxi River, China  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a scientific approach to eco-design of river fishways to allow upstream movement of fish past new and existing dams in China. This eco-design approach integrates principles of fish ecology/behavior and engineering, a scientific field also known as bio-engineering or eco-hydraulics. We define a fishway as a structure or mechanism to convey fish upstream past a dam. Man-made or natural stream beds can be part of the fishway mechanism. Fish include bony and non-bony fishes, and upstream passage is the concern here, not downstream passage. The problem is dams block access to upstream habitat used for spawning, rearing, and refuge, i.e., dams decrease habitat connectivity. A solution to alleviate this problem is to design fishways, preferably while the dam is being designed, but if necessary, as retrofits afterward to provide a route that fish can and will use to pass safely upstream without undue delay. Our eco-design approach for fishways involves eight steps: 1) identify the primary species of importance; 2) understand basic ecology and behavior of these fish; 3) characterize the environmental conditions where passage is or will be blocked; 4 identify fishway alternatives and select a preferred alternative; 5) establish eco-design criteria for the fishway, either from management agencies or, if necessary, developed specifically for the given site; 6) where needed, identify and perform research required to resolve critical uncertainties and finalize the eco-design criteria; 7) apply the eco-design criteria and site-specific considerations to design the fishway, involving peer-review by local stakeholders in the process; 8) build the fishway, monitor its effectiveness, and apply the lessons learned. Example fishways are described showing a range of eco-designs depending on the dam site and fish species of concern. We apply the eco-design principles to recommend an approach and next steps for a fishway to pass fish upstream at Hanfeng Dam, an existing regulating dam forming Hanfeng Lake on the Pengxi River near Kaixian, China.

Johnson, Gary E.; Rainey, William S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - act provisions fishing Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TESTIMONY OF JAMES W. BALSIGER, Ph.D ACTING ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR Summary: , and the fish passage provisions to the Federal Power Act, which all serve to protect and restore...

111

Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by 'free passage' dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

Pontus Ahlqvist; Kate Eckerle; Brian Greene

2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS APPENDIX B FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM B-1 December 15, 1994 Appendix B SUMMARY OF HYDROPOWER COSTS AND IMPACTS OF THE MAINSTEM PASSAGE ACTIONS This document summarizes regional hydropower costs and impacts of the mainstem passage actions in the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1994

113

FISH INSPECTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fish is an important nutritive component of the human diet as it provides protein, energy, and many other essential food elements and thus helps sustain health. Fish also contains unique constituents, such as the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which have various benefits for human health. As fish deteriorates more quickly postmortem than meat derived from terrestrial animals, quick and simple methods are required to confirm fish freshness and quality. This article presents recent methods to determine fish quality.

M. Sato; I.G. Gleadall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

EIS-0397: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project To Improve Fish Passage to Habitat in the Upper Part of the Watershed,...

115

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Overwintering Summer Steelhead Fallback and Kelt Passage at The Dalles Dam Turbines, Early Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of overwintering summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fallback and early out-migrating steelhead kelts downstream passage at The Dalles Dam turbines during early spring 2011. The study was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) to investigate whether adult steelhead are passing through turbines during early spring before annual sluiceway operations typically begin. The sluiceway surface flow outlet is the optimal non-turbine route for adult steelhead, although operating the sluiceway reduces hydropower production. This is a follow-up study to similar studies of adult steelhead passage at the sluiceway and turbines we conducted in the fall/winter 2008, early spring 2009, fall/winter 2009, and early spring 2010. The goal of the 2011 study was to characterize adult steelhead passage rates at the turbines while the sluiceway was closed so fisheries managers would have additional information to use in decision-making relative to sluiceway operations. Sluiceway operations were not scheduled to begin until April 10, 2011. However, based on a management decision in late February, sluiceway operations commenced on March 1, 2011. Therefore, this study provided estimates of fish passage rates through the turbines, and not the sluiceway, while the sluiceway was open. The study period was March 1 through April 10, 2011 (41 days total). The study objective was to estimate the number and distribution of adult steelhead and kelt-sized targets passing into turbine units. We obtained fish passage data using fixed-location hydroacoustics with transducers deployed at all 22 main turbine units at The Dalles Dam. Adult steelhead passage through the turbines occurred on 9 days during the study (March 9, 12, 30, and 31 and April 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9). We estimated a total of 215 {+-} 98 (95% confidence interval) adult steelhead targets passed through the turbines between March 1 and April 10, 2011. Horizontal distribution data indicated Main Unit 18 passed the majority of fish. Fish passage occurred throughout the day. We conclude that adult steelhead passed through turbines during early spring 2011 at The Dalles Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Passage Simulation of Monorail Suspension Conveyors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Th. Wunderlich, Th. Schäfer, St. Auer* Chair of Geodesy June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich Chair of Geodesy ETH Zurich #12;2 ...along narrow passages Z+F June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich Contents · specific-26, 2008 ETH Zurich the result: KOSIMU #12;3 Transport and Assembly Lines June 24-26, 2008 ETH Zurich Task

117

Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

Fernald, Russell

118

Primitive Fishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishes Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 322-A November 23, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITIVE FISHES The history of fish covers such a vast stretch of time that the mind simply cannot grasp its immensity. The beginnings of fish -- or at least the earliest known forms -- and of the fish-like animals that existed before them, are found as fossils in rocks that geologists say were formed 400 million years ago. Sea scorpions, worms, mollusks and all of the other main types of lower animals had already lived in the sea for ages before that. It is a question which of them, if any, gave rise to fish. These older animals had a digestive tube and beneath it, on the side next to the ground, was the brain and nerve cord. The forerunners of fish, however, had the brain and nerve cord above the digestive tube, with a slender rod of gristle in between -- something that no other animal ever had had before. The theory is that this rod later developed into the backbone that is found in all of their modern descendants: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

119

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Robot Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

Hacker, Randi

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTEBRATES OF FISH LAKE CAUTION! FISH LAKE SCAVANGER HUNT RED HEADED is another majestic bird of Fish Lake. These birds can be seen perched at Fish Lake. CLUB-TAIL DRAGONFLY INSECTS OF FISH LAKE There are A LOT

Minnesota, University of

122

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

123

Fish Bait  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Bait Fish Bait Nature Bulletin No. 70 June 15, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FISH BAIT The bass season opens June 15 in the northern zone. Then the number of fishermen doubles because it will no longer be necessary to throw back a bass caught while fishing for crappies, bluegills, bullheads or carp. That breaks a fellow's heart. Fancy tackle is very hard to get this year. But black bass do take worms and minnows, as well as frogs, hellgramites, grasshoppers, crickets and other live baits. The fly-casters and bait-casters, who carry around a tackle box filled with gadgets made of wood, feathers, fur, paint and assorted hardware, have no better luck -- on the average -- than the live bait fishermen at whom they turn up their noses.

124

Releasing recreationally caught fish to fight another day helps ensure there will be fish to catch today,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Releasing recreationally caught fish to fight another day helps ensure there will be fish to catch today, tomorrow, and for anglers in the future. Catch and release fishing done correctly helps preserve your sport. What Do I Need To Know? Releasing a fish in a way which improves its probability

125

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

126

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Passage Retrieval vs. Document Retrieval for Factoid Question Answering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Retrieval vs. Document Retrieval for Factoid Question Answering Charles L. A. Clarke Egidio that identifies documents or pas­ sages where the answer to a question might appear [1--3, 5, 6, 10]. The QA returns the top­ranked documents or passages, and the QA system selects the answers from them. In many QA

Clarke, Charlie

128

Pathways of Barotrauma in Juvenile Salmonids Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Boyle’s Law vs. Henry’s Law  

SciTech Connect

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing by the turbine blade may experience rapid decompression, the severity of which can be highly variable and may result in a number of barotraumas. The mechanisms of these injuries can be due to expansion of existing bubbles or gases coming out of solution; governed by Boyle’s Law and Henry’s Law, respectively. This paper combines re-analysis of published data with new experiments to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of injury and mortality for fish experiencing rapid decompression associated with hydroturbine passage. From these data it appears that the majority of decompression related injuries are due to the expansion of existing bubbles in the fish, particularly the expansion and rupture of the swim bladder. This information is particularly useful for fisheries managers and turbine manufacturers, demonstrating that reducing the rate of swim bladder ruptures by reducing the frequency of occurrence and severity of rapid decompression during hydroturbine passage could reduce the rates of injury and mortality for hydroturbine passed juvenile salmonids.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Brauner, Colin J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Seaburg, Adam

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam through restoring habitat, improving fish passage, protecting and recovering native fish populations, and reestablishing fish...

131

The Influence of Tag Presence on the Mortality of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Hydroturbine Passage: Implications for Survival Estimates and Management of Hydroelectric Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Each year, millions of fish have telemetry tags (acoustic, radio, inductive) surgically implanted to assess their passage and survival through hydropower facilities. One route of passage of particular concern is through hydro turbines, in which fish may be exposed to a range of potential injuries, including barotraumas from rapid decompression. The change in pressure from acclimation to exposure (nadir) has been found to be an important factor in predicting the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon undergoing rapid decompression associated with simulated turbine passage. The presence of telemetry tags has also been shown to influence the likelihood of injury and mortality for juvenile Chinook salmon. This research investigated the likelihood of mortality and injury for juvenile Chinook salmon carrying telemetry tags and exposed to a range of simulated turbine passage. Several factors were examined as predictors of mortal injury for fish undergoing rapid decompression, and the ratio of pressure change and tag burden were determined to be the most predictive factors. As the ratio of pressure change and tag burden increase, the likelihood of mortal injury also increases. The results of this study suggest that previous survival estimates of juvenile Chinook salmon passing through hydro turbines may have been biased due to the presence of telemetry tags, and this has direct implications to the management of hydroelectric facilities. Realistic examples indicate how the bias in turbine passage survival estimates could be 20% or higher, depending on the mass of the implanted tags and the ratio of acclimation to exposure pressures. Bias would increase as the tag burden and pressure ratio increase, and have direct implications on survival estimates. It is recommended that future survival studies use the smallest telemetry tags possible to minimize the potential bias that may be associated with carrying the tag.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gingerich, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Piper L.; Langeslay, Mike; Ahmann, Martin L.; Johnson, Robert L.; Skalski, John R.; Seaburg, Adam; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Inside Passage Elec Coop, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 18963 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Power Commercial Large Power Interruptible Commercial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.5720/kWh Commercial: $0.4600/kWh Industrial: $0.5640/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Inside_Passage_Elec_Coop,_Inc&oldid=410873"

133

First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Quantum state engineering in ion-traps via adiabatic passage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose two relatively robust schemes to generate entangled W states of three (or generally N) ions in ion trap systems by using adiabatic passage technique and appropriately designed ion-field couplings in a ...

M. Amniat-Talab; M. Saadati-Niari; S. Guérin

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Shaken, not stirred: The recipe for a fish-friendly turbine  

SciTech Connect

It is generally agreed that injuries and mortalities among turbine-passed fish can result from several mechanisms, including rapid and extreme water pressure changes, cavitation, shear, turbulence, and mechanical injuries (strike and grinding). Advances in the instrumentation available for monitoring hydraulic conditions and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques now make it possible both to estimate accurately the levels of these potential injury mechanisms in operating turbines and to predict the levels in new turbine designs. This knowledge can be used to {open_quotes}design-out{close_quotes} the most significant injury mechanisms in the next generation of turbines. However, further improvements in turbine design are limited by a poor understanding of the levels of mechanical and hydraulic stresses that can be tolerated by turbine-passed fish. The turbine designers need numbers (biological criteria) that define a safety zone for fish within which pressures, shear forces, cavitation, and chance of mechanical strike are all at acceptable levels for survival. This paper presents the results of a literature review of fish responses to the types of biological stresses associated with turbine passage, as studied separately under controlled conditions in the laboratory rather than in combination at field sites. Some of the controlled laboratory and field studies reviewed here were bioassays carried out for reasons unrelated to hydropower production. Analysis of this literature was used to develop provisional biological criteria for hydroelectric turbine designers. These biological criteria have been utilized in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program to evaluate the results of conceptual engineering designs and the potential value of future turbine models and prototypes.

Cada, G.F.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Servic e, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain a v e rage retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail

137

Fish Biology Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

Jochem, Frank J.

138

Cobra-Fish (combined binary ratio-FISH)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Cobra-Fish process, human chromosomes are painted in 24... combinatorial labeling , FISH , fluorescein ...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Camas Creek (Meyers Cove) Anadromous Species Habitat Improvement: Annual Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect

Populations of wild salmon and steelhead in the Middle Fork of the Salmon River are at historical lows. Until passage and flow problems associated with Columbia River dams are corrected to reduce mortalities of migrating smolts, continuance of habitat enhancements that decrease sediment loads, increase vegetative cover, remove passage barriers, and provide habitat diversity is imperative to maintain surviving populations of these specially adapted fish. In 1987-1988, 4.3 miles of fence was constructed establishing a riparian livestock exclosure. One end-gap and two water-crossing corridors were constructed in 1989 to complete the fence system. Areas within the exclosure have been fertilized to promote tree and shrub root growth and meadow recovery. A stream crossing ford was stabilized with angular cobble. Streambank stabilization/habitat cover work was completed at three sites and three additional habitat structures were placed. Extensive inventories were completed to identify habitat available to anadromous fish. Streambank stabilization work was limited to extremely unstable banks, minimizing radical alterations to an active stream channel. Enhancement activities will improve spawning, incubation, and rearing habitat for wild populations of steelhead trout and chinook salmon. Anadromous species population increases resulting from these enhancement activities will provide partial compensation for downstream losses resulting from hydroelectric developments on the Columbia River system. 10 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

Seaberg, Glen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fish Bulletin No. 96. California Fishing Ports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. 96 California Fishing Ports By W. L. SCOFIELD FIGURE 1.of the more important fishing ports FOREWORD The purpose ofthough it may be, of the 270 ports where commercially caught

Scofield, W L

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FISH PASSAGE CENTER OVERSIGHT BOARD Meeting Notes for May 12, 2008 Walla Walla, Washington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Present: Bruce Measure, John Ferguson, Doug Taki, Dan Goodman, Tony Grover, Steve Crow, Joann Hunt, Kerry Chairman Bruce Measure called the meeting to order and went over the agenda. He said Steve Yundt has taken, he noted. Moving data from the FPC is a minor issue because most of the data is held and maintained

142

FISH PASSAGE CENTER OVERSIGHT BOARD Meeting Notes for October 15, 2007 Missoula, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For example, if the FPC did 300 technical analyses in a year, could the Board do a Quality Assurance/Quality to become a full-fledged member of the Board, instead of an ex-officio member. Discussion of Operating Rules of operating rules to govern its activities. The group agreed that was a good idea and proceeded to review

143

Determination of fission rate by mean last passage time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean last passage time is introduced instead of the mean first passage time for determining the decay rate of a nucleus after induced fission. The stationary fission rate calculated by the inverse of the mean last passage time at the saddle point is in agreement with the result of Langevin simulations and better than that of the mean first passing time at the scission point. In particular, we take into account the backstreaming effect where test particles pass over the potential barrier multiple times. It is shown that the oscillating time of a hot fissioning system around the saddle point is the longest one in time scales of the fission, thus more neutrons might be emitted during this period.

Jing-Dong Bao and Ying Jia

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

A review of fish swimming mechanics and behaviour in altered flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...relation to passage through hydropower turbines: a review. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc...C 2006The role of the lateral line and vision on body kinematics and hydrodynamic preference...relative roles of the lateral line and vision. J. Comp. Physiol. A. 135, 315-325...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Factors affecting stranding of juvenile salmonids by wakes from ship passage in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

The effects of deep-draft vessel traffic in confined riverine channels on shorelines and fish are of widespread concern. In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, wakes and subsequent beach run-up from ships transiting the Lower Columbia River have been observed to strand juvenile salmon and other fish. As part of a before-and-after study to assess stranding effects that may be associated with channel deepening, we measured 19 co-variables from observations of 126 vessel passages at three low-slope beaches and used multiple logistic regression to discern the significant factors influencing the frequency of stranding. Subyearling Chinook salmon were 82% of the fish stranded over all sites and seasons. Given a low-slope beach, stranding frequencies for juvenile salmon were significantly related to river location, salmon density in the shallows, a proxy for ship kinetic energy, tidal height, and two interactions. The beach types selected for our study do not include all the beach types along the Lower Columbia River so that the stranding probabilities described here cannot be extrapolated river-wide. A more sophisticated modeling effort, informed by additional field data, is needed to assess salmon losses by stranding for the entire lower river. Such modeling needs to include river-scale factors such as beach type, berms, proximity to navigation channel, and perhaps, proximity to tributaries that act as sources of out-migrating juvenile salmon. At both river and beach scales, no one factor produces stranding; rather interactions among several conditions produce a stranding event and give stranding its episodic nature.

Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, John R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch canned fish items. The retail prices as contain d h rein for s veral types of canned tuna, canned salmon

148

EXPLANATION FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fish. So, unlike organic contaminants (for example PCBs and dioxins) which concentrate in the skin

149

First-passage percolation with exponential times on a ladder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider first-passage percolation on a ladder, i.e., the graph ? × {0, 1}, where nodes at distance 1 are joined by an edge, and the times are exponentially i.i.d. with mean 1. We find an appropriate Markov chain to calculate an ...

Henrik Renlund

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fish allergy-natural history and crossreactivity between fish species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clinical course of fish allergy is not sufficiently studied. Persistence seems ... the high structural homology of parvalbumins from different fish species, crossreactivity among fishes is common.

George Stavroulakis; Stavroula Giavi…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

SciTech Connect

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Passage OCGen Western Passage OCGen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6755,"lon":-67.014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

Chapter 19 Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 19 Fish This chapter describes fish resources in the project area and how the project...

155

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

156

Fish ladders of doom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Throughout much of South America, fish 'ladders' designed to help ... 'ladders' designed to help fish swim up-river to breeding grounds are actually sending the animals to their death, ...

Matt Kaplan

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Daedalus: Free captive fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The fishing industry is approaching a crisis. Once-rich ... industry is approaching a crisis. Once-rich fishing grounds such as the Grand Banks off Newfoundland are denuded; important species such as ...

David Jones

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

FISH | Catching and Handling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fish, especially as food, are an important resource worldwide. This chapter describes the anatomy, physiology, and composition of fish tissues. It is an easily digestible food and a perfect medium for the growth of the microorganism. The article describes the type of microflora found on newly caught fish. Different processing methods (i.e., freezing, canning, salting and drying, smoking, fermentation, and irradiation) greatly affects the number of microflora on fish.

P. Chattopadhyay; S. Adhikari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hydropower R&D: Recent Advances in Turbine Passage Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that...

160

CANNED FISH .RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH .RETAIL PRICES MA.Y 1959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MAY 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market a population of 30, 500 or over, and pric s w r obtain d by P rson 1 visit of ag nts to th retail stores in th

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labo r Statistics to obtain average retail prices for selected

162

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES NOVEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types, 500 or over, and prices were obtained by personal visits of agents to the retail stores

163

CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES, OC1rOIBrE~ UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INT...n.~""n FISH retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types, 500 or over, and prices were obtained by personal visits of agents to the retail stores

164

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRIUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRIUES FEBRUARY Jl959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES FEBRUARY 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Commercial Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain average retail prices

165

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contra cted with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain av rag retail pric s for se lected

166

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JA.NUARY 11959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JANUARY 195 9 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain average retail prices for se lected

167

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Cabled Acoustic Telemetry System for Detecting and Tracking Juvenile Salmon: Part 2. Three-Dimensional Tracking and Passage Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

In Part 1 of this paper [1], we presented the engineering design and instrumentation of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) cabled system, a nonproprietary technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet the needs for monitoring the survival of juvenile salmonids through the 31 dams in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Here in Part 2, we describe how the JSATS cabled system was employed as a reference sensor network for detecting and tracking juvenile salmon. Time-of-arrival data for valid detections on four hydrophones were used to solve for the three-dimensional (3D) position of fish surgically implanted with JSATS acoustic transmitters. Validation tests demonstrated high accuracy of 3D tracking up to 100 m from the John Day Dam spillway. The along-dam component, used for assigning the route of fish passage, had the highest accuracy; the median errors ranged from 0.06 to 0.22 m, and root mean square errors ranged from 0.05 to 0.56 m at distances up to 100 m. For the case study at John Day Dam during 2008, the range for 3D tracking was more than 100 m upstream of the dam face where hydrophones were deployed, and detection and tracking probabilities of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters were higher than 98%. JSATS cabled systems have been successfully deployed on several major dams to acquire information for salmon protection and for development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Fu, Tao; Seim, Thomas A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Choi, Eric Y.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, Matthew B.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

First-passage percolation with exponential times on a ladder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider first-passage percolation on a ladder, i.e. the graph {0,1,...}*{0,1} where nodes at distance 1 are joined by an edge, and the times are exponentially i.i.d. with mean 1. We find an appropriate Markov chain to calculate an explicit expression for the time constant whose numerical value is approximately 0.6827. This time constant is the long-term average inverse speed of the process. We also calculate the average residual time.

Renlund, Henrik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

172

September 19, 2005 Dear Fish Sellers and Fish Buyers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 September 19, 2005 Dear Fish Sellers and Fish Buyers: Our records indicate you are obligated. (1) WHEN DOES THE FEE BEGIN? The fee begins on: October 17, 2005 (2) WHAT HAPPENS THEN? All fish sellers must pay the fee and all fish buyers must collect the fee for all fee fish landed on October 17

173

iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

Pearce, Jon

174

Changes in fishing power and fishing strategies driven by new technologies: The case of tropical tuna purse seiners in the eastern Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Technological advancements can influence both the fishing power of a fleet and the fishing strategies it employs. To investigate these potential linkages, we examined almost three decades of data (1981–2008) from French tropical tuna purse seiners operating in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Applying a sequence of statistical methods at different temporal and spatial scales, we analyzed two indicators of fishing power (sets per boat-day on fish aggregating devices (FADs) and sets per boat-day on free-swimming schools) each of which represent a distinct fishing mode. Our results show that the increasing modernization of this fleet has led to increases in both fishing power and the available number of fishing strategies to choose from. A key output of this analysis was the breakdown of fishing power time series (for each fishing mode) into separate periods of continuous years during which catchability was assumed to be constant, thus identifying regime shifts. This partitioning allowed us to identify when key changes occurred in the fishery. Changes in FAD-associated fishing were mostly driven by the introduction of radio beacons (early 1990s) which lead to an increase in fishing effort and an expansion of fishing grounds (direct effect) and the implementation of time-area management measures which resulted in a fragmentation of the traditional fishing grounds in the 2000s (indirect effect). During the same period, fishing on free-swimming schools also increased despite the biomass of stocks decreasing and fishing grounds remaining unchanged. This suggests these increases were driven by improvements in fish detection technology (e.g., bird radars, sonar). These identified increases are not entirely unexpected: indeed it is widely recognized that fishing power in the purse seine tuna fishery has increased over time. However, these increases do not necessarily occur linearly. Thus, understanding how fishing power is changing over time (such as determining when regime shifts occur) is critical to improving the CPUE standardization procedure in tropical tuna purse seine fisheries.

Edgar Torres-Irineo; Daniel Gaertner; Emmanuel Chassot; Michel Dreyfus-León

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Primitive Fishing Tackle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishing Tackle Fishing Tackle Nature Bulletin No. 752-A April 19, 1980 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITlVE FISHING TACKLE Fishing is one of man's oldest occupations and the gear used for catching fish has changed but little over the ages. The basic methods in use today -- spearing, trapping, netting and angling -- had their origin among primitive peoples back in prehistoric times. Our modern steel fishhooks have gradually evolved from early crude hooks made from flint, bone, ivory, shell, horn or wood. Thousands of years ago, the Swiss Lake Dwellers and the ancient Egyptians used bronze wire bent into a shape like a youngster's pin hook. Much later some inventive fisherman added a barb to those bronze hooks to hold the fish more securely.

176

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

things? What is the largest fish you ever caught in a trap?Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with line?Kg? Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

BPA Fish Accords  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish-Accords Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

178

Fish in Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of State, Washington, D.C., during September 19-27. Various North American commercial fish organizations also combined to make the gathering a success.

C. L. CUTTING

1961-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Building bridges for fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building-bridges-for-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

180

One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

Mori, Greg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are now increasingly managed to support aquatic ecosystems and fisheries, in addition to traditional humanFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

Pasternack, Gregory B.

182

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

"I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton...

183

One Fish, Two Fish, Small Fish, Huge Fish: Utilizing Zebrafish as a Model for Studying Mitochondrial Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

353-367 Laelle, H. (1977) J Fish Biol 10, 121-174 Koerber,arrow). (I) The heart rates of MitoBloCK-6 treated fish andmorpholino-injected fish were markedly reduced compared with

Johnson, Meghan Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aquaculture: Future fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... s Institute of Aquaculture reveals a secret that most diners are blissfully unaware of: farmed fish are everywhere. Roughly every other morsel of ... are everywhere. Roughly every other morsel of fish passing through human lips was raised under human supervision. Right now, more than 50 ...

Daniel Cressey

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cleaner fish really do clean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The cleaning of client fish by cleaner ... by cleaner fish is one of the most highly developed interspecific communication systems known. But even though ...

Alexandra S. Grutter

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fish at Night  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Night at Night Nature Bulletin No. 264-A April 8, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH AT NIGHT Most people take it for granted that fish are creatures of perpetual motion and go swimming day and night. On the contrary, it appears that each kind has a rather definite daily routine with certain hours for quiet rest or sleep, and other hours for moving about in search of food. As a rule, fish active in daylight rest at night as if they were asleep. Sometimes they lean against rocks, with their fins folded, or creep into holes and among vegetation. Fish scientists have learned that almost every kind of fish makes regular daily trips between shallow and deep water. Lampreys, suckers, smelt, redhorses, wall-eyed pike and a few other kinds are known to make their spawning migrations and lay their eggs at night.

187

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stocks, smoothing management transitions, and for promotingmanagement Fishing on Curaçao and Bonaire should transition

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

First-passage percolation on ladder-like graphs with heterogeneous exponential times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the asymptotic speed of the first-passage percolation process on some ladder-like graphs (or width-2 stretches) when the times associated with different edges are independent and exponentially distributed but not necessarily all with the same mean. The method uses a particular Markov chain associated with the first-passage percolation process and properties of its stationary distribution.

Renlund, Henrik

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

PANEL: HTML: POISON OR PANACEA? Moderator: Robert Glushko, Passage Systems (USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PANEL: HTML: POISON OR PANACEA? Moderator: Robert Glushko, Passage Systems (USA) Panel: Dale Dougherty, O'Reilly & Associates (USA) Eliot Kimber, Passage Systems (USA) Antoine Rizk, Euroclid (France) Daniel Russell, Apple Computer (USA) Kent Summers, Electronic Book Technologies (USA) Many people

Glushko, Robert J.

190

The Growth of Fishes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Growth of Fishes Growth of Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 272-A June 3, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GROWTH OF FISHES Baby fish, by the millions, are hatching now every day in our lakes, streams and ponds. Some kinds come from eggs sown broadcast among water plants; others from eggs laid in clusters or nests; some from masses of eggs hidden in underwater holes; while the eggs of many little fish, such as minnows and darters, are attached in neat patches to the underside of rocks or sunken logs. For some time before hatching, the young fish can be seen wriggling inside the eggs. Newly hatched baby fish -- or fry, as they should be called -- look much alike, regardless of the size or appearance of their parents. Each is almost transparent except for the large dark eyes and a bulging stomach which encloses yolk from the egg. Under a magnifying glass, the pumping red heart can be seen and the mouth gulping water. The tiny fins are beginning to form, a few dots of dark pigment may show in the skin, but there is little or no sign of scales. They vary from an eighth to a half inch or more in length, depending upon the species and the size of the egg.

191

Mercury and Fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Fish Mercury and Fish Name: donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: how does mercury get into fish in rivers. what is the ecological process involved which could produce toxic levels of mercury in fish and eventually get into humans? Replies: Hi Donna! Nowadays mercury or its compounds are used at a high scale in many industries as the manufacture of chemicals, paints, household itens, pesticides and fungicides. These products can contaminate humans (and mamals) by direct contact, ingestion or inhalation. Besides the air can become contaminated also, and since mercury compounds produce harmful effects in body tissues and functions, that pollution is very dangerous. Now for your question: Efluent wastes containing mercury in various forms sometimes are dropped in sea water or in rivers or lakes. There the mercury may be converted by bacteria, that are in the muddy sediments, into organic mercurial compounds particularly the highly toxic alkyl mercurials ( methyl and di-methyl mercury), which may in turn be concentrated by the fishes and other aquatic forms of life that are used as food by men. The fishes dont seem to be affected but they are able to concentrate mercury in high poisoning levels, and if human beings, mamals or birds eat these containing mercury fishes, algae, crabs or oysters they will be contaminated and poisoned.

192

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act May 31, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement on the House passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act: "I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton not vetoed the ANWR drilling bill in 1995, we would have at least an additional one million barrels a day of domestic oil production available to the citizens of this country today." "We need to enhance our nation's energy mix by increasing domestic

193

House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act June 8, 2006 - 2:17pm Addthis Statement from Secretary Bodman WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from the Secretary Samuel W. Bodman of the Department of Energy on the passage of House Resolution 5254, The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act: "I commend the House of Representatives for their passage of this important piece of legislation. Expanding our nation's refining capacity is an important part of President Bush's four-point plan to confront high gasoline prices and is a key component to strengthening our nation's energy security. By increasing our nation's domestic refining capacity we can help grow our nation's economy and reduce our reliance on foreign sources

194

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act Statement from Secretary Bodman on the House Passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act May 31, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement on the House passage of the American-Made Energy and Good Jobs Act: "I applaud the House's passage of a bill that allows responsible, environmentally safe oil and natural gas drilling in the ANWR region of arctic Alaska. Had President Clinton not vetoed the ANWR drilling bill in 1995, we would have at least an additional one million barrels a day of domestic oil production available to the citizens of this country today." "We need to enhance our nation's energy mix by increasing domestic

195

Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes CIRCULAR 29 Fish and Wildlife Service John L. Farley, Director United States Department of the Interior Douglas McKay, Secretary #12;#12;Composition of Cooked Fish Dishes CIRCULAR 29 Fish and Wildlife Service John L. Farley, Director United States Department

196

Fish, Weather and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish, Weather and People Fish, Weather and People Nature Bulletin No. 241-A October 22, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FISH, WEATHER AND PEOPLE. Fishing can be one of the cheapest and most satisfying forms of recreation for people of all ages and both sexes. The proudest moment for many a boy is when he comes home with a big catfish or a string of bluegills caught with a can of worms for bait, and a cane pole or a willow cut from a thicket. Fishing can also be an expensive sport when the fisherman, laden with gadgets and high-priced tackle, journeys long distances to northern waters. The time of year, the sign of the moon, the barometric pressure, the direction and velocity of wind, rainfall, the amount of fishing and other conditions are some of the reasons given by credulous fisherman to bolster up their alibis. None of them can be proved. We do know that, in general, in the streams, ponds and inland lakes of Illinois, the principal fish caught in early spring are bullheads and, after them, the crappies. In summer the catches are mostly bluegills and largemouth black bass. In autumn, often, we again get good strings of crappies. But beyond that, as far as we know, in only one body of water has there been kept sufficient records over a long term of years, and a scientific study of such records, to throw any light upon the theories about why and when fish bite or don't bite.

197

Fish Scales and Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales and Science Fish Scales and Science Name: Amanda Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In special education class.Science project time.Topic choosen is HOW DO SCALES HELP FISH? Any suggestions or information would be of help. Replies: Wait a minute. Why do you think the scales help the fish? How do you know they do? Have you talked to a fish lately? Maybe they are useless, or even a problem. Maybe the fish wishes it didn't have scales! I say this only to emphasize two things: First of all, when you think scientifically, the MOST IMPORTANT thing is to be very careful not to assume you know something when you really don't. What I mean by that is: don't think you know the answer before you are dead positive absolutely for-sure 100% certain that you do. Why? Why make a big fuss over being so very careful? Well, I hate to tell you this (but you probably already know it), it's just SO EASY for human beings to fool themselves, to think they know the answers when they really don't know AT ALL what they are talking about. If you have a brother or sister, you know EXACTLY what I mean, I expect.

198

Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2  

SciTech Connect

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Haff Disease: Rhabdomyolysis After Eating Buffalo Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After Eating Buffalo Fish Linda L. Herman, MD Christineingesting certain types of fish, was first reported in 1924after eating cooked buffalo fish purchased at a suburban

Herman, Linda L.; Bies, Christine

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Drunken robber, tipsy cop: First passage times, mobile traps, and Hopf bifurcations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a random walk on a confined one-dimensional domain, we consider mean first passage times (MFPT) in the presence of a mobile trap. The question we address is whether a mobile trap can improve capture times over a stationary trap. We consider two scenarios: a randomly moving trap and an oscillating trap. In both cases, we find that a stationary trap actually performs better (in terms of reducing expected capture time) than a very slowly moving trap; however, a trap moving sufficiently fast performs better than a stationary trap. We explicitly compute the thresholds that separate the two regimes. In addition, we find a surprising relation between the oscillating trap problem and a moving-sink problem that describes reduced dynamics of a single spike in a certain regime of the Gray-Scott model. Namely, the above-mentioned threshold corresponds precisely to a Hopf bifurcation that induces oscillatory motion in the location of the spike. We use this correspondence to prove the uniqueness of the Hopf bifurcation.

Justin C. Tzou; Shuangquan Xie; Theodore Kolokolnikov

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Interior FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088 Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 In Reply Refer To: 20 lO-F...

202

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Part I of IV, Summary Report, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.  

SciTech Connect

The report looks at the most active periods of fishway research since 1938 as background for a project to apply fundamental fluid and bio-mechanics to fishway design, and develop more cost effective fish passage facilities with primary application to small scale hydropower facilities. Also discussed are new concepts in fishway design, an assessment of fishway development and design, and an analysis of barriers to upstream migration. (ACR)

Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Energy Secretary Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill Energy Secretary Bodman's Statement on House Passage of the Energy Bill July 28, 2005 - 2:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement regarding House passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005: "Ensuring America's future energy security has been a priority for President Bush since his early days in office, and I commend the House of Representatives, particularly Chairman Barton and Ranking Member Dingell, for their efforts on this broad-based legislation that helps achieve that goal. Because of the hard work and thoughtful approach that went into crafting this bipartisan legislation, the House has passed a bill that will reduce energy demand, increase energy supplies, and update our aging energy

205

Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House passage of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House passage House passage of the GAS Act Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House passage of the GAS Act October 14, 2005 - 11:58am Addthis "I applaud the House passage of the Gasoline for America's Security (GAS) Act. Chairman Barton and his colleagues are to be commended for taking steps to address the high gasoline prices we face by seeking to expand our nation's refining capacity and fuel supply." "The President has identified new refining capacity as a critical need for our growing economy, and this bill includes measures to simplify the refinery permitting process and limit the proliferation of boutique fuels, while maintaining high environmental standards. The bill also takes concrete steps to act on the President's call for new refineries to be

206

Coupled climate impacts of the Drake Passage and the Panama Seaway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tectonically-active gateways between ocean basins have modified ocean circulation over Earth history. Today, the Atlantic and Pacific are directly connected via the Drake Passage, which forms a barrier to the tim...

Simon Yang; Eric Galbraith; Jaime Palter

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Passage of a Bubble?Detonation Wave into a Chemically Inactive Bubble Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Passage of detonation waves from a chemically active bubble medium into a chemically inactive bubble medium is studied experimentally. The structure of ... pressures of these waves for different parameters of bubble

A. I. Sychev

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fishing | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fishing Fishing Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three datasets: electricity energy balance (2005 - 2009), electricity market snapshot (2009), and market competition statistics (2004 - 2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords Agriculture Commercial electricity demand electricity supply Fishing Forestry Industrial Residential Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Energy Balance (2005 - 2009) (xls, 42.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Market Snapshot (2009) (xls, 49.7 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Market Competition Statistics (xls, 46.1 KiB)

209

Analysis of fish bycatch and observer effect within the New Zealand ling bottom long-lining commercial fishery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research aims to make a contribution to management of the ling bottom long-line (BLL) fishery by: - providing improved understanding of fish bycatch in… (more)

Burns, R. J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

211

FOOD FISH FACTS (Osmerus mordax)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

89 FOOD FISH FACTS Smelt (Osmerus mordax) Smelt have been a popular food fish on the North American in baskets . Among early Pacific slope Indians, fish were extremely important as food and used as one. Uses of Smelt Smelt have delicate , sweet flavor an d con - tain a pleasant oil that aids digestion. l

212

Freshwater fish in salt water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater fish in salt water Freshwater fish in salt water Name: Shannon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would actually happen if a fresh water fish had to live in salt water? Replies: For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water. --ProfBill If you put a freshwater fish into saltwater, most fish would lose weight (from losing water from its body) and eventually die. Approximately 2% of all 21000 species of fish actually move from freshwater to saltwater or from salt to fresh at some point in their lives, the move would kill any other fish. But even with these special varieties of fish, the move must be gradual so their bodies can adjust, or they too, will die from the change. If you want to learn more about why the freshwater fish will lose water, (or why a saltwater fish in freshwater would gain water), look up the words "diffusion" and "osmosis"

213

Efficiency of Fish Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the system efficiency of a self-propelled flexible body is ill-defined unless one considers the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the power needed to tow a body in rigid-straight condition over the power it needs for self-propulsion, both measured for the same speed. Through examples we show that the quasi-propulsive efficiency is the only rational non-dimensional metric of the propulsive fitness of fish and fish-like mechanisms. Using two-dimensional viscous simulations and the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, we discuss the efficiency two-dimensional undulating foils. We show that low efficiencies, due to adverse body-propulsor hydrodynamic interactions, cannot be accounted for by the increase in friction drag.

Maertens, A P; Yue, D K P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish --Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 --ScienceNOW Page 1 of 2http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/1001/2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish -- Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 -- Science water. CREDIT: OLE SEEHAUSEN Red Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish By Chandra Shekhar ScienceNOW Daily News 1 October 2008 Beauty, as the saying goes, is in the eye of the beholder--and some fish have

Carleton, Karen L.

215

Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711 Gulf of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711 Gulf by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711 Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711 Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 August 1, 2006 - 4:47pm Addthis "I would like to commend the leadership of Chairman Domenici and the U.S. Senate for passing legislation that will help strengthen our nation's energy security by expanding the development of crude oil and natural gas reserves along our Outer Continental Shelf. "Just by going to the local gasoline station or looking at a monthly electricity bill, anyone can see the need to increase our domestic production of energy. It's important that we fully develop, in an environmentally responsible way, our nation's energy resources and this

216

Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of H.R.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 August 4, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis "Today the House passed legislation that does little to increase our nation's energy security or reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, the bills will actually lead to less domestic oil and gas production and increased dependence on imported oil." "Because H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 fail to deliver American consumers or businesses more energy security, but rather would lead to higher energy costs and higher taxes, the President's senior advisors would recommend that he veto these bills." "As the full Congress considers this legislation, I urge them to implement

217

Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of H.R.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passage of Passage of H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 Statement from Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on the Passage of H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 August 4, 2007 - 3:16pm Addthis "Today the House passed legislation that does little to increase our nation's energy security or reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In fact, the bills will actually lead to less domestic oil and gas production and increased dependence on imported oil." "Because H.R. 2776 and H.R. 3221 fail to deliver American consumers or businesses more energy security, but rather would lead to higher energy costs and higher taxes, the President's senior advisors would recommend that he veto these bills." "As the full Congress considers this legislation, I urge them to implement President Bush's Twenty in Ten Initiative that will reduce gasoline usage

218

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

capture or collect, or attempt to engage in any such conduct) of listed species of fish or wildlife without a special exemption. "Harm" is further defined to include...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks W.A. Kuperman and Philippedistributed among its 97 tanks to maximize feed-conversionrequires inventory- ing tanks regularly. Currently, this is

Kuperman, William A.; Roux, Philippe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Acoustic Method for Fish Counting and Fish Sizing in Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in an echoic tank. ICES Journal of Marineto fish counting in a tank. Journal of the Acousticaland materials of the cylindrical tanks for the experiments.

Roux, Philippe; Conti, Stéphane; Demer, David; Maurer, Benjamin D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

Liskiewicz, Maciej

224

EIS-0265-SA-164: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diversion Modification The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish passage improvement project at the L-9 diversion on the Lemhi River in Lemhi County,...

225

EIS-0265-SA-166: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Program The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish passage improvement project on Coleman Creek in Kittitas County, Washington with the...

226

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

227

Fish Smother Under Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smother Under Ice Smother Under Ice A BULLETIN FOR THE CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCLUSION IN THE WEEKLY ANNOUNCEMENT SENT OUT FROM THE OFFICE OF SUPT. WILLIAM H. JOHNSON Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation February 1, 1945 Nature Bulletin No. 1 FOREST PRESERVE NOTES Grown-ups, who used to kive on a farm or in a small town, are fond of talking about the old-fashioned winters "when I was a boy" and the winters that grandpa used to tell about. Well, one would have to go back a long, long time to find a winter as severe as this one. FISH SMOTHER UNDER ICE Lakes and streams breathe the same as living things. When they are covered with ice and snow they cannot get air and they much hold their breath until the ice thaws. While they are holding their breath the oxygen in the water is gradually used up by the living things sealed up in it -- fish, plants "bugs", snails, and hosts of microscopic life. If the ice lasts long enough, these living things die one after another as each kind reaches the point where it cannot stand any further oxygen starvation. Sometimes temporary relief is given by rains and melting snow that bring fresh, serated water under the ice, but no method of artificial respiration has been found that works. Sometimes, too, when water plants get enough sunlight through clear ice they produce small amounts of oxygen and delay the suffocation of the fish, etc.; but when snow and cloudy ice cuts off the light this does not happen.

228

Fishing Communities Facts Many West Coast communities start their fishing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7% 5.9% 4.4% 1.6% 2000 Race and Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity: California and Average of Selected Fishing Asian Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander Some other race Two or more races % Hispanic or Latino compared to State Total Fishing Communities Total Population Median Household Income % Family Households

229

Design and Implementation of a new Autonomous Sensor Fish to Support Advanced Hydropower Development  

SciTech Connect

Acceleration in development of additional conventional hydropower requires tools and methods to perform laboratory and in-field validation of turbine performance and fish passage claims. The new-generation Sensor Fish has been developed with more capabilities to accommodate a wider range of users over a wider range of turbine designs and operating environments. It provides in situ measurements of three dimensional (3D) accelerations, 3D rotational velocities, 3D orientation, pressure, and temperature at a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It also has an automatic floatation system and built-in radio frequency transmitter for recovery. The relative errors of the pressure, acceleration and rotational velocity were within ±2%, ±5%, and ±5%, respectively. The accuracy of orientation was within ±4° and accuracy of temperature was ±2°C. It is being deployed to evaluate the biological effects of turbines or other hydraulic structures in several countries.

Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Tian, Chuan; Morris, Scott J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Zhou, Da; Hou, Hongfei

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Making the Most of Fish Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T he effect of rice - seeding rate and fish stocking on thefloodwater ecology of rice - fish system . B S J the trenchmost people hear the word ‘fish,’ they think of food. In

Zhu, Julian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fish Habitat Regulations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Fish Habitat Regulations Author Alaska Department of Fish & Game Published Alaska Department of Fish &...

232

Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish  

SciTech Connect

Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

45 (2008-5) Adjoint-Based Shape Optimization of a Heat-Exchanger Passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conduction is employed. The cost function is defined as a sum of pressure loss and heat transfer, Distribution of non-dimensional heat flux : (c) Initial shape, (d) 6th shape, (e) Cross section of the bottomF244 45 (2008-5) - 623 - Adjoint-Based Shape Optimization of a Heat-Exchanger Passage with Heat

Kasagi, Nobuhide

234

Rice and Memory in the Age of Enslavement: Atlantic Passages to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice and Memory in the Age of Enslavement: Atlantic Passages to Suriname Judith Carney This article fact from the era of plantation slavery is that Suriname, about the same territorial size as the state. Slavery in Suriname was notorious for its brutal demands on labor and the attenuated life expectancies

235

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 21832204 Temperature and salinity variability in the exit passages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-strait gradient in near-surface temperature and salinity through the outflow straits, except in Lombok StraitDeep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 2183­2204 Temperature and salinity variability in the exit passages pressure gauges at each side of the straits, equipped with temperature and salinity sensors

Sprintall, Janet

236

Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage D. Reisenfeld, and T. R. Sanderson (2004), Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum, New Mexico, USA T. R. Sanderson Research and Scientific Support Department of European Space Agency

Sanahuja, Blai

237

Chirped quantum cascade laser induced rapid passage signatures in an optically thick gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report observations of rapid passage signals induced in samples of N2O and CH4...present in a multipass cell with an optical path length of 5 m. The effect of laser power and chirp rate upon the signals ... ha...

J. H. Northern; G. A. D. Ritchie; E. P. Smakman; J. H. van Helden…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Pathways, Volume Transport and Mixing of Abyssal Water in the Samoan Passage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow of dense water through the Samoan Passage accounts for the major part of the bottom water renewal in the North Pacific and is thus an important element of the Pacific Meridional Overturning Circulation. A recent set of highly resolved ...

Gunnar Voet; James B. Girton; Matthew H. Alford; Glenn S. Carter; Jody M. Klymak; John B. Mickett

239

Mean First-Passage Time Calculations for the Coil-to-Helix Transition:? The Active Helix Ising Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mean First-Passage Time Calculations for the Coil-to-Helix Transition:? The Active Helix Ising Model† ... The kinetics and thermodynamics of the coil-to-helix transition is studied using a one-dimensional “Zimm?Bragg” Ising model. ... 4. Mean First-Passage Time for the Active-Helix Ising Model ...

Nicolae-Viorel Buchete; John E. Straub

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

First lunar wake passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind fluctuations by 3D hybrid simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First lunar wake passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of wake effects and solar wind fluctuations of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Big Fish on the Yangtze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wish to protect the ecological resources of the Yangtze which include the puffer fish, a deadly but popular delicacy. The cost of the fish? 70 million renminbi or 11 million dollars of which it is estimated that only $ 1.7 million was spent on actual...

Hacker, Randi

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fish farming: Eat your veg  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... world's food supply, but there's a hidden cost behind some of the farmed fish on supermarket shelves. Many, including the popular salmon, trout and cod, are fed ... shelves. Many, including the popular salmon, trout and cod, are fed on wild fish. Lots of wild ...

Kendall Powell

2003-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

243

Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

244

Directory of Organizations October 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................9 FISH AND WILDLIFE AGENCIES..............................................................................................................................11 COLUMBIA BASIN FISH AND WILDLIFE AUTHORITY.......................................................................................................11 FISH PASSAGE CENTER

245

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001 : Burlingame and Little Walla Walla Sites.  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 2 newly constructed fish screen sites in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring of 2001. The fish screens facilities at the Little Walla Walla River in Milton-Freewater, Oregon and at Burlingame west of Walla Walla, Washington were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Due to a calibration problem with the instrument used to measure water velocities during the spring evaluations, we re-evaluated the water velocities at both sites after the canals discharges were increased in the fall. Based on the results of our studies in 2001, we concluded: Burlingame site--The rotary-drum screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. However, sediment and debris accumulations in the screen forebay could result in screen seal wear (due to silt) and may increase mortality due to predation in the screen forebay (due to woody debris accumulations along the screen face). All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were appreciably higher than approach velocities, however sweep velocities did not increase toward the bypass. Bypass velocity was greater than sweep velocities. Little Walla Walla--The flat-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were substantially higher than approach velocities and increased toward the bypass. Bypass velocity was greater than sweep velocities. The automated cleaning brushes at the Little Walla Walla site generally functioned properly. However, there was a small (6 to 12 in.) band along the length of the facility at the bottom of the screen that was not being cleaned effectively by the brush. In addition, the cable that drives the cleaning brush was showing signs of wear (cracks and frays) and should be replaced.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Evolution of blind cave fish  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evolution of blind cave fish Evolution of blind cave fish Name: rudeeric Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am a biology teacher, now starting a unit on evolution. Just about every book on the topic mentions the blind and albino cave fish. But I've always been bothered by this example. Why is being blind and white an advantage for animals in a cave? I understand that they have no use for eyes or pigment, but this sounds like we're back to Lamarck's law of use and disuse. Wouldn't there first have to be the mutations to cause these? And in order for the changes to become common, they would have to be advantageous. Although there is no use for the eyes or pigment, what is the advantage to losing them? Replies: I can think of one important use for the loss of pigment in fish. It has been documented with the early breeding of black mollies and black angelfish, that the fry were extremely hard to keep alive. The breeders found that these fish required much greatly quantities of protein to produce the pigment melanin, and therefore supplementing the fry with protein quantities that were many times higher than those required by less pigmented fish kept them alive. Imagine then, a situation where a random mutation of albinism in a cave dwelling fish results in a population that can use the protein that it consumes for growth and reproduction, rather than for pigment production. The albino fish could quickly out-produce the pigmented fish. What the "real" explanation would be as described by an evolutionary biologist, I have no idea.

247

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE 9 Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on the October 22, 2008, status document online. If unavailable, contact the Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office in Las Vegas at (702) 5 15-5230 and reference File No....

248

Fishing Communities Facts North Carolina's commercial fishing communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4% 15.3% 13.6% 10.4% 9.8% 7.3% 2.5% 2000 Race and Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity: Florida and Average races % Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Florida 15,982,378 78.0% 14.6% 0.3% 1.7% 0.1% 3.0% 2.4% 16: Selected Fishing Communities compared to State Total Fishing Communities Total Population Median Household

249

Fishing Communities Facts Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fishing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0% 12.1% 7.6% 6.2% 4.7% 1.6% 2000 Race and Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity: Connecticut and Average races % Hispanic or Latino (of any race) Connecticut 3,405,565 81.6% 9.1% 0.3% 2.4% 0.0% 4.3% 2.2% 9: Selected Fishing Communities compared to State Total Fishing Communities Total Population Median Household

250

Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

251

A chrestomathy Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A chrestomathy on fishes Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia of Ichthyology, Ecology and Evolution,200,000 words of science, of which roughly 45,000 (nearly 1%) refer directly or indirectly to fishes. These have now been compiled, annotated, cross-refer- enced and elaborated on by Daniel Pauly in Darwin's Fishes

Avise, John

252

Fish Oil Industry in South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief, "Fish Oils, " M. E. Stansby, editor, Avi Publishing Company, Westport, Connecticut, 1967. Circular 282

253

Effects of Non-Fish Based Raw Materials on the Fish Muscle Quality of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Non-Fish Based Raw Materials on the Fish Muscle Quality of Salmonids Jinfeng Pan Faculty and drawing: J.F. Pan) #12;Effects of Non-Fish Based Raw Materials on the Fish Muscle Quality of Salmonids Abstract Salmonids are considered as fatty fish and a healthy food. They are characterized by a high

254

Fish Community Assessment Rapid Bioassessment Protocol V --Fish (EPA 1989, 1999).......................................................693  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX C Fish Community Assessment CONTENTS Rapid Bioassessment Protocol V -- Fish (EPA 1989 ......................................................................................................................................707 RAPID BIOASSESSMENT PROTOCOL V -- FISH (EPA 1989, 1999) The following are excerpts from U.S. EPA, but focuses on fish. Electrofishing, the most common technique used by agencies that monitor fish communities

Pitt, Robert E.

255

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

256

MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.4133,"lon":-135.737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

257

First-passage time for the snap-through of a shell-type structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first-passage problem associated with snap-through of a shallow cylindrical shell subjected to a wide-band stationary stochastic loading is examined in this paper. The structure is sufficiently flat so as to exhibit only a symmetric mode under the action of the applied load. The approach utilizes a high-speed simulation technique to obtain sufficient samples from which statistics of the response may be computed. This allows the calculation of an approximate probability distribution for the parameter of interest. Zero initial conditions are assumed so that the problem is non-stationary. Results of this analysis are compared with the mean first-passage time obtained by numerically solving the associated Pontriagin-Vitt equation.

H.N. Pi; S.T. Ariaratnam; W.C. Lennox

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A New Facility for Studying Shock Wave Passage over Dust Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEW FACILITY FOR STUDYING SHOCK WAVE PASSAGE OVER DUST LAYERS A Thesis by BRANDON DAVID MARKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... Brandon David Marks ii ABSTRACT To ensure safety regarding dust explosion hazards, it is important to study the dust lifting process experimentally and identify important parameters that will be valuable for development and validation...

Marks, Brandon

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Experimental techniques for measurement of available potential energy as applied to the Drake Passage region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and encouragement. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I INTRODUCTION II DATA AND METHODOLOGY 1. Boussinesq method 2. SIG-N method 3. REO method 14 15 III COMPUTATIONAL PROCEDURES 18 IV COMPARISON OF RESULTS FROM DIFFERENT METHODS 1. Verification... instability was responsible for the transfer of APE. Joyce et al. (1981) studied a cyclonic ring in Drake Passage. They used the Boussinepg approximation to calcu- late APE. The Boussinesq approximation for APE per unit volume is derived from...

Jessen, Paul Frederik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Resume de Sequences Temporelles pour le Passage `a l' Echelle d'Applications Dependantes du Temps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R´esum´e de S´equences Temporelles pour le Passage `a l' ´Echelle d'Applications D´ependantes du {qpham, boualem}@cse.unsw.edu.au Abstract Nous pr´esentons dans ces travaux le concept du "R´esum´e de S grandes masses de donn´ees. Un R´esum´e de S´equence Temporelle s'obtient en transformant une s´equence d

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Destruction of Immature Fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... his North Sea Investigations. He has much to say as to the destruction of immature fish in the North Sea, and makes the following observations on proposed remedial measures:— ... measures:—

1892-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

The effect of rapid and sustained decompression on barotrauma in juvenile brook lamprey and Pacific lamprey: implications for passage at hydroelectric facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fish passing downstream through hydroelectric facilities may pass through hydroturbines where they experience a rapid decrease in barometric pressure as they pass by turbine blades, which can lead to barotraumas including swim bladder rupture, exopthalmia, emboli, and hemorrhaging. In juvenile Chinook salmon, the main mechanism for injury is thought to be expansion of existing gases (particularly those present in the swim bladder) and the rupture of the swim bladder ultimately leading to exopthalmia, emboli and hemorrhaging. In fish that lack a swim bladder, such as lamprey, the rate and severity of barotraumas due to rapid decompression may be reduced however; this has yet to be extensively studied. Another mechanism for barotrauma can be gases coming out of solution and the rate of this occurrence may vary among species. In this study, juvenile brook and Pacific lamprey acclimated to 146.2 kPa (equivalent to a depth of 4.6 m) were subjected to rapid (<1 sec; brook lamprey only) or sustained decompression (17 minutes) to a very low pressure (13.8 kPa) using a protocol previously applied to juvenile Chinook salmon. No mortality or evidence of barotraumas, as indicated by the presence of hemorrhages, emboli or exopthalmia, were observed during rapid or sustained decompression, nor following recovery for up to 120 h following sustained decompression. In contrast, mortality or injury would be expected for 97.5% of juvenile Chinook salmon exposed to a similar rapid decompression to these very low pressures. Additionally, juvenile Chinook salmon experiencing sustained decompression died within 7 minutes, accompanied by emboli in the fins and gills and hemorrhaging in the tissues. Thus, juvenile lamprey may not be susceptible to barotraumas associated with hydroturbine passage to the same degree as juvenile salmonids, and management of these species should be tailored to their specific morphological and physiological characteristics.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Interannual-to-Decadal Changes in Phytoplankton Phenology, Fish Spawning Habitat,and Larval Fish Phenology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The natural regulation of fish populations. p. 399-412. Inalgal bloom and larval fish survival. Nature 423: 398-399.otolith growth in young fish. Science 324: Davison, P. and

Asch, Rebecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia Photo of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation...

265

Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form: Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Fish Habitat Permit Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Publisher Not...

266

Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations.

267

Data Overview for Sensor Fish Samples Acquired at Ice Harbor, John Day, and Bonneville II Dams in 2005, 2006, and 2007  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to acquire Sensor Fish data on turbine passage at Bonneville II, John Day, and Ice Harbor dams for later analysis and use. The original data sets have been entered into a database and are being maintained by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory pending delivery to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when requested. This report provides documentation for the data sets acquired and details about the operations of the Sensor Fish and interpretation of Sensor Fish data that will be necessary for later use of the acquired data. A limited review of the acquired data was conducted to assess its quality and to extract information that might prove useful to its later use.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Deng, Zhiqun

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The underlying need for the project is to improve fish passage to habitat in the upper part of the watershed. Funding from BPA would serve to provide off-site mitigation for the effects of the federal Columbia River hydroelectric facilities on fish populations by improving fish passage at Lyle Falls. While the fish passage issues at Lyle Falls were not caused by the hydroelectric facilities, this project would help BPA meet its mitigation responsibilities and potentially increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin by enhancing fish passage into the Klickitat subbasin. EIS-0397-DEIS-Summary-2008.pdf EIS-0397-DEIS-2008.pdf More Documents & Publications

269

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

Fisher, Bob

271

Design, prototyping, and testing of an apparatus for establishing a linear temperature gradient in experimental fish tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immunology researchers require a new type of fish tank that provides a linear thermal gradient for experimental zebrafish in order to improve the accuracy and validity of their research. Zebrafish require the ability to ...

Kadri, Romi Sinclair

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sensing bending in a compliant biomimetic fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the problem of sensing motion in a compliant biomimetic device. Specifically, it will examine the motion of a tail in a biomimetic fish. To date, the fish has been an open-loop system, the motion of ...

Kaczmarek, Adam S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NUTRITIVE VALUE OF POLLOCK FISH SCALES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicated that pollock fish scale protein is as well digested but about 30 percent less assimilated than for growth, the biological values for maintenance, and the digestibilities of pollock fish scale possibilities of wool, an

274

Fish facilitate wave resuspension of sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we show that bottom-feeding fish greatly facilitate this process by reducing the erosion resistance of the sediment. We use a fish-removal experiment from a

275

Fluctuations of fish populations and the magnifying effects of fishing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...text). We discarded the first 100 y as burn-in and calculated the coefficient...B). We avoid the effect of simulation burn-in by not including...individuals is fisheries that target the roe of mature fish (e.g., some Pacific...

Andrew O. Shelton; Marc Mangel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Real-time feedback-controlled robotic fish for behavioral experiments with fish schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Real-time feedback-controlled robotic fish for behavioral experiments with fish schools Daniel T- gations of collective animal behavior. In the case of fish schooling, new insights into processes such as collective decision making and leadership have been made in recent experiments in which live fish were

Leonard, Naomi

277

To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank: Immersive VR for Animal Behavior-reality framework for inves- tigating startle-response behavior in fish. Using real-time three- dimensional tracking of the looming stimuli change according to the fish's perspective and location in the tank. We demonstrate

Shapiro, Benjamin

278

DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH Jindong Liu, Ian Dukes CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom Email: {jliua, idukes, rrknig, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Robotic fish the fish movement into several basic behaviours, namely straight cruise, cruise in turn and sharp turn

Hu, Huosheng

279

Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1 Institute, 411 Route 1, Suite 1, Falmouth, ME 04105 USA 4 Arizona Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research address: Vermont Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Vermont 328 Aiken Center

280

Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen colallen@indiana.edu phone: +1-812-855-3622 fax: +1, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA Abstract Questions about fish consciousness and cognition are receiving increasing this hugely diverse set of species. Keywords Fish, learning, cognition, consciousness Submitted to J

Indiana University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous Continental Shelf­Scale Imaging Nicholas C-transect methods from slow-moving research vessels. These methods significantly undersample fish populations in time and space, leaving an incomplete and ambiguous record of abundance and behavior. We show that fish

282

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

283

Fish Culture in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...controlled is a potential fish farm. In the United States...inhospitable by vi-olent winds, unstable soil, tides...rela-tively constant. Fish farming will provide only...however, the fact that fish farm-ing can provide animal...

Richard T. Lovell

1979-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa + 0 ) 2 6 - 4 9 Jacky J. Cosson I. INTRODUCTION Spermatozoa are unique among cells generated by the metazoans and are haploid unicells. Fish sperm is released with extremely harmful conditions (fresh water, sea or brackish water) in the case for many fish species (Huxley

Villefranche sur mer

285

COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

Sikes, Derek S.

286

Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes Xiaoyuan Tu Demetri Terzopoulos Department worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrody­ namically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit

Toronto, University of

287

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

Toronto, University of

288

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

Terzopoulos, Demetri

289

SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

346; SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 346 #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FishKernan, Director SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL-FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 by Robert L. Edwards

290

Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord­ ing to Newton's laws's method to integrate. ffl Accumulate the mean­square­velocity of all the fish 2 6 4 #fish X i=1 velocity 2 i #fish 3 7 5 1=2 and plot it as a function of time. ffl Choose the time step dt in the integrator

California at Berkeley, University of

291

A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

Healey, Christopher G.

292

C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of Swimming Performance in Fishes: Predicting Evolution with Biomechanics R. Brian Langerhans1, * and David N. Reznick2 NT NINTRODUCTIONTN NINTRODUCTION Residing within the immense diversity of fishes

Langerhans, Brian

293

Effects of fishing effort allocation scenarios on energy efficiency and profitability: An individual-based model applied to Danish fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global concerns about CO2 emissions, national CO2 quotas, and rising fuel prices are incentives for the commercial fishing fleet industry to change their fishing practices and reduce fuel consumption, which constitutes a significant part of fishing costs. Vessel-based fuel consumption, energy efficiency (quantity of fish caught per litre of fuel used), and profitability are factors that we simulated in developing a spatially explicit individual-based model (IBM) for fishing vessel movements. The observed spatial and seasonal patterns of fishing effort for each fishing activity are evaluated against three alternative effort allocation scenarios for the assumed fishermen's adaptation to these factors: (A) preferring nearby fishing grounds rather than distant grounds with potentially larger catches and higher values, (B) shifting to other fisheries targeting resources located closer to the harbour, and (C) allocating effort towards optimising the expected area-specific profit per trip. The model is informed by data from each Danish fishing vessel >15 m after coupling its high resolution spatial and temporal effort data (VMS) with data from logbook landing declarations, sales slips, vessel engine specifications, and fish and fuel prices. The outcomes of scenarios A and B indicate a trade-off between fuel savings and energy efficiency improvements when effort is displaced closer to the harbour compared to reductions in total landing amounts and profit. Scenario C indicates that historic effort allocation has actually been sub-optimal because increased profits from decreased fuel consumption and larger landings could have been obtained by applying a different spatial effort allocation. Based on recent advances in VMS and logbooks data analyses, this paper contributes to improve the modelling of fishing effort allocation, fuel consumption and catch distribution on a much disaggregated level compared to the fleet-based models we developed so far.

Francois Bastardie; J. Rasmus Nielsen; Bo Sølgaard Andersen; Ole Ritzau Eigaard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design  

SciTech Connect

Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage  

SciTech Connect

Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

Chadwick, Helen, E-mail: helen.chadwick@epfl.ch; Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sustainable alternatives to fish meal and fish oil in fish nutrition: Effects on growth, tissue fatty acid composition and lipid metabolism.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Traditionally, fish meal (FM) and fish oil (FO) have been used extensively in aquafeeds, mainly due to their excellent nutritional properties. However, various reasons dictate… (more)

Karalazos, Vasileios

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mean First-Passage Time Calculations for the Coil-to-Helix Transition: The Active Helix Ising Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mean First-Passage Time Calculations for the Coil-to-Helix Transition: The Active Helix Ising Model of the coil-to-helix transition is studied using a one-dimensional "Zimm- Bragg" Ising model. The mean first-dimensional Ising model for arbitrary spin-spin coupling (J) and external field (H) where J and H are expressed

Straub, John E.

298

Four Current Meter Models Compared in Strong Currents in Drake Passage D. RANDOLPH WATTS, MAUREEN A. KENNELLY, KATHLEEN A. DONOHUE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four Current Meter Models Compared in Strong Currents in Drake Passage D. RANDOLPH WATTS, MAUREEN A February 2013, in final form 11 June 2013) ABSTRACT Seven current meters representing four models: two vector-measuring current meters (VMCMs), two Aanderaa recording current meter (RCM) 11s, two

Rhode Island, University of

299

The two-interacting compartmental (TIC) model of the rate of passage for herbivores: application to sheep digesta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-interacting compartmental (TIC) model of the rate of passage for herbivores: application this in mind, in previous papers (Corino et al, 1992), we pre- sented a 2-interacting compartmental model (TIC difference between the TIC model and those reported in the literature is that the 2 compart- ments

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

Drake Passage Oceanic pCO2: Evaluating CMIP5 Coupled Carbon–Climate Models Using in situ Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) variations in Drake Passage are examined using decade-long underway shipboard measurements. North of the Polar Front (PF), the observed pCO2 shows a seasonal cycle that peaks annually in August and ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Colm Sweeney

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Attraction of Wild Coastal Fishes to an Atlantic Subtropical Cage Fish Farms, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assessed the influence of two commercial fish farms on the local aggregation of coastal wild fishes through a 'post-impact' sampling design at Gran Canaria Island (Canary Islands). At each farm...

Arturo Boyra; Pablo Sanchez-Jerez; Fernando Tuya…

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sandia National Laboratories: avoid altering fish behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish behavior Current Energy Converter Array Optimization Framework On March 13, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

303

International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

304

Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

305

Flushing associated with scombroid fish poisoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taylor SL. Histamine food poisoning: toxicology and clinicalan unusual cause of food poisoning! Emerg Med (Fremantle).J. Histamine fish poisoning revisited. Int J Food Microbiol.

Ferran, Marta; Yébenes, Mireia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cooperative fish rearing projects at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This presentation details the success of the cooperative efforts to develop fish rearing projects at the Hanford Site, Richland,WA.

Betsch, M.D., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fish and hydroelectricity; Engineering a better coexistence  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the problems that hydroelectric plants have regarding fish populations. The utilities that operate these plants are finding that accommodating migrating fish presents unique engineering challenges, not the least of which involves designing and building systems to protect fish species whose migratory behavior remains something of a mystery. Where such systems cannot be built, the status of hydroelectric dams may be in doubt, as is now the case with several dams in the United States. A further twist in some regions in the possibility that certain migratory fish will be declared threatened or endangered-a development that could wreak havoc on the hydroelectric energy supply in those regions.

Zorpette, G.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Anthropogenic sounds ? Potential effects on fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is concern that human?generated sounds may have deleterious effects on fish. This paper will review some of what is currently known about these effects and consider the questions that have to be answered before developing models to enable "prediction" of sound effects on particular fish species. A major restriction is that there are few peer?reviewed data on effects of anthropogenic sources on fish. Extrapolation from these results is further confounded since experiments differ in many ways each of which may alter the resultant impact on fish. For example studies vary in sounds types tested (e.g. pile driving vs. ship noise) signal parameters (intensity number of repetitions) species used fish age etc. Moreover a singularly important issue is that while many of the issues and impact mechanisms are potentially amenable to experimental lab study the ultimate questions regarding the effects of sound on fish behavior need to field based and require long?term observations where behaviour of wild fish is not constrained. Only by observing fish in the wild will we ultimately understand if and how anthropogenic sounds impact fish both during exposure and more importantly for extended periods after the termination of the sound.

Arthur Popper; Svein Lo/kkeborg; Robert McCauley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010 automatic optimisation tools to design efficient trawls in terms of energy consumption. The developed tool should provide a substantial gain on the fuel consumed of actual fishing devices while maintaining

Lewandowski, Roger

310

Long-term cleaner fish presence affects growth of a coral reef fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Animal behaviour 1001 14 60 70 Long-term cleaner fish presence affects growth of a coral reef fish Gillian E. Clague 1 Karen L. Cheney 1 Anne...of its kind, over an 8 year period, cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus were consistently removed...

Gillian E. Clague; Karen L. Cheney; Anne W. Goldizen; Mark I. McCormick; Peter A. Waldie; Alexandra S. Grutter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

FISH-BASED INDICATORS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF FISH-BASED INDICATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISH-BASED INDICATORS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS #12;DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF FISH OF PHILOSOPHY (2006) MCMASTER UNIVERSITY (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario TITLE: Development and use of fish on the water quality, fish habitat, and fish community of a Lake Ontario marsh, Frenchman's Bay. Seilheimer, T

McMaster University

312

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

313

Improved Enrollment and Pass Rates in Calculus by Werner Horn, Chair of Mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Since 1999, M150A has had a 50-60% pass rate. SuccessImproved Enrollment and Pass Rates in Calculus by Werner Horn, Chair of Mathematics Carol Shubin success outcomes: · increased the passing rates from the historical average of 58% to overall passage rate

Shubin, Carol

314

New Mexico Department of Game and Fish | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Fish Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Name: New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Abbreviation: NMDGF Address: 1 Wildlife Way Place:...

315

The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the...

316

What do we know about pile driving and fish?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of seismic air guns on marine fish. Continentalthe effects of seismic air guns on fish in northern Canada (to seismic airgun use on hearing of three fish species. J.

Popper, Arthur N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

Toronto, University of

318

Fish odor syndrome: a case report of trimethylaminuria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JG, Hansen RC. Fish odor syndrome: trimethylaminuria withLS. Smelling like dead fish: a case of trimethylaminuria in1 January 2014 Letter Fish odor syndrome: a case report of

Ulman, Catherine A; Trevino, Julian J; Miller, Marvin; Gandhi, Rishi K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sensor Fish Re-design to Support Advance Hydropower Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensor Fish Re-design to Support Advance Hydropower Development Sensor Fish Re-design to Support Advance Hydropower Development Sensor Fish Re-design to Support Advance Hydropower...

320

165 F ... Poultry, ground poultry Stuffing with poultry, meat & fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

165° F ... Poultry, ground poultry Stuffing with poultry, meat & fish Microwave cooking & reheating Reheating leftovers 155° F ... Ground meat & fish Injected meat (i.e. tenderized) 145° F ... Meat, fish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fishing and Early Jomon Foodways at Sannai Maruyama, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strait off the coast of Cape Tappi (marked as Fishing Area Alocations. Fishing Locations A: Tappi B: O’oma Distance (km)known fishing point near Tappi, it takes approximately 3460

Katayama, Mio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, STEWART L. UDALL, SECRETARY FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the use of Diesel engines on all but the smal lest vessels. Advantages in greater safety, lower fuel cost, and improvements will undoubtedly be made in the future. Only general principles are discussed here with the hope for shrimp fishing in the Gulf of Mexico, low-speed, heavy-duty , gasoline engines were used extensively

323

Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

325

Nutritional Properties of Recreationally Caught Marine Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the nutritional properties whether the fish are caught by either means. The terms oil and fat can be used inter changeably; here, we use the term oil. The oil content of fishes varies to a greater extent (from 0.3 to 15 tends to vary inversely with the oil content, and the sum of the two items usually approximates 80

326

MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in North Carolina and South Carolina GENE R. HUNTSMAN. Bill Gulf Stream /I Mustang /I Comanche J. J. Operated in Fishing area t972 1973 OffShore X OUshore X X Ollshore X X Offshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X Inshore X X

327

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.  

SciTech Connect

In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY Marine Biological Laboratory APR 21 1953 WOODS HOLE, Albert M. Day, Director DIRECTING THE MOVH-IENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY by Alberton L. McLain Fishery of an electrical leading device 21 Literature cited. ..,...,..,..........·· 2k ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Diagram

330

Fish Oil Supplement Research Remains Murky  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... If you've been following the media trail on fish oil lately, you've probably been tempted to forgo the smelly capsules. A systematic ... , The Journal of the American Medical Association, reported that neither eating extra helpings of fish nor taking ...

Melinda Wenner Moyer

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

TRAWLING AND THE STOCKS OF FISH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... before the Royal Society of Arts on January 27 on “Trawling and the Stocks of Fish”, Dr. E. S. Russell, director of fishery investigations, Ministry of Agriculture ... manner the problems which will confront us after the War in connexion with the national fish stocks of Great Britain and those of our near neighbours. In a summary of ...

1943-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fish are crucial in oceanic carbon cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Fish may play a more important role in the marine carbon cycle than previously thought, ... marine carbon cycle than previously thought, a new study shows. Researchers have found that fish excrete prodigious amounts of a mineral, calcium carbonate, that had been thought to come ...

Roberta Kwok

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Sense of Hearing in Fish*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THERE is an old dispute as to whether fish are able to hear or not. It has seemed improbable that they can. Three ... main reasons have been brought forward against it. (1) A biological reason: most fish seem to be dumb ; a sense of hearing would therefore not be of biological ...

K. VON FRISCH

1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP in Publication Data Main entry under title Wastewater characterization of fish processing plant effluents (Canada)); DOE FRAP 1993-39. TD899.F5W37 1994 363.73'942'0971133 C94-960159-4 #12;WASTEWATER

335

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS FOR THE 2014 FISHING YEAR NOAA FISHERIES, ALASKA via the GAF electronic reporting system. If no GAF were harvested in a year, the conversion factor is the first calendar year that GAF regulations will be in effect. Therefore, the conversion factors are based

336

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

337

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies This...

338

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

339

Lasers, fish ears and environmental change | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lasers, fish ears and environmental change ORNL and TVA team up to study Kingston spill restoration efforts Researchers analyze fish otoliths using a laser to understand...

340

Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

342

California Department of Fish & Wildlife | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Name: California Department of Fish & Wildlife Address: 1416 9th St, 12th Floor Place:...

343

Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

344

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

345

Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

346

California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

347

Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

further investigate the bioenergetic role of the microbialversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems by

McDole, Tracey Shannon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modulating LC-PUFA biosynthesis in freshwater farmed fish.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work focused on the in vivo fatty acid metabolism of freshwater fish, towards minimising the unsustainable use of fish oil in aquaculture feed. A… (more)

Senadheera , Shymalie Dhammika

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Accounting for Incomplete Species Detection in Fish Community Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Riverine fish assemblages are heterogeneous and very difficult to characterize with a one-size-fits-all approach to sampling. Furthermore, detecting changes in fish assemblages over time requires accounting for variation in sampling designs. We present a modeling approach that permits heterogeneous sampling by accounting for site and sampling covariates (including method) in a model-based framework for estimation (versus a sampling-based framework). We snorkeled during three surveys and electrofished during a single survey in suite of delineated habitats stratified by reach types. We developed single-species occupancy models to determine covariates influencing patch occupancy and species detection probabilities whereas community occupancy models estimated species richness in light of incomplete detections. For most species, information-theoretic criteria showed higher support for models that included patch size and reach as covariates of occupancy. In addition, models including patch size and sampling method as covariates of detection probabilities also had higher support. Detection probability estimates for snorkeling surveys were higher for larger non-benthic species whereas electrofishing was more effective at detecting smaller benthic species. The number of sites and sampling occasions required to accurately estimate occupancy varied among fish species. For rare benthic species, our results suggested that higher number of occasions, and especially the addition of electrofishing, may be required to improve detection probabilities and obtain accurate occupancy estimates. Community models suggested that richness was 41% higher than the number of species actually observed and the addition of an electrofishing survey increased estimated richness by 13%. These results can be useful to future fish assemblage monitoring efforts by informing sampling designs, such as site selection (e.g. stratifying based on patch size) and determining effort required (e.g. number of sites versus occasions).

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Jager, Yetta [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - african cichlid fish Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african cichlid fish...

351

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian freshwater fish Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: australian freshwater fish...

352

Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations  

SciTech Connect

Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea [Institute of Pathology, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas [Department of Human Genetics, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Tilkorn, Daniel [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Steinstraesser, Lars, E-mail: lars.steinstraesser@rub.de [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland  

SciTech Connect

Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

Airaksinen, Riikka, E-mail: Riikka.Airaksinen@thl.fi [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland)] [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland)] [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, FI-70701 Kuopio (Finland); Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Mannio, Jaakko [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Hallikainen, Anja [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Helsinki (Finland)] [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Helsinki (Finland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Consumption of fish: benefits and perceived risk  

SciTech Connect

Fish, a useful source of protein, may be polluted by microbes, natural toxins, and/or synthetic chemicals. However, based on a review of the U.S. General Accounting Office, 'There does not appear to be a compelling case to implement a mandatory comprehensive federal seafood inspection program.' Although earlier studies showed higher body burdens of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in populations who consumed a lot of fish from polluted waterways, a recent study refutes these observations. No information is available in the United States on the levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in anglers who consume a great deal of fish presumed to be contaminated by these chemicals.23 references.

Kimbrough, R.D. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish Photo:Jan-ErikJohansson,SLU Sustainable feed for farmed fish Farmed predatory fish (salmon, cod, etc.) need large quantities of feed, which at pre- sent consists of wildcaught marine fish spe- cies that are endangered to varying degrees. SLU researchers have

356

Pooling Strategies for Establishing Physical Genome Maps Using FISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pooling Strategies for Establishing Physical Genome Maps Using FISH Fengzhu Sun1 Gary Benson2 Norm (404)-727-3949. Running head: GENOME MAP USING FISH Keywords: FISH; Chromosome characterization strategies, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), which allow the assignment of a preset number

Sun, Fengzhu - Sun, Fengzhu

357

The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

358

Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g UNITED STATES 'DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortening By J. HANNEWIJK Unilever.C. December 1967 #12;J . Hannewijk I CHAPTER 18 Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortening INTRODUCTION

359

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

360

Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schooling properties of an obligate and a facultative fish species M. SORIA* , P. FREON § and P, Nouvelle-Calédonie, France Schooling fish species are conventionally subdivided into obligate interactions, Schooling behaviour, Polarity, Pelagic fish Running headline: Schooling properties of two fish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors  

SciTech Connect

Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

s427 was isolated in South East Uganda in 19601 (blood of sheep 427) 15 passages in mice then frozen at -70C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s427 was isolated in South East Uganda in 19601 (blood of sheep 427) 15 passages in mice in Tanganyika and preserved at EATRO in Uganda--was also used in BW lab at the LISTER INSTITUTE, ELSTREE prior

Papavasiliou, F. Nina

364

Effects of non-fish based raw materials on the fish muscle quality of salmonids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Salmonids are considered as fatty fish and a healthy food. They are characterized by a high proportion of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3… (more)

Pan, Jinfeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fish under influence: a macroecological analysis of relations between fish species richness and environmental gradients among European tidal estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish under influence: a macroecological analysis of relations between fish species richness Estuarine fish assemblages are subject to a great environmental variability that largely depends on both a macroecological approach aiming to identify the main environmental factors that structure fish assemblages among

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Kepler problem and Maxwell fish?eye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a certain sense the theory of the Maxwell fish?eye and that of the Kepler problem are formally equivalent. This equivalence and its consequences are described in some detail.

H. A. Buchdahl

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

368

FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.  

SciTech Connect

Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times/wk), which had mercury exposures (mean hair content of 3.9 ppm) much higher than those seen in the United States. As an adjunct to this cursory review, we also present some new ''ecological'' analyses based on international statistics on hair Hg, fish consumption, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and selected cardiovascular health endpoints. We searched for consistent differences between primarily fish-consuming nations, like Japan or the Seychelles, and others who traditionally eat much less fish , such as in central Europe, for example. We use data on cigarette sales, smoking prevalence surveys, and national lung cancer mortality rates to control for the effects of smoking on heart disease. These ecological analyses do not find significant adverse associations of either fish consumption or hair Hg with cardiovascular health; instead, there is a consistent trend towards beneficial effects, some of which are statistically significant. However, such ecological studies cannot distinguish differences due to variations in individual rates of fish consumption. We conclude that the extant epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of significant heart disease risks associated with mercury in fish, for the United States. The most prudent advice would continue to be that of maintaining a well-balanced diet, including fish or shellfish at least once per week. There may be additional benefits from fatty fish.

LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

A summary of demersal fish tagging data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report no.135 G. Burt, D. Goldsmith and M. Armstrong #12;#12;A summary of demersal fish tagging data. Armstrong August 2006 #12;This report should be cited as: Burt, G., Goldsmith, D. and Armstrong, M., 2006

370

Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Coast and Alaska marine fuel prices, 2004–2006 Pacificnets for sardine nets), marine fuel service, and vessel,Marine supplies (2) Recreational fishing (charter, private boat and shore-based) Fuel

Pomeroy, Caroline

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Planktivorous fish link coral reef and oceanic food webs : causes and consequences of landscape-scale patterns in fish behavior, diet and growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Morize. 1994. Reef fish communities and fisherySparisoma viride. Journal of Fish Biology Parker, R. P. andof growth in fishes. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 16:721-745.

Hanson, Katharine Mary Winston

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Planktivorous Fish Link Coral Reef and Oceanic Food Webs: Causes and Consequences of Landscape-Scale Patterns in Fish Behavior, Diet and Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Morize. 1994. Reef fish communities and fisherySparisoma viride. Journal of Fish Biology Parker, R. P. andof growth in fishes. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 16:721-745.

Hanson, Katherine Mary W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data �º Ð 1 ¸ � � �¹ � Ý�¹� � 2 1 to measure fish swimming speeds. This is possible when fish form schools that are large enough so that the multiple Doppler sonar beams are sampling the fish speeds at the same time. In situations where fish

deYoung, Brad

374

Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

375

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fish transportation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish transportation Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative fish transportation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fishing in Indiana...

377

Fish Assemblages in Reference and Restored Tidal Freshwater Marshes of the San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DM. 1998. Comparison of fish assemblages associated withand season effects on fish abundance data from deep waterfor annual changes in fish populations. Atwater BF, Conard

Grimaldo, Lenny; Miller, Robert E.; Peregrin, Chris M.; Hymanson, Zachary

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY Introduction Research has shown more effective in reducing incidence of fatal heart attacks in heart patients than were any other can act to reduce blood platelet aggregation and thereby reduce the risk of heart attack. This ef

379

Fishing Communities Facts Fishing communities in Hawai`i correspond to a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4% 2000 Race and Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity: Hawai'i and Average of Selected Fishing Communities Race Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander Some other race Two or more races % Hispanic or Latino (of any race to State Total Fishing Communities1 Total Population Median Household Income % Family Households below

380

Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006  

SciTech Connect

This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

Dauble, Dennis D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Use of Traits-Based Assessment to Estimate Effects of Hydropower Projects on Fish Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that influence the risk of downstream passage losses at hydroelectric power plants www.ornl.gov #12;

382

MEASUREMENTS OF FILM COOLING PERFORMANCE IN A TRANSONIC SINGLE PASSAGE MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Abstract Film cooling is an essential technology for the development of high performance gas turbine engines. A well-designed film cooling strategy allows higher turbine inlet temperatures, improving turbine engine blade geometry and flow conditions. The ultimate goals are: 1) to develop an experimental

Stanford University

383

Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we provide a mathematical model for the electrolocation in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approximate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation for small targets away from the fish. Based on this approximation, we obtain a non-iterative location search algorithm using multi-frequency measurements. We present numerical experiments to illustrate the performance and the stability of the proposed multi-frequency location search algorithm. Finally, in the case of disk- and ellipse-shaped targets, we provide a method to reconstruct separately the conductivity, the permittivity, and the size of the targets from multi-frequency measurements.

Habib Ammari; Thomas Boulier; Josselin Garnier

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids fish oils Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish oils Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acids fish oils Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart...

385

Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish June 4, 2014 -...

386

Predatory fish sounds can alter crab foraging behaviour and influence bivalve abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Canadian freshwater fishes. J Fish Biol 70, 109-120. ( doi...Ultrasound detection by clupeiform fishes. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109...2005 Effects of exposure to seismic airgun use on hearing of three fish species. J. Acoust. Soc...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Refractory Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Improvement Refractory Improvement NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 2 Project Description Industry would like gasifier on-line availability of 85-95% for utility applications and 95% for applications such as chemical production. Gasification facilities' are currently unable to meet these requirements, which have created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of gasification technologies. Refractory liners and syngas coolers are among key components of the gasification process previously identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities in the gasifier's carbon feedstock is the root cause of many problems impacting gasifier RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability). At the high temperatures of gasification, ash changes to liquid, gas, and solid phases which wear down refractory materials and can cause fouling, either of which can lead to unplanned shutdowns for system repair, replacement, or cleaning.

388

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

The pendulum dilemma of fish orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shape of a galaxy is constrained both by mechanisms of formation (dissipational vs. dissipationless) and by the available orbit families (the shape and amount of regular and stochastic orbits). It is shown that, despite the often very flattened shapes of banana and fish orbits, these boxlet orbits generally do not fit a triaxial galaxy in detail because, similar to loop orbits, they spend too little time at the major axis of the model density distribution. This constraint from the shape of fish orbits is relaxed at (large) radii where the density profile of a galaxy is steep.

HongSheng Zhao

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

391

Title 16 Alaska Statutes Chapter 20 Fish and Game Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish and Game Conservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 Alaska Statutes Chapter 20 Fish and Game...

392

Seagrass habitat utilization by fishes in Christmas Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fishes in Christmas Bay, TX were collected during April 1994 through March 1995 to: 1) assess temporal variability in their density, biomass, and diversity; 2) define the relationship between variability in fish population parameters...

Crotwell, Patricia Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cyclic AMP modulates electrical signaling in a weakly electric fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric fish are typically described as "pulse" or "wave" fish based on the regularity of the EOD. "Pulse" species produce brief EOD pulses at variable intervals with the interpulse ... interpulse interval are o...

L. McAnelly; A. Silva; H. H. Zakon

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Temporal hyperacuity in single neurons of electric fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the body surface. The ability of the fish to detect objects as perturbations of its EOD field can be severely impaired by a neighbour's ... field can be severely impaired by a neighbour's EOD of similar frequency. Accordingly, fish with similar ...

Masashi Kawasaki; Gary Rose; Walter Heiligenberg

1988-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fish and river pollution (J. R. Erichsen Jones)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fish and River. Pollution. Butterworth. Inc., Washington,. D.C. viii + 203 p. $9.75. Fish und River Pollution by J. R. Erichsen Jones fills the long-felt need for a ...

1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fish Farming in the Middle and Far East  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FISH culture covers a wide field of activities by which the yield of ... culture covers a wide field of activities by which the yield of fish from a given area of water can be increased by artificial means. It ranges ...

C F. HICKLING

1948-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

BRSIC RECIPES COOKinG fiSH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRSIC RECIPES fOR COOKinG fiSH Fishery Leaflet 106 Fish anel Wi Iellife Se r v;ce po-)ited States Department of the Interior Wa s.hi ngton, D.C. #12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. Fish~9~4~9 Introduction .· ... BASTC R~CIP~~ FOR GOOK IN~ FISH By Rose G. Kerr, Home Economist Branch of Commercial

398

SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

Schultz, K.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Zhao He Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring loads of a floating fish farm CeSOS Highlights #12;2 · Dead fish experiment · Simulations related to the dead fish experiment · Real fish experiment · Simulations related to the real fish experiment · Conclusions Experiments

Nørvåg, Kjetil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup MAURICE E. STANSBY ABSTRACT - All flavors noted in fish resembling petroleum oil are not derived from oil in water. Origins of various flavors to understand the differentiation between baseline flavor of fish in the absence of petroleum from flavors di

402

Fish Stocks Rainer Froese, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish Stocks Rainer Froese, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany Daniel Pauly, University of British Columbia and consisting of four elements (species names, location, time, and source). Catches The fish (or other aquatic organisms) of a given stock killed during a certain period by the operation of fishing gear. This definition

Pauly, Daniel

403

CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CARD-FISH and Microautoradiography Protocol for Bacteria and Archaea by Gerhard Herndl Lab @ www FISH Hybridization www.microbial-oceanography.eu 2007 2 Sample Fixation 1. Fix samples in Ethanol 95% 7. Dry and mount in DAPI mix #12;CARD FISH Buffers and Chemicals www

Herndl, Gerhard

404

FW405 FISH PHYSIOLOGY (3 CREDITS) COURSE OUTLINE SPRING 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FW405 ­ FISH PHYSIOLOGY (3 CREDITS) COURSE OUTLINE ­ SPRING 2011 I. Lecture: Time: Place: Monday, or by appointment. II. Required Materials o Fishes: An Introduction to Ichthyology, 5th edition (at CSU bookstore, or by appointment. VI. Course Description Physiological ecology of fishes, focusing on the diverse range

405

Design, Control, and Experimental Performance of a Teleoperated Robotic Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design, Control, and Experimental Performance of a Teleoperated Robotic Fish Evangelos Papadopoulos National Technical University of Athens 15780 Athens, Greece egpapado@central.ntua.gr Abstract-- Fish-cost teleoperated underwater robotic fish, driven by an oscillating foil. The main principles for the development

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

406

FISH SCHOOLS AS OPERATIONAL STRUCTURES CHARLES M. BREDER, JR.!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISH SCHOOLS AS OPERATIONAL STRUCTURES CHARLES M. BREDER, JR.! ABSTRACf The interaction of a space lattice, vortex trails, and the lubricity of fish surface mucus is shown to he important to the operation and structure of fish schools and significant in terms of locomotor efficiency. This is independent

407

Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VM114 Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2 1. This document is VM114, one of a series Introduction For many years water quality has been the most important limitation to fish production. Advances. Most successfully reared ornamental fish are omnivores, and these are the species that have adapted

Watson, Craig A.

408

Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere Center for Mathematics and Computer Science CWI Amsterdam, the Netherlands mullie¡ robertl¢ @cwi.nl Abstract Fish tank VR systems provide that resides at a fixed location. Therefore, fish tank VR systems provide only a limited virtual workspace

Liere, Robert van

409

Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish Jindong Liu, Huosheng@essex.ac.uk Abstract-- This paper presents a short review on the research of robotic fish. A simulation environment for robotic fish is built and the experiment shows that it is a convenient way to make research on the robotic

Hu, Huosheng

410

A METHOD OF PREPARING FISHES FOR MUSEUM AND EXHIBITION PURPOSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, by alcoholics, mounted skins, and plaster casts. The following are some of the commonly accepted objections of the fish, not a part of it. (3) Plaster casts may reproduce the . form perfectly, but all t ranslucency with clay. Now pour plaster over the fish and allow it to harden thoroughly, after which the fish may

411

Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Florida, and in the Gulf of Mexico, but prices for high-potency shark-liver oil made fishing for soupfinShark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner UNITED 5T ATE5 DEPART MENT.A OF l'O~I,a;RCI!,L Fr RERIES, Donald L. 'McKernan, Director · Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review

412

INTRODUCTION Weakly electric fish generate an electric organ discharge (EOD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4196 INTRODUCTION Weakly electric fish generate an electric organ discharge (EOD) that results in an electric field that surrounds the fish's body. In Eigenmannia, the EOD is quasi-sinusoidal and when fish are in close proximity (~1m or less) their EODs interact. In the case of two nearby conspecifics, the combined

413

Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FA90 Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2 1. This document is Fact Sheet FA-90, one of worm-like parasites that infect many different species of fish. Infections have been found in several families of fish including the Cichlidae (tilapia), Cyprinidae (danios), Cyprinodontidae (flagfish

Watson, Craig A.

414

Fishing for an Analogy to Global Warming William Menke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fishing for an Analogy to Global Warming William Menke That our beloved Wilson Lake once harbored and smaller fish. Any sort of unfavorable weather conditions could reduce the supply of food, which in turn, but whether the salt has affected the fish is hotly debated. Some environmentalists say that increased

Menke, William

415

Gille-ESYS 10 1 Farewell My Lovely (Fishes)1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gille-ESYS 10 1 Farewell My Lovely (Fishes)1 I staggered up the stairs to my office around 11'm Wanda Poisson. My contact at the department of Fish and Game said that you are a discreet and persistent, the kelp forest has transformed completely, and many of the fish have disappeared. I want you to find out

Gille, Sarah T.

416

Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

Watson, Craig A.

417

Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Climate Change on Inland Fishes of California Rebecca M. Quiñones rmquinones@ucdavis.edu Peter B Moyle pbmoyle@ucdavis.edu Center for Watershed Sciences Department of Wildlife, Fish of climate change on aquatic habitats in California · Climate change threats to native fishes · What can we

California at Davis, University of

418

Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

Watson, Craig A.

419

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery And Fish & Wildlife Subbasin Plan APPENDIX A ­ FOCAL FISH Lower Tributaries II.I. Washougal Subbasin II.J. Wind Subbasin II.K. Little White Salmon Subbasin II.L. Columbia Descriptions, status, and limiting factors of other fish and wildlife species of interest to recovery

420

upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks Hiromi Suenaga and Phil Merkey Introduction correlation with actual predator-prey problems in the real world. In our model we have the fish swimming to explore was the interaction between two different primary data structures. The collection of fish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease Striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and hybrid striped bass these fish are commonly raised in high densities under intensive aquaculture situations (e.g., cages, ponds of the viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens, but the fish become increasingly susceptible

Liskiewicz, Maciej

422

A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning Chao Zhou, Zhiqiang Cao, Shuo a novel miniature biomimetic robotic fish based on single link with compact structure, high maneuverability and multiple sensors. The robotic fish mimics the motion of Thunniform mode, and the methods

Boyer, Edmond

423

DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA Cigdem Beyan, Robert B We propose an approach for the analysis of fish trajectories in unconstrained underwater videos. Trajectories are classified into two classes: normal trajectories which contain the usual behavior of fish

Fisher, Bob

424

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia By Matthew Justice B of Resource Management (Planning) Title of Project: Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects #12;ABSTRACT This research explores the motivations of volunteers within fish-habitat rehabilitation

425

Fish can encode order in their spatial map  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 October 2004 research-article Fish can encode order in their spatial map T...perceptual range. The blind Mexican cave fish, Astyanax fasciatus, depends on detecting...environment, it is not known how this fish links places (or the area over which the...

T. B. de Perera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 25 18 The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge...of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern...this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis...

Iman Borazjani; Mohsen Daghooghi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Metamorphosing reef fishes avoid predator scent when choosing a home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fishes avoid predator scent when choosing a home Alexander L. Vail 1 2 3 * Mark I. McCormick...during this event settling fishes choose a home site based on a number of factors, including...fishes avoid predator scent when choosing a home. | Most organisms possess anti-predator...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

From Cave Fish to Pile Driving: A Tail of Fish Bioacoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is major international concern over the potential effects of seismic air guns on fishes (see references in Popper & Hawkins, 2012...). These devices use release of highly compressed air to project sounds in...

Arthur N. Popper

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fish Bulletin No. 28. Handbook of Common Commercial and Game Fishes of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

65 pp. , 28 figs. No. 28. Handbook of Common Commercial andFISH BULLETIN No. 28 Handbook of Common Commercial and Gamehas at- tempted to provide a handbook for the convenience of

Walford, Lionel A

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A LABORATORY FOR FISH BEHAVIOR STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tanks, means for controlling light conditions, and provisions for making chemical analyses. #12 from the enclosed observation platform 4 7. An experimental tank with electrodes installed for studies of fish in an electrical field 4 8. Interior view of the enclosed platform 5 9. An experimental tank

431

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

432

Fluctuating mate preferences in a marine fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...weaken the strength of selection operating on sexual...owing to directional selection (Qvarnstrom 2001...longitudinal studies in sexual selection are still surprisingly...Petrie 1997). 2. Material and methods The study...continuous through-flow of seawater. Fish were fed twice...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

FROZEN PROCESSED FISH AND SHELLFISH CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information which could be used by the fishing industry to increase consumer demand for fishery products, Massachusetts This project was financed from funds provided by the Saltonstall-Kennedy Act to increase. RELIABILITY OF STUDY RESULTS A. Sampling Error H B. Nonresponse Error 15 C. Response Errors 16 SAMPLE

434

Fish Culture in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...com-mercial "feedlots" offshore. Salmon diets must be...countries, where culture farms have been built by American...inhospitable by vi-olent winds, unstable soil, tides...however, the fact that fish farm-ing can provide animal...Department of Commerce, Farm-Raised Catfish Processors...

Richard T. Lovell

1979-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

OBSERVATIONS ON FISHES AND OTHER BIOTA OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.0 Sunrimary 27 References 29 FIGURES No. Page 1. East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas iv 2. Mouth- ber 1953 - May 1958 27 111 #12;GULF I NAUTICAL MILE MEXICO Figure l.--East Lagoon, Galveston, Texas344 OBSERVATIONS ON FISHES AND OTHER BIOTA OF EAST LAGOON, GALVESTON ISLAND Marino Biological

436

Fish Farming in the Belgian Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... problems being one of the principal objects of the Fisheries Research Station at Elisabethville (Belgian Congo), it may be of interest to describe some of our observations and results. ... of our observations and results. Before trials of fish culture were made in the Belgian Congo, it was already known that some species of Tilapia lent themselves more or less ...

A. F. DE BONT

1948-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fish play Minority Game as humans do  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of an unprecedented real Minority Game (MG) played by university staff members who clicked one of two identical buttons (A and B) on a computer screen while clocking in or out of work. We recorded the number of people who clicked button A for 1288 games, beginning on April 21, 2008 and ending on October 31, 2010, and calculated the variance among the people who clicked A as a function of time. The evolution of the variance shows that the global gain of selfish agents increases when a small portion of agents make persistent choice in the games. We also carried out another experiment in which we forced 101 fish to enter one of the two symmetric chambers (A and B). We repeated the fish experiment 500 times and found that the variance of the number of fish that entered chamber A evolved in a way similar to the human MG, suggesting that fish have memory and can employ more strategies when facing the same situation again and again.

Ruey-Tarng Liu; Fei Fang Chung; Sy-Sang Liaw

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT .. Introduction Dried-squid (surume) has been an item of commerce, ceremony, and diet in Japan for hundreds of years, and squid is caught of the fishery. In 1952 squid landings reached 646,730 tons and, at 15 percent of the total, became Japan's most

439

‘Communication’ in weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus niger (Mormyridae) I. Variation of electric organ discharge (EOD) frequency elicited by controlled electric stimuli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The weakly electric fish, Gathonemus niger, discharged with a frequency of 4 to 8 Hz during the day and 10 to 16 Hz during the night. The frequency of superimposed burst discharges (32 to 56 Hz) was independent of diurnal factors. The variation of the electric organ discharge frequency during the day was investigated in response to controlled electric stimulus patterns: (a) A free running stimulus frequency of 4 Hz, simulating the resting frequency of another fish, and different stimulus intensities, simulating different distances between two fish. (b) Free running frequencies of 4, 8, 16, …, 128 Hz and two particular stimulus intensities. (c) Discharge coupled stimuli (each discharge triggered an electric stimulus with a fixed delay) and different stimulus intensities. All three kinds of stimuli elicited defined and predictable response discharge patterns supporting the assumption that an electric fish would respond to a particular discharge pattern of another fish also in a similar and predictable manner. Low stimulus intensities (0·04 to 0·2 mV per cm) caused cessation of the discharge activity, a ‘hiding’ or ‘listening’ response. The discharge rate increased linearly with the logarithm of the stimulus intensity. The fish was particularly sensitive to stimulus frequencies which simulated its burst activity (32 to 56 Hz). Discharge coupled stimuli showed that the fish responded to about eight times lower stimulus intensities if the stimulus occurred between two discharges (15 to 30 m-s after the fish's discharge) than if the stimulus occurred within or immediately after the discharge. All suprathreshold stimuli elicited a typical discharge pattern: The irregular resting discharge activity became significantly regular. The degree of regularity was even improved during maintained stimulation. The regularisation of the discharge activity is thought to be involved in the fish's electrolocating system whereas frequency variations are considered as being involved in both the locating system and as communication signals among weakly electric fish.

Peter Moller

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream  

SciTech Connect

Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Ham, Kenneth [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream  

SciTech Connect

Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

Adams, S. M.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

443

Improved aethalometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

Hansen, A.D.

1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fish Lake Valley, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, sits at the southern end of the Mina Deflection where the very active Death Valley-Furnace Creek-Fish Lake Valley fault system makes a right step to transfer slip northward into the Walker Lane. Northern Fish Lake Valley has been pulling part since ca. 6 Ma, primarily along the Emigrant Peak normal fault zone (Stockli et al., 2003). Elevated tectonic activity in Fish Lake Valley suggests there may be increased fracture permeability to facilitate

445

LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, HAWAII, DERIVED FROM COMMERCIAL FISH RECORDS, 1959-1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marlin HumuhUIIIu Trigger fish I_, ru.l! 1u. NAME COMMONfrom Hawaii is cited when fish records do not differentiateHOTEC site, over 60 species of fish from 31 families are

Jones, Anthony T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the central California coast. Fish Bull 89:523-533and abundance of pelagic juvenile fish in the Santa BarbaraWashburn. 2003. Linking Early Fish Growth and Transport to

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage from an atomic to a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate P. D. Drummond and K. V. Kheruntsyan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to maintain high conversion efficiencies with smaller Rabi frequencies and under experimentally less demanding of the condensates. The result is that the STIRAP process appears feasible at high laser pulse intensities, providedStimulated Raman adiabatic passage from an atomic to a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate P. D

Heinzen, Daniel J.

448

Continuing coevolution of virus and defective interfering particles and of viral genome sequences during undiluted passages: virus mutants exhibiting nearly complete resistance to formerly dominant defective interfering particles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...3 (undiluted passage series), 75-day sp (CAR 4 carrier cells), and 34-day sp (CAR 21 carrier cells) mutants were described previously...the insertion at the N-NS junction in 4-year CAR 4 levels before and after such events might be...

N J DePolo; C Giachetti; J J Holland

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name Fish and Wildlife Service Place Washington, DC Year founded 1940 Phone number (303) 275-2370 Website http://www.fws.gov/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Mesolithic fishing and seafaring in the Aegean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 24 Background. . Fishing Practices. VI NET MATERIALS . . 24 26 33 VII PRESERVATION . 46 Salt Preservation. Smoking. . VIII CONCLUSIONS 49 52 54 REFERENCES 58 VITA 63 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. Map of Greece Page 2. Beach seine. 3.... Upwelling regions in the Aegean Sea. 4. Feeding tuna and birds. 5. Chumming with live bait 29 6, Tuna watchtowers . . 31 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1. Possible searoutes, distance, speed, and traveling time in the Aegean . . . . . 10 2. Ovis...

Webb, Thanos Aronis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Nature Bulletin No. 706 February 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLOR CHANGES IN FISH, FROGS AND LIZARDS Proverbially, the chameleon changes its color to suit every mood or situation. Hence the word is also an expression of contempt for a person who is fickle or changeable in character. That little lizard which is peddled at circuses or sold in pet shops under the name of "chameleon" is not the true Chameleon of the Old World tropics but the Anole, a native of the warm humid regions of our southeastern states. It is able to change from green to brown, or reverse, with some intermediate colors. Ordinarily it is pale green when quite warm or after it has been in the dark. In bright light or at low temperatures it is brown. Contrary to popular belief a brown anole may be found on a green leaf or a green one on brown bark.

452

Chapter 15 - Cloning of Medaka Fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Attempts at nuclear transfer using adult somatic cells in fish species had been unsuccessful for more than 40 years prior to the success achieved by the author of the present study using medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in 2008. Previous attempts at nuclear transfer in fish were believed to have failed due to the rapidity of the cell cycle within recipient eggs, which finished prior to completion of mitotic processes in donor nuclei. This issue was successfully circumvented by using non-enucleated and diploidized eggs obtained by preventing the release of the second polar body as recipients in the nuclear transfer of primary culture cells obtained from adult caudal fin tissue, as opposed to enucleated eggs. In those examined here, 1–3% of transplanted embryos that developed to the blastula stage successfully developed into adults. Adult clones possessed only donor genetic markers, and were both diploid and fertile. In control experiments using recipient eggs without diploidization, no adult clones were produced. These results indicated that recipient diploidized eggs exhibit activity related to reprogramming of the adult somatic genome.

Yuko Wakamatsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support research on the impacts of the treatment in Tims Branch, a small stream at the Savannah River Site. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. The M1 Air Stripper system at Savannah River Site, pictured here, was modified in 2007 to remove mercury. Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett collect fish samples in 2011 to support

456

Bonneville Power Administration Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0312 April 2003 Appendix A Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles for Bonneville Power Administration Rates and Contracts Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS Appendix A: Fish and Wildlife Funding Principles Appendix A/ 1 Appendix A FISH AND WILDLIFE FUNDING PRINCIPLES FOR BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION RATES AND CONTRACTS September 16, 1998 Preamble The purpose of these principles is to conclude the fish and wildlife funding process in which Bonneville has been engaged with various interests in the Region, and provide a set of guidelines for structuring Bonneville's subscription and power rate processes. The principles are intended to "keep the options open" for future fish and wildlife decisions that are anticipated to be made in late 1999 on reconfiguration of the hydrosystem and in

457

Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CIR921 Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2 1. This document is CIR921, one Is Fish Health Management? Fish health management is a term used in aquaculture to describe management practices which are designed to prevent fish disease. Once fish get sick it can be difficult to salvage them

Watson, Craig A.

458

Seasonal structure of fish communities at three barrier island habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

island ecosystems in the life cycle of these fishes must be better understood before we can effectively manage these important species. Previous studies (Reid 1955, Gunter 1958, Hellier 1962, HcFar land 1963, Pranks 1970, Livingston 1976, Naughton... Bay, Florida and the adjacent beachfront have been described by Naughton and Saloman (1978). Franks (1970) studied species composition and relative abundance of' the fish population inland of Horn Island, Mississippi. Seasonality of' fishes...

Pitts, Donald Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Radionuclide concentrations in fish and invertebrates from Bikini Atoll  

SciTech Connect

As in other global studies, /sub 137/Cs was found in the highest concentrations in edible flesh of all species of fish and in the lowest concentrations in the bone or liver. The mean concentration of /sup 137/Cs in muscle of reef fish from the southern part of the atoll is comparable to the global-fallout concentration measured in market samples of fish collected from Chicago, IL, USA, in 1982. Strontium-90 is associated generally with non-edible parts of fish, such as bone or viscera. Twenty-five to fifty percent of the total body burden of /sub 60/Co is accumulated in the muscle tissue; the remainder is distributed among the liver, skin, and viscera. The mean concentration of /sub 60/Co in fish has been decreasing at a rate faster than radiological decay alone. Most striking is the range of /sup 207/Bi concentrations among different species of fish collected at the same time and place. Highest concentrations of /sup 207/Bi were consistently detected in the muscle and other tissues of goatfish and some of the pelagic lagoon fish. In other reef fish, such as mullet, surgeonfish, and parrotfish, /sub 207/Bi was usually below detection limits by gamma spectrometry. Over 70% of the whole-body activity of /sup 207/Bi in goatfish is associated with the muscle tissue, whereas less than 5% is found in the muscle of mullet and surgeonfish. Neither /sup 239 +240/Pu nor /sup 241/Am is accumulated significantly in the muscle tissue of any species of fish. Apparently, /sup 238/Pu is in a more readily available form for accumulation by fishes than /sup 239 +240/Pu. Based on a daily ingestion rate of 200 g of fish flesh, dose rates to individuals through the fish-food ingestion pathway are well below current Federal guidelines. 24 refs., 1 fig., 27 tabs

Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalLiteratureReviewAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid510804...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

462

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

463

Fish Funding 2002-2006 (hydro/fcrps)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information on Cost and Revenue Effects for Fish Funding Agreement 2002 - 2006 Capital Cost Spreadsheets Summary of All Costs (updated on July 10, 1998) Capital Cost Spreadsheets...

464

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA...

465

Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

466

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

467

Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleStaticTemperatureSurveyAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid511143...

468

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

469

Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Oregon Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Policy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI...

470

Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of God. Studying gender ethics within the JM will helpFlirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution byof free love, gender ethics and evangelical Christianity

Johnson, Julianne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Interactions of ciliates with cells and viruses of fish.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis develops and utilizes in vitro approaches to study ciliate/fish interactions. The thesis is divided into six chapters. Chapter one reviews the literature on… (more)

Pinheiro, Marcel D.O.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Energy performance of fishing vessels and potential savings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Commercial fishing is heavily fuel dependant. The increase in the fuel price, together with the stock decline, occupational risks of fishing, the possibilities of finding a different future for new generations, are some of the reasons that have made fishing arrive at its ‘survival limits’, in many parts of Europe. This contribution aims at providing shipowners and researcher with the experience of undertaking energy audits, to reduce the fuel bill of fishing vessels. In order to do so, 3 fishing vessels were assessed comprehensively, for 2010–2012, to determine their energy consumption flow. The results indicate that energy consumption depends upon: (a) the structure and size of the vessel; (b) the engine conditions and use patterns; (c) the fishing gears used; (d) the fishing and trip patterns; (e) the distance to the fishing ground; (f) target species and their migration routes; and (g) the traditions onboard. Likewise, no generalisation can be made regarding the way energy is consumed by onboard equipment/machinery when different fishing gears are compared. Energy audits will need to be site-specific and to include sufficient data to obtain representative results; these are likely to be more than in land-based industries, due to the peculiarities of this sector.

Oihane C. Basurko; Gorka Gabiña; Zigor Uriondo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Electric signals and species recognition in gymnotiform fish.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gymnotiformes are South American weakly electric fish that produce weak electric organ discharges (EOD) for orientation, foraging and communication purposes. Because EOD properties vary widely… (more)

Fugère, Vincent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Commercial Fishing for Gulf Butterfish, Peprilus burti, Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Fishing for Gulf Butterfish, Peprilus burti, Introduction The decline of oil prices is: NMFS National Systematics Laboratory, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC 20560

475

Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Se in two marine fish.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is valuable to study the bioavailability of trace metal in marine fish for their ecological and commercial importance. A series of experiments were conducted… (more)

Zhang, Li

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

FISH EGGS AND LARVAE IN THE PLANKTON SAMPLES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the data on fish eggs and larvae from the plankton samples taken on four cruises in EE& Station plans for these cruises are shown in ...

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Angler exposure to domoic acid via consumption of contaminated fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well as storage methods and DA levels in the seawater whenstorage; and (4) assess possible relationships be- tween DA in fish viscera and in seawater

Pomeroy, Caroline

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Methods for assessment of fish production in fresh waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the examples were taken from marine fish studies. The book is not, and does not claim to be, a general handbook on fisheries production or man- agement.

2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

479

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.  

SciTech Connect

This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) special issue ROBERT HANNER1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sexes, and perhaps more subtle shifts across geographic ranges. Meanwhile, more efficient harvest methods, increas- ing consumer demand and globalization of trade, combined with other anthropogenic to those involved in the construction and expansion of large-scale databases such as FISH-BOL, and see

DeSalle, Rob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve fish passage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 April 2014 Accepted 12 May 2014 Keywords: Bioaccumulation Heavy metals Llobregat River species in an Iberian river with moderate metal pollution. Al, Fe and Zn were the most abundant metals trace elements (Bervoets and Blust, 2003; Noël et al., 2013). Heavy metals in fish represent a potential

García-Berthou, Emili

482

Juvenile marine fishes of Harbor Island, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(December, 1977) Robert Eugene Bonin, B. S. , Heidelberg College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas Bright A one-year study was made of juvenile marine fishes in the shallow water grass flats of Harbor Island, Texas. Samples were taken at each... the flats of llarbor Island . 91 vi 1 1 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PME Location of Harbor Island Location of collection sites. Beam trawl used in study. Seasonal changes in average salinity on the flats 17 Seasonal changes in average water temperature...

Bonin, Robert Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fish die as a result of a wide variety of natural and unnatural causes. Fish may die of old age, starvation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish die as a result of a wide variety of natural and unnatural causes. Fish may die of old age, severe weather, and other reasons. A few dead fish floating on the surface of a pond or lake is not necessarily cause for alarm. Expect some fish to die of old age, injury, winter starvation, or even post

Liskiewicz, Maciej

484

How does one weakly electric fish locate and find another electric fish in its environment? One way is to orient to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How does one weakly electric fish locate and find another electric fish in its environment? One way is to orient to the electric discharges that the second fish produces using passive electrolocation. Passive electrolocation differs from active electrolocation in that the fish relies entirely upon exafferent rather than

Hopkins, Carl D.

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative prey fish Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

prey fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative prey fish Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental Biology of Fishes 49:...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous fish Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromous fish Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental Biology of Fishes 64: 229242, 2002....

487

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Fish and...

488

FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153167 The behavioural dynamics of fishers: management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153 by his/her own goals or constraints. Despite this reality, the complex dynamics of fishing has and behavioural dynamics of fishing to provide insight into fisher behaviour and its implications

Boyer, Edmond

489

Patterns in the Use of a Restored California Floodplain by Native and Alien Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

became iso- The * indicates alien species. No samples wereby larvae of native and alien fishes. Pages 125-140 inK, Mount, JF. 2003. Alien fishes in natural streams: fish

Moyle, Peter B; Crain, Patrick K; Whitener, Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

491

EIS-0397: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Record of Decision 7: Record of Decision EIS-0397: Record of Decision Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund modifications to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, Washington. In addition to improving fish passage to the upper part of the Klickitat River watershed, This decision implements the Proposed Action and Preferred Alternative identified in the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (Lyle Falls) EIS (DOE/EIS-0397, November 2008). Record of Decision for the Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0397 (February 2009) More Documents & Publications EIS-0397: Mitigation Action Plan EIS-0397: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0397: Final Environmental Impact Statement

492

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

494

Model for characterization of a vortex pair formed by shock passage over a light-gas inhomogeneity  

SciTech Connect

This work investigates the two-dimensional flow of a shock wave over a circular light-gas inhomogeneity in a channel with finite width. The pressure gradient from the shock wave interacts with the density gradient at the edge of the inhomogeneity to deposit vorticity around the perimeter, and the structure rolls up into a pair of counter-rotating vortices. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the scaling laws for the flow field produced by this interaction at times long after the passage of the shock across the inhomogeneity. Numerical simulations are performed for various initial conditions and the results are used to guide the development of relatively simple algebraic models that characterize the dynamics of the vortex pair, and that allow extrapolation of the numerical results to conditions more nearly of interest in practical situations. The models are not derived directly from the equations of motion but depend on these equations and on intuition guided by the numerical results. Agreement between simulations and models is generally good except for a vortex-spacing model which is less satisfactory. A practical application of this shock-induced vortical flow is rapid and efficient mixing of fuel and oxidizer in a SCRAMJET combustion chamber. One possible injector design uses the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a jet of light fuel to generate vorticity which stirs and mixes the two fluids and lifts the burning jet away from the combustor wall. Marble proposed an analogy between this three-dimensional steady flow and the two-dimensional unsteady problem of the present investigation. Comparison is made between closely corresponding three-dimensional steady and two-dimensional unsteady flows, and a mathematical description of Marble`s analogy is proposed. 17 refs.

Yang, J.; Kubota, T.; Zukoski, E.E. [California Inst of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cost-Effectiveness Strategies for the Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cost-Effectiveness Strategies for the Fish and Wildlife Program: Progress and Potential The Northwest Power Act contains language promoting the cost-effectiveness of the Council's Fish and Wildlife responsibilities with respect to cost-effectiveness. Perhaps the two most common questions the IEAB fields

496

MFR PAPER 1176 An Automated Unmanned Fishing System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and structures in the Gulf of Mexico and several thousand more which are oil producing units. Recreational. SEIDEL and THOMAS M. VANSELOUS ABSTRACT-Coastal pelagic fish resources of the Gulf of Mexico are basi fish in the Gulf of Mexico consists primarily of purse seining for menhaden (Brevoortia sp

497

Molecular filtration for recovery of waterborne viruses of fish.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was supported by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under Anadromous Fish Act PL 89304 and by the Bonneville Power Administration under contract number DE-A179- 83 BP 11987, project number 83-312. G. R. Bouck served as the COTR...

R A Watanabe; J L Fryer; J S Rohovec

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

PROJECTED EFFECTS OF FUTURE CLIMATES ON FRESHWATER FISHES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECTED EFFECTS OF FUTURE CLIMATES ON FRESHWATER FISHES OF CALIFORNIA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012028 A methodology is presented that allows systematic evaluation of climate change impacts on freshwater fishes

499

Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms Annual Report 2004 Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Published: May 2005 Prepared by: Christian B. Hvidt Lars Brünner Frank Reier without clear reference to the source. #12;Hydroacoustic monitoring of fish communities in offshore wind

500

Environmental Biology of Fishes ISSN 0378-1909  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period, the water level rises and may form side channels and pools in the floodplain. The subsequent B.V. 2011 Abstract In regulated rivers, fluctuating water depths associated with pulsed discharges may strand small fish in side channels and pools. Quantitative assess- ments of stranded fish

Klimley, A. Peter